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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  June 20, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond one hundred days. after a public outcry president trump backs down on his tough policy on illegal immigration. he says he'll sign something soon to stop the separation of parents and children at the border. the public pressure became impossible to ignore and forced mr trump to abandon his policy — but he doesn't sound happy about it. if you are really, really, pathetically weak comedy country will be overrun with millions of people. if you are strong, then you don't have any hard. it is a tough dilemma. perhaps, iwould rather be strong. a welcome reprieve for theresa may after conservative rebels decide to support a key vote on brexit. also on the programme... whether it's the goatee or the glorious goals, all eyes are on ronaldo as he helps portugal to a 1—0— victory against morocco, knocking them out of the world cup. is the sun rising or setting on our civilisation?
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that's the question behind a major new exhibition by american artist ed ruscha. get in touch with us using the hashtag... hello and welcome — i'm katty kay in washington and matthew price is in london. donald trump has been put in the unusual position of having to back down. six weeks after changing american policy in a way that caused thousands of families of illegal entrants to be separated on the mexican border — he is now reversing course. the president came under irresistible pressure to end family separation as images and sounds of crying children prompted a public outcry. republican lawmakers told him the zero tolerance policy had to change and today he was forced to listen to their appeals. the republicans want security and insist on security for our country, and we will have that the same time we have compassion, we want to keep families
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together, it is very important. i will be signing something in a little while that is going to do that, and the people in this room want to do that, and they are working on various pieces of legislation to get it done. but even as he announced he is changing course — the president made it pretty clear he wasn't very happy about having to do so. if you are weak, if you are weak, some people would like you to be weak, but if you are really, really, pathetically weak, then the country will be overrun with millions of people. if you are strong, then you don't have any heart. that is a tough dilemma. perhaps i would rather be strong, but that is a tough dilemma. and joining us now from brownsville, texas is the bbc‘s gary o'donoghue. gary, what does this shift in policy from the white house mean for people tried to enter the united states
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illegally darnell on the border? -- down there in legally. this 180 degrees u—turn by the president does not mean that the zero tolerance policy ends, because that policy indicates that anyone who crosses the border will be arrested, but what they are talking about here is whether or not parent should be interpreted from children. the people that come across the river, not a stone's throw behind me, along this stretch of the river, they will still be arrested, they will still be processed through the criminal justice system, and their asylum claims will be assessed in that way. the president is saying, they will not be separated from their families. however, it is far from clear, whether there is sufficient capacity in the system, down here, to house parents with their children, and whether there are enoughjudges, children, and whether there are enough judges, to processes children, and whether there are enoughjudges, to processes claims
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in the time it is required, because there are still limitations on the of time that you cannot children up 0k, thank you very much. joining us now with more on the administration's policy is marc lotter — who formerly served a special assistant to president trump. do you think, from your discussions in the white house, on the issue of immigration, when you are serving that in the trump administration, that in the trump administration, that they anticipated the outcry that they anticipated the outcry that would come from the american public when they saw these images of children being separated from their pa rents children being separated from their parents in the water? i'm not sure that it was and because in any many cases this is a continuation of a policy that has been imposed by long—term. policy that has been imposed by long-term. you is the continuation ofa long-term. you is the continuation of a law, but it is a change in the way that lawyers enforced. there we re way that lawyers enforced. there were already thousands of children being detained, and in many cases unaccompanied minors. this is a
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president that campaigns are being very tough on immigration. if you cfoss oui’ very tough on immigration. if you cross our border, you will be prosecuted. one of the side—effects of that, because of court decisions, is that you have two separate the family from the children while they go through the criminaljustice system. i did want to get ahead of what the president's going to say. but now he is being forced to reverse course? it is going to be on the separation side. i don't want to get ahead of what he will sign this afternoon, but the prosecutions will continue. if you cross the border illegally, you will still be prosecuted for doing that. if you wa nt to prosecuted for doing that. if you want to seek asylum in the united states of america, come through one about what eventually, and you will be able to come down to make asylum claim, and there is no illegality, no criminaljustice process, and there is no separation. matthew, in london, here. in europe, there are similar problems. lots of people
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coming from poorer countries and driving in southern europe, as you know. the european union is trying to work out its weight around this, and one of the ways that countries have done it in the past, is signed deals with sometimes not terribly nice governments and leaders in north africa, and as well. i wonder, bearing in mind mexico is basically your border country, and relations with mexico are not that great at the moment, how much cooperation you believe there could be with the mexicans to try and address this problem? well, as the president has said, we definitely need mexico to help stem this tide, but in all honesty, the problem we have right now is not misty coming from mexico, but through it. what we are seeing isa but through it. what we are seeing is a lot of central american families and children, migrating up to the united states, and that is one of the things that the president wa nts one of the things that the president wants congress to address. because the currently have laws on the books that allow us to immediately read patriot people who come into our country illegally from canada and mexico. —— repatriates people. we
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don't have that right under the law with people who are coming in from central america and other countries, and that is what the president wants to see updated, and that is another reason why we need congress do it.|j am also wondering about the choreography today, the resident actually need to sign a presidential order to change this, could he not have picked up the phone to tell the border guards to change what they we re border guards to change what they were doing? the key is to be able to continue on with the prosecution. if he had made the call, you would not have had the immigrants becoming prosecuted. they would have been allowed to go into the country, which was what was previously happening. by the president taking this step, we are maintaining the criminal prosecutions it and ending the separation policy. we still need congress to act, because there are court cases that that that the take president, and by getting congress to act quickly, we can still do this within the bounds of the law. 0k thank you very much forjoining us.
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this is such an interesting issue, and displaying out on this week on both sides of the apt addict, in italy, germany, and in the us. it does seem, here in america, it is, that those images and the sounds that those images and the sounds that we have played every because of this week, of children being separated from their families, that particular issue has caused public opinion to shift. the problem is that under pressure, they felt that this could lose them votes, they started saying, you had top republicans saying to the president, look, we did like this policy any more, because it is going to cost us vote in those elections, please can you reverse course? and i am thinking back over the last year and a half, matthew, ithink this thinking back over the last year and a half, matthew, i think this is the biggest switch on a policy like this that we have seen from the president, so far. it is fascinating, isn't it, and you mention germanyjoined fascinating, isn't it, and you mention germany joined the discussion. if you think back to angela merkel‘s reaction to the big flow of more and more refugees and migrants coming across into europe
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in two dozen 15, her reaction was ultimately, let's open the borders, let's let them in. —— 2015. if you now look at policy in germany, she is on the back foot because just got coalition partners saying that that policy is no longer any good, we wa nt to policy is no longer any good, we want to solidify the borders not just of germany but also the european union. so politicians are many different countries around the world grappling with the political problem that immigration presents, but also the moral and ethical dilemmas that are thrown up by it, as well. yes, and as the president has said, it is one thing to say that you want to be tough on immigration, but went people see what that means comment of the people's lee lives, sometimes they say they did like it after all. theresa may hasn't had many good days recently — but she got one today. dominic grieve, a leading pro—eu voice in the conservative party, said he will support the government's plans for a parliamentary vote on any future brexit deal. this squashes, for the moment at least, a rebellion in mrs may's own party that had threatened her leadership. in a battle of wills with tory rebels, the prime minister stood firm and won.
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but this is only one vote and one test — she needs to get several bills through parliament to prepare for brexit and there could still be fights over every one. let's speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young. vicki, just tell us, wasted a important? i think that is the point, isn't it. theresa may is a prime minister, who does not have a majority of mps. that means that almost every vote is a bit of a battle. this particular bit of legislation, the eu withdrawal bill, was supposed to be about making sure that there is a smooth brexit, so when the uk leave the year, all of that eu law, all of those regulations, it was all going to be transposed over, taken over, but into british law. so there is
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not a gaping hole, if you like, but into british law. so there is nota gaping hole, if you like, in the statute book. that is what the law was supposed to be about, but it became about an awful lot more. that is partly because the figures on her own side, people who are very much pro—eu, who wanted to make sure that they get a meaningful vote at the end of the process, if she comes back with a deal from brussels, end of the process, if she comes back with a dealfrom brussels, all with no deal, they wanted to have a meaningful sale in what happens next. it became this extraordinarily complicated battle in the house of commons and also in the house of lords. in the upper chamber about who would be in control of that process. we have had lots of comings and goings, talks of copper mice, and goings, talks of copper mice, and this was the moment where dominic grieve, that senior conservative and decided he would fall in line behind the prime minister. my view is that if that is the issue, having finally obtained, with little bit more difficulty than i would have wished. the obvious acknowledgement of the sovereignty of this place over the executive in black—and—white language. i am prepared to accept the government's difficulty and support it... i am prepared to accept the government's difficulty, and, in the circumstances, accept the form of amendment it wants.
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he and others gave way, but they wa nted he and others gave way, but they wanted a legal guarantee that they would have a meaningful vote. what the government was arguing with that theresa may cannot go to brussels, and geta theresa may cannot go to brussels, and get a good negotiation, or a good deal if there was not the option that she would walk away with no deal, it all. they were adamant that it could not be written into law. this is what a senior brexiteer minister had to say about what went on today. there were some procedural changes today, but there was no change in the fundamental issue here which is that the government cannot be forced by parliament to negotiate something that the government doesn't want to do. that is the key as we move forward. hopefully, now, this takes the whole brexit debate into a new place. the focus is no longer
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on the legislation, which was designed to give us a smooth transition, as we leave the eu, but on the future economic partnership, itself. it isa it is a significant moment for the government, many people bought that theresa may could not trigger article 50, and there have been coppermine ‘s is by the government, but in the next 20 minutes or so, this bill is very likely to become law, and as we know, the clock is ticking... thank you very much indeed for that update. let's look get more reaction to today's vote let's get more reaction to today's vote from gina miller — pro—europe campaigner and businesswoman — she campaigned successfully to allow parliament to vote on whether the uk could start the process of leaving the eu. your court case that you thought was very much about parliament needed to have boys in this whole process,
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needed to be part of the britons, it could not just be needed to be part of the britons, it could notjust be up to be prime minister and a small number of mps in government. so this is all my fault, basically. laughter what bearing that in mind, do you believe that parliament has got the power it should have? absolutely not. this isjust another example of the government wanting to diminish the government wanting to diminish the role of parliament. the an hour and a half for such an important debate, and then put it up against a major debate, which could be at any time. they have been making deals behind the scenes, as it were, to keep the party unity together. that is not transparency. so in your mind, party unity, is winning over, well as you would say it, the power of parliament and democracy. well as you would say it, the power of parliament and democracym well as you would say it, the power of parliament and democracy. it is
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diminishing democracy. what happened today, which is very curious, and no one is noticing it or commenting it, is the statement that was agreed, or what was agreed, actually puts the decision, when it comes back into the hands of the speaker, which is extraordinary, to not actions they that mrs may will then decide, is not business as usual. jena, is this about the withdraw bill and parliamentary authority, or is this really about trying to get a second referendum on brexit, and woody actually be happy with anything that was less than that? i think it is absolutely about a second vote, and people's vote, because irresponsible politicians got us into this mess, and actually responsible politicians in my view actually have to put it back to the people. it is about getting people to ratify the options at the end of this process, because what we now have, unfortunately, is notjust one party what we now have, unfortunately, is
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not just one party that what we now have, unfortunately, is notjust one party that is divided, but actually two main political parties that are divided and are in a deadlock. have got to go back to the people to decide what the options are. that, to my mind, is the most democratic thing we can do. here is what i don't understand, let's say there was a second referendum, that look like a remit possibility, and the campaign to stay in the european union one, and then what do we do, we say, best—of—3? then what do we do, we say, best-of-s? it is not a referendum, it isa best-of-s? it is not a referendum, it is a vote on the real options on the table, which would be what ever theresa may and come back with, the special deal that we already have, or no deal. you have got to give everybody the option. it is not a rerun of his impression, it is a real options on the table, because we did not know what they were. it is that people had that often two years down the line, that the most democratic thing we can do. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. and forgiving us your perspective, on that. katty, it is that
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interesting point, when you sit here in britain, italy does not feel that there ever could be a second referendum. it does not feel that thatis referendum. it does not feel that that is the way in which the politics of this is heading. you have got a prime minister who numerically is pretty weak, you have got a government which is divided on where to go on this policy, you have an opposition party, which is divided on what to do about the european union, and, itjust seems still, nine mind—boggling that at this seismic moment in british history, you still have all these divisions, and a government trying to navigate its way with russell sitting there and sing, hurry up, tell us what you want. just what happened today with dominic grieve and the tory rebels decided to support the government, how much of a predictor is that the bills to come? does it mean the fight is over, or are theyjust holding their fire? i don't think their fight is
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over, and we are certainly not saying that. it'll be instinctively how they react to liam fox, the trade secretary, and whose outlook, there is nothing in this that gives parliament any sovereignty, at all. there is nothing in this to give power to stop this process. dominic grieve would want to see that differently. there is a european coming up in if you mix time, plenty of other moments, in which buyers can be put up, but that is getting to bea can be put up, but that is getting to be a very dangerous game, indeed, because the clock is ticking on the actual date that britain leaves the european union. right, yes. not very far away. indonesian authorities say at least 180 people are still missing, after a tourist ferry sank off sumatra. the wooden vessel was licensed to carry only 60 people — just 18 survivors have been found. the ferry sank into lake toba which is one of the deepest lakes in the world. as of friday, the european union will tax billions of dollars‘ worth of american goods coming
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into the eu. us exports such as blue jeans, motorbikes and bourbon whiskey will be targeted. it's direct retaliation to donald trump's decision to tax european steel and aluminium products being shipped into the united states. of american goods coming into the eu. us exports such as blue jeans, motorbikes and bourbon whiskey will be targeted. it's direct retaliation to donald trump's decision to tax european steel and aluminium products being shipped into the united states. prince louis of cambridge will be christened by the archbishop of canterbury next month. the fifth in line to the throne was born on 23rd april. his christening will be held on monday the 9th ofjuly at the chapel royal at st james's palace. is our civilisation rising orfalling? that's the question behind a new exhibition at the national gallery in london. the american artist, ed ruscha one of the pioneers of popart is now in his 9th decade and he's showing a series of works looking at the rise and fall of empire. david sillito went to meet him. this is a story about how our industrial world is changing, through the eyes of a man whose life's work has been a strange landscape of modern life.
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almost any change can upset people. whether it is a glorified something or other, or the removal, the total removal of something. they are portraits of then and now. ed ruscha stands with andy warhol and roy lichtenstein as one of the giants of pop art, and artistic passion for the everyday of modern life. the gas stations, the word pictures, and the inspiration for this exhibition, these 19th—century paintings by thomas cole about the rise and fall of empire. ed ruscha's rise and fall begins with our recent industrial past. the old very american workplace is now rather less american. the trade school is of course now no longer a trade school. there is a lot more security, and whatever happened to the phone booth? as you can see, it has disappeared.
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the question is, is this all about just change, or progress, or decline? you know they have a... moral to them. they say progress, but not necessarily positive progress. there is some kind of peace involved in it. peace? peace, peace of mind, peace of... you know, even if it is momentary, you can still smell the roses. so, it is just a shifting landscape that has caught his eye, and was worth turning into it. —— turning into art. what it means is up to us, but while ed ruscha's life and inspiration may be los angeles, it is a shift that is
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going on all around us. the question is, are we looking at a sunrise or a sunset? david sillito, bbc news. in the world of portuguese football, there is god and then there is christiano ronaldo. the hero of this world cup scored again today — this time against morocco to lead portugal to a 1—0 win. clearly his hat trick last week against spain wasn't enough and ronaldo is now the record european scorer in international football history. and also in a surprise win, japanese went wild last night. their side won its opening game, beating colombia 2—1, and securing the team's first victory ever against a south american side. and not only did they win — they cleaned up after themselves. seriously, after the match japanese fans meticulously picked up the trash from their rows and seats. how much do you love those japanese fans? let's get the latest from olly foster who's in moscow. here is my problem with the world
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cup, somebody losers. i feel here is my problem with the world cup, somebody losers. ifeel bad for them. i love that cristiano ronaldo got his fourth goal, but now i feel bad for the moroccans. you are too soft, katty. cristiano ronaldo with his 85th international goal has knocked morocco out of this tournament. a seven is really moving. we are starting to be bursting that get into the last 16. the first team that will be going home early, as well. we know the identity of three of those. that man, cristiano ronaldo ready once that golden boost, —— golden boot, doesn't you keys it was actually a header. he leads the goal scoring charts. the portuguese capital, the talisman really was to make a bit of an impact here in russia. the other match in group b, going on in kazan, scoot spain who got that draw against cristiano ronaldo's hat—trick, 3—3, the opening match.
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if iran when that, they would go into the last 16. a little earlier, we saw uruguay beat saudi arabia. saudi arabia out, egypt out, as well. uruguay through, and that confirms, even though the russians knew it already, by the way that they were partying last night, the through to the last 16, as well. every time you speak of a 18 going out, katty sheds another two years. that tera byte out, katty sheds another two years. that terabyte of the about the japanese fans gearing up after the stadium, but not just japanese fans gearing up after the stadium, but notjust them, some senegalese fans, as well. yet, the senegalese, as well. only the fans who win. if they had lost, maybe they would have left their rubbish, but they were in great mood. they had beaten colombia, they beat the polls, the senegalese, full—time whistle, hurray, we've won! you go to the cinema, you drop your popcorn
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by mistake, you did pick it up afterwards. we have seen it all at this world cup, now. but yes, hats off to the japanese and the senegalese. is good for them. thank you very much. chris jana rinaldo, matthew, has a very good reason to celebrate, doesn't he? evilly does. they put up that statue of him. in the island where he was born, and a lot of people raise questions about it, but they have replaced it. they have put what a lot of people think isa have put what a lot of people think is a fantastic statue, in that. so they have replaced a really bazaar one, the something nice. theyjust need to add a halo. they do indeed. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — are the democrats in the doldrums? we hear from a former obama advisor who says the party needs policies that aren't ‘just a lighter shade of orange' — we'll explain. hello, most of us have seen some
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sunshine today, but a major difference in temperature. much warmer and difference in temperature. much warmerand humid. difference in temperature. much warmer and humid. further difference in temperature. much warmerand humid. further north, more cloud coming in, and that has been bringing with it some cool and fresh air. you can see the big differences on our temperature map for today, cooler and fresher end to the north—west, the last of the heat and humidity, towards the south and east anglia. in between, a week weather front, and some east anglia. in between, a week weatherfront, and some rather east anglia. in between, a week weather front, and some rather beefy showers in that chilly air across scotland. plus across east anglia, and bizarre. as we head through this evening, we will look at those showers, could be quite heavy, and could merely affect scotland. worst of the showers had their way out into the north sea. skies will clear the most of us, and temperatures will drop away, so it will be a cool and temperatures will drop away, so
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it will be a cooler nights across the board. the reason for the change, drawing away all that warm and humid air, and pushing down some cooler and fresher air from the north. those north to north winds are coming on the top of this area of high pressure which will be shaping our weatherfor of high pressure which will be shaping our weather for the next of high pressure which will be shaping our weatherfor the next few days ahead. quite windy in the north—east of scotland, and blustery winds down dismal seacoast, as well. it isa winds down dismal seacoast, as well. it is a north to north—westerly winds, it will heal cooler and fresher, but on the whole, it will bea dry fresher, but on the whole, it will be a dry day with some lengthening spells sunshine, just a bit of bad weather cloud coming up every now and then. temperatures most later be lower, 16 degrees in norwich, and 16-17 a lower, 16 degrees in norwich, and 16—17 a typical number. friday, the winds become lighter, we will have, again, a lots of sunshine, round. a lot more cloud spilling across northern parts of scotland. cabbage is that lighter winds and sunshine lifting a degree or so, so around
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about 22 celsius. still got high pressure in charge, drifting towards the uk, and around is top of it, some rain for the northern half of scotland. otherwise the weekend will be dry, lots of warm sunshine, one by day, chilly by night. —— warm by day chilly by night. this is beyond 100 days, with me katty kay in washington. matthew price is in london. our top stories: president trump says he plans to sign an executive order to end the controversial practice of separating migrant children from their parents at the us border. theresa may fights off another commons revolt by rebel conservative mps who'd been demanding a meaningful say on the final brexit deal. coming up in the next half hour: more women than ever
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are running for office in the midterm elections, we look at how the me too movement is inspiring them to represent. the uk peer and star of the apprentice alan sugar is forced to apologise after his tweet about senegal‘s world cup football team is widely attacked as racist. let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag beyond100days. let's get more on our top story — president trump's decision to end the policy of separating parents and children at the us—mexican border. the decision comes after days of public outrage and confusing messages from the white house on why the policy was implemented in the first place. announcing his decision to reverse course, mr trump bemoaned america's weak borders and previous administration's inability to stop people coming into the country illegally. someone who worked on this and other policy issues in the obama white house is dan pfeiffer,
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former senior adviser to the former president and author of the new book yes we still can. thanks very much forjoining the programme. i want to ask you about theissue programme. i want to ask you about the issue of immigration and president obama, your former boss, has put out a facebook page which is being widely run on social media in mejias, are we a nation which tolerates the cruelty of ripping children from their parents‘ arms? but when you look at what is happening with immigration here and in europe, i wonder if you don't think you against a tide that is stronger than just donald trump on this. there is a widespread desire from populations on both sides of the atlantic to see administrations ta ke the atlantic to see administrations take proper responsibility for this issue. the question of immigration issue. the question of immigration is dry to find a balance between laws and values as a nation. i can't speak to the other side of the
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atlantic, but an american iraq bipartisan majorities that support these policies that they have talked about, including providing illegal starters for a long time, protecting the dreamers. there is an angry populist revolt which is a vocal minority. the broader consensus is around a more progressive and thoughtful approach to immigration as advocated by the democrats and frankly, many republicans. let me ask you about the democrats as they head into the midterm elections. we have heard a lot about the blue waves and the resistance to donald trump in the country. but when you look at what the democrats are offering, it seems often and that's what they are offering his anger at tramp and opposition to him. you might not like the phrase make america a great again, but it is simple and powerful and i can't think of what the democrats'
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corresponding phrase would be. how do they sell themselves cross this is why i wrote the book. yes we still can is a way to take the lessons we learned against obama's battles a nd lessons we learned against obama's battles and provide lessons for democrats going forward. one of the lessons i talked about as it is a mistake to start with a slogan and work backwards. you need a compelling, inspirational story about why the party empowers the wrong party. the argument we should be making us around two things, stopping the chaos and corruption in tramp oz washington. we are starting to see that it is a story, not a slogan. i wonder, are to see that it is a story, not a slogan. iwonder, are you to see that it is a story, not a slogan. i wonder, are you getting nervous? because tramp oz popularity figures are going up. —— trump's popularity figures. you now see it
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being suggested that fewer people are thinking america is heading in the wrong direction than a year ago. more people are beginning to say america is heading in the right direction. taking those two things together, the midterm elections do not look so rosy for the democrats. since the 2060 election, they will not be a day that goes by when i am not be a day that goes by when i am not nervous about what happens in politics. but you are seeing tremendous energy and activism and organising on the democratic side and that is very good. you are seeing that tramp trump's numbers are going up in some polls but are still very low. the democrats have all the tools and opportunity and momentum to win, wejust all the tools and opportunity and momentum to win, we just have to do the work. if we do, we have a very good shot. it is not inevitable that the blue waves will come but we have
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the blue waves will come but we have the opportunity to do it if we follow the lessons i talk about in my book. dan pfeiffer, thank you for joining us. you hit on something there, matthew, and that is what is making democrats nervous. top the democrats acknowledge this, when you look at the state of the us economy, short—term, it is giving the economy a boost as people are feeling it in their pockets. you look at the stock market and the fact that unemployment is going down, then you start asking suburban voters, do you wa nt to start asking suburban voters, do you want to carry on with president trump? how do you want to switch on trial for the democrats because you do not like what you're saying? democrats are starting to think they may have more in the fight on their hands, november that they would have said a few months ago. i'm just wondering, is there also a sense that everyone would acknowledge that there has been an
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unresolved question with immigration in the united states for decades and nobody has yet come up with solutions. is there a point at which, as unpalatable as some of those allusions that president trump suggests, is there a point at which people say, at least he is trying to break new ground? yeah, and that's what we see with president trump time and again, whether it's north korea, iran, trade, this process of shaking things up and trying things that have not been done. if you are a traditional is, you will argue there isa traditional is, you will argue there is a reason we have always done things the same way, because otherwise it goes off the rails. if you want a shake up, you like what he is doing. at least things are changing and moving and that is unappealing prospect —— appealing prospect to people who have supported him. it has gone largely it has gone largely it's gone largely unnoticed here in the us but there has been
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considerable international criticism of the united states' decision to withdraw from the un human rights council. the british foreign secretary boris johnson described america's decision as regrettable. the us envoy to the united nations, nikki haley, said the council was a cesspool of political bias, whose members targeted countries with positive human rights records to distract from their own abuses. she said calls for reform in the council had been ignored. for too long the human rights council has been a protector of human rights abuses, and a cesspool of political bias. regrettably, it is now clear that our call for reform was not heeded. therefore, as we said we would do a year ago, if we did not see any progress, the united states is officially withdrawing from the un human rights council. it's world refugee day today and across europe it hasn't been a good day for asylum seekers. controversial immigration legislation has been passed by the hungarian parliament, including a law making it a criminal offence to facilitate
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illegal immigration, something that could implicate aid and amnesty groups, despite legal experts saying the measures breach european laws. it comes ahead of a meeting on sunday where leaders of eu states primarily affected by migration will commit to step up efforts to restrict the movements of those who have claimed asylum. we'rejoined live from oslo now byjan egeland, secretary general of the norwegian refugee council and chair of the un task force on humanitarian access in syria. on this world refugee day day, i imagine you are looking at what is happening in europe and here and the united states with a certain amount of dismay. but you have to acknowledge there is a lot of public concern about the policy of taking in migrants from other countries. there is. because also the myths
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prejudices are spread by our political and other leaders. instead of exploding the myths, they are furthering this, which leads to hungary leading the race to the bottom away from international law and into an uncharted territory where we are now in break with european civilisation that gave the world the european and international refugee convention after the second world war when we, the europeans, where refugees. it would be a sad irony if the issue of migration were to be the issue that finally broke the back of the european union. in a way that currency, the euro, perhaps, didn't do. because you have to acknowledge that that is a possibility, isn't it? i hope not. i hope we, and we have to take some
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self—criticism to, all of us that work with refugees. how have we not been able to explode the myths? there are few migrants, asylum seekers that come to europe. turkey alone took more refugees last year than 35, 1a european countries. uganda took more people per day than hungary took more people per day than hungary taken a year. but isn't it the case that in the communities where you have 100 or 1000 people moving in from another part of the world, in those communities people do feel that perhaps their way of life is under some sort of threat mischa people do feel that it isn't being handled well enough, this whole larger situation, by their own governments. and we have got to the situation over the last few decades and that's a problem that cannot be
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unravelled in a few months. and that's a problem that cannot be unravelled in a few monthslj and that's a problem that cannot be unravelled in a few months. i want to discuss, how can we do better in terms of integrating those who come to our society is so that they can getjobs, pay taxes, contribute? we are not good enough in that in europe and we have not been good enoughin europe and we have not been good enough in america of late to do that. but again, it is not true that they cause also solve problems, violence, criminality, terrorism. it is not true. it is based on a myth. we have to fight that. we have responsibilities to protect the vulnerable. the asylum right was something given because europeans needed it during and after the second world war. today, four
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nations take two thirds of all refugees on earth. turkey, bangladesh, uganda and sudan took two thirds of all refugees and the global. the 190 other nations took the final third. we can do it if we have some responsibility sharing and avoid this race to the bottom away from the norms. thank you very much for joining from the norms. thank you very much forjoining us. this is beyond 100 days, still to come: we'll tell you why a british peer lord — lord sugar — has been forced to apologise after he posted on twitter a picture of senegal‘s world cup team. there's a warning today over the worst shortages for decades of the gas used to make carbonate drinks, co2. factories across northern europe have been forced to stop production because they can't source one of the key ingredients. danny savage reports.
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fizzy drinks are part of our everyday lives. prosecco, diet coke, sparkling water... they are vital to the success of our pub and drinks industry. but they all need what's in this very unexciting—looking tank, and stocks of co2 at this brewery in leeds are getting low. enough for now, but a fresh supply is needed soon. it's absolutely huge. 90% of our production is carbonated beer. brewer brian has been promised another delivery of co2 at the start of next month, but things are getting a bit tense in the industry. it should be ok for a couple of weeks, as long as the issue doesn't continue longer than our supplier has said it will. speaking to other brewers, they are in a similar position. just keeping an eye on it, in some cases reducing production slightlyjust to make sure they get through. co2 puts the bubbles in fizzy drinks. currently, at least five producers across northern europe are off—line for maintenance, creating the worst supply
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crisis for decades. but the message is, don't panic. we have got some shortages, we have got some issues, we are coping with it, and we hope that working with those companies we can get this supply of c02, which is so vital to the brewing industry, back on stream as quickly as possible. but could we cope with a flat future without our fizzy favourites? so, how about gin without the tonic? 0k... it's quite different! better with the tonic? better with the tonic, definitely. carbon dioxide is used for packing food as well, but indications from the drinks industry are that this is going to get worse before it gets better. the british peer lord sugar has apologised after being accused of racism over a tweet in which he compared a picture of senegal‘s world cup squad with beach sellers in spain.
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the picture showed the team next to an array of sunglasses and handbags. lord sugar — who hosts the apprentice on bbc one — later deleted the post and apologised, but the tweet had prompted hundreds of critical responses, as frankie mccamley reports. the british billionaire turned tv star of the apprentice, lord sugar, synonymous with these two stinging words. you're fired. it's deflected in! but following the cynical - poland world cup match, lord sugar compared senegal‘s team to beat renderers in spain, posting an image of beachwear and handbags underneath. the comments prompted hundreds of people to show him the red card. an mp would she was troubled after seeing his racist wheat. following the criticism, he
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tweeted so say... it was casual racism. i don't think he believed that in the first instance. as an educational charity working on young people on a daily basis and seeing the effects of casual racism, i can assure him that is. but as the reaction has gone on, i think he has come to realise the implications of his words and actions today. we have tried speaking to lord sugar, but he was not available. despite him not speaking to us at his home in essex today, lord sugar has tweeted an apology. so all michael sugar, night. the bbc press office also commented on lord
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sugar‘s actions, saying it was a seriously misjudged tweed. it continued to see it was right he apologise unreservedly. senegal claims their victory on the pitch with a win over poland. and even the fa ns were with a win over poland. and even the fans were press for cleaning up the stand afterwards. those senegalese and japanese fans, i love them! now the us midterm elections are fast approaching, and already records are being set, including the number of women running for office. and regardless of their politics, many of these women found inspiration from the me too movement for their campaigns. our north america correspondent rajini vaidyanathan has been to meet two of the female candidates squaring off in, and slovenia, a state currently represented by 18 men. she sent this report. i was a victim of campus sexual violence when i was in college. going through the criminaljustice system as a victim was one of the worst experiences of my life. i've certainly experienced my share of sexual harassment. it's something that most women experience and i think
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at this point in time, we're fed up. discrimination in the workplace, sexual harassment and equal pay, just some of the issues which have got women talking in the last 12 months. and for many, the only way to change the status quo is by running for office, which is why there are a record number of female candidates in this year's midterm election. the me too movement relates a lot to my own personaljourney. i wanted to become a special victims prosecutor to make sure that no victim was treated the way that i was. unfortunately, i ended up battling cancer and that made me realise that life is short and i wanted the ability to effectuate greater change. my parents came here from south korea with next to nothing to achieve the american dream, and because they were afforded those opportunities, i have the ability to pursue my american dream, which is public service. the area of pennsylvania where i live has been represented
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until recently by a congressman who was also implicated in a me too issue. pat meehan has resigned, effective immediately, admist misconduct allegations. i have been a civil rights lawyer and i've been an education and public schools advocate for more than 30 years in this area. and under this administration, i've seen the things that i've been fighting for challenged every single day. what has been the biggest challenge for you, running as a female candidate? you get a lot of comments about appearance, always. what should i wear? what shouldn't i wear? should i speak more loudly? should i speak more softly? i guess any candidate is going to get some of that, but women seem to get more. running as a woman of colour, a lot of folks have been extremely excited about my candidacy. but at the same time, i think that there is a stereotype that we are seen as perpetual foreigners, and i am no less american than anyone else. what's so staggering about where we are, pennsylvania, is that not a single woman
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represents this state in congress. you are missing something. something very obvious. they are all male. i did not know that. the fact that we didn't realise there was a problem at first, either, which is part of the problem. i don't know if it's women have run and lost or if there just haven't been many women out there. there are a record number of female candidates, but how well will they do this november? one thing is for sure, though, with mary gay and pearl kim running head—to—head, the state of pennsylvania will send at least one woman to congress. and for more on the number of women running this election cycle we can speak now to melissa richmond, vice president of running start — an organisation that trains young women to run for office. why are we seeing so many women why are we seeing so many women run this time around? i am so excited
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that there were backward numbers of women running and i think it is because they are excited and mad about issues, coming into their own partner. i think we will continue to see record numbers of women in future elections as well. it seems to me, and i've only looked at the numbers briefly, that there are more democratic women running than republican women. why is that? there are. in congress we have three times as many democratic women serving as republican, and in state legislatures we have twice as many democratic serving as republican. the democrats have a really good tradition in recruiting women candidates. there are many democratic women the cycle who are frustrated and are motivated by a desire to change things. i'm wondering, here in the uk, which i think ranks higher for female involvement in politics than the us
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does, there are all women shortlists which have been experimented with. i wondered whether that is something the american political system would be suited to at all? i don't think in the united states we are going to go to in the united states we are going to gotoa in the united states we are going to go to a list system or two quarters. we are go to a list system or two quarters. we a re pretty go to a list system or two quarters. we are pretty individualistic and so the women who will get out and run are people who want to make change in their own communities and think they are well—suited unqualified to do so. from your perspective, it is about women wanting to get involved because the issues they see that i'm not being dealt with that they feel empowered enough to get involved in trying to sort those issues. that's the key? absolutely. when an win at the key? absolutely. when an win at the exact same rate as men when the win, but we don't have enough running. they key is to get women energised and excited, keep their confidence high so there are more entering the pipeline at the beginning. when an win at the same rate as men, so if we had as many
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women running, we could get to 50—50 on capitol hill. yes, but we would have to solve the problem first that there are not enough republican women running, so there are not enough republican women running, so in order to get to parity and current numbers, 80% of the democrats would have to be women. republicans and right leaning groups will have to recruit and fund ‘ candidates the way the their candidates the way the democrats do without having an enormous number of women on the left. you are nonpartisan? running sta rt left. you are nonpartisan? running start is nonpartisan, so we work with women of every political stripe. thank you so much for coming in tojoin us, we will stripe. thank you so much for coming in to join us, we will see stripe. thank you so much for coming in tojoin us, we will see how stripe. thank you so much for coming in to join us, we will see how those women do in november. but it's interesting to hear that when they do run, they dojust interesting to hear that when they do run, they do just as well as men do. wejust have do run, they do just as well as men do. we just have to encourage more to get into the political process. absolutely. i had a look when we came on air. do you know the country with the best representation of politics? i do. rwanda.
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then bolivia, the cuba and the seychelles. britain at 49. the british parliament are still only one third female members of parliament, but that is the best that has ever been achieved. it is a process that has taken too long, but it will looks to be moving in the right direction. and when women are in political office, they do change things. in the united states, women have a better track record than men of getting bills passed through congress. so having women actually running makes a difference as well in terms of legislation and the outcomes to the country. why do you think that is? it's the sexist to say, women are better at compromising? that would be my argument. especially men in positions of power tend to get testosterone fuelled and dig their heels in. guys i said it! you said it, not me! here in the us, what tends to happen
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is women have a better track record working across the aisle, so you get more democratic women working with republican colleagues and vice versa, and that seems to be a winning formula for actually getting things done. a bit like this programme, we have a man and woman and get things done! coming up next on bbc world news, ros atkins is here with outside source. for now, from matthew price in london and me, katty kay, in washington, goodbye. a fresher night tonight ‘s computer last night for many of you. temperatures in north yorkshire did not depth between 17 last night. those same sports may drop towards seven, a ten celsius drop. a cooler front has been moving across today.
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it is not with everyone at the moment, still some tumours across southern and eastern parts. a bit of cold and isolated showers here but us cold and isolated showers here but us that clears, the fresher air pressure zone. overnight, some heavy showers across scotland and northern england the morning and the temperature drop i mentioned. temperatures widely down into single figures tomorrow morning. the sorest ulcers —— somersaults test. it will be quite a breeze blowing. elsewhere, isolated showers may clip the north—east of me in scotland. most. the state sunny. cloud in southern scotland, northern england and into the east midlands but long spells of sunshine for many. a breeze coming in from a north—westerly direction which will have meant a drop in temperature. instead of the mid to high 20s, just
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about 20 degrees, most sitting in the teams through the afternoon. enter thursday evening, the cloud will melt away. clear skies into friday morning and greens on the temperature profile, another cool night with single figure temperatures to start friday. friday will be another beautiful day and not quite as windy. a breeze most noticeable across eastern areas. the vast majority of the country dry. temperatures starting to climb once again, even further into the weekend. if you are after outdoor activities, this is yourfriend. high pressure is dominating. whether funds may clip the north of scotland but for the vast majority, a dry and sunny weekend where the temperatures continue to climb. into next week, they will climb further, high 20s, low 30s perhaps for next week. this is bbc news.
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i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm. a report finds more than a50 patients died after being given powerful painkillers inappropriately at gosport war memorial hospital. these horrifying, shameful and unforgivable actions need to be disclosed in a criminal court for thejury to decide disclosed in a criminal court for the jury to decide and only then can we put our loved ones to rest. president trump has signalled he will change the immigration policy, which has seen children separated from their parents at the mexican border. we have compassion, we want to keep families together, it is very important, i will be signing something in a little while that will do that. in hungary, the parliament has approved legislation that criminalises the work of organisations that help asylum seekers. the ayes
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