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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 21, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello — this is breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. a u—turn from president trump — he promises to stop separating children from families crossing the us border and signs an executive order reversing his own policy. thousands of youngsters including babies and toddlers have been taken from their parents and locked up as part of his zero—tolerance approach to illegal immigration. good morning — it's thursday the 21st ofjune. also this morning: families call for criminal proceedings over the premature deaths of hundreds of elderly hospital patients in gosport. as far as as faras i'm as far as i'm concerned, they've got to get a conviction for all the rest of the families who also have a genuine case. paying for the nhs — the chancellor will outline plans for raising taxes later today.
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good morning. colleges and universities get nearly £1 billion a year from the universities get nearly £1 billion a yearfrom the eu but universities get nearly £1 billion a year from the eu but what happens to that money after breaks it and what can it mean to the students and teachers and colleges like this. i am in leeds this morning to find out. in sport, southgate‘s in a sling. the england camp had a rest day yesterday but the england boss dislocated his shoulder, while out running. and carol has the weather from ascot this morning. it is gold cup day—to—day here at royal ascot, also ladies day. we are expecting to see a lot of high fashion. but the weather is much fresher than has been. a lot of us will see sunny spells but showers in the north—east will clear, it be blustery. keep that hat on! president donald trump has ordered an end to the separation of migrant
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children from their parents at the us border with mexico. his administration's policy of "zero—tolerance" towards illegal immigration led to thousands of children being detained away from their parents. but last night he signed an executive order bringing the policy to an end, as our washington correspondent gary o'donoghue reports. this stretch of the rio grande in brownsville, texas is where where —— is where many try to enter the united states. every week some drown in the attempt. those who make it face arrest and prosecution. it at centres like this that adults and children were being separated, leading to those now notorious images of children apparently housed in cages. the national and international outcry was, in the end, too much even for president trump. but he struck a defiant tone while doing his u—turn. trump. but he struck a defiant tone while doing his u-turn. so we are
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keeping families together, and this will solve that problem. at the same time, we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a zero tolerance. we have zero tolerance for people that enter our country illegally. thousands of children have been separated from their pa rents have been separated from their parents in recent weeks and no one really knows how long it will take to reunite them. it's going to be a herculean task, if you will, because it's going to require a lot of transparency in finding out exactly where these children were separated from the families and where those pa rents from the families and where those parents are. the churches are often at the forefront of immigrant welfare in the rio grande valley and just hours after the stroke of the presidential pen, all denominations gathered in the rain to welcome the change of heart by the administration. later in the programme we'll be speaking to an immigration lawyer who's been working with families who've been separated — that's in just over 30 minutes' time.
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families are calling for a criminal investigation, after an inquiry found hundreds of elderly patients were over—prescribed powerful painkillers without medicaljustification. an independent panel said more than a50 patients died prematurely at gosport memorial hospital, and a further 200 could have suffered a similar fate. they will have to look at it in more detail, they will have to bring 15 of the strongest cases into the criminal court because that's where it deserves to go. whether that's my case 01’ it deserves to go. whether that's my case or not, and as far as i'm concerned, they've got to get a conviction for all the rest of the families who also have a genuine case. our correspondent richard lister is in gosport this morning. it's going to take a long time the details of that report, that enquiry to sink in? yes, it certainly is,
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it's a big report, 670 or so pages and this is the hospital at the heart of it but it's a very different place now from the hospital mentioned in this report. it has got excellent ratings from the vast majority of people who use it, it's a very different era are so from the families of the victims, attention is elsewhere, on the agencies and people at the heart of this story. hampshire police is at the top of this list, they looked into the situation three times and they were able to come up with enough evidence for a realistic chance of prosecution. this report says each of these situations is poorso says each of these situations is poor so hampshire police have questions to ask about those explanations and they want to see the investigation reopened. hampshire police said they would look at this evidence, it was suggested by the health secretary they might want to get another forced to do so, given their vested
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interest but the victims families are not going to be satisfied until they hear something definitive from hampshire police about reopening this investigation. theresa may has vowed there will be a smooth and orderly exit from the eu, this after her government's flagship brexit bill cleared its final parliamentary hurdle. she avoided a backbench rebellion with an eleventh hour concession to pro—eu tories. the "department for exiting the eu" said it marked a "crucial step" in the uk's preparations for brexit. meanwhile, the home secretary, sajid javid, is calling on other eu countries to give details of their arrangements for british nationals living abroad after brexit. later today, he'll give more information on the settlement scheme for eu citizens wanting to stay in the uk. mrjavid has accused other countries of failing to match britain's progress on dealing with expats. the education secretary, damian hinds, has backed calls making ‘upskirting' a specific criminal offence will move a step closer today, after it was controversially blocked last week. the prime minister reiterated her support for the bill
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which could lead to a two year prison sentence for people who take surreptitious photographs up women's skirts. a previous attempt was scuppered by tory mp sir christopher chope who was concerned about the bill's lack of scrutiny. it will be re—introduced in parliament later. taxes will rise to pay for increased health spending, that's what the chancellor phillip hammond is expected to say when he delivers his annual mansion house speech later. he'll say the cost of the 20—billion pound funding package, announced by theresa may, will be met by taxpayers in a "fair and balanced way", as jon donnison reports. in the week the prime minister pledged an extra £20 billion of nhs funding, tonight we'll get some indication of how the government intends to pay for it. and the chancellor, philip hammond, is expected to say that taxes will have to rise as he gives his annual mansion house speech on the state of the uk economy. he is expected to say that any increases will be fair and balanced, to support
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the nhs we all use. this could put at risk the conservative party's manifesto pledge last year that there was a firm intention to reduce taxes. and in an early draft of the speech released overnight by the treasury, there is no mention of the so—called brexit dividend that theresa may said could be used to pay part of an increased one mac built. of an increased nhs bill. economist have said they dismissed the idea that there will be a dividend from leaving the european union, arguing that cost to the economy outweigh any reduction in payments to the eu. jon donnison, bbc news. around 200 families have been told they will have to move out of their homes on the broadwater farm estate in north london following a recent safety inspection. structural tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire, found that two of the 11 blocks were at risk of collapse. the london borough of haringey, which owns the properties,
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has now recommended that residents should leave while the future of the buildings is decided. when was the last time you saw a frog? ages ago. frogs and toads are abandoning our gardens according to a new survey, which shows a sharp fall in the number of sightings of the amphibians. it's being blamed on a lack of garden ponds. the figures come from an rspb survey, which asked members about the wildlife they see in their neighbourhood. in that noise they make when they mate? i missed that. its nature. well, it's a kind of nature. what happens when you kiss of frog? they turn into a prince? and you get
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married. happy ever after. when choosing a dress, many brides might stick with tranditional materials like lace, silk or satin. for those who want to shun tradition, there is an alternative which certainly isn't bog—standard. these are the entrants for this year's annual toilet paper wedding dress contest. hoping it doesn't rain. i saw what you did there. even the bouquets are made out of loo role and they match. it's pretty impressive. it is all tissue. that is fantastic. if you're getting married this weekend, swap your plans. someone else who can do
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with some toilet roll as the man behind you, gareth southgate, to damage him up. many people are asking how did you dizzy dislocate —— dislocate your shoulder while running? on a beach, with uneven sand, you take a tumble. your headphones on, you take a tumble. sand, you take a tumble. your headphones on, you take a tumblem is pretty ha rd headphones on, you take a tumblem is pretty hard to do, i would have thought. what you're meant to do on a rest day is rest. england might have had a day off yesterday, but gareth southgate found himself in the wars. he went for a run, and managed to dislocate his shoulder. so no athletic celebrations against panama, on sunday then it was a day, when the fancied teams struggled,
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but survived, at the world cup. cristiano ronaldo — who else — on target for portugal, but they laboured to a 1—nil win over morocco. the goal takes ronaldo, to the top of the goalscoring charts in russia. spain were unconvincing too, against iran, but diego costa's third of the tournament was enough. uruguay also won, to knock saudi arabia and egypt, out. another record breaking day for england's cricketers. the women smashed the highest score in a t20 international, with 250 as they thrashed south africa in taunton. to think carol's hackers made out of toilet roll? i guess wondering if she did get satellite tv. this is by
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stephenjones. we are expecting to see some high fashion. royal ascot started on tuesday and goes all the way through till saturday. around 300,000 people are expected to attend and the prize money for the first time this year is going to be above 30 million. my plan straight after this programme is to go out and buy a horse. we are looking at highs of around 18 celsius. a noticeable breeze so if you are coming down and wearing a big hat, stick an extra hat pin in it. a fresh field to the day today, particularly in the south. it has been muddy of late. a fine, dry and
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sunny day. if we start off by taking a look around the country it does feel quite cool. we do have some showery outbreaks of rain and here today, it is going to be pretty windy. quite strong gusts. for northern ireland, a few showers. the sun will come out the euro across and wales, a lot of sunshine. cloud bubbling up. through the day, a bit more cloud developing across central, eastern and southern parts of england. nonetheless, still sunny spells. temperatures up to about 21 celsius. through this evening and overnight, the wins will start to come down, and with clear skies, it will be a cool night. introducing
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some patchy light rain and drizzle. we started that tomorrow. we are going to start that clout across the north—east. it's going to drift further across the northern half of scotland. for the rest of us, more sunshine tomorrow. temperatures will rise. as we head through the weekend, temperatures will continue to rise with a bit of dry weather but next week, we still think someone but next week, we still think someone the south—east will hit 3a the first this year. thank you very much. will we see lots of different hats on new? you are going to see three. fabulous. three big hat, i love big hats. do you have a hat with a pretzel or a
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bagel? no. well, you should have. i will tell you why. this is addressed bya will tell you why. this is addressed by a designer who makes edible dresses. this is a golden lace dress embossed with bagels and pretzels, which can be as perfect. you go to these big dos and there is never enough food. tomorrow morning, you, kia! a touch of bagel for the dress. we are getting very environmentally friendly —— here. you are watching the clothes so from the bbc. let's have a look at the morning's front pages. the times leads with questions being asked in whitehall. apparently when double trouble comes to the uk and europe next month there is torquay is planning to meet vladimir putin,
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which could have all kinds of diplomatic and geopolitical implications. whitehall mandarins are asking how they handle that. on the front page of the financial times, a picture of donald trump. 0ur lead story this morning, caving in to pressure over the us policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the mexican border. he has agreed to stop the practice. the other main story dominating many of the front pages is the gospel wore memorial hospital —— war. the enquiry found that patients had their lives shortened by treatment they receive there. in the mirror leads with the same story. there is some doubt about the actual number because some of the records don't exist any more. what have you got, other than sling—gate?
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exist any more. what have you got, other than sling-gate? this is something i need to do, when this girl was one she had meningitis and lost the lower parts of her arms and legs. 13 years on she is a national trampolining champion. she has beaten all the rest of the trampolining championships. and a lot of talk about whether andy murray will actually play at embleton. he did well at queens, even though he lost to nick kyrgios in three sets. he will decide in the next few hours whether he will go to eastbourne. he thinks he can go quite a long way if he does make it to wimbledon. and another player can still qualify, with some
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commentators saying he has served as tarmac his ban and should be allowed to compete. archaeologists and dinosaur experts have established, you know when you see those movies with a tyrannosaurus rex coming towards you, always with a tongue hanging out, looking hungry, but they reckon he couldn't move his tongue. he could read his prey to shreds with his little hands, but he didn't have a tongue to do it. shreds with his little hands, but he didn't have a tongue to do itm a lwa ys didn't have a tongue to do itm always reminds me, whenever we talk tongue stories, whether you can roll your tongue. can you do it? or touch your tongue. can you do it? or touch your nose. i can do it as well, the make—up department would have a fit. i can't do that. i have too much tyrannosaurus rex in me. i am incapable. you taste your food with your tongue, so could the
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tyrannosaurus rex had pasted all that lovely flash if he didn't have a proper tongue, or she that lovely flash if he didn't have a propertongue, or she have a tongue? —— flash. lots of questions surrounding brexit, and lots of students worried about... european students worried about... european students studying here worried about what the future holds, and that is what the future holds, and that is what ben is taking a look at today. good morning to you both. we are at leeds city college, they have 20,000 stu d e nts leeds city college, they have 20,000 students spread across the city and there is concern about what happens to the funding which places like this get after brexit. colleges and universities up and down the country get nearly £1 billion a year in funding so there is a concern that the students who come here, they have students from 127 different countries at this place, and what it could mean for them and the funding which is involved. let me introduce
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you to two people, you'lljones is a deputy executive here, and philip is that leeds university. good morning to you both. what happens to that money? it is a lot of money we get from the eu which funds a lot of this stuff at colleges and universities. are you worried about what happens after brexit? we are extremely worried. we are worried about losing that funding. the government has said that it would match the funding. we are worried about the erasmus funding, which is opportunities for people to go and work experience, etc, and we would be disappointed to lose that. 127 different nationalities of students you have in the college. does it affect who comes here? but also, crucially, what they are able to do and thejobs crucially, what they are able to do and the jobs they go on to do? because you are very vocational. certainly, it might affect the eu nationals but it wouldn't affect the other 100 countries as well but in
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terms of skills shortages, there are already skills shortages due to brexit according to the cipd. we think the skills sector, and fe colleges should retrain and train up the existing workforce to fill some of those vacancies. and peter, from the university point of view, you rely on a lot of funding for the research that you do. is there a worry that that tap gets turned off after brexit? there is always a concern that might happen but i think over the last 18 months there has been a growing awareness of how important international links are for universities and colleges, and we can see signs, especially through sajid javid beginning to suggest that students might be taken out of immigration quotas. a very good sign from the prime minister a couple of weeks ago that uk universities should be able to associate with european research grams which will
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ta ke european research grams which will take place from 2021. yes, a lot to content with. we will introduce you to some of the students. good morning to you all. jean, you head of careers and work experience, all that sort of thing. we heard a bit about erasmus. explain why that so important to some of these students. so it is an erasmus plus programme, and we get funding which enables over 200 students and staff to go to 13 european countries to take up work placements, to experience a different culture, and really to develop the skills they are going to need when they enter the workplace, or he or apprenticeships. it is the resilience, the employability skills as well as the sector specific skills. and you were able to go abroad, you studied in greece, and thatis abroad, you studied in greece, and that is important in terms of getting access to different universities and different training, but also the ability to live in europe, isn't it? yes, it was
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fantastic. we did plenty of different... i was in the kitchens, behind the bar, serving tables, two com pletely behind the bar, serving tables, two completely different people do what we used to. it was a fantastic thing to put on my cv and has got me a lot ofjobs since. it is about to put on my cv and has got me a lot of jobs since. it is about that hands—on education and ability to be in different places to learn those different skills. for now, thank you to you all. i will chat to you all later but let me talk quickly to jack grove from times i education. we heard some of the practical applications for what it could mean the individual people —— times higher education. yes, there is no certainty in the long—term for the coming academic year, 2018—19. there isa coming academic year, 2018—19. there is a good sense of what will happen. stu d e nts is a good sense of what will happen. students can come to the uk and get the same deal they get at the moment. from 2019—20 it is a different matter, and there is no
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certainty. universities and colleges wa nt certainty. universities and colleges want that certainty, and students are starting to make plans. if you are starting to make plans. if you are going to come to the uk, you need to have a better time to think about it and decide where you want go. so if they don't have that certainty, then it is going to be difficult for them to start to think about coming here, and that is going to affect a lot of institutions. about 140,000 eu students come to the uk and are studying here at the moment, so it is a lot of students. clearly a lot to think about. nice to see you. it is about skills, visas, access to students, it is also about funding for research. so also about funding for research. so a lot for these places the content with. we will talk more about it over the course of the morning. i will see you after seven a.m.. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. coming up in the next half—hour: tim muffett is getting some award—winning gardening tips from green—fingered schoolchildren. what a beautiful day there.
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what a beautiful day therem what a beautiful day there. it is absolutely lovely. we are at saint gregory's catholic science college. a few years ago the plan was to turn this space into a staff car park and pupils and teachers have thought about it and decided to turn it into about it and decided to turn it into a garden. today it has been announced that this garden has won the royal horticultural society's school team gardening competition. the gardeners have some very green fingers. why do you enjoy gardening so much? it is very relaxing. ijust move to a new house and wanted to learn a a few new things about gardening. and why do you enjoy it so much? world, it is fun, and it is kind of a chance to do some gardening. excellent, you carry on. thejudges will be gardening. excellent, you carry on. the judges will be talking to them a little later and we will be finding out what criteria they used to decide why this garden was judged
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best of all. first, the news, weather and travel where you are. good morning from bbc london news. around 200 families have been told they will have to move out of their homes on the broadwater farm estate in north london following a recent safety inspection. a report found two of the 11 blocks on the estate are at risk of collapse following structural test is carried out after the grenfell tower fire. the local council which owns them has recommended the resident should be moved out while the future of the blocks is decided. an inquest into the death of an 18—year—old is due to be held at the coroner's court in waltha mstow to be held at the coroner's court in walthamstow today. lauren's mother said her daughter's symptoms were initially down to stress or food poisoning. in october 2016 she died of meningitis w. her mum had asked hergp of meningitis w. her mum had asked her gp about getting had a vaccine
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against it at lauren died before she could get it. i thought she was having a panic attack because everything got bad, so ijust totally assumed that she was so stressed about university and what she wanted to do that she was having a panic attack. so i mean my husband and my son left half an hour before she actually collapsed, and that's what i thought i was dealing with. and then obviously just what i thought i was dealing with. and then obviouslyjust her breathing got worse. today marks the 70th anniversary of the docking at oh, my god! in essex. almost 200 migrants were on board. the first passengers were allowed to disembark the following day, 1948. that will now officially become annual windrush day. so far we have a good service on all of the tube lines. moving onto the roads we have traffic building on the london bound a40 in uxbridge heading towards northolt. in barking, the age 13 has a lane
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closed in both directions for gas mains work —— a13. time for a time for a check time for a check on time for a check on the time for a check on the weather. time for a check on the weather. hello, good morning. it is the summer solstice today, and that will ta ke summer solstice today, and that will take place at 1107, later on this morning. it is a pretty nice safe as well. it will stay dry and there will be lots more sunshine to come. but last night we saw a cauldron go through so we are now in the fresh airand it is through so we are now in the fresh air and it is a coolerfields through so we are now in the fresh air and it is a cooler fields of things, really, this morning. but there is lots of early sunshine around the fresh air and it is a cooler fields of things, really, this morning. but there is lots of early sunshine around and northern areas. so it is really south—western areas. so it is really south—western areas of the capital that will see the best of the sunshine throughout the best of the sunshine throughout the day. top temperatures today of 20 or 21 celsius, a noticeable north—westerly wind. it is not feeling quite as warm as mighty as it has done in recent days. the humidity levels will be lower, but the pollen is still very high. into
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this evening, lots of late sunshine around. 0vernight tonight we are going to keep those clear skies and this is how we start off the day tomorrow. it is going to feel quite cool tomorrow. it is going to feel quite cool, i think, tomorrow. it is going to feel quite cool, ithink, temperatures tomorrow. it is going to feel quite cool, i think, temperatures will drop back into single figures overnight. so a sunny start started the day tomorrow. tomorrow dry, light winds, and it will start to feel warmer, drier and settled through the weekend and the next week. just look at those temperatures climb. it will start to feel warm warmer. i will be back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. there is plenty more on our website. goodbye. hello — this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. children who walk to school with their parents could be exposed to almost a third more pollution than the adults, according to new research. we'll be finding out the best ways to make sure you and your family are breathing clean air. it seemed a bit too good to be true when thousands of british airways customers snapped up cheap flights. and it turns out it was. the company has
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cancelled the tickets. we'll be hearing from angry passengers. if you give money to beggars are you part of the problem? that's the suggestion from one police force this morning. a former homeless man will tell us what he used to do with the cash he was given. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the us president donald trump has ordered an end to the separation of migrant children from their parents at the us border with mexico. his administration's policy of zero tolerance towards illegal immigration led to thousands of children being detained without their parents, but last night he signed an executive order bringing the policy to an end. president trump has insisted his administration will retain its tough stance on illegal immigration. if you are weak, which some people would like you to be, if you are
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really, really pathetically weak, the country is going to be overrun with millions of people and if you are strong, you don't have any heart. that's a tough dilemma. perhaps i'd rather be strong, but that's a tough dilemma. families are calling for a criminal investigation, after an inquiry found hundreds of elderly patients were over—prescribed powerful painkillers without medicaljustification. an independent panel said more than 450 patients died prematurely at gosport memorial hospital, and a further 200 could have suffered a similar fate. they will have to look at it in more detail, they will have to bring 15 of the strongest cases into the criminal court because that's where it deserves to go.
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whether that's my case or not, and as far as i'm concerned, they've got to get a conviction for all the rest of the families who also have a genuine case. theresa may has vowed there will be a ‘smooth and orderly‘ exit from the eu — this after her government's flagship brexit bill cleared its final parliamentary hurdle. she avoided a backbench rebellion with an eleventh hour concession to pro—eu tories. the department for exiting the eu said it marked a crucial step in the uk's preparations for brexit. meanwhile, the home secretary, sajid javid, is calling on other eu countries to give details of their arrangements for british nationals living abroad after brexit. later today, he'll give more information on the settlement scheme for eu citizens wanting to stay in the uk. mrjavid has accused other countries of failing to match britain's progress on dealing with expats. there is a risk of degrees losing their credibility, with university leaders saying standardised approaches are a threat to their independence. making upskirting
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a specific criminal offence will move a step closer today, after it was controversially blocked last week. the prime minister reiterated her support for the bill which could lead to a two year prison sentence for people who take surreptitious photographs under other people's clothing. a previous attempt was scuppered by tory mp sir christopher chope who was concerned about the bill's lack of scrutiny. it will be reintroduced in parliament later. taxes will have to rise to pay for increased health spending, that's what the chancellor phillip hammon is expected to say when he delivers his annual mansion house speech later. he'll say the cost of the twenty—billion pound funding package announced by theresa may, will be met by taxpayers in a "fair and balanced way". in an early draft of the speech there is no mention of the "brexit dividend" which the prime minister said could be used to cover part of the bill. around 200 families have been told they will have to move out of their homes on the broadwater farm estate in north london following a recent safety inspection.
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structural tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire, found that two of the 11 blocks were at risk of collapse. the london borough of haringey, which owns the properties, has now recommended that residents should leave while the future of the buildings is decided. frogs and toads are abandoning our gardens according to a new survey, which shows a sharp fall in the number of sightings of the amphibians. it's being blamed on a lack of garden ponds. the figures come from an rspb survey, which asked members about the wildlife they see in their neighbourhood. it's been ages since i saw frog. and hedgehogs as well. when did you last see one? not in a good way. when choosing a dress, many brides might stick with tranditional materials like lace, silk or satin. for those who want to shun tradition — there is an alternative which certainly isn't bog—standard. these are the entrants for this year's annual toilet paper wedding dress contest. even the posies and bouquet made out
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of toilet roll and tissues. beautiful dresses, absolutely stunning. they are not very practical, especially in the uk.” probably sydney shouldn't say this. if you think you shouldn't say it, don't say it. what about getting a runny nose ? don't say it. what about getting a runny nose? would they have to be abandoned them ——a ban on using a tissue? i shouldn't have said it. it's a great use of toilet roll. runny noses because they got hayfever? possibly, orjust a cold. they are crying because they are upset. let's talk about the world cup quickly. injury shocker for
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england. it's the manager, gareth southgate. yes — england manager gareth southgate has crocked himself, out running on their rest day. he'll not be doing any celebrating like this for a while. he's been all over the place, hasn't he? we'll find out in one hour. it was meant to be a day off. you only sling when your winning, is how some of the papers are describing it this morning. yes — england manager gareth southgate has crocked himself, out running on their rest day. he'll not be doing any celebrating like this for a while. he dislocated his shoulder, and he apologised to the medical staff who looked after him, for ruining their day off. he apologised to the medical staff
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because he ruined their day off. posing for pictures. , live with the england camp in the next hour. three games, three wins, the only goal to knock morocco out of the tournament. 3 very underwhelming games but cristiano ronaldo managed to grab the headlines again. he's the tournament's top scorer, with 4 in two games, and has now become the highest scoring european, in men's international football. you'd have to give ronaldo a pat on the back for his goals at the world cup. don't try doing that to teammate pepe though. it seems even the slightest touch can really really really hurt the defender. we've not had an update on his condition after such a brutal challenge butjust hope he's 0k. what did you do to him? he gave him a tap on the back. we've not had an update. he could have ended up in a sling, like southgate. this is
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great. this also get in on the playacting. he even chucks the ball away. didn't pull the referee though. let's get back to the action. similar struggles for spain against a beligerant iranian outfit. diego costa scored the game's only goal — although he didn't really know too much about it. perhaps the most bizarre moment came with iran searching for a winner. they had a throw and their player tried to do one of those acrobatic ones but didn't quite nail it! one for the training ground, we thinks. two more teams can't now qualify for the knockout stages following uruguay‘s1—nil win over saudi arabia. luis suarez‘s goal not only means that saudi arabia will be heading home, but also mo salah's egypt. both teams have two defeats from two games. uruguay and russia will go through. well after ronaldo's exploits on wednesday,
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today sees lionel messi's opportunity to grab the headlies. his argentina side will hope to improve on their draw against iceland. they play croatia at 7pm and you can follow that game on bbc one. the games involving dennmark and australia and france and peru can be found on radio 5 live and bbc sport website. on that france versus peru in yekaterinburg, the most easterly of the world cup venues. the normal capacity of the stadium is only 23,000 and organisers needed it to be 35,000. the solution? build a huge temporary stand outside the ground up into the sky. conor mcnamara and dion dublin were trying to get used to the gradient ahead of commentating today. it looks like they are watching on the big screen. what can you actually see? the players would look like ants. i could not sit up the
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top of that. me either. it would be quite daunting. also if you are trying to take a cup of tea down the steps. you can see the view. it is. and just a day after england's men broke the one day international world record, england's women were making history of their own at taunton. tammy beaumont hit a 47 ball century to help england to a total of 250 for 3, surpassing the t20 world record of 216 for1 that new zealand set earlier on in the day. south africa only managed 129 in reply as england won their first tri series match by 121 runs. there was an upset at royal ascot yesterday. 11—2 shot poet's word shocked the odds—on favourite cracksman, ridden by frankie dettori, to win the prince of wales' stakes. the victory makes sir michael stout the most successful trainer in royal ascot history with 76 wins.
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british number one kyle edmund — the sole brit left in the draw at queen's — will attempt to make it to the quarter finals today when he takes on nick kyrgios — the man who beat andy murray the top seed in london is marin cilic. beaten in last year's queen's and wimbledon final — he needed three sets to get past gilles muller. carol is at royal ascot and since you are making such disparaging remarks about her dress, would you like to? it's a practical hat and it's lovely. it's not made out of toilet roll but i wonder if you could get satellite tv on it. that sport is backpedalling. getting out of the studio fast. you look gorgeous. seriously. there is a
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reason i am here and you are not. good morning. iamjoined by reason i am here and you are not. good morning. iam joined by lee from racing post. today gold cup of course. but he thinks stands a chance of winning it? it's a cracking race, the biggest flat marathon in horseracing and we will cash ——a horse called order of st george and the young british rival called stradivarius. frankie dettori had three winners here on tuesday. he's won the gold cup five times, the first back in 1992, three days before ian botham played his final test match and in the three weeks before the first episode of the ill—fated soap, eldorado. can frankie do it? is horse is improving. the question is: would he stay the trip? that's a big question. desert skyline by david
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cord —— by a guy called david elgar. he would have a decent chance. does anybody but on the colour of the queen's outfit? you go around the bookmakers and they will have prizes. yellow was a winning bet. there was one just before the hat is revealed. it tends to fall in price. someone somewhere is having a few quid, possibly with inside information. any other tips? george of hearts and the ribblesdale sta kes, of hearts and the ribblesdale stakes, a horse called sun maiden, the trend for the queen who became the trend for the queen who became the winning manchester ‘s chain —— trainer in royal ascot history, 77 winners over an awful long time. that is brilliant. the weather here today is set fair
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at royal ascot. looking at a temperature of about 18 celsius. it is quite breezy so if you are coming down stick an extra penny on your hat. we are looking at a high of 18 to 20 with some sunny spells. most of us it is a fresh start to the day. it has been so lucky in the south of late, and for many it will be dry with some pleasant, warm sunshine. looking around the country, we can see a lot of blue sky first thing this morning. across the north and north—east of scotland we have the cloud and also still some showers. they will clear and the sun will come out, but it will be pretty windy in the north and around the northern isles. rather strong gust is, actually, so bear that in mind. for the rest of scotland, northern ireland, some showers. they will fade in the morning and the sun will come out. the england and wales, one or two showers at the moment but they are the exception rather than the rule. most will have a dry day with sunny spells. as we go through the course
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of the day, a bit of cloud will develop across central, northern and eastern parts of england. nonetheless we are looking at some sunny spells coming through that cloud. the best of the sunshine in wales and south of the m4 corridor, with highs and the south—east up to 21. wherever you are it will be a breezy day and the pollen levels are higher and very high everywhere except the far north of scotland, where they are low or moderate. through the evening and overnight the wind will start to ease. we will have clearer skies, a cold night, as well, and by the end of the night we will have more cloud coming in across the north—west of scotland and northern ireland. that will be thick enough to produce some drizzle and patchy, light rain. we start tomorrow on a fresh note but again a lot of clear skies. the cloud across the north of scotland will produce again, across the highlands and the northern isles, some patchy light rain and drizzle. for the rest of the uk, lengthy spells of sunshine and the temperature will respond
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accordingly. it is worth noting as we get into the weekend that a lot of dry weather will be across our shores. across the north of scotland at times there will be a little bit of rain and strong winds. that leaves us in the next week, which on current thinking will be a warm one. highs up to 30 celsius. thank you very much indeed. i am wondering what odds they can get on what colour hat you will be wearing for the 7am headlines. possibly mt! not if mike has anything to do with it. we wait and see another change, eurovision style, at seven a.m.. let's return to our main story now — president trump has signed an executive order promising to keep families together in migrant detentions at the us border with mexico. he said he had been swayed by images of children who have been taken from parents while they are jailed and prosecuted for illegal border—crossing. the zero tolerance policy
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to criminally charge all undocumented border crossers, introduced by the us attorney general in april, has been met with international criticism. us immigration officials say more than 2,000 children were separated from their parents between may and june this year. they're first detained at border protection holding cells before being moved to one of around 100 detention centres. a hotline has been set up for parents to call after they're released from custody, but some separations are permanent. let's speak to immigration lawyer carlos garcia, who has been dealing with separated families in texas. thank you for talking to us on brea kfast thank you for talking to us on breakfast this morning. can you tell us some of the families you have been speaking to, what experiences you have been witnessing? we have been speaking to mothers and fathers who have their children taken away from them, just after being detained by border patrol, and the border
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patrol official comes in and tells them your child has to come with us, and they don't tell them where they are going to take the child, when they will be able to see the child again, or when or if they will be reunified whatsoever. so when i am talking to these people, i canjust see the sadness in their face, in their highs. they don't realise what is going on until it's too late. ok. —— their eyes. is this because they are given absolutely no information when they are separated? what process a re when they are separated? what process are they put through? that's correct. they are not given any information. some of the reports that i have seen have indicated that water patrol officials are giving pa rents water patrol officials are giving parents that phone number that you we re parents that phone number that you were discussing a little while ago, but when i have talked to parents, i talked to about ten of them just
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yesterday, right before they were about to be prosecuted for the criminal action, they indicated that they did not receive any information. in fact, they were asking me where can i find my child? isaidi asking me where can i find my child? i said i don't know, that is why i am trying to get this information, so that down the line we can hopefully reunify you with your child. so while that hope remains, at least now donald trump has reverse the policy. how quickly do you see that being put into action? well, i hope it is put into action soon, but this executive order ostensibly limits separation while simultaneously expanding family detention. the order links the alternative nightmares of family separation with family detention. they are trying to detained families together, which also doesn't seem right. ok, so what do you want to
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see? i would like to see that, if a person is fleeing their country and coming to our country, because they are fleeing for their lives, they have been harassed, there have been threatened with murder, that we give them due process. that they have an ability to present their case before an immigration judge and ability to present their case before an immigrationjudge and don't have to be incarcerated, with a four or five—year—old child. that they are able to present their case in a non— detained setting, and if the immigrationjudge detained setting, and if the immigration judge grabs their asylum case, so be it. if the immigration judge denies their asylum case then they have to follow the law. all of this based on the law. i'm not asking for anyone to circumvent the law, just follow the processes that we have in. thank you very much for talking to us on this programme. when a group of pupils from a school
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in north—west london heard about plans for a staff car park extension, they had a better idea. they got together and turned the patch of land into a wildlife—friendly garden. now, the green—fingered gang have been given a gold award from the royal horticultural society for their creation. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the school for us now. that is much better than a car park, isn't it? yes, indeed. can you imagine cars parked all over this site? st gregory's catholic science couege site? st gregory's catholic science college gardening club teams said no thank you, the garden they have created is absolutely beautiful. and it has been awarded... 0r created is absolutely beautiful. and it has been awarded... or the team have been awarded the prize of school gardening club team of the year. and i am speaking to a
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representative of the rhs. why did you decide to award the prize to this school? well, our water is not for excellence, but dedication and passion and this school had it in abundance —— our award. the way they have integrated curriculum into the garden is outstanding, for a secondary school as well. and these guysjust secondary school as well. and these guys just created the space themselves, they designed it, they made it happen, and for us it was just unanimous. very well deserved. and let's have a quick chat to some of the students here. it is all about relaxing and enjoying yourself, and you have been involved in the club for some years. i firstjoined in the club for some years. ifirstjoined in year7 in the club for some years. i firstjoined in year 7 and year 8, and in year9 i firstjoined in year 7 and year 8, and in year 9 it inspired me tojoin the eco— committee, and now in year ten i was appointed as the eco— prefect. why do you enjoy it so much? i enjoyed so much because it is just much? i enjoyed so much because it isjust a much? i enjoyed so much because it is just a beautiful place to be. i feel peace here. we will have a walk
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around here and taken some of the sites as we come along. as you can see, the original car park is down there. this would have been turned into more of that, but the space is used so much more effectively. let's have a chat to the member of staff who has overseen all of this. how do you feel, to be the winner of the prize? i feel very you feel, to be the winner of the prize? i feelvery proud you feel, to be the winner of the prize? i feel very proud of all the children, and all the work they have put in, and i feel children, and all the work they have put in, and ifeel ecstatic, actually. the garden has flourished over the many years, and the latest development has made a massive difference to the whole school. all lessons across the whole curriculum. how hard is it to get kids in gardening? actually, it is quite easy. they are really enthusiastic. they love being outdoors, they love doing the physical activity, and is actually very calming and relaxing for them. let's have a walk through here. it is notjust a random bits of garden. thought has gone into
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each particular area. this, for example, is a remembrance garden and members of the community who have passed away are honoured and remembered here. john, one of the stu d e nts remembered here. john, one of the students here, will explain to us how important this part of the garden is for you and why it you are so inspired to take part in gardening. why do you enjoy it?|j enjoy gardening because it is kind offun, and enjoy gardening because it is kind of fun, and adjust improve the environment, which helps us live as humans. you find it relaxing, as well? it is really relaxing. it is kind of putting your mind at ease, while you are picking them up and seeing how beautiful they grow. you have done an absolutely amazing job. thank you very much indeed. i will wander down here as well. it is not just about planting plants but eating them as well. this is a vegetable garden, i think we have some courgettes growing here as well. gardening is one of my favourite things to do because i get
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to learn different things, the names of plants, and also learn how to garden and do things at home for plants. fantastic job. congratulations on your award. what an inspirational team of young gardeners we have here. i am sure you will agree they have done a pretty impressivejob. you will agree they have done a pretty impressive job. we will ask you later if you have seen any frogs or toads. a report out today says the number of frogs and toads has declined enormously, so go frog spotting, please. if there is a pond. he looks really enamoured with that suggestion. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. two housing blocks in tottenham on the broadwater farm estate are at risk of collapse, and around 200 families have been told they will have to move out of their homes. it follows a recent safety inspection on the estate following structural tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire. the local council who own them has
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recommended residents should be moved out while the future of the blocks is decided. a decision will be made about their future next week. an inquest into the death of 18—year—old lauren sandell is due to be held at the coroner's court in walthamstow today. in october 2016 she died of meningitis w. her mum had asked her gp about getting her the vaccine against it, but lauren died before she could get it. i thought she was having a panic attack, ‘cause her breathing got bad. so i just totally assumed that she was so stressed about university and what she wanted to do, that she was having a panic attack. so, i mean, my husband and my son left half an hour before she actually collapsed, and that‘s what i thought i was dealing with. and then, obviously, just her breathing got worse. today marks the 70th anniversary of the empire windrush dropping its anchor at the tilbury docks in essex. almost 500 migrants were on board,
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seeking new opportunities and to help rebuild post—war britain. the first passengers were allowed to disembark the following day, on 22 june 1948. that will now officially become annual windrush day. let‘s have a look at the travel situation this morning. 0n the tubes, we‘ve got severe delays on the piccadilly line. 0n the trains, disruption on thameslink services between bedford and st pancras international due to a points failure. 0n the roads, there is traffic building on the m4 london—bound from junction 4 at heathrow. in barking, the a13 alfreds way has a lane closed in both directions at the junction with movers lane, for gas mains work. and in homerton, brooksbys walk is closed in both directions, also for gas mains work. lets have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it‘s the summer solstice today, and that will take place at 11:07am, later on this morning. it‘s a pretty nice day, as well. it will stay dry, and there‘ll be lots more sunshine to come,
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but last night we saw a cold front go through. so we are now in the fresh air, and it is a cooler feel to things, really, this morning. but there‘s lots of early sunshine around in northern areas. so it‘s really south—western areas of the capital that will see the best of the sunshine throughout the day. top temperatures today of 20 or 21 degrees celsius. a noticeable north—westerly wind. it‘s not feeling quite as warm or as muggy as it has done in recent days. the humidity levels will be lower, but the pollen is still very high. now, into this evening, lots of late sunshine around. 0vernight tonight, we‘re going to keep those clear skies. and this is how we‘ll start off the day tomorrow. it‘s going to feel quite cool, i think. temperatures will drop back into single figures overnight. so a cool but a sunny start to the day tomorrow. tomorrow dry, lighter winds, and it will start to feel warmer, drier and settled through the weekend and into next week. just look at those temperatures climb. it will start to feel warm warmer. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. families call for criminal proceedings over the premature deaths of hundreds of elderly hospital patients. a report published yesterday found that more than 650 people at gosport war memorial hospital had their lives shortened by excessive doses of painkillers. as far as i‘m concerned, they‘ve got to get a conviction for all the rest of the families who also have a genuine case. good morning, it is thursday 21 june. also this morning: a u—turn from president trump. he promises to stop separating children from families crossing the us border as he reverses his 0wn policy. paying for the nhs.
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the chancellor will outline plans for raising taxes later today. good morning. colleges and universities get nearly £1 billion a year from the universities get nearly £1 billion a yearfrom the eu, so universities get nearly £1 billion a year from the eu, so what happens to that money after brexit, and what could it mean for the students, the teachers and the colleges themselves? i am at this training couegein themselves? i am at this training college in leeds to find out. in sport, southgate‘s in a sling. the england camp had a rest day yesterday — but the england boss dislocated his shoulder, while out running. and carol has the weather from royal ascot this morning. good morning. good morning. it is gold cup day to day here at royal ascot. it is also ladies day and the summer solstice. a fresh start with
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a lot of sunshine around. showers across the north—east of scotland is slowly moving away, and blustery. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: families are calling for a criminal investigation, after an inquiry found hundreds of elderly patients were over—prescribed powerful painkillers without medicaljustification. an independent panel said more than 450 patients died prematurely at gosport memorial hospital, and a further 200 could have suffered a similar fate. they‘ll have to look at it in more detail. they‘ll have to bring 15 of the strongest cases into the criminal court, because that‘s where it deserves to go. whether that‘s my case or not, and as far as i‘m concerned, they‘ve got to get a conviction for all the rest of the families who also have a genuine case. but it‘s absolutely furious, these
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are elderly people who are not at end of life, they weren‘t receiving end of life, they weren‘t receiving end of life care, this is what so many are so upset about. after two decades of fighting, many have just in sight. at that time the staff at this hospital, it‘s a very different place the hospital. 94% of patients. ashley, the victims families are beyond, particularly at hampshire police. investigations which this report says were consistently poor. hampshire police have said that they are reviewing this report and they
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will consider how to act on any new evidence, the chief constable has said there does seem to be evidence in here that they haven‘t decided what they should do next. it has been suggested they bring in another force as an independent arbiter to decide how this investigation should proceed. president donald trump has ordered an end to the separation of migrant children from their parents at the us border with mexico. his administration‘s policy of "zero—tolerance" towards illegal immigration led to thousands of children being detained, away from their parents. but last night he signed an executive order bringing the policy to an end, as our washington correspondent gary 0‘donoghue reports. in the rain to welcome the change of heart by the administration. this stretch of the rio grande in brownsville, texas is where many try to enter the united states.
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every week, some drown in the attempt. those who make it face arrest and prosecution. it‘s at centres like this that adults and children were being separated, leading to those now notorious images of children apparently housed in cages. the national and international outcry was, in the end, too much even for president trump. but he struck a defiant tone while doing his u—turn. the national and international outcry was, in the end, too much even for president trump. but he struck a defiant tone while doing his u—turn. so we are keeping families together, and this will solve that problem. at the same time, we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a zero tolerance. we have zero tolerance for people that enter our country illegally. thousands of children have been separated from their parents in recent weeks and no—one really knows how long it will take to reunite them. it‘s going to be a herculean task, if you will, because it‘s going to require a lot of transparency in finding out exactly where these children were separated from the families and where those parents are. the churches are often
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at the forefront of immigrant welfare in the rio grande valley and just hours after the stroke of the presidential pen, all denominations gathered in the rain to welcome the change of heart by the administration. the disk gathering will be glad the president has ended the separation of children from his parents but the policy of zero tolerance of crossing the border illegally has not changed and that could mean increasing numbers of children in custody. theresa may has promised there will be a ‘smooth and orderly‘ exit from the eu, after her government‘s flagship brexit bill cleared its final parliamentary hurdle. she avoided a defeat with an eleventh hour concession to rebels in her party. we‘re joined now by our assistant political editor norman smith. norman, this hasn‘t been an easy road for the prime minister, and presumably there are more challenges ahead?
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it's it‘s over, is it? it's over, is it? mrs maze in a much position. she got the legislation safely to the commons. she goes into the emu negotiations, while the foot. but above all, she can now look ahead to future parliamentary battles, whether it be over customs legislation or in your zhon immigration. safe in the knowledge that come at the hour, tory rebels
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who threatened to revolt against mrs may are very, very cheery indeed against voting against the government. meanwhile, the home secretary, sajid javid, is calling on other eu countries to give details of their arrangements for british nationals living abroad after brexit. later today, he‘ll give more information on the settlement scheme for eu citizens wanting to stay in the uk. mrjavid has accused other countries of failing to match britain‘s progress on dealing with expats. making ‘upskirting‘ a specific criminal offence will move a step closer today, after it was controversially blocked last week. the prime minister reiterated her support for the bill which could lead to a two year prison sentence for people who take surreptitious photographs under other people‘s clothing. a previous attempt was scuppered by tory mp sir christopher chope who was concerned about the bill‘s lack of scrutiny. it will be reintroduced in parliament later. taxes will rise to pay for increased health spending,
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that‘s what the chancellor phillip hammond is expected to say when he delivers his annual mansion house speech later. he‘ll say the cost of the £20 billion funding package, announced by theresa may, will be met by taxpayers in a "fair and balanced way", as jon donnison reports. in the week the prime minister pledged an extra £20 billion of nhs funding, tonight we‘ll get some indication of how the government intends to pay for it. and the chancellor, philip hammond, is expected to say that taxes will have to rise as he gives his annual mansion house speech on the state of the uk economy. he is expected to say that any increases will be fair and balanced, to support the nhs we all use. this could put at risk the conservative party‘s manifesto pledge last year that there was a firm intention to reduce taxes. and in an early draft of the speech released overnight by the treasury,
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there is no mention of the so—called brexit dividend that theresa may said could be used to pay part of an increased nhs bill. economist have said they dismissed the idea that there will be a dividend from leaving the european union, arguing that cost to the economy outweigh any reduction in payments to the eu. jon donnison, bbc news. around 200 families have been told they will have to move out of their homes on the broadwater farm estate in north london following a recent safety inspection. structural tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire, found that two of the 11 blocks were at risk of collapse. the london borough of haringey, which owns the properties, has now recommended that residents should leave while the future of the buildings is decided. frogs and toads are abandoning our gardens according
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to a new survey, which shows a sharp fall in the number of sightings of the amphibians. it‘s being blamed on a lack of garden ponds. it is simple if you think of the reasons. a lot of us are filling in ponds. some people think that they area ponds. some people think that they are a lot of hassle or perhaps even dangerous. so filling them in and because of that, there is less of an environment of frogs and toads to thrive. perhaps you could send some pictures. a lot of people have been in touch. hearing them made, mating season. when did you last see a hedgehog? marie has said, talking of wildlife and gardens. carol is at royal ascot. we‘ve
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talked a lot about the dangers of air pollution. but what can you actually do to minimize the risks? well, maybe if you‘re doing the school run this morning, rather than take the quickest route, you could use the quiet backroads where there‘s less traffic. that‘s one of the pieces of advice from the people behind "clean air day". but what else can you do? we‘rejoined by larissa lockwood, who is the head of health at global action plan and 14 year old joe, who is an ambassador for clean air day. we arejoined by we‘rejoined by larissa lockwood, who is the head of heal at global action plan and 14 year old joe, who is an ambassador for clean air day. good morning to you both. talking about alternative routes, it seems like the obvious thing but when you‘re on the school run, you need to get there. but loads of time. the
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best thing you can do and what we recommend is walk or cycle on the school run because you will be exposed to less pollution. the windows are right. how can you be exposed to more pollution if you are out on the bicycle. the fumes will suckin out on the bicycle. the fumes will suck in through the cars events. levels are about two times higher. it's levels are about two times higher. it‘s always better to walk and drive. when you are walking to school, we are recommending quieter routes. you can be exposed again to double the amount on busy roads. pa rents double the amount on busy roads. parents walking their children on quieter routes. you are an ambassador to clean out, joe. you have a personal reason to doing that. when i was about ten or
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something, i woke up at some point in the middle of the night and i couldn't really breathe. it is said had a breathing problem and gave me a reliever in halo. then i got -- then you got asthma. do you feel it‘s worse in a place with a lot of pollution? 0r walking down a busy road? it gets worse. through the city centre? i was saying when we started this chat about how time is always tight. | this chat about how time is always tight. i can‘t imagine, however great a student you are, that you a lwa ys great a student you are, that you always have loads of time to get to school. you just want to take the quickest route, don‘t you? school. you just want to take the quickest route, don't you? yes, to be honest. i think the safest thing to do would be always... if you are
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asthmatic, then always take your reliever with you. that helps you. if you feel tension in your throat and you can‘t really breathe, you can take that to help you through it. and also getting the bus is quite good as well, because if every single person on a bus got in a car as well, it would be a lot less pollution. and walking, as well. that helps as well. you are getting nods from the side. this is about awareness, not just what to do nods from the side. this is about awareness, notjust what to do but ways of reducing the pollution. yes, we have been delighted by the level of interest up and down the country. there are thousands of organisations involved and 500 events going on. the aim of the day is to help the public know more about the risks of air pollution and provide some advice on risks and what to do. there is loads of advice on reducing
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pollution and avoiding exposure. how do you know if you are in an area where there is lots of pollution? i don‘t carry around measuring equipment, i can just don‘t carry around measuring equipment, i canjust tell if it smells a little bit more fumey or foggy. what can you do if you think you‘re being affected ? foggy. what can you do if you think you're being affected? monitoring is improving across the country, in many areas there is a postcode tracker where you can put in your postcode and find out what levels of pollution are like. but i think regardless of where you live, eve ryo ne regardless of where you live, everyone can take action to reduce air pollution. it is improving the health of all of us, contributing —— it is affecting the health of all of us, contribute into thousands of deaths every year, causing heart and lung disease, triggering asthma and stunting children‘s development. it is really worth everybody doing what they can to help reduce pollution and protect their health. how is your chest this morning? this morning it is fine, there are not many people on the road at this
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early time and i took my inhaler this morning. so you think later in the day, in russia, it might... differently, yes. thank you for your time. —— in rush hour. carol is at royal ascot with the weather this morning. will the sun be shining for ladies day? you don‘t even want to know what mike said about your hat this time. you are right, i don‘t. if you are standing outside for any length of time, it is a fresh start, fresher thanit time, it is a fresh start, fresher than it has been for the last few days. you can see how quiet it is. we have seen some horses out stretching their legs. the grandstand is nice and empty, it would be later on, and you can see where the royal box is. that lovely curvature sticking out, and look down the racecourse and it is lovely and tranquil. if you have an allergy
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to pollen, worth mentioning at this stage the pollen levels are high or very high across most of the uk. the exception to that is across the north of scotland, where they are moderate or low. royal ascot started on tuesday and runs until saturday and around 300,000 people are expected to visit royal ascot during that particular time to watch the races. the prize muggy for the first time will be over £30 million. for the gold cup, the winner will take home £500,000 —— prize—money. not bad for a lot of work. this morning we are looking at a fresh start. a fair bit of sunshine. the forecast for royal ascot is a dry one. highs of 18 to maybe 21. but you will notice the breeze, and if you are coming down, i strongly suggest you anchor your hat with an extra pin. for the rest of the uk it is that fresh start. we also have some sunshine around. a few showers, but many of those will clear away. you
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will also notice it will be a blustery day, especially windy across the far north of scotland. we will have strong gust of wind. for scotla nd will have strong gust of wind. for scotland this morning, we have some showers across the north and north—east. here it will be particularly windy. further south across scotland we are looking at some sunshine. 0ne across scotland we are looking at some sunshine. one or two showers in northern ireland, but they are starting to fade. the sun will come out for you where we haven‘t got it already, and the england and wales, already, and the england and wales, a fine start. 0ne already, and the england and wales, a fine start. one or two showers and a fine start. one or two showers and a little bit of cloud first thing as well. just here and there, but not spoiling it. temperatures picking up in the sunshine as we go through the day. more cloud will build across northern, central and eastern parts of england. but nonetheless, even here we will see some sunshine. the best of the sunshine in wales and south of the m4 corridor. temperatures up to about 21 in the south, but don‘t forget it is breezy. it is coming from the north—west, so the temperature will be tempered a little bit by the breeze. as we head on through the
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evening and overnight, the cloud we have building up through the day will tend to break. for many of us dry night. it will be a clear and cool night as well, with the winds easing. the other thing by the end of the night is a new weather front coming in from the north—west introducing thicker cloud and also some light on patchy rain and drizzle. so we start tomorrow with that scenario in the north—west. that cloud and some patchy rain and drizzle spreading across the highlands and the northern isles. for the rest of the uk we are looking at a lot of sunshine. lengthy sunny spells tomorrow, especially where we have the cloud today. temperatures climbing up a degree or so. as we go through the weekend, we are looking at a lot of dry weather this weekend although at times in the north of scotland it will be wet and windy. in the next week, the dry weather continues for most but the temperature rarely rise. next week we could have 30
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celsius for the first time this year across parts of the south—east of england. you will need a big hat for some shade them, carol. she has got one! i have another one to show you just yet, before the end of the programme. is it even bigger? it is a different shape. get those pens ready. that is a stunning hat. we were talking earlier about sajid javid saying he wants consideration abroad. we are talking about stu d e nts abroad. we are talking about students today. and ben is out this morning. you might wonder why i am surrounded by cars, we are at one of the big training facilities. this is a 1951
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car, originally made eight miles down the road from here. so restoring classic cars as well. one of the courses that they offer. what you are right, what happens to all that funding that universities and colleges get, after brexit? bill is one of the bosses. places like this ta ke one of the bosses. places like this take a lot of money to run. you have a great facility here. colleges and universities get a lot of money from europe, nearly £1 billion in the country. what does brexit mean for you? it is a relatively small amount of money we receive from the eu. nevertheless it is important, and without it it would make us struggle to maintain facilities as high—quality as this. to maintain facilities as high-quality as this. and there are so many different issues are related. it is about visas for students, access to funding, and that the skills gap. what you are doing here is teaching really practical vocational skills. are you worried that we won‘t have the right skills as a country? i am. eu migrants undertake a huge amount of skilled labour in this country but we see an opportunity for britain in
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brexit, in the fe sector, where we can up skill in areas like digital, engineering, and other skills shortage areas in the region and the country more widely. it is a tough one, isn‘t it? we will talk more later. so you have heard what some of the challenges are. let me introduce you to some of the students. tara, you are one of the stu d e nts students. tara, you are one of the students here. you are worried about what could happen. just explain why. i want to do her own make—up, and it will be hard trying to travel to other countries, especially if we leave the eu, because i can‘t go into europe. do you worry that that means your career options will be limited? yes. and mark, something similar you want to do. that was very much about working abroad. and doing yourjob internationally. tell us what worries you have.” doing yourjob internationally. tell us what worries you have. i want to study the technical side of live events, and live events all over the world. i think getting to them and
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setting up events in different countries will be a lot harder, because of this. and obviously if you are working freelance, as well asa you are working freelance, as well as a technician, that will be very ha rd to as a technician, that will be very hard to get work overseas, because of visas and green cards and things like that. and jena, you look after the work experience and basement programmes. two very worried students, it is fair to say. it is about access to that vocational training, but also finding their jobs. finding the jobs, and that is why the erasmus programme is so important. it gives them opportunities to see if they want to work abroad or to continue in their sector, as well. so it is a fantastic opportunity, it would be such a shame if we lose it. for now, thank you very much. jack, good morning to you. the challenge of course is all of this uncertainty. these places are businesses. they need to have a bit of certainty about what happens next, but as we heard that, there is none. yes, the
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big question is what will happen in 2020. will students from the eu have access to those student loans? there is no question they will be able to come here and study at universities, but will they be able to get loans to cover the tuition fees and a maintenance cost is? if they can‘t, will students from europe be able to find £30,000 to come to the uk when they could probably go to germany for free they could probably go to germany forfree or they could probably go to germany for free or france where it is not very much. they have options, and the question is whether they will wa nt to the question is whether they will want to come to the uk and pay all that money, but also whether they will get visas and have to pay quite a lot of money to go through that process when currently it is free. universities are having to grapple with these issues, and i think they wa nt with these issues, and i think they want a bit of clarity. clarity the real question. thank you very much. those are some of the issues, about clarity, about visas, about the skills, but also about finding someone to do those jobs. a lot of uncertainty for colleges and
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universities over things like funding, but also for the students and the teachers who are here. really interesting to hear what they are saying, especially the whole thing about freelancing, that security being abroad. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sara 0rchard. two housing blocks in tottenham on the broadwater farm estate are at risk of collapse, and around 200 families have been told they will have to move out of their homes. it follows a recent safety inspection on the estate following structural tests carried out after the grenfell tower fire. the local council who own them has recommended residents should be moved out while the future of the blocks is decided over the next week. an inquest into the death of 18—year—old lauren sandell is due to be held at the coroner‘s court in walthamstow today. in october 2016 she died of meningitis w. her mum had asked her gp
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about getting her the vaccine against it, but lauren died before she could get it. i thought she was having a panic attack, ‘cause her breathing got bad. so i just totally assumed that she was so stressed about university and what she wanted to do that she was having a panic attack. so, i mean, my husband and my son left half an hour before she actually collapsed, and that‘s what i thought i was dealing with. and then, obviously, just her breathing got worse. today marks the 70th anniversary of the empire windrush dropping its anchor at the tilbury docks in essex. almost 500 migrants were on board, seeking new opportunities and to help rebuild post—war britain. the first passengers were allowed to disembark the following day on 22 june 1948. that will now officially become annual windrush day. let‘s have a look at the travel situation this morning. 0n the tubes, we‘ve got minor delays on the piccadilly line, from acton town to heathrow, due to a signal failure. 0n the roads, in whitton,
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traffic is building on the a316 chertsey road from the hospital bridge road roundabout towards twickenham. in barking, the a13 alfreds way has a lane closed in both directions at the junction with movers lane, for gas mains work. and in homerton, brooksbys walk is closed in both directions also for gas mains work. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it‘s the summer solstice today, and that will take place at 11:07am, later on this morning. it‘s a pretty nice day for it, too. it will stay dry, and there‘ll be lots more sunshine to come, but last night we saw a cold front go through. so we are now in the fresh air, and it is a cooler feel to things, really, this morning. but there‘s lots of early sunshine around in northern areas. so it‘s really south—western areas of the capital that will see the best of the sunshine throughout the day. top temperatures today of 20 or 21 degrees celsius. a noticeable north—westerly wind. it‘s not feeling quite as warm or as muggy as it has done in recent days. the humidity levels will be lower, but the pollen is still very high. now, into this evening,
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lots of late sunshine around. 0vernight tonight, we‘re going to keep those clear skies. and this is how we‘ll start off the day tomorrow. it‘s going to feel quite cool, i think. temperatures will drop back into single figures overnight. so a cool but a sunny start to the day tomorrow. tomorrow dry, lighter winds, and it will start to feel warmer. drier and settled through the weekend and into next week. just look at those temperatures climb. it will start to feel warm warmer. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back tojon and naga. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news: families are calling for a criminal investigation, after an inquiry found hundreds of elderly patients were over—prescribed powerful painkillers without medicaljustification.
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an independent panel said more than 450 patients died prematurely at gosport memorial hospital, and a further 200 could have suffered a similar fate. they‘ll have to look at it in more detail. they‘ll have to bring 15 of the strongest cases into the criminal court, because that‘s where it deserves to go. whether that‘s my case or not, and as far as i‘m concerned, they‘ve got to get a conviction for all the rest of the families who also have a genuine case. the us president donald trump has ordered an end to the separation of migrant children from their parents at the us border with mexico. his administration‘s policy of zero tolerance towards illegal immigration led to thousands of children being detained without their parents, but last night he signed an executive order bringing the policy to an end. president trump has insisted his administration will retain its tough stance on illegal immigration. president trump has insisted his administration will retain its tough stance on illegal immigration.
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if you‘re weak, if you‘re weak, which some people would like you to be, if you‘re really, really pathetically weak, the country‘s going to be overrun with millions of people. and if you‘re strong, then you don‘t have any heart. that‘s a tough dilemma. perhaps i‘d rather be strong, but that‘s a tough dilemma. theresa may has vowed there will be a smooth and orderly exit from the eu, this after her government‘s flagship brexit bill cleared its final parliamentary hurdle. she avoided a backbench rebellion with an 11th hour concession to pro—eu tories. the department for exiting the eu said it marked a crucial step in the uk‘s preparations for brexit. meanwhile, the home secretary, sajid javid, is calling on other eu countries to give details of their arrangements for british nationals living abroad after brexit. later today, he‘ll give more information on the settlement scheme for eu citizens wanting to stay in the uk.
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mrjavid has accused other countries of failing to match britain‘s progress on dealing with expats. making upskirting a specific criminal offence will move a step closer today, after it was controversially blocked last week. the prime minister reiterated her support for the bill which could lead to a two year prison sentence for people who take surreptitious photographs under other people‘s clothing. a previous attempt was scuppered by tory mp sir christopher chope who was concerned about the bill‘s lack of scrutiny. it will be reintroduced in parliament later. taxes will have to rise to pay for increased health spending, that‘s what the chancellor phillip hammond is expected to say when he delivers his annual mansion house speech later. he‘ll say the cost of the 20—billion pound funding package announced by theresa may, will be met by taxpayers in a "fair and balanced way". in an early draft of the speech, there is no mention of the brexit dividend which the prime minister said could be used to cover part of the bill. dixons carphone has reported a 20%
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fall in annual profit, the company issuing a profit warning and revealing a huge data breach with millions of customer details being hacked. the new ceo alex baldock has pledged to cut nearly 100 carphone stores this year. and the prime minister of new zealand, jacinda ardern, has given birth to a baby girl, popping the news on social media. the baby was seven pounds, three ounces. she and her partner, clark,
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put it on social media. "welcome ounces. she and her partner, clark, put it on social media. " welcome to our village, we won", the only second world leader to give birth in office, the first was the late prime minister of pakistan, benazir bhutto. she will take six weeks on maternity leave but she will remain as prime minister during that time and her deputy will deal with day—to—day work and she will be back in office in six weeks. congratulations to her and anyone is has welcomed a baby. there have been reporters outside the hospital waiting for news in auckland. carol is going to have the weather shortly coming from royal ascot. she has had an array of hats. she hasn't responded to any of my message is on social media. she has blocked tube. you are dead to carol. i compared ——i compared her hat to a
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satellite. i'm onlyjealous because a hat like that would swamp me, i wouldn't even be able to see.|j wouldn't even be able to see.|j would seriously move on. injury worry for england but it‘s not harry, it‘s only gareth southgate, the manager. that is him in happier days before he dislocated his shoulder while out running. england‘s players return to training after a rest day yesterday. i say rest day, but manager gareth southgate didn‘t find it too relaxing. our correspondent david 0rnstein is in repino. david — what has southgate done?and where did he do it? i wonder if that is where gareth was running in the woods, whatever happened? running in the woods, whatever happened ? where running in the woods, whatever happened? where did he do it? there are plenty of lovely running routes around here in repino on the gulf of finland but as you may be able to
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see, they are quite treacherous in places with lots of rocks. it seems gareth southgate slipped, took the ball and try to cushion his fall but p°pped ball and try to cushion his fall but popped out his shoulder. luckily, the english doctor was behind him, managed to pick him up, an ambulance arrived and took into a private hospital. sorry to be gruesome at this hour but they popped his shoulder back in he returned. 0ne this hour but they popped his shoulder back in he returned. one of the first things he said was, i am sorry. yesterday was the first and only day that the staff and players would have completely off during their stay at the world cup. he held their stay at the world cup. he held the players meeting and you can see images of him wearing a sling which we might see a training today. gareth southgate on the sidelines. he said he might have to temper some of his celebrations if england are to score, maybe a fist bump, rather than a
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to score, maybe a fist bump, rather thanajump of to score, maybe a fist bump, rather than a jump of delight. lots more leisurely exertions. some of them went into st petersburg, 45 minutes from here, a few of them pictured at the hermitage art gallery, seeing the hermitage art gallery, seeing the sights and culture that this pa rt the sights and culture that this part of russia has to offer. a relaxed and david them if not their manager. we wish gareth a speedy recovery. lovely shots of the english players. we get back to the serious training. how is the squad looking? aside from southgate, there is only one injury concern, and that is only one injury concern, and that is over dele alli. a leg problem diagnosed as a minor thigh strain. but he has taken to social media saying he is confident he will do everything to get fit as soon as possible so fingers crossed for him
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ahead of the match on sunday in nizhny novgorod. they will train at 915 uk time. we will see 15 minutes of that. the media will have an open session for 15 minutes and we will see who of the 20 training. then it is the game on sunday. no other injury concerns that we know about. england of course, if they win that much, could book their place in the last 16. so far so good for england, on and off the pitch. no major dramas, just a certain case of a dislocated shoulder for gareth southgate. if dele alli is using, they do have the likes of reuben loftus. ijust want loftus. i just want to say, when he was described as popping the shoulder back in, did you watch the lethal
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weapon films? mel gibson, he pops it all back in. you can do that if it's the right sort of injury. don't do that at home. 0n the field yesterday — 3 games. 3 wins for the favourites. 3 very underwhelming games, but cristiano ronaldo managed to grab the headlines again.. he scored the only goal to knock morocco, he‘s the tournament‘s top scorer, with 4 in two games, and has now become the highest scoring european, in men‘s international football. you‘d have to give ronaldo, a pat on the back, for his goals at the world cup. don‘t try doing that to teammate, pepey though. it seems even the slightest touch, can really really really, hurt the defender. ‘tis but a scratch. we‘ve not had an update on his condition, after such a brutal challenge, and he could also end up in a sling like southgate butjust hope he‘s 0k. and not to be outdone in the race to the world cup oscars iran‘s goalkeeper alireza beira nvand was also getting in on the playacting. didn‘t fool the referee, though.
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and costa didn‘t take too kindly to it either 0verall, spain, struggled against a beligerent iran team. diego costa scored the game‘s only goal — although he didn‘t really know too much about it. perhaps the most bizarre moment, came with iran, searching for a winner. they had a throw and their players, tried to do one of those acrobatic ones, but didn‘t quite nail it! one for the training ground, we think. two more teams, can‘t now qualify for the knockout stages following. uruguay‘s1—nilwin over saudi arabia. luis suarez‘s goal not only means that saudi arabia, will be heading home, but also mo salah‘s egypt. both teams have two defeats from two games. uruguay and russia will go through. well, after ronaldo‘s exploits on wednesday, today sees lionel messi‘s opportunity to grab the headlines again. his argentina side, will hope to improve, on their draw against iceland. they play croatia at 7pm, and you can follow that game on bbc one.
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the games involving dennmark and australia, and france and peru can be found on radio 5 live and bbc sport website. on that france v peru in ekaterinburg, the most easterly of the world cup venues. the normal capacity of the stadium is only 23,000 and organisers needed it to be 35,000. after a deluge of psychic otters, cats, sausage dogs and lemurs, one more beautiful creature, has thrown his hand into the ring, the lesser spotted david beckham. he was speaking at a football academy in beijing, about the future of chinese football and without the need to pick a bowl of food, to determine the outcome, he made this bold prediction, looking ahead to the world cup final itself. 0k, ok, that‘s a very difficult question. the top two would be argentina and... and england, and england. why the laughter? disbelief in his audience.
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he would be pilloried if he didn‘t say england. i think he genuinely believes, like people are starting to. speaking of argentina, i want to go back to 1978, because we have some memorabilia. we had to make our own, things were tough. thank you very much indeed. thousands of british airways customers have had their tickets cancelled after a pricing error led to passengers buying seats at a reduced cost. thousands of british airways customers have had their tickets cancelled after a pricing error led to passengers buying seats at a reduced cost. those affected had reserved flights to tel aviv and dubai for less than £200. ba has apologised for the error and offered a full refund to those affected, as well as a £100 voucher off their next booking — thousands of british airways customers have had their tickets i‘m not sure how you‘re supposed to
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recognise the mistake of a £287 ticket. it‘s not ordinary at all. in fa ct, ticket. it‘s not ordinary at all. in fact, there were cheaper flights. ticket. it‘s not ordinary at all. in fact, there were cheaper flightslj have no idea what's going on, i don't know if i should book cars, hotels, some of the things i had already booked. i spent the last two days chasing them, finding out what is going on, why is it being counselled? is going on, why is it being counselled ? how is going on, why is it being counselled? how can i read book the flight counselled? how can i read book the flight and use the vouchers. they've managed to read book my flight but i've been left out of pocket, i'm still waiting from a refund, i've had to pay for new flights. i'm really angry about this because on friday, had i known they were cancelled, i could have booked the flights for over £200 less than what they are costing now. well, joining us now is the consumer and money expert sue hayward. what do you do if you‘re in that
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position? you get your voucher and an apology but what are your rights asa an apology but what are your rights as a consumer. what this really hinges on is if it is a clear pricing error. they are arguing yes, it was a mistake but actually, i think consumers have a real case against british airways because if you book a ticket for around 200 quid, why would he have any reason to think it was going to be a mistake? there are bears eat and that with some of the cheaper outlines to places like dubai. the total cost of that £1 there was actually £190 after the taxes and the passenger taxes that we had to pay is so normally, the normal price, you say around £200, is pre— taxis? tax can be about 170 quid on long haulflights so tax can be about 170 quid on long haul flights so i tax can be about 170 quid on long haulflights so i don‘t tax can be about 170 quid on long haul flights so i don‘t think it is unreasonable to think that around 200 quid was a good deal. if they had been offering fares for £20, you
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might have had reason to think hang ona might have had reason to think hang on a second, there is something fishy here. but these were fair is being sold, bought through a travel agent. i don‘t think as a consumer you would have reason to think there is something wrong with it. this is it, if you shop around and also if you bought from a travel agent, but the problem is as a consumer, right now you are potentially out of pocket. you have the refund from ba, but if you have booked hotels, car hire and trips, what do you do? the flight hire and trips, what do you do? the flight has been cancelled. your ticket has, and you won‘t be on the flight. ticket has, and you won‘t be on the flight. what you can do is use legal assistance, because that is a free legal service and they may intervene. they may be able to contact intervene. they may be able to co nta ct ba intervene. they may be able to contact ba and see if there is a case to answer for covering if you have to cancel hotels, car hire, that sort of thing. it has a knock—on effect. that sort of thing. it has a knock-on effect. sojust that sort of thing. it has a knock-on effect. so just to be clear, sorry to bang on on this
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point, they got a price of £1 for the ticket and usually it is £200 plus taxes. they do vary, but i would say a round £200. so it would have been really around £400. yes. and they got them for £195. why does ba think it is justified in this? and they got them for £195. why does ba think it isjustified in this7m is banging on about contract law and saying it has the right it was it said we made a mistake to give them the money back and then issuing the £100 voucher. they are trying to stick to saying we have made a mistake. if i go stick to saying we have made a mistake. ifi go to stick to saying we have made a mistake. if i go to a shop and pick up mistake. if i go to a shop and pick up an item and it is priced at £2.50, and the cashier says that looks low, but i say that as the price on the ticket, i have done that before, they say ok, we have to sell it to you at that price. why does that not apply with airline tickets? well, actually, legally if you go into a shop and a top is
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£2.99 and they say it should be £9.99, legally they don‘t actually have to sell it to you at that price. very often big high—street stores will because it is good pr, but they don‘t have too. it is an invitation to buy, basically. the price of the ticket is an invitation to buy. where you could get them on thatisif to buy. where you could get them on that is if for example they were delivering you in with huge banners saying everything £2.99 and then saying everything £2.99 and then saying we made a mistake, it is £9.99. 50 saying we made a mistake, it is £9.99. so what. us from not believing any offer? this is the problem. i go to dubai a lot, and if i received an offer for 200 problem. i go to dubai a lot, and if i received an offerfor 200 quid, i would have snapped it up and thought thatis would have snapped it up and thought that is a good deal. airlines are competing against each other. with the world cup on, you could be thinking they are wanting people to go to different destinations, certainly tel aviv and dubai, with 40 degrees heat it is very hot. people may not want to go, so they
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may be cutting the fares. as a consumer you would have grounds to say i genuinely believe that fear. and some of those consumers in that film seemed like they want to fight this. absolutely. thank you for explaining that, it is very clear, and a very complicated issue. i thought it was £2.99, if it says it on the sticker. if it says you are wearing a satellite dish on your head, you would expect to wear it. those are mike‘s words, not mine? head, you would expect to wear it. those are mike's words, not mine? he is very rude, isn‘t he? it is beautiful here this morning. you can see the infamous pink seat amid a sea of green seats. and nick smith, communications director here. good morning, welcome back. thank you very much, lovely to be here. every year we talk about clothes and what you can wear in the different areas of royal ascot. so any changes this
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year? well, we are asking in the main public enclosure to wear a smart matching suit, not strictly a new rule but something we are really encouraging. and we have asked them to wear socks this year. the trend for young gentleman not to wear socks, but perhaps that is not the right thing at royal ascot.“ socks, but perhaps that is not the right thing at royal ascot. if you are coming to the royal enclosure, what are the rules? jumpsuits are now acceptable, aren‘t they? what are the rules? jumpsuits are now acceptable, aren't they? yes, jumpsuits are acceptable. we like to move with the times dumber and last year with all the time was right to bring in the jumpsuit, year with all the time was right to bring in thejumpsuit, but year with all the time was right to bring in the jumpsuit, but generally speaking men, morning suits with a black or grey top hat, and ladies smart attire, skirt below the knee, lovely hat like yours. bless you, thatis lovely hat like yours. bless you, that is not what mike thinks about my hat, the cheeky monkey. the other thing you are looking at this year are behavioural issues. tel is about that. yes, we are being very vigilant. we are very aware what is happening notjust vigilant. we are very aware what is happening not just at vigilant. we are very aware what is happening notjust at racecourses but it all leisure events. we have
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more security, they are more visible, they are wearing hype is, we have drugs method dogs, and we are telling everybody at royal ascot that we are here to look after them as best we can. i am hanging onto my hat for a very good reason. it is blustery. ladies, if you are coming to royal ascot or anywhere else which a hat, pin it down well. men, seem to you. the forecast is a dry one. it will be 18 to 20 celsius this afternoon with sunny spells but there is a blustery winds. the wind is making it feel chilly if you‘re exposed to it. for the rest of the country a fresh start that it has been. it has been so muggy, especially in the south, of late. but there will be a lot of dry weather and warm sunshine as well. if we take a look around the country, starting off in scotland at nine a.m.. there is a lot of dry weather but across the north and north—east, the northern isles, we have showers. they will tend to fade as we go through the morning but it is also very windy here. strong gust
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of wind. the rest of scotland is looking at sunshine. northern ireland has some showers, but they will fade. the sun will come out for you as well. northern england and northern wales, apart from the odd shower it is a dry start and began a sunny one. little bits and pieces of cloud. as we go through the course of the day, the cloud will start to build across central, eastern and northern england. that doesn‘t mean to say it will be overcast. they will still be sunny spells, just not wall—to—wall blue skies. the sunniest skies are likely to be south of the m4 corridor, and also wales. blustery wind, taking the edge of the temperatures which at best today will be 21. yesterday we had 26. pollen levels while high or very high across the uk, the exception to that is across the north. here we have across northern scotla nd north. here we have across northern scotland low or moderate levels. through the evening and overnight, the wind will start to ease down. a cool night in the clear skies and what you will also find it by the
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end of the night we will have more cloud coming across the north—west of scotla nd cloud coming across the north—west of scotland and northern ireland, thick enough for a little bit of rain and some drizzle. tomorrow morning we start on a fresh note and that cloud across northern scotland spreading right the way across the north, producing again some patchy light rain and drizzle. the rest of the uk, more sunshine. lengthy sunny spells tomorrow with the temperature up spells tomorrow with the temperature upa spells tomorrow with the temperature up a notch on today. that is the trend as we go through the weekend. the temperature will continue to rise. there will be some spots of rain across northern scotland, windy at times, but as we head into next week, as the temperature continues to climb, some parts of south—east england by the end of the week could well be looking at 30 celsius. you will take off, with that hat, if you are not careful. hat has already taken off are not careful. hat has already ta ken off by are not careful. hat has already taken off by itself. i was running after it like something out of benny hill. did you not know it was going to be windy today? you would think carol would know, of all people!
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to be windy today? you would think carolwould know, of all people! she is getting so fed up with us today. lam is getting so fed up with us today. i am rubbish at putting in hat pins. whatever the secret is, it is wonderful. it looks great. my fair lady. when a group of pupils from a school in north—west london heard about plans for a staff car park extension, they had a better idea. they got together and turned the patch of land into a wildlife—friendly garden. now, the green—fingered gang have been given a gold award from the royal horticultural society for their creation. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the school for us now. we have been talking about frogs, as well, and how we need more wildlife spaces well, and how we need more wildlife 5 pa ces to well, and how we need more wildlife spaces to encourage more nature. i am not sure if you have seen any of those, but it certainly looks busy behind you. we have some good news on the fog front. we will come to that a little later. as you say, this could have been a car park. that was the original plan. the
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stu d e nts that was the original plan. the students and staff here said let‘s not do that, let‘s turn it into a garden, and today the royal horticultural society have honoured this team at the best in the country. and you can tell us why, as you are one of the judges. yes, so our competition has been running for the last seven years and it is all about finding those really passionate and dedicated young gardeners, and stories that might inspire other schools to do the same sort of thing. that's really why this school here has won a team of the year category. this school has developed a garden over the last ten years from a wasteland to this amazing garden you see now. this team of students that we will see today are a testament to that. they have developed this new space for the whole school to learn outside, all the curriculum subjects are cove red all the curriculum subjects are covered and a very inspiring story. let‘s have a chat to some of those students. i will ask these guys
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here, doing a finejob. why do students. i will ask these guys here, doing a fine job. why do you enjoy gardening so much?|j here, doing a fine job. why do you enjoy gardening so much? i enjoy gardening because we get to plant these amazing plants, and they are very small and after weeks and weeks they grow up amazingly. and as we plant herbs and spices we get to use them in the kitchen of our school to make different meals. thank you very much indeed, very inspiring stuff. i will make my way around here and have a quick chat to the member of staff who has overseen this project. and you have a baby frog. we have, and newts and tadpoles as well. it might bea and newts and tadpoles as well. it might be a bit difficult to see the frog. why do you think this garden has been such a success and won the first prize? it has been such a success because of the variety of elements we have in the garden. it is not just about elements we have in the garden. it is notjust about gardening but wildlife, pond dipping, and education through nature. and the kids loved it, that they? and many congratulations. let‘s have a quick
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look down here, the kids really enjoying it, they are saying how relaxing and inspiring they find it. congratulations to all the staff and pupils, and good that we saw some baby frogs. wearing tapioca? love it! i wonder what the kids' reactions were when they were told they had to be thereat six a.m.. don‘t knock it, these are kids who managed to get rid of staff car park in favour of wildlife. they can do anything. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sara 0rchard. two housing blocks in tottenham on the broadwater farm estate are at risk of collapse, and around 200 families have been told they will have to move out of their homes. it follows a recent safety inspection on the estate following structural tests carried
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out after the grenfell tower fire. the local council who own them has recommended residents should be moved out while the future of the blocks is decided, over the next week. an inquest into the death of 18—year—old lauren sandell is due to be held at the coroner‘s court in walthamstow today. in october 2016, she died of meningitis w. her mum had asked her gp about getting her the vaccine against it, but lauren died before she could get it. i thought she was having a panic attack, ‘cause her breathing got bad. so i just totally assumed that she was so stressed about university and what she wanted to do that she was having a panic attack. so, i mean, my husband and my son left half an hour before she actually collapsed, and that‘s what i thought i was dealing with. and then, obviously, just her breathing got worse. today marks the 70th anniversary of the empire windrush dropping its anchor at the tilbury docks in essex. almost 500 migrants were on board, seeking new opportunities and to help rebuild post—war britain. the first passengers were allowed to disembark the following day, on 22 june 1948. that will now officially become annual windrush day. let‘s have a look at the travel situation this morning.
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0n the tubes, we‘ve got minor delays on the piccadilly line from acton town to heathrow, due to a signal failure. 0n the roads, in chiswick, getting busy on a4 great west road approaching the hogarth roundabout, heading towards hammersmith. in barking, the a13 alfreds way has a lane closed in both directions at the junction with movers lane, for gas mains work. and in homerton, brooksbys walk is closed in both directions, also for gas mains work. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it‘s the summer solstice today, and that will take place at 11:07am, later on this morning. it‘s a pretty nice day for it, too. it will stay dry, and there‘ll be lots more sunshine to come, but last night we saw a cold front go through. so we are now into fresher air, and it is a cooler feel to things, really, this morning. but there‘s lots of early sunshine around in northern areas. so it‘s really south—western areas of the capital that will see the best of the sunshine throughout the day. top temperatures today of 20 or 21 degrees celsius.
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a noticeable north—westerly wind. it‘s not feeling quite as warm and muggy as it has done in recent days. the humidity levels will be lower, but the pollen is still very high. now, into this evening, lots of late sunshine around. 0vernight tonight, we‘re going to keep those clear skies. and this is how we‘ll start off the day tomorrow. it is going to feel quite cool, i think. temperatures will drop back into single figures overnight. so a cool but a sunny start to the day tomorrow. tomorrow dry, lighter winds, and it will start to feel warmer. dry and settled through the weekend and for next week, just look at those temperatures climb. it will start to feel warm warmer. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. families call for criminal proceedings over the premature deaths of hundreds of elderly hospital patients.
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a report published yesterday found that more than 450 people at gosport war memorial hospital had their lives shortened by excessive doses of painkillers. as far as i‘m concerned, they have got to get a conviction for all the rest of the families who also have a genuine case. good morning, it‘s thursday the 21st ofjune. also this morning: a u—turn from president trump — he promises to stop separating children from families crossing the us border as he reverses his own policy. good morning, colleges and universities get about a billion a year from the universities get about a billion a yearfrom the eu, but universities get about a billion a year from the eu, but what happens to that money after brexit? well i‘m at one of the country‘s biggest
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colleges here in leeds finding out what it could mean for students, staff and the college itself. in sport, "sling when you‘re winning." the england manager gareth southgate, has apologised to england‘s medical staff, after he dislocated a shoulder while out running near the team‘s hotel in their beach resort. new zealand‘s prime minister has given birth to a baby girl. jacinda ardern is the first world leader ever to take maternity leave. and carol has the weather from royal ascot this morning. 0h, very stylish! lovely! oh, very stylish! lovely! thank you, good morning. it is gold cup day and ladies day and the summer solstice. it is breezy if you‘re stepping out, bear that in it is breezy if you‘re stepping out, bearthat in mind. it is breezy if you‘re stepping out, bear that in mind. it is a fresh start, but for many it is a sunny one with still some showers in the north. but the sun will come out
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here too. more details in 15 minutes. you should have thought about that breeze, hold on tight! first, our main story. families are calling for a criminal investigation, after an inquiry found hundreds of elderly patients were over—prescribed powerful painkillers without medicaljustification. an independent panel said more than 450 patients died prematurely at gosport memorial hospital, and a further 200 could have suffered a similarfate. 0ur correspondent richard lister is in gosport for us this morning. richard, it is still, the details and the scale of the findings of the inquiry sinking in still? it is quite astonishing when you‘re talking of more than 650 lives shortened unnecessarily at this hospital in the 1990s. for the families of the victims, the report is vindication for two decades they
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have been campaigning forjustice for their relative, who they suspected had died wrongfully. for staff, it is a difficult time. 94% of patients today say they recommend the treatment here. so the attention is focussed on what happens next and to that what is hampshire police going to do? the families want criminal prosecutions. that means these cases have to be reopened. there were three investigations into the complaints and the report says the complaints and the report says the quality of the investigations was consistently poor. police are saying now that there is information which they haven‘t seen and they wa nt to which they haven‘t seen and they want to put together a process for deciding what the next step should be. for the families, that has to be nothing less than a route to prosecutions. thank you very much. we are going to speak to one of the local mps shortly. president donald trump has ordered an end to the separation of migrant children from their parents at the us border with mexico.
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his administration‘s policy of "zero—tolerance" towards illegal immigration led to thousands of children being detained, away from their parents. but last night he signed an executive order bringing the policy to an end, as our washington correspondent gary 0‘donoghue reports. this stretch of the rio grande in brownsville, texas is where many try to enter the united states. every week, some drown in the attempt. those who make it face arrest and prosecution. it‘s at centres like this that adults and children were being separated, leading to those now notorious images of children apparently housed in cages. the national and international outcry was, in the end, too much even for president trump. but he struck a defiant tone while doing his u—turn. so we are keeping families together, and this will solve that problem. at the same time, we are keeping a very powerful border and it continues to be a zero tolerance.
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we have zero tolerance for people that enter our country illegally. thousands of children have been separated from their parents in recent weeks and no—one really knows how long it will take to reunite them. it's going to be a herculean task, if you will, because it's going to require a lot of transparency in finding out exactly where these children were separated from the families and where those parents are. the churches are often at the forefront of immigrant welfare in the rio grande valley and just hours after the stroke of the presidential pen, all denominations gathered in the rain to welcome the change of heart by the administration. everyone here will be glad the president has ended the separation of children. but they know the policy of zero tolerance of people
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crossing illegally has not changed and that could mean increasing numbers of adults and children in custody. theresa may has promised there will be a "smooth and orderly" exit from the eu, after her government‘s flagship brexit bill cleared its final parliamentary hurdle. she avoided a defeat with an eleventh hour concession to rebels in her party. we‘re joined now by our assistant political editor norman smith. norman, this hasn‘t been an easy road for the prime minister, and presumably there are more challenges ahead? there will be a lot more battles to fight. but i suspect in downing street they‘re feeling more chipper this morning than they were 24 hours ago after last night‘s threatened tory revolt basically fizzled out for what many regard as the offer of little more than a parliamentary fig leaf. because what it means is that
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mrs may has now managed to get the two key pieces of brexit legislation safely through the commons in the article 50 and the withdrawal bill. her party still kind of intact. there were only six rebels last night. and she goes into the eu negotiations without a sort of damaging defeat hanging around her neck. but by far the biggest boost for her i think will be the increased confidence she will have that she can face up to future parliamentary battles over things like the customs bill or new immigration rules with more confidence, because she knows that cometh the hour, tory rebels are very, very wary of voting against her. thank you very much. taxes will have to rise to pay for increased health spending, that‘s what the chancellor phillip hammond
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is expected to say when he delivers his annual mansion house speech later. he‘ll say the cost of the £20 billion funding package announced by theresa may, will be met by taxpayers in a "fair and balanced way". in an early draft of the speech there is no mention of the "brexit dividend" which the prime minister said could be used to cover part of the bill. the mobile phone and electronics retailer dixons carphone has reported a 24% fall in its annual profit. the company issued a profit warning last month, and last week it revealed a huge data breach, with millions of customers‘ details hacked. the new ceo alex baldock has already pledged to shut nearly 100 carphone warehouse stores this year. it‘s a girl! the prime minister of new zealand, jacinda arden, has given birth to her first child in auckland. she‘s nowjust the second world leader to give birth whilst in office. 0ur correspondent hywel griffith joins us now from sydney.
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so there has been a great deal of excitement about this in new zealand? yes, the whole country was watching and waiting since she went into hospital in the early hours of the morning, driven by her partner, who had been tweeting pictures of herjust who had been tweeting pictures of her just before reading who had been tweeting pictures of herjust before reading through her cabinet papers. but after about 12 or 13 hours of waiting, the news came ina or 13 hours of waiting, the news came in a very modern way with a post on instagram that young baby adern has been born. the message was welcome to our village. that is very modern. the parenting position will be modern, he will become the first dad or the first father for new
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zealand. he will be doing most of the parenting once jacinda ardern‘s six weeks of maternity leave comes to an end. this is being seen as a landmark for new zealand. people are proud about the gender equality of having a female prime minister giving birth in office and somebody who can take maternity leave and then go back to herjob. thank you very much. they all look very well and relaxed in that picture. good for them. mike will keep us up—to—date with the sport. and carol will keep us up—to—date with the weather from royal ascot. families are demanding a criminal inquiry into what they call the "unforgiveable actions" at gosport memorial hospital. yesterday a report found more than 450 patients died after they were prescribed powerful painkillers without medicaljustification.
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relatives had campaigned for almost a decade to uncover the truth and end, what they described as, their "harrowing" wait for answers. i said, "he was all right when i left him yesterday, and you‘re telling me he could be dead while we are talking?" she said, "well, he hasn‘t got long to live." he was admitted on 14th. 14th, yeah. and he died on 18th. three days before he was going to get discharged and he come home... he sat in the chair there and he said, "pauline," he said, "please, please tellthem not to pump any more morphine." he knew what they was pumping in him. it‘s about time — to put it mildly — and they will have the look at it in more detail. they will have to bring 15 of the strongest cases into the criminal court, because that‘s where it deserves to go. they have got to a get a conviction for all the rest
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of families who also have a genuine case. that was gillian mckenzie, who was the first person to report her concerns to the police. her mp stephen lloyd joins us now from westminster. thank you forjoining us here. it has taken so long, can you understand the frustrations of people like gillian? hugely. mrs mackenzie first reported it 20 years ago. think about that. to the hampshire police and the senior managers at the trust. she was to bed off. if she has been listened to, bluntly, lives would have been saved. she came to see me ten years ago when i was still the candidate in eastbourne and told me this incredible story. i found in eastbourne and told me this incredible story. ifound it in eastbourne and told me this incredible story. i found it hard to believe. it sounded like a movie script. but i promised to read all her papers, her reports and i did so over the weekend and i came to the
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conclusion this absolute nightmare may well be true. i took it up to westminster, where a colleague of mine happened to be the liberal democrat shadow health minister. he also agreed with me and the relatives and gillian that this could be true. i then get elected, continued lobbying and campaigning on behalf of the remarkable mrs mackenzie to try and get to the truth and then we had a bit of good luck and that is norman lamb in the coalition became the health ministered and he pushed for an inquiry. we onlyjust got it literally it was launched only a few weeks before the general election. four years later, at least the relatives now have the truth. what i wa nt to relatives now have the truth. what i want to see is i want to see them getjustice. want to see is i want to see them get justice. because it want to see is i want to see them getjustice. because it is quite clear from this report and getjustice. because it is quite clearfrom this report and i‘m using
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my words advisedly, but it is clear from the report it is notjust about 460 people given drugs inappropriately, your viewers know andi inappropriately, your viewers know and i know what that means is over 450 people were killed. that is not the word used in the report. the report used the word shortening life, rather than kill. it does. i'm using that word myself deliberately. because i‘m not a lawyer, but i know the other word for inappropriately shortening life is they were killed. that means i‘m determined, i have already raised it in the house yesterday, and i will continue to do so until we get it, i‘m determined that key named individuals within the report actually face criminal prosecution, have their day in court and have to take responsibility for the absolutely shocking and i cannot use that word strongly enough, shocking actions that took place all those years ago in gosport. i would
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like to say one last thing, i want to flag that a couple of nurses incredibly bravely in the 90s tried to whistle blow and they were ignored. they de serve a medal and mrs mackenzie deserves a statue. families say they want a criminal inquiry, how confident are you that the systems are in place to allow that to happen? do you think it will happen that that that process begins? it has to and it can't take another 20 years. gillian is now 84. i was pleased with whatjeremy hunt said in his statement yesterday. he indicated that he would be thinking the same way as me and made a point of saying that it cannot be the, the inquiry can‘t be done by the hampshire police, it needs to be a different force. but i will be
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pressing for this. the families got the truth yesterday, they now deserve justice. what do you say to people who might have elderly relatives who are going into hospital in the future and wondering, could this happen now, could it happen again in my community? how confident are you that it couldn‘t? community? how confident are you that it couldn't? you can never be sure. the national health service has over a million staff. what i think is true is changes to the last ten yea rs think is true is changes to the last ten years or so, particularly with the care quality commission means that i think it is much, much harder for rogue elements to get away with what doctor barton and some of the people did. not least that a number of consultants who should have been utterly responsible to oversee what doctor barton was doing just ignored it basically ignored the whistle—blowers. i think that is
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harder today but what it does demonstrate, and to me i think this is so important, i think there is still a cultural challenge in the modern world where elderly frail people not seen. that is not right. and if this shocking horror of a report means that we just begin to be far more focused across the piece on the needs and the welfare of elderly frail people, then some good has hopefully come out of what was an utter, utter nightmare. stephen lloyd mp, thank you forjoining us here on breakfast. we will continue to follow that story as investigations and allegations are followed up. carol is a royal as got this morning. it looks windy. we will have a little look at your
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sartorial choices later on. thank you. it is windy notjust at royal ascot but across the board. it is gold cup day today and frankie dettori is hoping to make this his sixth gold cup win on stradivarius. if you are into having a punt, wild illusion is another tip for you. it is ladies day, we are hoping to see some high fashion today. everybody is wondering what colour of hacked her majesty the queen will be wearing. she wore yellow on tuesday, pale blue yesterday so i am going for green myself. it should stay dry today but it is breezy. if you are coming down and you are wearing a hat, make sure you anchor it well or you will be running after it.
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temperatures 18 to 21. generally across the uk does a fresh start today and we are looking at some sunny spells. but there is some showery rain across the north and north—east of scotland. it will be particularly windy in the north of scotland today. northern ireland, the shallows you have will fade through the morning and you too will have sunny spells. for most of england and wales, it is a dry start and afunny england and wales, it is a dry start and a funny one. but it is blustery. if you are out in it, it is cooler thanit if you are out in it, it is cooler than it was this time yesterday and with the wind, it does feel chilly if you are hanging around for any length of time. as go through the course of the day the sunshine will prevail. we will see more cloud build—up across northern and eastern parts of england. there was to be sent sunny spells but the lion‘s share will be across wales and south
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of the m4 corridor. temperatures up to 21 but tempered by the wind. the pollen levels are high and very high across the board apart from in northern scotland where they are moderate or low. it will be a cool night under clear skies and by the end of the night we will have more cloud coming in across the north and west of the country. that will be thick enough in northern and western scotla nd thick enough in northern and western scotland for some patchy rain and also some drizzle. we start tomorrow ona also some drizzle. we start tomorrow on a fresh note under clear skies. the cloud in the north drifts across northern scotland. for much of the uk tomorrow we will have lengthy sunny spells, particularly if we we re sunny spells, particularly if we were going to see more cloud than today. as a result, the temperature will be a bit higher. as we head into the weekend there will still be some dry weather around. northern scotla nd some dry weather around. northern scotland seeing some windy conditions. the temperature continue to rise. by the time get to the middle or end of next week, parts of the south—east of england could well be looking at 30 celsius for the first time this year. carol, thanks
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very much. we were getting caught up talking about frogs there. i don‘t think you would have seen anywhere you are. did you know there is a shortage of frogs? no, ididn‘t. i no, i didn‘t. i used to love collecting tadpoles when i was a child. there was an abundance in those days. maybe you caused the shortage, carol! no, i‘m sure it is safe. carol is getting a lot of stick this morning. frogs and toads have traditionally been one of the most common sights in our gardens, but it seems they‘re abandoning us, as a new survey shows their numbers are falling. so people are being urged to create their own simple ponds and pools to tempt the amphibians back.
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dr karen haysom is from the wildlife charity amphibian and reptile conservation and joins us now. good morning. what is a simple pond? it is just good morning. what is a simple pond? it isjust a good morning. what is a simple pond? it is just a small pond with shallow edges and shallow sides and plants around it so that your frogs and toads climb in and out. how big? a lot of people think if you are going to have a pond you will have an acre in your back garden but most people have pretty small but gardens. in your back garden but most people have pretty small but gardensm could be as small as a washing—up bowl size. just a cool, damp area which gives wildlife a bit of water. it can do so much good in your garden. is that the reason, because people have been filling in their ponds over the past couple of decades that we have seen a sharp decline in frogs? that might be one of the things but there are so many things which affect our gardens. it matters what is in your garden and also the habitat around it. these
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little creatures move around an area. if your neighbour has a pond and their habitats near you, you can help them. how do you know that we are seeing fewer frogs and toads at the moment? what are the survey is telling us? it may be people are not spending enough time in their gardens to see frogs and toads, rather than there being fewer around? absolutely. we're not sure if it could be that. that is important as well. it is really good to get out into nature and have those experiences. it might be a signal that the animals are genuinely less common or people could be getting out there less and seeing them. either of those things is pretty important because it is such a wonderful thing to be able to do. i'm feeling guilty because i have not seen a frog in my garden for yea rs have not seen a frog in my garden for years and then we filled in a pond when we moved house. we have
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young kids and we are thinking about safety. lots of people have been in touch to say you have got frogs and toads in your gardens and you have sentin toads in your gardens and you have sent in your pictures. this one is from leslie in cambridgeshire. that is not leslie! this is not rachel but this is what she saw in cheshire. this is from deni‘s garden in lancashire as well. we have got another picture as well. this woman sent a picture and the frog is in her hand and it is as big as one segment of her finger. absolutely tiny. i know they have to start out as babies. they do, you are right! what do you do to encourage more wildlife? ponds are great that you can leave
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some areas of your grasp the bit longer so they have cooler and damp places. you can plant native plants and places. you can plant native plants a nd flowers places. you can plant native plants and flowers in your garden. you can think about the chemicals you using your garden and make sure you cut back on those so there is more food for the animals to eat. and you can make sure your garden is not sealed tight. a lot of people wonder why there is not any wildlife but they have closed all the fences so they cannot move between gardens. to that battle between not wanting the neighbour‘s cat to come into your garden... but wanting frogs and toads. why are they important to nature? they have an important place in food webs. they creep around eating things like slugs and flies and things which might be eating your garden plants which you enjoyed. and they also love food from lots of other animals like grass snakes. and when they are
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tiny, tadpoles, pretty much everything eats frogspawn and tadpoles so they are playing their pa rt tadpoles so they are playing their part in nature. but i think also say many people have their first experience of wildlife by seeing a frog or a toad orfrogspawn, the first sign of spring. you see how much fun those kids were having this morning seeing those. they were loving it. and what a pity if we could not pass on those experiences to our children. a good message. thank you for coming in. whatever you are up to, i imagine how you wa nt to you are up to, i imagine how you want to know how you‘re getting out and about. we will be back at half—past. see you soon. it is probably more comfortable
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first thing this morning. temperatures haven‘t been as high through the night, because that warmerair through the night, because that warmer air has been pushed away towards the south and replaced by this northerly wind bringing in fresher conditions. this afternoon it will remain dry. lots of sunshine out there as well. quite a strong wind, particularly in the north—east of scotland, where we could see gusts of 45 to 50mph. that wind coming in from the north—west and quite breezy. a bit fresher compared to yesterday. temperatures down by a few degrees. particularly in the south. 21 in london. 16 to 18 elsewhere. but with some sunshine, that will still feel pleasant and warm. tonight we will have clear skies. still a bit of breeze in the far north—east. it will turn chilly in the early hours of friday morning. the temperatures down into single figures. a chill first thing.
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but lots of sunshine on friday. lots of blue skies continuing into the afternoon. a bit of cloud across the far north of scotland making the sunshine hazy. temperatures up by a degree on friday. so about 16 to 22 celsius. into the weekend, this big area of high pressure is anchoring itself across the uk and that means light winds, very settled weather. not a lot of change over the weekend. there will be plenty of dry weather, lots of sunshine around and it is going to warm up as we go through the weekend and certainly into next week as well. these are the temperatures we are looking at. the mid 20s by sunday. by next week temperatures into the high 20s and for some the low 30s. this is business live from bbc news with samantha simmonds and vishala sri—pathma. today the british finance minister, phillip hammond, is set to give a crucial speech on the future of the uk economy. live from london, that‘s our top story
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on thursday 21st june. phillip hammond takes to the operating theatre! with brexit looming ever closer, the uk finance minister is faced with some tough challenges in order to boost spending on healthcare. also in the programme... a test of india‘s mettle! the country raises its taxes on us goods in retaliation to washington‘s tariffs on steel — we‘ll cross live to delhi for the latest.
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