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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 20, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm... a devastating report into the deaths of a56 people blames an "institutional regime" of prescribing opioids with no medicaljustification. throughout relatives have shown remarkable fortitude in questioning what happens to their loved ones. the documents explained and published today show that they were right to ask those questions. nothing i say today will lessen the anguish and pain of families who have campaigned for 20 years forjustice after the loss of a loved one. but i can at least, on behalf of the government and the nhs, apologise for what happened and what they have been through. familes and campaigners call for prosecutions and ask how could this have happened, and also — why did they have to wait so long? another crunch brexit vote for the prime minister — this is the scene live in the house
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of commons as tory rebels prepare to defy her once again. iam i am vicky young at westminster, where there has been another attempt ata where there has been another attempt at a last—minute compromise. will it be enough to persuade conservative rebels? quit separating the kids or separating the children. mr president, don't you have children?! us democrats challenge president trump over the controversial policy of separating migrant parents from their children. coming up on afternoon live... all the sport with hugh — cristiano ronaldo is back at it again at the world cup... yes, good afternoon, simon. he is back at it again. european champions portugal back in action and the world's best player is showing eve ryo ne world's best player is showing everyone why he is exactly that. all the latest, at 2:30pm. and darren beth has the weather. turning cooler
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and fresher over the next few days but next week it is turning warmer again. it will be a dry and warm june for the rest of the month. we will be looking at that later in the programme. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. for hundreds of families the years of waiting are over — and their worst fears realised — with the publication of a devastating report into the deaths of patients at gosport war memorial hospital. a56 people's lives were shortened because of an "institutional regime" of prescribing opioids with no medicaljustification. the report raises as many questions as it answers. where were the regulators? why did staff continue with these practices that were clearly wrong? why was there a ten—year delay before investigations were begun? and will criminal charges now be brought? the establishment — it seems — didn't listen when staff spoke out — and families who were concerned were written off as "troublemakers". catherine burns reports.
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robert wilson. sheila gregory. geoffrey packham. elsie devine. arthur cunningham. gladys richards. some went into gosport war memorial hospital to recover after falls. other had bed sores or broken bones. none came out alive. some families have been fighting for the truth for over 20 years. today they came to hear the latest report. they were hoping for something critical and they got it. it says that at least a56 patients died because they were given strong painkillers with no medicaljustification. that between 1989 and 2000 there was an institutionalised practice of shortening of lives. it points out that nurses first raised concerns in 1991 but their warnings went unheeded. the relatives have shown remarkable tenacity and fortitude in questioning what happened to their loved ones. the documents explained
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and published today show that they were right to ask those questions. gillian mckenzie was the first relative to go to the police, in 1998. her mother gladys richards went to gosport for rehabilitation after a hip operation. gillian says she was recovering well, yet on the day she was admitted her medical notes said nurses could confirm her death. like hundreds of other patients, gladys was put on diamorphine. this should only be used to relieve severe pain. she died four days later. when i contacted the police and said i wanted an appointment with somebody in cid with an allegation of unlawful killing, i had been told, "there, there, my dear, you're upset". no one was arrested or charged but the publicity made other families come forward. by 2002, police were looking into 92 cases. today's report talks about a56 lives
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being shortened but says the real number could be much higher. missing records mean that probably at least another 200 were affected. there have been several other investigations over the years but only one person has faced disciplinary action. jane barton is a former gp who worked part—time at the hospital. she signed 833 death certificates over 12 years and in 2010, the general medical council found her guilty of serious professional misconduct. she was not struck off but chose to retire. my whole objective with this was to get everything out into the open so that we could see exactly what had happened. and i hope very much for their sake that they can achieve some sort of closure. and if there is a case for further criminal investigation,
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then that should then take place. the report doesn't have the power to recommend specific criminal action yet calls on the government, the police and other authorities to recognise how significant this is and to act accordingly. i am looking forjustice for all the families. and the justice for all the families will be if there are convictions in the criminal court, whether it is their particular case or not. after a 20—year fight, gillian is now 8a and accepts she may not live to see this happen. catherine burns, bbc news. we can speak to the former health minister featured in the we can speak to the former health ministerfeatured in the report, norman lamb, singled out as the man who brought this inquiry to light by the health secretary. can you hear me 0k? yes. it is a victory for the
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families, but perhaps a hollow victory? it does not have to be, this is a critical staging post and i pay this is a critical staging post and i pay tribute to the bishopjones and the pinehill for exposing exactly what happened in gosport hospital, and it is truly shocking. the loss of a56 people who were prescribed inappropriately opioids. they had gone for rehabilitation and ended up losing their lives. so there must now be a criminal investigation conducted by another force, not the local force that has failed so far to get to the bottom of this. and also, we must make sure that all those people, who in the words of bishop james jones, that all those people, who in the words of bishopjamesjones, closed ra nks words of bishopjamesjones, closed ranks and hopes is gated, blocked the families getting to the truth, they have to be held to account as well because that is really shocking, the fact that people were left in the dark for so many years, ignored, not listen to, and that must never happen again. what you
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are describing is a cover—up by the establishment. absolutely, these are ordinary people who raised legitimate concerns in the early 90s, and including a whistle—blower within the hospital, a nurse. and they were all ignored. no one was prepared to face up to possible serious wrongdoing. and this awful sense of the establishment closing ranks, ordinary people just not getting their voices heard. you know, it is rather similar to the awful events following the grenfell tower fire. another case of ordinary people not having their voices heard. if i was a family member, one of the first questions i would ask is, what on earth was the motivation? of course, the report cannot go into that. well, that is why there must be a police investigation. the fact that people
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went into this cottage hospital after being discharged from the acute hospital for after being discharged from the acute hospitalfor a after being discharged from the acute hospital for a feed after being discharged from the acute hospitalfor a feed of rehabilitation, but on admission to the hospital they were routinely being prescribed opioids... sometimes on the day of admission. this is beyond belief. that is why there must be a thorough police investigation. we have to ask questions of the general medical council who took ten years to properly reach a conclusion, and then the panel failed to strike the doctor off the record. and also the inquests which failed to get to the bottom of this, and indeed, the department of health, because in 2013, when i finally got hold of the bacon report, which i had asked for two or three months earlier, when i finally saw it and i was away on holiday in france, i was told by my private office that there was a plan
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the next day to announce that there would be no public inquiry, and i intervened to see on no account should that announcement be made. there must be another thorough investigation given what that investigation given what that investigation exposed. the crown prosecution service has said we will consider the content of the report and take any appropriate steps as required. there will be the fear that this gets kicked into the long grass. well, of course, it has already been kicked into the long grass given that families have been waiting 15, 20 years for anything to happen. so now, there must be a programme of action, and that the regulators, the police and others, who are now in the spotlight, they must demonstrate to the public that they are prepared to learn lessons, and to point the finger at those people who closed ranks, those people who closed ranks, those people who closed ranks, those people who blocked the truth from the families. those people who also skated as the bishop made clear in
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his report, because only then can people rebuild trust in public institutions. you were clearly shocked at the level of that cover—up if you are describing it, but where are you angry the longer you look at this and her from relatives? well, firstly, i was incandescent when i discovered that in my absence on holiday officials we re in my absence on holiday officials were recommending that there should be no public inquiry, and making a public statement to that effect will stop but the more i hearfrom families, the more i investigated what happened and the more horrified i became, that there was just this sense of ordinary people being ignored, not having their voices heard. and we must learn lessons, and the prime minister was correct in this in response to my question. this is an issue that provide the public services. we have to be prepared to trust people, to listen
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to them, and to properly investigate their concerns. norman lamb, i know you are present, the families are in portsmouth, we will hear from them andi portsmouth, we will hear from them and i know that they wanted to thank you as well. thank you very much for joining us, norman lamb. let's hear from one of the family's spokespeople. we would like to thank the address this morning. the truth has been spoken here after a long format years wait. since 1998, we have currently campaigning for a nswe rs have currently campaigning for answers in light of the unexpected deaths of our relatives. and we made promises that we would not give up without having those answers. we have to thank norman lamb for listening to our grievances, although in terms of what we wanted, which was a judge—led public inquiry, his hands were tied.
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respect and admiration for gillian mckenzie and her perseverance with hermp mckenzie and her perseverance with her mp stephen lloyd, for if not for stephen, we would not be here today. we all have much gratitude for understanding the enormity of our challenges and being the only mp to do something about it. 12 investigations, and here we are. july 2002, the commission of health improvement report ordered by sir liam donaldson was issued and whilst its co nte nts liam donaldson was issued and whilst its contents were distressing, begin with no accountability. 0ctober 2002, decommissioned professor richard baker to complete his random audit, the results of which were locked down for 11 years. bearing in mind that medical records are destroyed after this time. when its contents were finally released in 2013, after hard campaigning, the families will not even given the right to digest contents before publication was made public. it was abuse by powers of the mighty and
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nothing more than exploitation. learning of the shocking revelations was one thing, but then knowing that the recommendations that are in the report were ignored for all of that time, noting that it was the duty of the state to investigate those 837 deaths shook these families. the department of health and its chief medical officer ignored those serious findings and continued to put patient safety at the bottom of the pile. then began the hampshire police investigation, instigated by a whistle—blower that came forward with documentation from 1991, highlighting a culture that doctor barton had brought to the hospital in 1989. the investigation was at best incompetent. facts left out of statements, incorrect synopsis of patients and erroneous medical prescriptions. bearing in mind this was the largest criminal
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investigation under the nhs and there were not even expert witnesses. is this what we should expect from our police, or was this pa rt expect from our police, or was this part of a cover—up culture? december 2006, after waiting another format yea rs, 2006, after waiting another format yea rs , we 2006, after waiting another format years, we were faced with the devastating news that the cps had failed to secure a conviction. 2009, ten victims were given non—article two compliant inquests with another delay to 2013. the inequality, as he faced top directors afforded to doctor barton and the nursing team, along with the mairead of seasoned professionals with unlimited taxpayer ‘s money, whilst we had to fight for our legal representation, coming on board at the 11th hour. the appalling actions of both corner bradley will never be forgotten. we a lwa ys bradley will never be forgotten. we always believed inquests were to find the cause of death through transparency and honesty. in our case, documentation was redacted or
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simply removed from the court to ensure that the jurors could not have the full picture. and whilst the dead still managed to conclude that the drugs administered were inappropriate, without logic, unjustifiable and shortened life, they were instructed to say that they were instructed to say that they were instructed to say that they were given for therapeutic purposes. the only point that richard samuel of portsmouth health ca re richard samuel of portsmouth health care trust hang onto in a statement to the media, shameful. what a disgrace to humanity. whilst we continue to be treated with contempt. in 2010, we had the defective hearing of drjane martin that the gmc, which proved to all of us that the gmc, which proved to all of us that they are simply not fit for purpose. other doctors struck off and prosecuted for less, but we are well aware of her affiliation. the gmc well aware of her affiliation. the g m c clearly well aware of her affiliation. the gmc clearly took no heat to dame janet smith any report of 200a. this
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was followed by the mmc with the closed—door hearing an unbelievable yet again no credibility. and finally three times to the cps, who we re finally three times to the cps, who were intent on not following the own code of practice, content to work with many related evidence, including withholding vital evidence from others. every government body and or quango locked together with no chance of objectivity, impartiality and ultimately, the truth. they are all clearly desensitised. and an inequality of arms to stop us achieving justice for ourfamilies whose arms to stop us achieving justice for our families whose lives ended so for our families whose lives ended so inhumanely, the insanity of it all. a situation that we were just supposed to accept and lie down to. regulatory bodies are presents to uphold the law but they appeared to do whatever they wanted, at every single time they were absolved of the misconduct. they have nothing to
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fear from the complaints procedure, which people like us are forced into for answers. there is no individual duty of candour, they set parameters that they used to close us down. none of us would have allowed our loved ones to be admitted to gosport war memorial hospital had been when there was an ongoing police investigation in 1998. the people of gosport have the right to know, and there would have been out reg had been on the concerns of the whistle—blower some ten years before. the excuse will field of all of them is not only shameful, but it is scandalous and immoral. we have grossly field the ethical standards by abusing people's human rights. our vulnerable relatives who were stripped of their final words to their loved ones, silenced by overdoses is more than catastrophic. this sort of behaviour going on in our nhs is both chilling and precarious. as victims of crime, we
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are all entitled to have an explanation when an alleged injustice has occurred. but this has been sinister, calculated and those implicated must now face the full rigour of the criminaljustice system. accountability must take precedence here, these horrifying, shameful and unforgivable actions need to be disclosed any criminal court for a jury to decide and only then can we put our loved ones to rest. thank you. well, that was bridget reeves, the granddaughter of lc divine giving a statement on behalf of all of the families as a result of the publication of that devastating report. more on that throughout the afternoon. moving onto brexit... on monday the house of lords again defeated the government. the numbers
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are tight, let us hear from defeated the government. the numbers are tight, let us hearfrom david davis, the brexit secretary. alternatively, the prime minister announces before the 21st of january 2019 that no deal can be agreed with the european union, the statement must be made within 1a days and the motion must be tabled in both houses within seven days of that statement. finally, if no agreement has been reached by the end of the 21st of january 2019, a statement must be made within five days and in motion must be tabled in both houses within five sitting days. that would happen whatever the state of negotiations at that stage. i will give way to the chairman of the brexit committee. when he recently appeared before the select committee, the gentlemen confront that the motion asking the house to approve the withdrawal agreement would be amendable. can he therefore explain
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to the house why the government is now proposing amendments to the lord's amendments, to include the reference to neutral terms, when the right honourable gentleman will be very aware that standing order 20 for the of the house, says that if it is considered to be a neutral terms, it cannot be amended. why is it done in one case but not any dire circumstances that he is trying to make clear to us now? you need to listen to the rest of my speech, i have spent the last ten minutes explaining that to you. the point that we are at is that the initial provisions speak for themselves. our proposed amendment creates a formal structure set out in law for the parliament to express its use in all the various scenarios that might come to pass on our exit from the european union. but... not forthe
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moment. it passes three test. i am glad to see that the amendment setback to us from the other piszczek sets the majority of these provisions. the call of the disagreement focuses on the exact nature of the motion offered to the houseif nature of the motion offered to the house if any of the circumstances come to pass. it offers ‘s is in neutral terms. questions have focused on whether that means they would not be amendable. honourable member as will be aware it is not within the competence of government tojudge whether within the competence of government to judge whether amendments can be tabled two motions. but for clarity, i quote from standing order 2a b in the house of commons which states... a motion that this house is considered the matter is expressed in neutral terms, nonmembers to be tabled. i have written to the chairman of the procedure committee setting out how the government understands this process will operate in practice and i have read a copy of that letter in the lives
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of both houses. thank you. enormously grateful to the secretary of state to allow me to make an intervention. this is an important contribution this afternoon. i am really most unhappy with the repetition by the prime minister and others in government with this mantra that no deal is better than a bad deal. others like the secretary of state to get a guaranteed to the people of northern ireland that the government that he represents here today will not be gambling with the constitutional status of northern ireland as an integral part of the uk, because no deal would be to a ha rd uk, because no deal would be to a hard order, which would inevitably be exploited by sinn fein and buy new ira dissidents. will he get that guarantee? we will not be gambling with the status of the border and i will return to the issue of no deal shortly. because that is central to much of the issue of the end ability of motions. i will give way to my
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honourable friend first. of motions. i will give way to my honourable friend firstlj of motions. i will give way to my honourable friend first. i suggested my right honourable friend, is the importance that the government has taken importance that the government has ta ken not that importance that the government has taken not that if a no eruption is rolled out, it guarantees a worse deal in any negotiation, anyone who has been party to a negotiation will understand that. he is correct and thatis understand that. he is correct and that is a point i will return to.|j give way. grateful to you. any satisfactory amendment that left the house of lords, the government would be obliged to put forward a substantial motion of that agreement has been rejected, no doubt it would d raft has been rejected, no doubt it would draft that with a view to commanding the majority of the house. but other people could put forward a substantive amendment with alternative proposals as to how to proceed. now committee rejects that, and he is trying to replace it in the situation that the government does not have to put anything in its
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second amendment except that it takes note, and then if anybody tries to put a substantial motion forward as an amendment... i will give you a pound to a penny, mister speaker, that the argument will be fears that if you passed this, it willjust mean fears that if you passed this, it will just mean no fears that if you passed this, it willjust mean no deal, because the government is not going to negotiate this and it will bring the thing to an end. i cannot, forthe this and it will bring the thing to an end. i cannot, for the life of me, see why the government is hesitating about the lord's commitment, except, of course, that it has come under pressure tremendously, from hard—line brexiteers and the government who will force the government to reject the perfectly satisfactory understanding that had been reached with honourable on the side last week. that was ken clarke. we will come away from that. you can continue to watch that on the bbc parliament channel. whilst on—air,
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the boss of siemens, ceo juergen meara, has said that clarity is needed as to how the trade union will work after brexit. across to vicki young. a lot of people are asking that and there seems to be a sense of dj vu with the arguments from the house of commons. yes, this has been going from the commons to the lords and back again. the lords we re the lords and back again. the lords were not happy with it and it gets incredibly technical. this is the broad argument, which is about if there is a no deal scenario, because parliament has rejected the deal that theresa may has brought, or she has not been to get one at all, what then happens, who controls the process ? then happens, who controls the process? who decides what she does next? what some mps have said those that in that scenario they should be able to say to her, go back to brussels and try once more, we do not want to drop out without any deal. what they have been afraid of is that they will be given no choice at all, either you take this deal, ta ke at all, either you take this deal, take no deal, or you just crash out
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anyway. that is what they are trying to avoid. it has become incredibly technical. seve government has managed to find a compromise. eleanor garnier in our political correspondent, in the heart of the houses of parliament joins correspondent, in the heart of the houses of parliamentjoins us now. what is the latest talk of compromise from the tories? today, yes, vicky, was a test of nerves from the tory rebels and the government, both sides fronting up, neither wanting to back down, but within the last two minutes we have had a move from the government and it seems like this may have bought some of those tory rebels. nicky morgan conforming on twitter that she will now back the government amendment, andl she will now back the government amendment, and i have been talking to another paul brewer remainer, ed vaizey, who has told me that he will be backing the amendments of the government. they came into this day talking about another crunch vote, because those remain mps, the tory mps, thought they had been given a promise by the prime minister that
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she was going to look into their concerns about this meaningful vote, as you described, how much power parliament would have in the event ofa no parliament would have in the event of a no deal, whether parliament would be able to tell the prime minister to get back to brussels to negotiate. tory remainers, the rebels, thought they had been given a promise by the prime minister, only for 24 hours later to be let down as they put it. so, we came to the day and everybody was feeling pretty cross about the whole situation, but it seems that the very la st situation, but it seems that the very last minute that once again, this tory rebels have been bought off. we do not know that for sure, the debate, vicky, hasjust started in the house of commons and we think it will last for one hour and 30 minutes, then we will find out once and for all whether these corrie remain mps are satisfied with what the government has put forward.
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thank you very much, eleanor, eleanor garnier in the central lobby of the houses of parliament. stephen gethins from the snp joins of the houses of parliament. stephen gethins from the snpjoins me now. this is fiendishly complicated, but they want to be able to amend anything that the government brings before them in the scenario of a no deal. put forward their own suggestions for what happens next. are you clear that that is what the government is saying will happen? i am not sure that anybody is clear about any of this. what has been clear from the first day is just how much chaos and confusion there is a pa rt of much chaos and confusion there is a part of this. fundamentally, what today should be about, as parliament having a say about what comes back, because this matters. leaving the eu had a big impact onjobs, economy, education, and opportunities for young people, and that is by parliament is likely the border ministrations and others should have a say on this. at the rizzi no deal scenario, that would be devastating, but again, today, what we have seen
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at the chaos and confusion at the very heart of this government's efforts and this is the real illustration of that. if we got to the scenario were theresa may put a deal to parliament and it was rejected, politically, that is so damaging to her, isn't it? why would iorany othermemberof damaging to her, isn't it? why would i or any other member of parliament give the government carte blanche to sign away potentially hundreds of thousands ofjobs, sign away potentially hundreds of thousands of jobs, to sign away potentially hundreds of thousands ofjobs, to wag so much off of our economy to impact on public services? the reason why we have a parliament and why i travelled down from my constituency every week, to come to this place, is to scrutinise the working government and to make the case for our constituents. it would be irresponsible of parliamentarians to simply hand that over to the government. this is a big job that the government has on its hand at the government has on its hand at the moment and that is why you have a parliament and it should be involved in that, just like the devolved administrations should be involved in the area is that impact
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them as well. the scenario would be that the snp would accept any deal put forward. surely you would rather leave without one at all? the snp have been consistent, scotland voted to remain in the eu and we have therefore offered a compromise to keep as any single market and the customs union. that respects the referendum, as much as i do not like it, iwant referendum, as much as i do not like it, i want to remain part of the eu, and solves problems like northern ireland, and we know from the government's orlagh economic analysis is the least best worst option. we have been consistent on this and the government have been utterly inconsistent, and at a time when they should be reaching out to other parties, reaching out to try to bring different parts of the uk together, we see the tories be more worried about scurrying around the backbenchers during the debate in the dying minutes and using all of this kind of parliamentary procedure to try to find a way around it. that is not scrutiny. that is not taking a responsible approach to a relationship with the rest of europe. that is something that will
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be damaging for all of us. stephen gethins, from the snp, thank you very much. that debate is under way in the house of commons, the vote is expected at 3:30pm. a lot of talking about there are some set mps coming in from hospital, heavily pregnant mps, having to go through the lobbies because this is expected to be an incredibly close and tight vote. it might still be, of course, but it seems from what people have been seeing, including eleanor, that those conservative mps think they will get enough from the government to swing behind theresa may. we will find out for sure in the next hour or so. find out for sure in the next hour or so. thank you, vicki young at westminster. let's have a look at the weather. darren burnett is here. everybody with a garden knows there has been no rain. so far, june has been dry and warm, average temperatures 1 degrees above average but focus on
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how dry it has been. this is a map from the met office and it looks at the range so far this month. the rainfall has been deficient. we can probably highlight that better if we look at this league table. if you look at this league table. if you look back at spring, spring was particularly dry in the north—west of the uk across scotland. the early pa rt of the uk across scotland. the early part of summer has been wettest of all in scotland. almost two thirds of the average rainfall whereas it's been very dry in south—east. only dorset has had 2% of the expected amount of rainfall. how is your garden looking on your estate? particularly dry? from what i can see from the window, there's still
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water. the swimming pool is good. the horses are good. the mini zoo is all right. i'm worried about my coastal path. but we've got stuff for that. ok. the environment agency say that we don't need to worry about water levels. the rivers are flowing at the right lovell is for this time of year. it is just the surface of the garden that is very dry. if you were to get out into your garden and dig a big hole, you are good at that, you would find it gets wetter as you go down. notjust on this programme. some are suggesting we are in for a heatwave. they like to do that because it sells newspapers. however, yesterday we discussed that temperatures could hit 30 degrees. it is going to get
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hotter before it gets a bit cooler. really, well intojuly, we are going to find high—pressure shaping our weather. close enough by to mean that it weather. close enough by to mean thatitis weather. close enough by to mean that it is probably going to be warm. there's not great deal of rain in the forecast at all. so, the papers have got a point. a heatwave. 30 degrees and no rain. that is pretty hot and dry. shall we have a look at the forecast? we will do the paper review tomorrow! when i'm not here! what we've got today is something different across the south—east. more towards the south—east we have more humid air. you can see the difference on our temperature map. cool and fresh into the north—west and more humid and warm towards the south—east. in between a pathetic
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weather front that is not producing much rain at all. that is fading away. nothing in the south—east. some heavier showers across northern scotla nd some heavier showers across northern scotland where it is much cooler. we will see a lot more showers this evening across scotland. just brushing northern ireland for a time and maybe the far north of england for a time. it becomes clear and a lot cooler. a noticeable drop in temperatures. a more comfortable night for sleeping. the heat and humidity pushed away into the near continent. the cooler and fresh air is coming around the top of this area of high pressure. that's going to dominate our weather for the next week or two for the very least. quite windy across the north east of scotland. some blustery winds on north sea coasts. it's a cooler trees. a lot of drier weather away
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from those showers in the northern ireland of scotland. the different feel for the weather towards the south—east. a significant drop in temperature for norwich. as we move towards the end of the week, on friday, a bit more cloud coming into northernmost parts of scotland. otherwise plenty of showers around. those temperatures beginning to lift a little bit. that's not far off the average for the time of year. the high pressure is just average for the time of year. the high pressure isjust shifting position getting closer towards the uk butare position getting closer towards the uk but are still around the threat ofa uk but are still around the threat of a bit more cloud and spots of rainfor of a bit more cloud and spots of rain for the northernmost parts of scotland. otherwise, this weekend, blue skies and lots of sunshine. overnight, the knights will be on the poolside. —— the night will be
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on the cool side. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a major inquiry finds hundreds of elderly patients at a hospital in hampshire died because of what it says was an "institutionalised regime" of prescribing "dangerous doses" of powerful painkilling drugs when there was no medicaljustification. nothing i say today will lessen the anguish and pain of families who have campaigned for 20 years for justice after the loss of a loved one. but i can at least on behalf of the government and the nhs apologise for what happened and what they have
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been through. familes and campaigners call for prosecutions — and say they were consistently let down by the authorities. the government is facing another cliff hanger vote on a key piece of brexit legislation — as some of its own mps are expected to rebel. the debate on that is under way. quit separating the kids or separating the children. mr president, don't you have children?! us democrats challenge president trump over the controversial policy of separating migrant parents from their children. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. the european champions are showing their credentials on the world stage with a rather unsurprising talisman. as ever, cristiano ronaldo at the forefront for portugal. two years ago when portugal won the european championship, hampered by injury he didn't have a starring role. he is
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looking for things to be completely different. a hat—trick in the first match and he has followed that up with the first goal in the match today against morocco. a trademark headerfrom a set today against morocco. a trademark header from a set piece. his fourth goal of the tournament so far. life pictures. portugal still leading into the last ten minutes. it is a match you can see on bbc one and the bbc sport website. ronaldo still at the forefront in russia. there you go again, trying to get people to watch a different channel! we've now had a glimpse of all 32 teams at this year's tournament — what have we learned? it's been a good world cup so far. there's been a lot of talk about the number of penalties awarded. nine so far. 18 is the record for a world
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cup. halfway there already. var has played a big part in that. few of sides in this tournament. 2.81 per game on average, the lowest since 1968. and there has only been one red card, for columbia's carlos sanchezin red card, for columbia's carlos sanchez in their defeat against japan. we've seen a lot of good goals. we selected a few for you. the first, a great strike from spain fullback nacho in their first match against portugal. an equaliser right at the end of that game from cristiano ronaldo. a trademark free kick from him. showing is why he could end up the golden boot winner in russia this time around. and a good goals from felipe coutinho, the
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former liverpool player. showing the anfield faithful what they are missing out on. the final goal from belgium's dries mertens. england will have to watch out for that in their final will have to watch out for that in theirfinal group match. will have to watch out for that in their final group match. england have a rest day today but they have an interesting way of recuperating yesterday after their win against tunisia on monday night. racing unicorns in the pool. this from jesse lingard's social media. he was very happy about that as they begin their preparations for their meeting with panama on sunday. let's have a look at the other fixtures today. uruguay facing saudi arabia in rostov. if they avoid defeat, russia will be the first team to qualify
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for the next round. and then iran play the 2010 winners spain. you can listen on five live. britain's dan evans has not been given a wild card into this year's wimbledon. he has returned from a ban for taking cocaine but he will have to play in a qualifying tournament. the organisers say that the decision was on a matter of principle. let's get more now on that report into deaths of hundreds of patients at a hospital in hampshire. the inquiry into suspicious deaths at the gosport war memorial hospital has found a56 patients died because powerful drugs were prescribed ‘without medical justification'. it says that between 1989 and 2000, there was an ‘institutionalised practice' of shortening lives. concerns were first raised in 1998 about a higher than usual number of deaths in gosport hospital's department of medicine for elderly people. in 2006, hampshire police
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investigated the deaths of 92 patients, there were no prosecutions. then in 2009, inquests take place into the deaths of 10 patients — they find that some patients were given "inappropriate medication" a general medical council hearing about drjane barton, the only person to face disciplinary action, finds that she was guilty of "serious professional misconduct." despite the council's findings, the crown prosecution service said there was insufficient evidence for a prosecution on gross negligence manslaughter charges. doctor barton subsequently retired. then, in 201a, the government announced an independent investigation into deaths at hospitals in the house of commons earlier today. the event is at gosport were
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troubling and i think this is one of theissues troubling and i think this is one of the issues that we need to deal with across the public sector and, if i may say, i across the public sector and, if i may say, i page beauty the right honourable gentleman for establishing the enquiry when he was a minister. i'm sorry that it took so long for the families to get the a nswe rs so long for the families to get the answers from the nhs and i would like to thank bishopjamesjones and his panel members for what they have done and i would be happy to meet the right honourable gentleman with the right honourable gentleman with the bishopjones the right honourable gentleman with the bishop jones and the right honourable gentleman with the bishopjones and the health and social cares secretary has been putting such a focus on transparency within the nhs and these findings
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are deeply distressing and concerning but measures have been put in place. a short time ago bridget reeves, who's grandmother elsie devine died in 1999 — paid tribute to the work of the panel, and then listed a catalogue of missed opportunities. the sort of behaviour going on in our nhs is both chilling and precarious. as victims of crime we are all entitled to an explanation when alleged injustice has occurred. this has been sinister, calculated and those implicated must face the full rigour of the criminaljustice system. accountability must take precedence here. these horrifying, shameful, unforgivable actions need to be exposed in a criminal court for a jury to decide and only then can we put our loved ones to rest.
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more on that story later. let's take you to the house of commons. dominic grieve is speaking on the amendment he has tabled. they enabled as for the first time to consider the meaningful vote in relation to the government's view of what it should be and the suggestions that came from their lordship's house. i'd like to say here and now how deeply i object to the way they get vilified for doing the job that we have as them to do. to act as a revising chamber and to send back to this house proposals for our consideration. mr speaker, the issue has been highlighted by the earliest speaker which is about to perform a meaningful vote should take. there are two options in front of the
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house. the house will recall that when this matter first arose last week, the amendment that had come from the lords included a mandatory element, something which is rather constitutionally unusual. i don't think it has happened since the civil war in the 17th century. i seem civil war in the 17th century. i seem to recall it ended with a waving of this portable from oliver cromwell in relation to the mace. i apologise to the house that in trying to produce something else i probably didn't draft as well as i might have done. it led to a sensible discussion prompted by my right honourable friend the prime minister who had a number of ours in her room and said she would do her best to meet the concerns we were expressing on their not being a meaningful vote on no deal. last
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thursday i have to tell our house it looked as though we were going to reach an agreement based on exactly the terms of the lords amendment that has come back to ours. at a very late stage, it was indicated to me that the government feel able to proceed with that. i'd like to emphasise that i make absolutely no criticism of those with whom i negotiated who behaved impeccably. i have the knowledge that negotiations may founder at the last minute. it was u nfortu nate may founder at the last minute. it was unfortunate from my point of view and i will come back to that point briefly in a moment. be that as it may, the government's tabled amendment was the one we are being asked to accept a day. one that asks us asked to accept a day. one that asks us to note and doesn't give as an opportunity of amending. two arguments have been put to me to justify this change when it occurred
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and in the negotiations that followed. the first one was that there was concern about the justice bill he of the amendment. it's right to say that the standing orders of the house cannot be in my view be impugned in any court outside this high court of parliament but if one puts reference to the standing orders in a statute, it can raise some very interesting if not arcane legal issues about the extent to which a legal challenge can be brought. my own view is that the amendment is credibly open to challenge and i happen to think that the government amendment is not credibly open to challenge either. although it is worth pointing out that it although it is worth pointing out thatitis although it is worth pointing out that it is as likely to be challenged as the other, so i don't accept a differentiation between them. that was the first argument. the second argument put forward was
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ofa the second argument put forward was of a very different kind. it was said to me and i think it was picked up said to me and i think it was picked up by said to me and i think it was picked up by the opposition front bench spokesman that the government had real concerns that this is hugh which i have to say i think is an issue of detail had acquired such a status with those with whom we were negotiating that it could undermine the government's negotiating position in trying to get the united kingdom... a lot of detail there. we're going to pull away. if you wa nt to we're going to pull away. if you want to keep watching that, bbc parliament has continuous coverage. we will take you back for the boat perspective around three 30 pm. —— for the vote, expected around 3:30pm. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. an inquiry into the deaths
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of hundreds of elderly people at gosport war memorial hospital in hampshire concludes that a56 of them died after being given powerful painkillers — without medicaljustification. the government could be facing a rebellion from some of its own mps — when the commons votes again on a key piece of brexit legislation. president trump challenges congress to draft new immigration laws in response to widespread criticism of the us policy of separating child migrants from theirfamilies. the european union will launch a raft of retaliatory tariffs against us exports on friday. the move comes after us president donald trump imposed steep duties on steel and aluminium earlier this month. eu trade commissioner cecilia malmstrom confirmed american exports such as blue jeans, motorbikes and bourbon whiskey will be targeted — but she added — the bloc does "not want to be in this position". an online gambling operator has been fined £2m forfailing to protect a problem gambler. 32red allowed one customer to deposit £758,000 with no money laundering or social responsibility checks.
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kindred, which owns 32red, said it accepted the penalty and was "working hard" to improve its processes. if you enjoy a bubbly beverage then listen up because a shortage of co2 could take the fizz out of sparkling drinks this summer. the british beer and pub association, which represents brewers and 20,000 uk pubs, said the co2 shortage is already causing stoppages in beer production. carbon dioxide also delivers beer at the pub pumps and is used to pack fresh meat and salads. people in rural areas have less money, less savings, and less access to financial services than those in the town, but seem more satisfied with their financial situation. the findings come from a financial conduct authority survey — which also reported a north—south divide with consumers in the north east of england having the lowest level of savings and investments of any english region. how can you have a shortage of co2?
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because we are not making enough. we wa nt to because we are not making enough. we want to talk about the dowjones because a familiar name in the dow jones, has gone all is going. this is a story about ge — general electric being dropped out of the dowjones and replaced by walgreen — a retailer — now it is interesting for a couple of reasons — how many companies do you think are in the doubt? i've no idea. 30. that's what i would have said. compare that to the ftse 100 and the other big us market the s&p 500 how those stocks are selected is also interesting because it is based on stock price — so the price of a share — rather than total market capital so in this situation the company
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that us replacing ge — the chemist and convience store chain walgreen, actually has half the market capitalisation of ge. let's start there with our reporter paul blake — paul, why does the dow look at stock price and with just 30 companies is it really a true reflection of the us economy? it has been a long—standing question. it is 30 companies representing a cross—section of the american economy. it is the one that people always refer to when they talk about how the economy is doing. a lot of people say it is just 30 economies and the american economy
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is one of the biggest in the world. does it really represent the state of the american economy. we have had situations where the dow was doing fine but broadly speaking other companies were not. for the last 100 plus years, close to 120, it has been the index that people look at. it isa been the index that people look at. it is a big indignity for ge to be picked off it. what has happened to the company? it is in a pretty poor state right now relative to its past. one of the glorious big american companies has found itself ina cash american companies has found itself in a cash strapped situation where it is very indebted. it's largely due to bad wheel making over the last couple of decades. it has tried to redirect and reap right the ship. it has laid off employees and cut
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its dividend but it is still in the doldrums trying to get back on track. certainly, it was one of the first original companies on the dow. the dow is saying that they are trying to represent the american economy and ge doesn't necessarily do that. and can you give us an update on the disney, comcast, sky deal. disney has put in a new offer for the conglomerate of rupert murdoch. they are offering $30 per share up from 28 offered by comcast last week. 21st century fox say it prefers the disney deal. it increases the value of the company
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but they are still looking at offers from other companies who are willing to put in offers. thank you for that analysis. do you want to have a look at the markets is only your phone? he was getting up—to—date information. a lot of positive feeling. ocado is coming up but it's still not where it was last week. i will be back in an hour. time for a look at the weather. here's darren bett. a week and disorganised weather front is heading across. ahead of it it is still and humid in the sunshine but cooler and fresher with showers arriving in the north—west of scotland. most of the showers
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affecting scotland for a while and could be quite heavy. heading out into the north sea later on. the skies will clearfor most into the north sea later on. the skies will clear for most others and temperatures will drop away. a cooler night than for quite some time. behind that weather front, it's a change of wind direction. stronger winds in the north—east of scotland. maybe a fuchsia hours in the north—east of scotland. on the whole, thursday will be dry. lengthy spells of sunshine. temperatures will be lower. it will feel quite different across the south—east and east anglia. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy.
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today at 3pm: a devastating report into the deaths of a56 people at a hampshire hospital blames an "institutional regime" of prescribing powerful opioid pain killers with no medicaljustification. throughout, the relatives have shown a remarkable tenacity and fortitude in questioning what happened to their loved ones. the documents explained and published today show that they were right to ask those questions. nothing i say today will lessen the anguish and pain of families who have campaigned for 20 years forjustice after the loss of a loved one. but i can, at least, on behalf of the government and the nhs, apologise for what happened and what they have been through. accountability must take precedence, here. these horrifying, shameful, unforgivable actions need to be disclosed in a criminal court for a jury to decide and only then
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can we put our loved ones to rest. another crunch brexit vote for the prime minister — this is the scene live in the house of commons. i'm at westminster where compromise is in the air. conservative rebels say they will now back theresa may. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh and the world cup says goodbye to it's first team. yes, morocco are out, beaten 1—0 by the european champions, portugal. the only difference between the teams, the fourth goal of this yea r‘s world cup teams, the fourth goal of this year's world cup for cristiano ronaldo. more later in the hour. let's get a weather update. today is the last day of the warm and humid daysin the last day of the warm and humid days in the south—east for a while. tomorrow will feel cool and fresh everywhere but with plenty of sunshine. we look at the weather for
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the weekend later in the programme. thank you. also coming up — archaeologists accuse illegal metal detectorists, who've been targeting hadrian's wall, of damaging the site and robbing us of knowledge about the past. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. for hundreds of families, the years of waiting are over and their worst fears realised, with the publication of a devastating report into the deaths of patients at gosport war memorial hospital. a56 people's lives were shortened because of an "institutional regime" of prescribing opioids, with no medicaljustification. the report raises as many questions as it answers. where were the regulators? why did staff continue with these practises that were clearly wrong? why was there a ten—year delay before investigations were begun? and will criminal charges now be brought?
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the establishment, it seems, didn't listen when staff spoke out and families who were concerned were written off as "troublemakers". let's speak to the chair of the gosport independent panel, the right reverend james jones. thank you forjoining us. was there an establishment cover—up? the panel found in those documents... —— are the panel found no documents suggesting this. but the institutions challenged by the families came together and closed ra nks families came together and closed ranks and distanced the families and made them feel that they were troublemakers. you dealt with families in the hillsborough enquiries. you said, back then, that lessons must be learned. i'm just wondering what lessons you think should be learned from this one. when the prime minister was home
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secretary asked me to write a report learning lessons on the hillsborough‘s families experiences and we titled the report the patronising disposition of unaccountable power. this is what they felt themselves, that over the yea rs, they felt themselves, that over the years, as they have asked questions, in all innocence and in good conscience, about their loved ones, they have been treated in a patronising way. and not taken seriously. the lesson learned is that when there is a public tragedy like this, there is a public tragedy like this, the public institutions should be open, they should be —— they should respond with candour and transparency and should not put their own reputation above the interests and rights of the individuals who are asking questions. which is exactly what has happened in this case. i'm wondering if you were shocked when we began to realise what you were dealing with here? —— when you began to realise.
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when we examined the first set of families, 163, and discovered that 71 lives had been shortened through an excessive use of opioids that we re an excessive use of opioids that were not medicallyjustified, that led asked to investigate all 202a deaths at the hospital from 1989 until 2000 will stop that is when we then discovered a huge tranche of other people whose lives had been shortened in a similar way. and, yes, that was shocking. it has been startling to the families today. i'm sure the families would have asked you to explain what you think was behind it. i know it's not in the remit of your inquiry but it is something you must have asked yourself? the families are rightly wanting to know that. we investigated according to our terms of reference, to access all the documents and access them
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with a panel of experts in the different fields and write an account of what we found. what we we re account of what we found. what we were not too required to do, beyond our terms of reference, was to interview the people named in the documents. are not required to do. only by interviewing those people would you be able to find the sort of a nswers would you be able to find the sort of answers you are rightly seeking. what would have been the first question you would have asked if they were sitting in front of you now? whom? those that the families are saying needs to be questioned further about this. that is for people who are expert in the field of criminal investigation. that is not the expertise of the panel that was brought together two, specifically, analyse the documents that we accessed. it is really important, for the sake of future investigations, that we, as a panel,
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don't stray beyond our terms of reference. i understand why you want to ask that question but it is not appropriate to put that to me at this particular point. and you will understand why i asked that question. if i may, iwant understand why i asked that question. if i may, i want to end, after such a grim period for you and the families, with something of a lighter note. you described the tenacity of the families, they have been remarkable. the two words that i used that come readily to mind is "tenacity" and "fortitude". i have known the families for a0 years and i came down to gosport a0 years ago and met a small group. as we continued our work, slowly more people came forward. as they came forward, they we re forward. as they came forward, they were all characterised by this tenacity. they wouldn't let go of the questions. and by this fortitude, this courage, that when you actually do challenge people in authority, you worry about how you view of self are going to be treated. the fact that out of love
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for their loved ones, they continued with their campaign. —— about how you yourself are going to be treated. it requires tribute to be paid to them. also, the media and everybody need to be very sensitive as to how the families are feeling today. because it's been very emotionalfor them today. because it's been very emotional for them receiving this news. they deserve support at this time. not least because, for the last 20 years, they've had no support from anybody. and you would back them, as they want to take this further? i've said to the families today, and i've said it to the secretary of state, that i'm very willing to come back to gosport in the autumn to meet with the families in the way that i and the panel have done over the last three and a half yea rs. done over the last three and a half years. meeting them every three months. i will return in the autumn with them to see what progress has been made, following the publication of the report today. i will
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certainly stand with them in making sure that there is indeed progress. thank you very much for your time. a short time ago bridget reeves, who's grandmother elsie devine died in 1999, paid tribute to the work of the panel, and then listed a catalogue of missed opportunities. our vulnerable relatives, who were stripped of their final words to loved ones, silenced by overdoses, is more than catastrophic. this sort of behaviour going on in our nhs is both chilling and precarious. as victims of crime, we are all entitled to have an explanation, when an alleged injustice has occurred. but this has been sinister, calculated and those implicated must now face the full rigour of the criminaljustice system. accountability must take precedence here. these horrifying, shameful, unforgivable actions need to be disclosed in a criminal court for a jury to decide and only then can we put our loved ones to rest. more of this story throughout the
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afternoon. within the past few minutes, the leading conservative brexit rebel, the former attorney general, dominic grieve, says he will support the government in this afternoon's vote on the eu withdrawal bill. some rebel tories have been threatening to back an amendment, which would give the commons a say in what would happen, if no deal was made with brussels. let's go straight to our chief political correspondent vicki young. does that mean that the government will win this? yes, i think it does, now. if dominic grieve is onside, we have heard from others such as nicky morgan, if they swing behind the bar minister, it feels as if this will go through, withdrawal bill will go back to the lord and i will be surprised that having heard if the commons backs it is that they will go in other directions. it sounds as if on our theresa may has done enough. this has been a technical row at times about how much save
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parliament might have, if we have the scenario that there is no deal done with brussels. both sides saying that is not what they want to happen but what several mps are saying is that they don't want to be give —— given a take it or leave it option. given this deal all leave without a deal. or in fact given the scenario that theresa may has said, i have done no deal. they wanted to have a say and direct the government almost in what happens next. there has been a sort of compromise at the last minute. it seems to have been enough to bring on side people like dominic grieve. here he is. a little bit more difficulty than i would have wished. the obvious acknowledgement of the sovereignty of this place over the executive in black and white language. i am prepared to accept the government's difficulty and support it... i am prepared to accept the government's difficulty, and, in the
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circumstances, except the form of amendment it once. —— accept. gets very technical but it seems the government is saying that in a no deal scenario they will come forward with some kind of motion and the mps will be able to amend it? understanding order section 20 ap, the speaker cannot amend a neutral motion. —— zab. it would be unprecedented for the speaker to allow that to be amended. i'm obviously delighted that the potential rebels have decided to back the government on the withdrawal bill and back the will of the british people that we saw in the british people that we saw in the referendum result. obviously, the referendum result. obviously, the bigger majority of the government has got and if the bill goes back to the lords tonight, that's going to persuade the lords that's going to persuade the lords that this legislation has got to go through and we got to get on with
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brexit. you have said over the years that parliament needs to be in control of its own laws, that's the pa rt control of its own laws, that's the part of the reason for leaving the eu. why shouldn't mps have a say, if we get to that scenario where there is no deal? because that would have undermined the government's position in negotiations with the european union and made a poor deal very likely, almost certainly a poor deal. because no dealwas likely, almost certainly a poor deal. because no deal was being taken off the table? if that is taken off the table? if that is ta ke n off taken off the table? if that is taken off the table? if that is taken off the table? if that is taken off the table we have already committed to £40 billion of taxpayers money in the so—called divorce bill to what will be a terrible deal. that could never be allowed to happen. it was a wreck in motion. how do you feel more broadly about where we are with the negotiations? —— wrecking motion. some are concerned we are running out of time and there doesn't seem to be the progress we would have liked, who do you blame? the negotiations are always going to go down to the wire. these will be the easiest trade negotiations anyone has ever had. we have already rated conversion is currently with the
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european union. it's a matter of michel barnier, what do you want tariffs on? we want tariff free trade. it can be done in an afternoon, that is why we can have these pantomimes of the legislation, these pantomimes of the legislation, the deal can be done very quickly. if there is willingness on both sides. we are offering them reciprocal tariff free trade to a market where they sell us 90 billion euros a year of goods more than we sell to them. it is in their interest. why is that not happening? are there being —— are they being more intransigent? a government with no majority in the house of lords and there are people who are struggling to accept the will of the british people. parliament voted by 6-1 british people. parliament voted by 6—1 for a referendum to the british people a referendum. people talk about palin entry sovereignty, we gave the decision of the referendum to the british people —— parliamentary sovereignty. the british people have spoken and we have to leave the european union. british people have spoken and we have to leave the european unionm your view, there are some people in the house of lords and some of your conservative colleagues who you think are trying to block brexit?
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the motion, the amendment you saw from the house of lords may have been slightly more subtle than the original amendment 19 last week. but it certainly was a blunt instrument which would have been a wrecking motion. i'm delighted the potential rebels have come on board with the government, it is the right thing to do. thank you. i would imagine that not everybody is happy. sadly among opposition parties. they might not be so willing to go along with this. —— certainly a month. eleanor garnier is inside parliament. lam in i am in central lobby at the heart of everything going on. i am joined by an opposition mp, the liberal democrat ed davey. thank you. firstly, your reaction to the fact that these tory rebels, we had dominic grieve, deciding he will now back the government's amendment? usually disappointed. tory so—called rebels never seem to want to rebel. they have been conned again. this is if you were yet to even be table. it
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flies in the face of the evidence. this government has ignored parlance time and again. arnold has passed motions on this and that and the government have not done it —— this government have not done it —— this government has ignored parliament again. if you want to give parliament a meaningful vote and let the people have the final say comments on liberal democrats who are making that argument. that is something you are making about a public having a say here in westminster. what is left for mp5 to do, to sway the government's position when it comes to that final brexit deal? we have to have a vote in parliament. it would be undemocratic. given the brexiteers said it was all about parliament sovereignty, the idea that parliament can't have that vote would seem deeply undemocratic. the liberal democrats want to go further, we don't think itjust should be mps that decided but the people. the people started it, let them finish it. when we eventually know what brexit mean that we still don't know today what it means, when we have that information, i think the people should have the final say. liberal democrats want that and
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parliament should give the people the final say. dominic grieve has said he is satisfied because it is now in black and white, written down, that the government accepts that parliament is sovereign, therefore it will be able to dictate or persuade the government, when, if, that final brexit deal is rejected. or theresa may doesn't get it. he is obviously convinced that he has the confidence from government that mps in the house of commons will be able to influence what the government does next. conservatives so—called rebels are a bit naive. unless you have got this written into law that is being passed by parliament, i don't think the government will necessarily on a pledge that it makes in a ministerial statement. it has refused to listen to parliament when it has voted on substantive motions, why should that change? this cove na nt ha 5 why should that change? this covenant has shown complete disrespect for parliament. —— this government has shown. it is naive in the strongest way for these tory rebels to take the word of this
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government. that's why i think the only way to solve this question, when we know what brexit means, and if the liberal democrat position that the people should have a final say. thank you. one thing we should add, simon, that dominic grieve mentioned in the house of commons committee reminded mps that the ultimate sanction that mps that the ultimate sanction that mps have is a motion of confidence. dangling that threat, if you like, to the government that if they don't stand to their word, that threat remains. thank you. eleanor gana inside parliament and vicky young outside parliament, thank you. you are watching afternoon live, these are watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. an inquiry into the deaths of hundreds of elderly people at gosport war memorial hospital in hampshire concludes that a56 of them died after being given powerful painkillers, without medicaljustification. the leading conservative brexit rebel, the former attorney general, dominic grieve, says he will now support the government in this afternoon's vote on the eu withdrawal bill. president trump challenges congress to draft new immigration
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laws in response to widespread criticism of the us policy of separating child migrants from theirfamilies. and in sport, morocco are alt of the world cup, cristiano ronaldo scored the goal which sent them home and gave portugal a 1—0 win in their second group match. —— ma rocco are out. he is now an all—time scorer for the european national side. midfielder dele alli has a minor strain as england begin their countdown to their second world cup game against panama on sunday. and in tennis, dan evans is refused a wild card at wimbledon as he tries to rebuild his careerfollowing wild card at wimbledon as he tries to rebuild his career following a ban for recreational drug use. more on those stories just after half past. theresa may has refused to comment on leaked documents which apparently show the government was warned two years ago of impending chaos caused by timetable changes on northern rail.
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the labour mp lisa nandy says she's been handed e—mails from within the department of transport. and we can speak to lisa nandy now — she's in westminster. pretty damning stuff because it also talks about how to handle the media and its rather cynical, isn't it? there's even one e—mail that was released under the freedom of information act, by the department, that science itself off "yours cynically, etc,. —— signed itself. it talks about strategies for dealing with mps and concerned passenger groups and handing socks to those passenger groups as they lose their key routes. it betrays a mindset right at the heart of department of water content for passengers who travel on these northern trains right across england. theresa may doesn't comment on leaked documents, are you happy with that answer? they were not leaked, they were provided by her own department of the —— under the freedom of information act after a request was made by a passenger
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transport group who so utterly frustrated at a lack of progress. they and i and many other mps had been warning the changes at the department but were considered which came into force a few weeks ago would cause serious disruption on our railways, would leave people stranded and would cause dangerous levels of overcrowding at some of our busiest stations at peak commuter times. we were reassured all the way along by ministers including chris gaining that those concerns were being taken seriously. as it turns out, the decision had been made privately. —— including chris grayling. privately there was an attitude of complete and utter disrespect, not just for an attitude of complete and utter disrespect, notjust for those raising it with those who were relying on those services. that was just in documents two years old. chris grayling argued that he got the rail bosses in recently and had a total reassurance from them that there would not be cut. where does there would not be cut. where does the buck stopped with this? what we need right now is transparency. we had requested these e—mails from a few years ago because of the
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problems we have been having. what we haven't yet got from the department, because they haven't released them, is the private conversations that were happening over the 18 months in the run—up to these timetable changes coming into force. what i can tell you is that i wrote to chris grayling a couple of weeks before those changes came in. to say that there were real problems, urging him to think again and delaying the timetable coming into force. junior ministerjoe johnson rail minister wrote back to say everything would be fine and they were going ahead. you cannot say he wasn't warned there were going to be problems. this is pretty incendiary stuff, where does it go from here? we need complete and utter transparency as to what happened in the department. chris kennington is to come clean about what he knew and when. it seems to me fairly astonishing —— chris grayling needs to come clean. officials making fairly major decisions about the future of our ra i lwa ys decisions about the future of our railways without the secretary of state at least having some knowledge or curiosity about what was about to
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happen. he stood in front of the house of commons only a week ago and said that he would make sure that those who were responsible for the chaos and misery on our railways would be held accountable. and if thatis would be held accountable. and if that is him, then he is going to have to resign. there is a mindset here of a group of people who make decisions about our railways who don't travel on them and have no idea of the cost of getting it wrong. what we need in the north of england is the ability to notjust make decisions about how our ra i lwa ys make decisions about how our railways are run and where investment is put, but also the ability to hold accountable those who are making those decisions to make sure that when they get it wrong, when they are getting it wrong, when they are getting it wrong, something can be done about it. thank you. president trump has challenged congress to make new policy. outrage has... ata
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at a meeting last night with fellow republicans, president trump said he would support new compromised legislation. amid growing concern from members of his own party, the president came to capitol hill, to talk about the crisis on the southern border. the system has been broken for many years, the immigration system. it's been a really bad, bad system, probably the worst anywhere in the world. we're going to try and see if we can fix it. thank you. having met with republicans, he was heckled by democrats. quit separating the kids, separating the children. mr president, don't you have kids? still, though, no word of an imminent solution. we had a good meeting. these are laws that have been broken for many years, decades, but we had a great meeting. thank you. pressure to reform america's immigration system is being driven by images such as these, children kept in cages after being separated from their parents. under a new zero—tolerance policy,
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anyone caught crossing the border illegally is now being arrested. 2,000 sons and daughters have been separated from their parents in little over a month. but far from bowing to public pressure, the president is doubling down. in one tweet on the subject, he warned of illegal immigrants infesting the country. and he continues to blame the democrats, even though republicans control both chambers of congress. the president, alone, can fix it with this flick of a pen, by signing a presidential order to end the agonising screams of small children who have been separated from their parents. mr president, i'll lend you my pen. any pen. you can fix it, yourself. mr trump insists the solution lies with congress. let the children go! but as protests sprout up around the country and in the face of growing international
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condemnation, one conservative talk show host has likened the situation to a crisis which threatened to derail a previous republican administration, warning that this could be "trump's katrina". david willis, bbc news, los angeles. the authorities in indonesia say they now believe at least 190 people are missing after the sinking of a ferry in sumatra. just 18 survivors have been found, all within hours of the ferry sinking into lake toba, one of the deepest lakes in the world. it's feared the wooden vessel was danefrously overloaded and was only licensed to carry 60 people. rebecca henschke has the latest from jakharta. the wooden boat that sank in this picturesque volcanic lake,
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when it hit bad weather, is believed to have been three times over capacity. authorities say it was operating illegally and didn't hand out tickets to passengers, so there are no details about who was on board or how many people. authorities are having to go off families coming search teams are still combing the lake looking for any survivors. they have said they will do that for at least the next seven days. and an information centre has been set up, on the side of the lake, for desperate families seeking news. this is a very popular time to be travelling in indonesia, as millions head home to celebrate the islamic festival of eid. this would be indonesia's worst maritime accident for years, but they are not uncommon. in the last week, there has been four boat accidents and officials have admitted to the bbc that they are struggling to enforce even basic safety standards across this vast archipelago of more than 13,000 islands. survivors have talked about not enough life jackets on board and how they had to scramble to grab one, as the boat went underwater. you are watching afternoon live from
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bbc news, let's get a weather update. weather now with darren bett. a weak and disorganised weather front is moving across england and wales. barely any rain. ahead of it, south—east and east anglia, warm and humid in the sunshine, sunny spells in the north, but cooler and fresher and quite a few showers arriving into the north west of scotland. those showers get close to northern ireland in the evening and most of them affecting scotland for a while, heavy and the worst of them in the north sea. skies will clear for most of us and temperatures will drop away. it will be a cooler night tonight. particularly across england and wales. cooler air coming in behind that weather front. it is very weak, no rain on it really, a change in ourwind direction, more north to north—westerly. stronger winds in the north—east of scotland on the north sea coasts. maybe a few showers in the north—east of scotland but it
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will mostly be dry with lengthy spells of sunshine. patchy fair—weather cloud here and there. temperatures will be lower and it will feel quite different across the south—east and east anglia. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a major inquiry finds that more than a50 patients died after being given powerful painkillers inappropriately at gosport war memorial hospital. an independent panel concludes there was an "institutional practice of shortening lives". nothing i say today will lessen the anguish and pain of families who have campaigned for 20 years forjustice after the loss of a loved one. but i can at least on behalf of the government and the nhs apologise for what happened and what they have been through. familes and campaigners call for prosecutions — and ask how these events happened, and why they have to wait so long for answers.
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the leading conservative brexit rebel, the former attorney general, dominic grieve, says he will now support the government in this afternoon's vote on the eu withdrawal bill. quit separating the kids or separating the children. mr president, don't you have children?! us democrats challenge president trump over the controversial policy of separating migrant parents from their children. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. a team has been knocked out of the world cup already. and it's not one of ours. moral: are the first team eliminated from this yea r‘s world cup the first team eliminated from this year's world cup in russia, beaten 1-0 year's world cup in russia, beaten 1—0 by portugal. cristiano ronaldo has broken a lot of hearts in the football world and it was him again. a powerful header in the first half, scoring his fourth of the tournament adding to the hat—trick in the
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opening group match. a fightback from morocco in the game but they couldn't find an equaliser and went home in tears, unfortunately for them. another great moment for cristiano ronaldo. he overtakes puskas as a scorer cristiano ronaldo. he overtakes puskas as a scorer of overall international goals. that was one of the early second round matches so we've now had a glimpse of all 32 teams at this year's tournament — what have we learned? there's been a lot of talk about the number of penalties in the tournament. there have been nine so far. 18 is the record for a world cup. var has played its part. three have been awarded after var. 2.81 is the average number of offsides and it is the lowest since 1966.
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incredibly, only one red card so far. what we really want to see our goals. we have picked a selection of the best goals so far in russia. this comes from spain's nacho fernandez. beautiful stripe from him in the opening jaw against portugal. the equaliser right at the end came from that man ronaldo. nothing that the manchester united goalkeeper david de gea could do about that one. philippe coutinho of brazil has an entry against switzerland in their opening draw. now of course of barcelona. liverpool fans, this is what you are missing out on. and the third comes from belgium's dries mertens in their 3—0 win over panama. england looking out for that sort of thing is they are facing
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belgium in their final group sort of thing is they are facing belgium in theirfinal group game. they are on a rest day today. they got to spend some time with friends and family. yesterday they had a recovery session in the swimming pool recovery session in the swimming pool, racing unicorns! seeing is believing. we might see them lift the world cup. jesse lingard pretty happy, splashing around. two fixtures still to come today. your gripe facing —— uruguayan are in group a, uruguay face saudi arabia in rostov. that kicks at apm live on bbc one and radio 5live. and at 7pm, iran play spain which is live on radio 5live. britain's dan evans has not been given a wildcard to wimbeldon. the 28—year—old has recently returned from a ban for taking cocaine and will now have to play in the qualifying tournament. sources at the all england club say
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the decision was based on a matter of "principle". that's all the sport for now. more for you in the next hour. let's get more now on that report into deaths of hundreds of patients at a hospital in hampshire. the inquiry into suspicious deaths at the gosport war memorial hospital has found a56 patients died because powerful drugs were prescribed ‘without medicaljustification'. it says that between 1989 and 2000, there was an ‘institutionalised practice' of shortening lives. concerns were first raised in 1998 about a higher than usual number of deaths in gosport hospital's department of medicine for elderly people. in 2006, hampshire police investigated the deaths of 92 patients, but there were no prosecutions. then in 2009, inquests took place into the deaths of 10 patients — they found that some patients were given
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"inappropriate medication". a general medical council hearing on the conduct of drjane barton, the only person to face disciplinary action, found that she was guilty of "serious professional misconduct". despite the council's findings, the crown prosecution service said there was insufficient evidence for a prosecution on gross negligence manslaughter charges. dr barton subsequently retired. then, in 201a, the government announced an independent investigation into deaths at hospitals earlier i spoke to the liberal democrat mp norman lamb who commissioned this inquiry four years ago. he welcomes today's report and is calling for further action. now there has to be a criminal investigation conducted by another force, not the local force that has failed so far to get the bottom of this. also, we need to make sure that all those people who, in the words of bishopjamesjones, closed ranks, obfuscated, blocked the families getting to the truth.
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they have to be held to account, as well. because that is really shocking. the fact that people were left in the dark for so many years, ignored, not listened to. that must never happen again. what you're describing is an establishment cover—up. yeah, absolutely. these were ordinary people who raised legitimate concerns in the early 90s and including a whistle—blower within the hospital, a nurse. they were all ignored. no—one was prepared to face up to possible serious wrongdoing. and this awful sense of the establishment closing ranks. ordinary people just not getting voices heard. it is rather similar to the awful events following the grenfell tower fire. another case of people, ordinary people, not having their voices heard. if i was a family member, i think one of the first questions i would ask is,
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what on earth was the motivation? and, of course, the report can't really go into that. well, that's why there needs to be a police investigation. the fact that people went into this cottage hospital after being discharged from the acute hospital for a period of rehabilitation, but on admission to the hospital, they were routinely being prescribed opioids, sometimes on the day of admission, this is beyond belief. and so, that's why there has to be a thorough police investigation. but we have to ask questions of the general medical council, who took ten years to properly reach a conclusion. and then the panel failed to strike the doctor off the record. and also, the inquests which failed to get to the bottom of this. and, indeed, the department of health. because in 2013, when i finally got hold of the baker report,
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which i'd asked for two to three months earlier, when i finally saw it, and i was away on holiday in france, i was told by my private office that there was a plan, the next day, to announce that there would be no public inquiry. and i intervened to say on no account must that announcement be made. there must be a thorough investigation, given what that baker report exposed. the crown prosecution service, as we are on air, say "we will consider the content of the report and will take any appropriate steps, as required." there will be a fear that this just gets kicked into the long grass. well, it's already, of course, been kicked into the long grass, given that families have been waiting 15, 20 years for anything to happen. now, there must be a programme of action. the regulators, the police, and others, who now are in the spotlight, must demonstrate to the public that they are prepared to learn lessons. and to point the finger at those
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people who closed ranks, those people who blocked the truth from the families. those people who obfuscated, as the bishop made clear, in his report. because only then can people rebuild trust in public institutions. as you can see from the picture behind me, the debate on brexit is still under way in the house of commons. it looks as though the pressure on the prime minister may have lessened in the last half hour. vicky young is outside the house of commons. dominic grieve, a principal proponent of the original amendment has backed down. he feels he has heard enough from the government. this is about who is in control of the process if we have a no deal situation at the end of the negotiations. he feels he has heard
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enough from the government that if it came to that, mps and lords would be able to have their say. others are saying it is not much of a concession but it has managed to bring this compromise which suggests that as the debate winds up and the vote starts taking place in about 20 minutes, it seems that theresa may may well be in the clear when it comes to the eu withdrawal bill. let's look at some of the order brexit issues. we get caught up in the detail of what's going on in there but if you are in brussels and looking at all of this, they will be thinking, they are completely divided over in britain and are easier to deal with. it is important to note that a defeat for the government on this would have been damaging for theresa may leading
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into what is already likely to be a tense and disappointing summit next week. the eu's perception of the division between parliament and government on this wouldn't have been that this is great for us. they are concerned about the credibility of the prime minister and does she have enough credibility to deliver support for any deal that they could agree. do you think it has been damaging for the prime minister?m reputational terms losing this boat would have been damaging but even if the amendment had passed it wouldn't have represented much of a constraint. i don't think the government is seriously thinking in terms of no deal. the days of saying no deal is better than a bad deal are well and truly in the past. brussels want to get back to thinking about northern ireland. we
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have forgotten that little problem there. there seems to be not much of a solution to that side of things. is brussels getting frustrated with the progress on that?” is brussels getting frustrated with the progress on that? i think they are probably frustrated on that. they are looking for more progress on britain given that we agreed a december agreement on a potential backstop solution to the problem in northern ireland and six months down the line they have tabled a customs deal and not addressed 80% of the question, the regulation deal. they are getting frustrated on this issue. we keep hearing from michel barnier that the clock is ticking. is there a danger that the deal won't come but will they do a deal in the end? both of the things are true. there is a lot separating the two sides so i wouldn't count on this working out well there is a
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chance that talks could break down but it will be the 11th hour when things are sorted out. i wouldn't be surprised if the october summit do as well as we were hoping and things are wrapped up in november and december. all along people have been sceptical about what we can achieve. they said we wouldn't be able to get transition sorted out and article 50. all have gone to plan despite hurdles and we are seeing the same with the withdrawal bill. it may be true but there are many hurdles down the line. we are seeing that the last—minute horse trading and persuasion tactics from the government have shown that there isn't much trust in the government strategy internally within the conservative party and the trust in the prime minister's leadership to deliver on this and that will be visited when it enters the house of
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commons. i think we are going to have this fight again. the customs union is the next big fight. we keep building up these votes. the conservative rebels are reluctant to cause the premise to pain but they do feel very strongly about having a very close links to the ewe after withdrawing. one of the things they have been able to pull the rebels around is by saying that this is a procedural bill and their substantive bills to come. there are people who are keeping their powder dry for the customs and trade bill. negotiations with the eu will only get tougher when we move on to trade. thank you both very much for joining others. in the house of commons, they have just wound joining others. in the house of commons, they havejust wound up joining others. in the house of commons, they have just wound up the debate. you can see from the pictures that mps are dividing, as they call it. going into one lobby
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or the other, voting on this amendment and we have heard lots of stories today of mps who have been ill, coming from hospital. a couple of labourmps, at ill, coming from hospital. a couple of labour mps, at least one, jo swinson, the lib dem, who is about to give birth as somebody put it. she is nine months pregnant. nothing would have kept her awake today. there has been an awful lot of arms twisted by the whips. it seems that the government should get its way and that vote will take about 15 minutes and, simon, we will bring the result when we get it. nine months pregnant suggests something quite soon, doesn't it? thank you very much. but due later on. in a moment the business news with xx. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live.
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an independent panel finds that a56 patients died after being given powerful painkillers inappropriately at gosport war memorial hospital. the crown prosecution service will now consider whether criminal charges should be brought. the leading conservative brexit rebel, the former attorney general, dominic grieve, says he will now support the government in this afternoon's vote on the eu withdrawal bill. president trump challenges congress to draft new immigration laws in response to widespread criticism of the us policy of separating child migrants from theirfamilies. here's your business headlines on afternoon live the european union will launch a raft of retaliatory tariffs against us exports on friday. the move comes after us president donald trump imposed steep duties on steel and aluminium earlier this month. eu trade commissioner cecilia malmstrom confirmed american exports such as blue jeans, motorbikes and bourbon whiskey will be targeted — but she added — the bloc does "not want to be in this position". an online gambling operator has been fined £2m for failing
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to protect a problem gambler. 32red allowed one customer to deposit £758,000 with no money laundering or social responsibility checks. kindred, which owns 32red, said it accepted the penalty and was "working hard" to improve its processes. people in rural areas have less money, less savings, and less access to financial services than those in the town, but seem more satisfied with their financial situation. the findings come from a financial conduct authority survey — which also reported a north—south divide with consumers in the north east of england having the lowest level of savings and investments of any english region. news from the high street normally means something grim but not this time. normally it is about food chains going into cbas or high street stores on their knees. that
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third profits warning yesterday for debenhams. but this is a good news story. yes — this is a government survey of 2,000 consumers and 750 independent high street retailers across the uk — and they say more than half of the nation's independent high street retailers are optimistic about the future of their local high street. surprised? i surprised ? i was. let's talk to maureen hinton, retail research director at global data — maureen this survey says 53% of independent retailers describe themselves as optimistic or very optimistic about the future of high streets — why do you think that is? i think it depends a lot on which location they are in and what kind of retailer they are. in a large conurbation like manchester, in a suburb with a local high street, up against strong local competition from the big shopping centres very nearby and easy to get to. but if
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you are in a more rural area, a market town or seaside town, you are much more of a central hub for the local community and also if you are the kind of retailer offering something a bit different from the major retailers, then you are more ofa major retailers, then you are more of a draw. say, a headdress, copy shop, something you can't get online. it's more social. what do you think the future of the high street is? it needs to evolve because it is not the way that we shop now. i think there will be a lot more residential and workspaces in these high streets and it will bring people back into the centre of towns and we will have more need for the kind of convenience stores that we need now. the way that we live now. i think it is an evolution, really. this research was done as pa rt really. this research was done as part of the great bushes should high
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street awards, run by the government. —— great british high street awards. do you think we need help late these awards?” street awards. do you think we need help late these awards? i think the high street needs a lot of help with things like parking that make it difficult to shop there. it is good to have positive news for a change and will make consumers think more positively about the high street and perhaps use it more but it is still going to be challenging. perhaps use it more but it is still going to be challengingm perhaps use it more but it is still going to be challenging. it was independent retailers who more of half of them felt optimistic that the news from shoppers was less positive. only 27% of them described their high street as improving and many said that they didn't have enough shops and services to meet their needs. are they doing enough to encourage shoppers? probably not but often it is not in their remit to do it. they need support from local authorities and also from the
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consumer point of view, all we ever hear is bad news because there is so much bad news in retail at the moment. in towns like darlington, for instance, big spaces being left by big stores like house of fraser and marks and spencer closing, you start to feel very down about the prospects of the high street. thank you very much for your time. in the midst of celebrations and the world cup, it is a shortage of co2 that we are facing. this is a story about co2 — carbon dioxide which is used not just to make fizzy drinks — but also to delivers beer at the pub pumps and to pack fresh meat and salads. and we are facing a shortage in the uk — british beer and pub association says some brewers have had to halt production. earlier i spoke tojohn raquet,
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ceo and founder of trade publication gasworld about the situation. this is a simple supply and demand situation. we have eight production plants that normally operate in the uk. two thirds of that capacity is off—line, at the moment, due to normal maintenance or other issues or technical issues. so, we don't have sufficient to actually supply the increased demand at this time of year. for liquid carbon dioxide for both the beverage industry and the food processing industry. well, this week has been particularly a crunch week. i was informed by one major beverage brand at the weekend that they are looking for additional product for this time. but i would be expecting this crunch period this week to be resolved in the next two to three weeks. hopefully, it was just a storm in a pint glass. that wasjohn from gas
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world. gas world? who knew! let's return to parliament where we are awaiting the crucial vote on brexit. just explain the process and what we need to be looking out for? this is the vote on the grieve manuscript amendment. a last—minute amendment. what you are looking for when they come back, it is some way off at the moment. still a few minutes away. it basically means that if the ayes win, the government has been defeated. the tory rebels will be the ayes in this scenario. dominic grieve has said that he won't be backing his own amendment. but heidi allen has actually said that she will be backing the amendment. he
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didn't withdraw. even though he said he was backing the government. we will cbs np, lib dem ‘s, labour mps, how many of them will back that at. it is going to be the vote that matters here and we will find out whether the government has got through. if dominic grieve, who has become the leader of the little bundle of conservative rebels, i don't know if we can call them that any more,. maybe ken clarke, anna soubry, heidi allen may well still d efy soubry, heidi allen may well still defy the government. it sounds like the others are falling into line.“ there is dj vu about this it is because we have been here before. but we now know that there were conversations going on in little rooms of camera where promises were being made. is that happening here ain? being made. is that happening here again? it is what has happened yet
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again. there is now dispute over whether there was all wasn't a concession. david davis was very clear that a motion was brought forward in case there is a no deal scenario cannot be amended by the house of commons. but this additional bit of paper suggests that it will be up to the speaker, in fact, to decide whether it will be able to be amended. this is about whether mps if we get to a no deal scenario don't have to just take note of what the government says, if they say we haven't got a deal, let's decide, let's have a vote on it. it's not aboutjust taking notes. it's about whether they can say, go back to brussels and try again. all we wanted go back and try and turn around article 50 and go back to the 27 and make sure brexit doesn't happen for another year. that is what they were talking
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about. mps were very concerned about having to just take all leave a no deal scenario. leaving without a deal. it does feel as if some of those conservatives who were talking about rebelling were looking for a way not to undermine their prime minister. they are not comfortable, if you like in defying their own government. some of them who are mps who until the brexit process would never have rebelled against their own side but they feel they have to do that. it feels like they have to come to some sort of compromise so the conservative mps can walk away thinking, if it comes to it, and it's not a scenario that anyone wa nts to it's not a scenario that anyone wants to happen. they feel that they can have a say in what happens next. we have heard also is of stories about the pressure mps have been
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under. normally, any mp who is sick and be brought in a car to nearby the palace of westminster, the yard just in front and the whips go out and say it is fine. they are being made to come into the house of commons and there are reports from people, you can see people like naz shah who has come to vote straight from hospital being brought in in a wheelchair. couldn't get the wheelchair. couldn't get the wheelchair past the clap's table. add to back up and use the other door. feeling very ill. another mp coming straight from hospital. —— the clerk's table. it is making sure that every single mp is here to register their vote. it looks like the government may have done enough and they partly will have been held by those on the labour side. we talk about the divisions on the
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conservative side but of course jeremy corbyn has those sitting behind him who were very much pro—brexit. they want to back the brexit cause and they will vote with the government to do so. their numbers have been rising. it originally only two or three but that number rose quite dramatically last week. that will have helped the conservatives quite a lot. for every conservatives quite a lot. for every conservative rebel, you got someone on the labour side saying they will vote with the government and they cancel each other out. it might still be pretty close. we will know shortly. exciting stuff but it needs pointing out that europe hasn't even had a look at this yet. that's the thing. how is this being seen from brussels? i suppose they know, of course, they are very well aware that there are divisions within the conservative party and within parliament and the broader point is
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that this is about the kind of brexit that we want. the accusation against people like dominic grieve and the house of lords is that they arejust and the house of lords is that they are just tried to stop grexit. pretending it is about parliamentary authority. they would deny that. this is certainly about the type of brexit that we end up with in the end, whether we are very closely aligned with the european union afterwards or whether we have a clea n afterwards or whether we have a clean break, as some of the brexiteers would see it. this is incredibly important. for all sorts of reasons. business want to know. we are going to have another fight about a customs union and whether we stay in a customs union. whether there is a new customers partnership. the cabinet hasn't even worked out what they want to do about that, let alone parliament. the argument from people like david davis, the brexit secretary is that
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parliament has had numerous opportunities to debate, there have been hours of debates on exit so far and they will have more opportunities to do that. numerous opportunities to do that. numerous opportunities to do that. numerous opportunities to bring about boats. we have seen it over various other subjects how parliament is pretty good at getting to have its say and to vote on things they want to talk about. even if they are not binding votes, politically, they can be very difficult for prime ministers and if it got to the stage where theresa may comes back at the end of the air or early next year and says i haven't got a deal, or she has a deal that is rejected by parliament, politically, she is going to be in a whole world of trouble. some on her own side would say that would mean an election or she would be ousted. the political reality sometimes will ta ke the political reality sometimes will take over what might be going on legally on what they will be debating in the house of commons. they are just
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debating in the house of commons. they arejust coming debating in the house of commons. they are just coming in now. debating in the house of commons. they arejust coming in now. without going to get the result. order! order! the ayes to the right, 303, the noes to the left, 319. the noes have it, the noes have it. unlock! the question is, the government motion that this house agrees with the lord's in their amendments 19 c—e, 19gto 19
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lord's in their amendments 19 c—e, 19gtoi9l lord's in their amendments 19 c—e, 19gtoi9lnd lord's in their amendments 19 c—e, 19gtoi9lndp. lord's in their amendments 19 c—e, 19gto 19 lnd p. and lord's in their amendments 19 c—e, 19 g to 19 l nd p. and proposes amendments to lords amendments 19 p as on the amendment paper. as many that are off that if penny say aye. of the contrary, no. i think the ayes have it, i think the ayes have it. or do. ayes have it, i think the ayes have it. ordo. i ayes have it, i think the ayes have it. or do. i must now put a single question to agree with the lord's in all of the remaining lord's proposals. i simply remind the house of that with which i feel sure it is closely familiar, four b—e 2a c and 110 b to 110j. as many closely familiar, four b—e 2a c and 110 b to 110 j. as many that are of that opinions say aye. of the country, no. ithink that opinions say aye. of the country, no. i think the ayes habit, the ayes have it. a victory for the
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government, let's go back to vicky young. -- ayes habit. quite convincing given how everyone was saying that would be close.” convincing given how everyone was saying that would be close. i will contradict you, simon. it is a good win but it is closer than i would have thought given the conservative rebels have backed down. it's a majority of 16. if you just add up the numbers, 622 mp5 voted, 28 who haven't. a reasonable number of abstentions crewe. i think it shows... we will have to look at the voting lists. it is possible the conservative rebels had the numbers to defeat the government but we will have to see when we see the list. the big picture, the government has gone through... it has got through. we would imagine that the eu withdrawal bill will get through tonight from the house of lords. thanks for contradicting me! thank you, we will return to you later on
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maybe. let's go to inside the house of commons. we have immediate reaction. i'm here with one of those so—called tory rebels, the conservative mp nicky morgan. your reaction to the government winning? it has been a result a lot of discussion to get that win. discussion on both sides. what has been confirmed today is the sovereignty of parliament and the fa ct sovereignty of parliament and the fact that this bill has been changed in ways the government would not have expected, three weeks ago, including a meaningful vote, when there is a deal or if there is no deal. that is not exactly what happened. some are now saying that you and your fellow tory mps who have been called bubbles up until now don't deserve that title because you keep backing down —— have been called rebels. in the face of pressure. we've voted against the government in december but we're not here to vote against the government, as dominic grieve said, we are here to do what is right for the country in an incredibly complex process of brexit. it's not about who won and
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who lost. it is about making sure the sovereignty of parliament has been respected in this case and there will be further parliamentary debate on the next couple of weeks on the future trading relationship of the eu which is equally important. have you saved up your metalfor important. have you saved up your metal for future battles on the trade bill, the customs bill? the government knows how much many of us ca re government knows how much many of us care about that and the prime minister has been clear that she wants to get the right future relationship. it's a very complex process. it is proving troublesome for both parties. people are working their way through a morass of different debates and discussions and, complexities. we will see in the next couple of weeks. the prime ona the next couple of weeks. the prime on a stick and go to the june eu summit with this bill that has been passed by parliament —— the prime ministercan passed by parliament —— the prime minister can go. there is a process but we had more to debate. does this leave the prime minister in a position where she thinks i will never really be faced down by these so—called rebels so she willjust keep pushing through what she and the brexiteers, who are putting a lot of pressure on the prime
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minister, wants to see her do? we had a statement today and that shows what a motion means adding neutral terms language. it is the parliament and standing orders that holds sway on this. it shows there is pressure on this. it shows there is pressure on all sides. ultimately, we're not here to hear all fulfil other people's tags for us or labels. this is about doing the right thing for our constituents and our country. and having a destabilised and undermined government doesn't do that. was that one of your major concerns, that if you had voted down the government, you would have left theresa may in such a difficult and compromising position, not just ahead of that big next round of negotiations in brussels, but leaving her... we know she doesn't have a majority in the house of commons, but leaving her in such a precarious position, that is one you cannot stomach? undoubtedly, it is not a supply is as they consented mbia did not want to see a conservative government in a
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difficult position and they hung parliament —— as a conservative mp i do not want to see. i want to see the right brexit deal for the country and the conservatives want to see that, too. there were many different considerations. but a technical debate about votes and standing orders is one thing. but a debate about the future trading relationship with europe is also going to be something. that's coming down the tracks. thank you. simon, from a very busy house of commons, after those so—called crunch votes, i think we really did feel like we we re i think we really did feel like we were on the edge of the government being defeated. once again, theresa may has managed to get her conservative mps to get into line. she has got through this difficult period. thanks. let's go outside. we can rejoin vicky young. is that now get in terms of these crunch votes, that horrible phrase? when is the next one? until next week, simon! this eu
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withdrawal bill, let's remember what it is about. it is make about making sure we have some laws ready to go when we leave the european union at the end of march next year. that was the end of march next year. that was the point. it is transposing all that eu law into british law so we have a functioning statute book. that is what it is supposed to be about. it has become about other things. that is why people are tagging on other issues. there are some who say this is not the vehicle to do this, it was just supposed to bea to do this, it was just supposed to be a straightforward bill about making sure that will happen. but it has turned into something else with lots of mps fighting for this so—called meaningful vote at the end of the process. they will go back to the house of lords this evening. if they agree with this, and given the house of commons has passed it, that is most likely, that becomes law and that has meant that its apology hurdle has meant that its apology hurdle has passed. the next thing that will
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happen is a customs bill —— its parliamentary hurdle. the trade bill. the fights start again about customs unions and our future trading relationship. let's discuss what happened today. with me here is conservative mp jonathan djanogly. two conservatives! we have had a range of opinions from some parties and different parties. how did you vote ? and different parties. how did you vote? you were called a rebel in the past, what did you do today? after a week of touring and throwing, we came toa week of touring and throwing, we came to a deal. i voted with the government on that basis, it's a compromise. i know everyone wants to see compromise. i know everyone wants to see winners and losers but that's not how it works in real life. what persuaded you today? what do you think you got now that you didn't have yesterday? it's actually been a process over weeks and months, rather than two days. the first big concession with the government agreeing to parliament having a veto, that is the first time it's ever happened. the question then
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we nt ever happened. the question then went to saying that if the beta is exercised or if there was no deal, what with the situation be —— if the veto was exercised. i, like the majority of the commons, wants to know if there would be another alternative, if we would be able to meet and discuss what plan b is not have the hard brexit that would be so have the hard brexit that would be so damaging for this country. concessions were given by the government over the last few days to the extent i now feel confident that we will have a full debate with amendable motions that ultimately parliament can decide what it wants to discuss. whatever happens. in the event of not good news. this is if things go badly and i hope they won't. nigel evans, big concession that parliament will be in control of the process if we end with a no deal scenario. the important thing is that nobody ties the prime minister's hands as was the possibility had this gone through. viscount hailsham wanted this, dominic grieve originally wanted
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this. nobody was to tie the prime minister's hands as she negotiates the best deal for the united kingdom. the fact is, jonathan and i are not daggers drawn here. we are brexiteer and remainer, ivoted brexiteer and remainer, ivoted brexit and jonathan voted remain and we can stand here today saying we are both satisfied that this bill has become an act. assuming, as you said, the house of lords decided not to hit it back, which ever one it is, back to us in the house of commons. with a majority of 16 i would assume and would rather hope... iwas would assume and would rather hope... i was talking to a pier early on and he said, nigel, if you send it back to us, as you want, i don't think there's an appetite in the house of lords to send it back to you. let's hope not. do you feel parliament is now in control of this situation? this idea that there is an amendable notion that mps could change that and dictate? —— motion. i wanted more than anything else for the prime minister to go with david
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davis and the plethora of civil servants we have got negotiating this without their hands being tied. you feel their hands are not tied? they will not be tied in the negotiation. it is important. we still want to trade with the european union post brexit. we want to trade in as frictionless a way as possible. we have an £80 billion deficit. that would be in the interests of the european union to do something similar. we hope at the end of this process as we leave the european union, jonathan and i both agree we are leaving the european union, it is what the people voted for onjune 23 union, it is what the people voted for on june 23 2016, union, it is what the people voted for onjune 23 2016, at union, it is what the people voted for on june 23 2016, at the union, it is what the people voted for onjune 23 2016, at the end of that process, we want to trade with the rest of the world and we want to be able to be non—justifiable by the european courts and also to control our own borders. that will be leaving the european union notjust the technicality which will happen on march 29th11pm next year. there are plenty of debates to come on those types of issues. it is not the
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end. some are saying we call you rebels but actually that is not what is going on. the important point to make is that this is an important bit of legislation that set the legal framework for us leaving the european union. we have had hundreds of hours of debate on it, hundreds of hours of debate on it, hundreds of amendments. the government has made dozens, scores of concessions on it. it has been a very fruitful, constructive debate. the fact that people don't vote against the government doesn't mean that discussions are ongoing for weeks and months in terms of the point you're going to get to. one way or another, we have ended up with a good, workable piece of legislation. i would like to see some concessions from the european union! by the way, there was never any question from what i would call the soft levers side, we are not remainers any more. laughter there was never any suggestion that we wanted to have, in any way, hold the prime minister's hands as she we nt the prime minister's hands as she went to negotiate, quite the
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opposite. do you think you could prevent a no deal scenario? if that is what you are presented with next year? it's a hypothetical! it is a hypothetical! there are so many variables. this was not providing a means to stop or do anything... this was providing the procedural format in which the house of commons can assess the situation and if it so feels say that we do think the government should look at such and such. it's a process, ratherthan government should look at such and such. it's a process, rather than a policy. jonathan and i are both confident that we have got a great prime minister. we've got a great team, the european union leaving team, the european union leaving team, we are confident. deal by october? it is absolutely possible. the negotiations are going to get really serious when she goes out of the eu meeting in a few weeks' time. she will come back and we will have a better idea where we are, once we get an idea from the eu as to what
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they think about her proposals. in they think about her proposals. in the meantime, she is going out with a decent set of proposals in relation to things like the backstop, the customs arrangements, the need for us to have full access to the single market. we must support her in that and we will see where she gets too. a warning to michel barnier, he talks about no cherry picking britain, well, no cherry picking britain, well, no cherry pickers michel barnier, we love british cherries but we also love british cherries but we also love spanish cherries, too and we wa nt love spanish cherries, too and we want to carry on buying them after we leave the eu. thank you. both conservative mps and it seems piece may have broken out at least for this hour. you ended up talking about cherries! it goes from happy to bizarre, doesn't it? thank you. you are watching afternoon live. within the past few minutes the government has won a key vote in the commons — on the eu withdrawal bill with a majority of 16.
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during the debate the leading conservative rebel, the former attorney general, dominic grieve, said he would support the government. an independent panel finds that a56 patients died after being given powerful painkillers inappropriately at gosport war memorial hospital. the crown prosecution service will now consider whether criminal charges should be brought. president trump challenges congress to draft new immigration laws in response to widespread criticism of the us policy of separating child migrants from theirfamilies. and in sport, morocco at alt of the world cup, cristiano ronaldo scored the goal which sent them home. it gave portugal a 1—0 win in their second group match and ronaldo is now the all—time top scorer for a european international side. england midfielder dele alli has a minor thigh strain, the only worry as england begin the countdown to their second world cup game against panama on sunday. in tennis, dan evans has been refused a wild card for wimbledon, as he tries to rebuild his career following a ban for
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recreational drug use. i will be back with more on those stories just after half past. for hundreds of families, the years of waiting are over and their worst fears realised, with the publication of a devastating report into the deaths of patients at gosport war memorial hospital. a56 people's lives were shortened because of an "institutional regime" of prescribing opioids with no medicaljustification. the report raises as many questions as it answers. where were the regulators? why did staff continue with these practices that were clearly wrong? why was there a ten—year delay before investigations were begun? and will criminal charges now be brought? the establishment, it seems, didn't listen when staff spoke out and families who were concerned were written off as "troublemakers". catherine burns reports. robert wilson. sheila gregory. geoffrey packham. elsie devine. arthur cunningham. gladys richards. some went into gosport war memorial hospital to recover after falls. others had bed sores or broken bones.
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none came out alive. some families have been fighting for the truth for 20 years. today, they came to hear the latest report. they were hoping for something very critical and they got it. it says that at least a56 patients died, because they were given strong painkillers, with no medicaljustification. that between 1989 and 2000, there was an institutionalised practice of shortening of lives. it points out that nurses first raised concerns in 1991, but their warnings went unheeded. the relatives have shown remarkable tenacity and fortitude, in questioning what happened to their loved ones. the documents explained and published today show that they were right to ask those questions. gillian mckenzie was the first relative to go to the police, in 1998. her mother, gladys richards, went to gosport for rehabilitation, after a hip operation.
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gillian says she was recovering well, but on the day she was admitted, her medical notes said nurses could confirm her death. like hundreds of other patients, gladys richards was put on diamorphine. it should only be used to relieve severe pain. she died four days later. when i contacted the police and said i wanted an appointment with somebody in cid with an allegation of unlawful killing, i had been told, "there, there, my dear, you're upset". no—one was arrested or charged, but the publicity made other families come forward. by 2002, police were looking into 92 cases. today's report talks about a56 lives being shortened, but says the real number could be much higher. missing records mean that probably at least another 200 were affected. there have been several other investigations, over the years, but only one person has
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faced disciplinary action. jane barton is a former gp, who worked part—time at the hospital. she signed 833 death certificates over 12 years and, in 2010, the general medical council found her guilty of serious professional misconduct. she wasn't struck off, but chose to retire. my whole objective with this was to get everything out into the open, so that we could see exactly what had happened. and i hope, very much for their sake, that they can achieve some sort of closure. and if there is a case for further criminal investigation, that that should then take place. the report doesn't have the power to recommend specific criminal action, but calls on the government, police and other authorities to recognise how significant this is and to act accordingly. i'm looking forjustice, for all the families. and the justice for all the families
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will be if there are convictions in a criminal court, whether it's their particular case or not. after a 20—year fight, she is now 8a and accepts she may not live to see this happen. catherine burns, bbc news. following the publication of the report, the health and social care secretary, jeremy hunt, gave his reaction to the findings in the house of commons. nothing i say today will lessen the anguish and pain of families who have campaigned for 20 years forjustice after the loss of a loved one. but i can at least, on behalf of the government and the nhs, apologise for what happened and what they have been through. had the establishment listened when junior nhs staff spoke out, had the establishment listened when ordinary families raised concerns instead of treating them as troublemakers,
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many of those deaths would not have happened. the gosport independent inquiry was chaired by bishopjamesjones. he says that today's report made difficult reading for the families of the victims. their reaction, as i said at the beginning, was understandably emotional. and, i think, the way they reacted showed them just how much they had carried inside themselves, over 20 years or so. and if i can quote anonymously one of the families, as saying to me that it was such a relief to hear what they had thought, for so long. and been dismissed. to hear their narrative understood and repeated by a panel that had done such detailed research into the documents. again, i want to emphasise the distinctiveness of the panel
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was that we had access to all 202a. all those documents and no other investigation either sought or had such access to that comprehensive set of documents. which gives, i think, the panel the authority with which it has spoken today. bridget reeves, who's grandmother elsie devine died in 1999, has this afternoon paid tribute to the work of the panel, and then listed a catalogue of missed opportunities. our vulnerable relatives, who were stripped of their final words to loved ones, silenced by overdoses, is more than catastrophic. this sort of behaviour going on in our nhs is both chilling and precarious. as victims of crime, we are all entitled
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to have an explanation, when an alleged injustice has occurred. but this has been sinister, calculated and those implicated must now face the full rigour of the criminaljustice system. accountability must take precedence here. these horrifying, shameful, unforgivable actions need to be disclosed in a criminal court for a jury to decide and only then can we put our loved ones to rest. more on this story in the next half an hour. time for a look at the weather. here's darren. more of the same? a rather dry time? more of the same? a rather dry time? more of the same, exactly right. a very dry time, dry and warm in may and dry and warm injune as well. we watched a focus about how dry it has been, this is a map from the met
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office which looks at the average rainfall this month. anything that is brown at the darker brown it is, the drier it is compared to average. large parts of the uk have been very dry so far this month. that really dark stuff in the south, less than 20%? less than 2096, dark stuff in the south, less than 20%? less than 20%, significantly 2096? less than 2096, significantly less. this is the league table. there are fluctuations across the uk. 296 there are fluctuations across the uk. 2% of expected rainfall in dorset, 3% in essex, that equates to about1.2 dorset, 3% in essex, that equates to about 1.2 millimetres of rain so far this month. towards scotland, it has been significantly wetter, still below average but wetter. whilst we have had high pressure dominating and never too far away from our shores, we have also had lower pressure to the north west of the uk. weather fronts that have trailed their way down across the uk, always more active in the north—west across scotland, hence more rain. as they reach the south—east, nothing left along the weather fronts, hence the
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lack of rain. that is what we are seeing today. gardeners are going to be concerned! hearing what you are saying... gardeners are always concerned! i hear what you are saying, we will be in drought measures quite soon at this rate? not necessarily, the environment agency are not worried because of the rain we had in the spring. ground water levels and river flow levels they are where they should be at this time of year unlike this time last year, nothing to worry about at the moment, service level very dry. we could do with rain, i am running out of water in my buts in my garden. no sign of any rain. over the next two weeks or more. no sign of those water buckets being filled. particularly over the next few days. indeed. high pressure will be dominating our weather. we have seen be dominating our weather. we have seen differences in the uk with some warm sunshine restricted to the south—east where we have had blue skies and humid air. towards the
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north—west, we have had much more cloud coming down, a different sort of cloud, producing some showers in northern scotland. where we have much cooler and fresh air. you can see the difference in the uk, hired tim bridges and heat and humidity in the south—east and east anglia. temperatures up to 25 degrees in london and lincolnshire, further north it is cooler, 17 at best. some showers in the forecast, some dotted about in central and northern scotla nd about in central and northern scotland developing more widely over the next few hours. brushing northern ireland and heading across northern england and into the north sea. things become dry overnight. the wind is changing direction and bringing cooler air, temperatures will be lower everywhere, a welcome change across the southern half of the uk where it has been difficult to sleep with the heat and humidity. cooler and fresh air moving down across the whole of the uk and that comes down around the top of this area of high pressure. it is centred to the west of the uk. more north to
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north westerly airflow. it will be quite windy, especially in the north—east of scotland, costs of 50 mph. blustery winds on the north sea coasts. apart from showers in the northern isles, it should be a dry day on thursday. fairweather cloud bubbling up, not threatening anyone. plenty of sunshine but a different feel to the weather in the south where temperatures will be lower than today. still looking further north at around 16, 17 celsius. towards the end of the week, we still have lots of fine and dry weather, more cloud in the northern half of scotland. plenty of sunshine. we will start to see temperatures are rising day on day. warming upa temperatures are rising day on day. warming up a touch, 22 or 23 degrees is quite likely in the south—east. it will feel warmer because the winds won't be as strong. we have the centre of the hive, initially out more to the west of the uk, starting to migrate its weight used across the whole of the uk. —— centre of the high—pressure. it will be warming up in the sunshine but
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still some cool nights around with those light winds. next week, those temperatures continue to climb even more. by the end of next week, we could be seeing temperatures as high as 30 degrees but still no sign of any rain. a letter of resignation, you just sign it! laughter this is bbc news — our latest headlines. theresa may has won a key brexit vote in the commons with a majority of 16. during the debate the leading conservative rebel, the former attorney general, dominic grieve, said he would now support the government. an inquiry finds that more than a50 patients died after being given powerful painkillers at gosport war memorial hospital. an independent panel concludes there was an "institutional practice of shortening lives". nothing i say today will lessen the anguish and pain of families who have campaigned for 20 years forjustice after the loss of a loved one.
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but i can at least on behalf of the government and the nhs apologise for what happened and what they have been through. families and campaigners call for prosecutions — and ask how these events happened, and why they have to wait so long for answers. mr president, don't you have kids? us democrats challenge president trump over the controversial policy of separating migrant parents from their children. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. it's world cup. it continues to be an eventful tournament... my colleague olly foster has had the fortune to be out in moscow. where portugal and morocco played
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out the first game of the day — and once again cristiano ronaldo was a major influence? we've got another three weeks and it's been fantastic. cristiano ronaldo has set another international record. he got the winner against morocco, the first tea m winner against morocco, the first team to be eliminated. he is now the record international goal—scorer for a european. he has overtaken the great puskas record of 8a for hungary. a bullet header here in moscow. wishful thinking? morocco's fans had to try something. cristiano ronaldo can be ruthless on the football pitch. he lived up to his
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reputation. one the morocco defence simply seemed to disregard as he ghosted in. the fourth time we have seen ghosted in. the fourth time we have seen his celebration in russia and maybe not the last. morocco set about getting back on to level terms and perhaps should have had a penalty. there are seemed to think so. penalty. there are seemed to think so. the north africans kept plugging away, closer with every chance. ronaldo? he wasn't. would this come back to haunt portugal? their opponents had plenty of chances to make them pay but couldn't take any of them. meaning this man could celebrate yet again. the last 16 within touching distance for portugal while home is calling for morocco. very tough on morocco who we re very morocco. very tough on morocco who were very very good. they have too played their last march but they are
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the first team to be eliminated. let's ta ke the first team to be eliminated. let's take you down to rostov. uruguay are currently playing saudi arabi, in group a, that match licked off about half an hour ago. there has been a goal. luis suarez just tap in after the goalkeeper misted. this match is live over on bbc one. —— missed it. if the match stays like that, russia would definitely be through and uruguay would go through as well with two wins after winning their first match. later, spain are playing iran in casanas. there are matter what
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happens in that match, the maths is such that morocco will be out definitely. imran khan qualify for the group stages if they win after their opening win against morocco. the maths all make sense. —— iran can qualify. what's the latest from the england camp? they are a few hundred miles to the north at the camp just outside saint petersburg. they got back from volgograd very early after that last 935!) volgograd very early after that last gasp harry kane winner against tunisia. dele alli has a slight thigh strain which has to be watched before they face panama. they have a com plete before they face panama. they have a complete day off. this is really going to fill panama with fear. look at this. unicorn racing. we don't have the pictures that they are in a
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swimming pool on these large inflata bles, swimming pool on these large inflatables, unicorns, racing in the swimming pool. take my word for it. they are all looking in good spirits and will head off for that match on sunday against panama. seeing is believing and you can get those pictures on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. so — the government has won today's key brexit vote in the commons with a majority of 16. victory was assured after the leading conservative rebel dominic grieve said he would now be supporting the government — apparently after receiving further reassurances from ministers. let's go straight to our chief political correspondent vicki young. a cynic would say that they have heard those assurances before. that
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will be the argument from some people. the government will be pretty pleased as the house of lords will presumably back what the house of commons has just done and the withdrawal bill will become law. i am joined by the labour mp antoinette sandbach. tell me why you weren't reassured by what the government said today. it is a motion that can't be amended which means that parliament can't express is viewed when it comes to no deal. it will be such a crisis point that i argue parliament should be able to express its view. i am elected to represent my constituents and therefore that means, being their voice in westminster. chris leslie, you were presumably urging on the conservative rebels. is this the end of the matter? the only thing i
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would say, dominic grieve is a very honourable man. he is taking the government at their word. i wouldn't do that because they have made promises before that don't get fulfilled but he has managed to extract some words from the government which has moved from the position at the weekend when the prime minister said that parliament cannot overrule the government. the government has been forced to at least say that mps can table motions on this issue. we still have our foot in the door as parliamentarians representing the people and stopping the country going into a callow matters with egg situation. i wouldn't have trusted the government as much as he has. isn't the truth of it, if mps vote against a deal or if there is no deal, we are going to be in if there is no deal, we are going to beina if there is no deal, we are going to be in a gym at your situation. this
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is why we wanted the process in the bill because we wanted a way to express our views in relation to what should happen in the future in a way that didn't bring down the government. if you table a no—confidence motion, that would lead to an immediate election and having an election in circumstances where you are in the no deal situation would be incredibly difficult. and there is another battle over the customs union? this isa battle over the customs union? this is a gruelling process. anybody who thought that the referendum was the end of it, forget it. parliament is going to be absorbed by this and we are going to have our say. although it wasn't as satisfied as writing it in the bill, dominic grieve and others have extract it some concessions. not as satisfying as some would like it to be but we have
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the trade bill, the customs bill, the trade bill, the customs bill, the deal proper when it happens. and lot of others are going to keep fighting for alliances, frictionless trade, all the things that we take for granted in trade, all the things that we take forgranted in our trade, all the things that we take for granted in our daily lives because ultimately our constituents lives are going to be really affected if we get this wrong. thank you very much indeed. this will go back to the house of lords and theresa may may be able to cite with relief as she goes forward next week to other battles. like you very much indeed. —— thank you. rogue treasure hunters have caused significant damage to a section of hadrian's wall, according to a report from heritage organisation historic england. the report warns of the threat so called ‘nighthawk‘ detectorists can cause, highlighting more than 50 holes found along the roman archaeological site. joining me from newcastle is mike collins,
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an inspector of ancient monuments at english heritage. also i'm joined from bristol by gary cook, a metal detectorist and reporter for the searcher magazine, which covers metal detecting in the uk. mike collins, first of all. what are they doing? are they stealing our past. this is a criminal offence. they doing? are they stealing our past. this is a criminal offencem is. we've seen an upsurge in illegal detecting along hadrian ‘s wall starting with a tip—off from a member of the public. there were 50 holes dug in one small section. it is important to make the point that this is not responsible detecting fraternity responsible for this. this is a tiny minority who don't follow the rules, do these criminal acts, probably late at night and it is not the vast majority of the detecting community who we very much
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appreciate. but you can never be sure what they have managed to find. that is the frustration. all we see is the holes. we don't know what a rtefa cts they is the holes. we don't know what artefacts they might have found. in artefacts they might have found. in a sense, they are stealing from the land owner here but also the understanding that those artefacts could have given as. gary, what sort of person gets up in the middle of the night with a torch and metal to dating machine and does this sort of thing. not the same people that work in the way you do. —— detecting machine. the only answer is a thief, really. responsible metal detector —— detectorists don't like being tarred with the same brush as these guys. they use metal detectors for stealing. as responsible metal
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detectorists we work very closely with landowners and work very closely with the portable antiquities scheme and report our findings and do everything by the book. according to the letter of the law. we will not go on land that we do not have permission for and we certainly would not go on to a scheduled monument or english heritage land, that sort of thing. to answer your question again, somebody who would get in the middle of the night with a metal detector, the tool for their trade for stealing. they are not a metal detectorists, they are not part of our hobby whatsoever. as detectorists, we will do anything in our power to help the authorities to put a stop to this and report anything, or anyone, that put a stop to this and report anything, oranyone, that we put a stop to this and report anything, or anyone, that we know is doing this. the difficulty is, how doing this. the difficulty is, how
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do you police this? that was for mike. back to you in a minute, gary. it isa mike. back to you in a minute, gary. it is a big site and we would have to be very lucky to come across somebody traversing the wall late at night conducting this illegal activity. we are reliant on the responsible detecting community and also the public and landowners to report things that they find suspicious. we very much welcome gary's words about the responsible detecting fraternity and we really value their support in trying to put an end to the illegal tiny minority. gary, there must be a temptation, i know you go through the processes and get permission to dig and when you find something you have to declare it, do you? if it falls under the treasure act, then you do have to declare it by law. most
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detectorists no matter what they find will share their fines with the landowner. what i mean by that is they will show the landowner what they will show the landowner what they find. there is the national council for metal detecting and they have a code of conduct that we all adhere to. part of that is to show the landowner what we find and engage the landowner with what we find. i found engage the landowner with what we find. ifound recently engage the landowner with what we find. i found recently a bronze age axe mould that was used to produce axe mould that was used to produce axe heads during the bronze age. it's about 3500 years old. it now resides in devizes in wiltshire's museum. a lot more people can come and see it and appreciated. would it have made you a millionaire? no! i still work for a living. unless you
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are lucky enough to find a horde of roman coins or something like the staffordshire hoard, which to be fair does but, you know, to most detectorists, it is getting out into the fresh air and finding the odd roman coin or something like that. it's a misconception. people think they can go out and make their fortune. it's not going to happen. it's a great hobby but we do have very strict rules that we all stick to and part of that is engaging the landowner with what we find and getting everybody, involving the portable antiquities scheme and the finds liaison officer for your area. recording your finds. as detectorists, we encourage you to re cord detectorists, we encourage you to record your finds. we have to leave
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it there but it's fascinating stuff. gary and mike collins thank you very much for talking to us. the republican speaker of the us house of representatives, paul ryan, says he expects a vote tomorrow on legislation to end the practise of separating migrant children from their parents. president trump has been defending the hardline policy but at a meeting last night with fellow republicans, he said he would support a new compromise measure. david willis reports from washington. amid growing concern from members of his own party, the president came to capitol hill, to talk about the crisis on the southern border. the system has been broken for many years, the immigration system. it's been a really bad, bad system, probably the worst anywhere in the world. we're going to try and see if we can fix it. thank you. having met with republicans, he was heckled by democrats. quit separating the kids, you're separating the children! mr president, don't you have kids?!
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still, though, no word of an imminent solution. we had a good meeting. these are laws that have been broken for many years, decades, but we had a great meeting. thank you. pressure to reform america's immigration system is being driven by images such as these, children kept in cages, after being separated from their parents. under a new zero—tolerance policy, anyone caught crossing the border illegally is now being arrested. 2,000 sons and daughters have been separated from their parents in little over a month. but far from bowing to public pressure, the president is doubling down. in one tweet on the subject, he warned of illegal immigrants "infesting" the country. and he continues to blame the democrats, even though republicans control both chambers of congress. the president, alone, can fix it with this flick of a pen, by signing a presidential order, to end the agonising screams of small children, who have been
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separated from their parents. mr president, i'll lend you my pen. any pen. you can fix it, yourself. mr trump insists the solution lies with congress. crowd: let the children go! but as protests sprout up around the country and in the face of growing international condemnation, one conservative talk show host has likened the situation to a crisis which threatened to derail a previous republican administration, warning that this could be "trump's katrina". david willis, bbc news, los angeles. we arejust we are just hearing that president trump says he will be signing something pre—emptive in a little while on immigration. he says he is meeting with congress members on immigration. there is a possible
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reversal of that policy coming. we will bring you more from the white house as soon as will bring you more from the white house as soon as we have more news. president trump obviously stung by the considerable criticism of that wallasey. more later. in a moment, the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: the prime minister wins a key vote in the commons on the eu withdrawal bill after leading tory rebels said they had received sufficient assurances to support the government. an independent panel finds that a56 patients died after being given powerful painkillers inappropriately at gosport war memorial hospital. the crown prosecution service will now consider whether criminal charges should be brought. after talks with president trump — the speaker of the house of representatives paul ryan — says he expects a vote tomorrow on a measure to stop the separation of migrant children from their parents at the mexican border. there may be more news on that even
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before then. we will keep you informed. the european union will launch a raft of retaliatory tariffs against us exports on friday. the move comes after us president donald trump imposed steep duties on steel and aluminium earlier this month. eu trade commissioner cecilia malmstrom confirmed american exports such as blue jeans, motorbikes and bourbon whiskey will be targeted — but she added — the bloc does "not want to be in this position". supplies of heineken's, john smith's extra smooth and amstel kegs have been hit by an industry—wide shortage of carbon dioxidejust as the world cup and barbecue season get under way. seasonal manufacturing shutdowns have left the uk with just one big plant producing co2. carbon dioxide doesn'tjust put the fizz into drinks — it also delivers beer at the pub pumps and is used to pack fresh meat and salads. an online gambling operator has been fined £2m forfailing to protect a problem gambler. 32red allowed one customer to deposit £758,000 with no money laundering or social responsibility checks. kindred, which owns 32red,
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said it accepted the penalty and was "working hard" to improve its processes. news about disney and their bids for fox and sky. that's right, this is a situation which has been rumbling on for some time, it's the fox, the mouse and the media beast disney. the mouse had offered an all—stock bid of $52.a billion to acquire 21st century fox. last week, the media beast comcast said it had offered to pay an all—cash offer of $65 billion. this afternoon, disney increased it's offer to $71 billion, £53.8 billion in cash and stock. sky is linked to all this because fox is its biggest share holder with a 39.1% stake.
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its share price up about 3%. it's a bidding war. that's exactly what it is. also a good day for ocado, after it was heralded as the microsoft of retail. itjoined the it joined the footsie itjoined the footsie on monday and became one of its biggest fall is. people are taking a very long 15 year view of ocado and deciding that they could have some very strong growth in the future. what about sterling? you knew it was coming. what is going on? weak against the dollar, but is that dollar strength or sterling weakness?
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if you look at it against the dollar back in april it was $1.a3, this week it's been below $1.32, but if you look at the euro, the pound has pretty much held its value over the last 12 months. let's start there with laith khalaf, senior analyst at hargreaves la nsdown, so is sterling strong or weak? well, it depends which currency you are looking at. over today we have seen some are looking at. over today we have seen some dollar strength but if you look at the broader picture, and interest rate decisions tomorrow, driving the currency. the market is expecting a 3% chance of a rise in the rate so that means it is not
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going to happen unless there is a real shock. if you look to april, sterling was a lot higher than it is now. markets were pricing in a pretty much near certainty of an interest rate rise. what's changed in the interim, the shock 0.1% growth in uk gdp in the first quarter. that has knocked back expectations in the uk and the currency as well. let's talk about disney increasing their bid for fox. this is a really big battle brewing between these two media giants. disney now coming back with a cash or stock offer. that's important because the murdoch family own about 17% of fox. a pure cash offer might meana 17% of fox. a pure cash offer might mean a capital gains tax problem. if
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you look at fox's share price, its trading at about $10 above what disney have offered for the company. so the market thinks there is another bid coming from comcast and will come in over the top again. shareholders are hoping for a happy endings. ocado, how are investors feeling about them ? they have had a rough ride in the market. they were a favourite of short sellers. they are starting to be gained value. how are investors feeling? tell until fairly recently it was a binary company that was going to succeed or fall on it was a binary company that was going to succeed orfall on its it was a binary company that was going to succeed or fall on its face but it has succeeded in signing deals on distributing its technology in canada and the us so it is a very
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different proposition. it is still very expensive in terms of its ratio to earnings. amazon is the equivalent of a rolex in terms of the pricing is of its stock. it is a very expensive stock and needs to deliver but it has huge potential to bea deliver but it has huge potential to be a huge part of the global retail scheme which is why we have seen the share price rise so steeply. thank you for that analysis. a quick look at the markets. dixons carphone have results coming out tomorrow. and tomorrow, interest rates do not look as if they will rise. that's it. next the news at five but now let's catch up with the weather from
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darren bett. a week and disorganised weather front is moving south with very little rain on it at all. barely any rain. ahead of it, south—east and east anglia, warm and humid in the sunshine, sunny spells in the north, but cooler and fresher and quite a few showers arriving into the north west of scotland. those showers get close to northern ireland in the evening and most of them affecting scotland for a while, heavy and the worst of them in the north sea. skies will clear for most of us and temperatures will drop away. it will be a cooler night tonight. particularly across england and wales. cooler air coming in behind that weather front. it is very weak, no rain on it really, a change in ourwind direction, more north to north—westerly. stronger winds in the north—east of scotland on the north sea coasts. maybe a few showers in the north—east of scotland but it will mostly be dry with lengthy spells of sunshine. patchy fair—weather cloud here and there. temperatures will be lower and it will feel quite different
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across the south—east and east anglia. today at 5.00pm: hundreds of deaths at a hospital in hampshire because of the over—use of strong painkillers. an official report names a56 victims as the authors blame an "institutional regime" of prescribing opioidswith no medicaljustification. the relatives have shown remarkable tenacity and fortitude in questioning what happened to their loved ones. and the report states that the families of those affected were badly let down by the authorities. these horrifying, shameful, unforgivable actions need to be
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disclosed in a criminal court for a jury to decide, and only then can we put our loved ones to rest. we'll have details of the report and we'll have reaction from portsmouth and from westminster. the other main stories on bbc news at 5.00pm:
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