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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 21, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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“p up to coast but inland, temperatures up to maybe 25 degrees. cooler for the time being but it will not last. temperatures will climb again and by next week sunspots will hit 30 degrees. health secretaryjeremy hunt calls for a shift from a blame culture into a learning one at the nhs — but there are still fears the scandal at gosport could be repeated. i've worked with a group of whistle—blowers who have said that, basically, if you whistle—blowers in the nhs you will be fired. more than 3 million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn as the government outlines the process. throughout the process, we will be looking to grant, not for reasons to refuse. president trump vows to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with hugh. and there are injury concerns both
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on and off the pitch for england. gareth southgate will have to stay calm in the dugout as he has dislocated his shoulder. one concern on the pitch, dele alli missing out on the pitch, dele alli missing out on training. we have the latest from the england camp later. and ben rich has all the weather. it's going to get warmer as temperatures will head upwards. a bit cooler out there today but that is not stopping the sunshine and there's plenty more sunshine to come. it is the longest day of the year. more on the summer solstice coming up. also coming up, new zealand's prime minister jacinda ardern has given birth to herfirst child — a girl — making her only the second elected leader in modern history to give hello, everyone. this is afternoon live.
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it could be happening again — we just don't know. the frightening prospect from leading health academic professor sir brian jarman, who says that the scandal at gosport war memorial hospital is possible elsewhere in the nhs. we'll be talking to the professor injust a moment, but his comments come as health secretaryjeremy hunt said the "blame" culture in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths in gosport. relatives of the more than a50 people whose lives were cut short by excessive use of painkillers say they want justice and are calling for prosecutions. our correspondent richard lister reports from gosport. all of those groups failed in their duty of care here and the family say
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that those responsible for that should be held to account. mike hobday‘s father, alan, died in gosport war memorial hospital in 1999. he felt at the time that his dad was treated as a nuisance, given drugs to calm him down. now he knows there was no medical justification for the painkillers which ended alan's life. why is it going to take until the autumn to start an investigation? you could start investigating tomorrow. ok, nothing is going to happen until the investigation goes through, but why can't it start straightaway? so the question asked by these victims‘ families is this. when will there be a criminal prosecution of those involved in ending more than 650 lives? hampshire police have acknowledged that this report does contain new information about what happened at this hospital in the 1990s, but they haven't confirmed when or even whether the investigation will be reopened. the chief constable, olivia pinkney, has said it's important that processes are put in place to ensure that
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all of the relevant agencies come together to enable decisions about next steps to be made in a way that is well considered and transparent to all of the families. but one expert in hospital mortality rates has warned that there is still a culture in which health officials would prefer not to know, when he tells them of potential problems. he says the issues in gosport could exist elsewhere as well. i don't think it's on the scale of gosport at all, or anything like that. but i think that there probably are deaths in hospital that could be avoided, yes. yesterday's report held consultants, nurses and all the agencies involved responsible for what happened in gosport, but one key figure has yet to speak. drjane barton, who ran the hospital's prescription regime, was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the general medical council eight years ago. she is thought to be out of the country, but will be facing serious questions when she returns. responding to the claim that what
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happened here could be replicated at some level in other hospitals, the health secretaryjeromy hunt told the bbc that he was confident progress has been made and if any situation happened here like in the 90s would be picked up more quickly today. that was richard lister. joining me now is professor sir brian jarman, emeritus professor at imperial college london and co—founder of the doctor foster unit, which monitors hospital statistics and nhs performance. thank you for your time. jeromy hunt has said there needs to be a shift from a blame culture to a learning culture have the nhs. we have heard that before, haven't we? we have. how likely is it that a culture like that can change? well, i think it's very difficult for the nhs to change because i think, and i'm thinking as
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the regulator said that the enquiry, that the driver is to give a good news story to the minister and that has been the problem at the nhs, that the managers look up to their bosses and not down to the patients. jeremy hunt, i saw him on television yesterday, and he seemed very genuine and willing to do something andi genuine and willing to do something and i hope he will do, but you can see the problems at gosport were raised in 1991 and they have carried on since them and there were reports that it was 2001, and these were not published. and the difficulty has been that those whistle—blowers are told they are not playing the game and are sort of mocked and not
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listened to this even worse, whistle—blowers in the nhs, in general, and i think it's almost true in all cases, that is people who have tried to raise the case of the problems and find nobody takes notice in the hospital they then have to go outside to whistle blow and they are fired. they go to an employment tribunal if they are wrongly dismissed and then offered the pavement, but then i —— then they are told to get the payment they are told to get the payment they must sign a confidential agreement and they must be gagged to say that they will not say what was wrong and from then onwards they will not work again in the nhs, they are blacklisted so they are fired, gagged and blacklisted and may even be gagged again to say that they weren't gagged. i have worked with a group of these whistle—blowers, fairly key whistle—blowers who had these experiences and they find it is the case. in fact the staff
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survey shows that i think it is about a third, the staff do not feel fate —— save to blow the whistle. we should have a system which is com pletely should have a system which is completely independent of the department of health and i don't think we will get it it should be independent and nhs staff can go and whistle—blowers and will be told that they will not be punished for doing so and any manager who does should be dismissed on the spot. and we also need to have a system whereby patients can make complaints. there was a system until 2004 with an independent panel and what happens if someone has a problem in hospital, you write to the chief executive andrew says you'll do something but if you are not satisfied, and one fifth people are not satisfied, what could happen up are not satisfied, what could happen up to 2004 issue could go to the independent panels and they would investigate and the hospitals would
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be represented by a barrister, but they have been abolished and not replaced. you can then go to the ombudsman and she will only look at 196 ombudsman and she will only look at 1% of cases, so what do you do? is there any organisation there to investigate, because when you look at it there is no organisation that is responsible for investigating individual cases of poor care. this was actually said by sir robert francis in his closing submission. what you are describing in terms of the current culture is an establishment cover—up. the current culture is an establishment cover-up. for want of a better word, a conspiracy. can you still hear me, professor?” a better word, a conspiracy. can you still hear me, professor? i can. you are describing a conspiracy, in effect. i wonder how high up it goes, because you are responsible forfigures are given goes, because you are responsible for figures are given an early indication that things are going wrong so are those figures ignored orjust not wrong so are those figures ignored or just not wanted ? wrong so are those figures ignored
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orjust not wanted? it is difficult to say. people did these reports commissioned by the erudite lawyer lord darcy, the equality minister, andi lord darcy, the equality minister, and i have copies of them when i gave evidence to the enquiry and askedif gave evidence to the enquiry and asked if i could put them forward because they were very instructive about what we should do about improving quality of care in the nhs. i was told i could not so i had to get them under the freedom of information act. the chief medical officer also had those reports and wrote a report on them saying that effectively quality was not on the agenda in the nhs and i did not know about that until after the enquiry soi about that until after the enquiry so i aska about that until after the enquiry so i ask a member of parliament, who was on the health committee, to ask a parliamentary question to get the report that was denied and she then
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for freedom of information requests and that was denied and we eventually had to go to the top level and asked panorama to get it and they got it the next day. is it fairto and they got it the next day. is it fair to assume that you have sympathy with those relatives who are now calling for action in this latest case, but ijust wonder if you have got angry as you realise what is going on through the organisation, the nhs. i've always been a great supporter of the nhs. i rana been a great supporter of the nhs. i ran a practice for 28 years in inner london and we had only nhs patients, totally dedicated and then i was on the bristol enquiry and i began to wonder what the problem was and over the years i have got more and more worried where i see just things going wrong and went so far as to say i thought there was a denial machine in the nhs, to deny these various things, and i hope the secretary of state is not denying
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now because he will probably say, i imagine that they have set up the guardians in hospital to deal with people trying to blow the whistle, but the whistle—blower group i dealt with are not in the slightest bit encouraged by the guardian system and i'm sure they would be able to give detailed reasons why they are not. professor, i must let you go. thank you very much for your time. eu citizens who want to stay in the uk after brexit have been promised there will be a simple process to confirm their status. the home secretary, sajid javid, said the system — which will start in the autumn — will be as easy and swift as possible and he insisted there would be no repeat of the failings in the windrush scandal. settled status is likely to be granted to anyone who can prove they've lived in the uk for at least five years and has no serious criminal convictions. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. eu migrants coming to the uk at the moment are free to live and work it without a permit.
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but this freedom of movement will end with brexit. instead, eu citizens who want to stay will have to apply for settled status under a new government scheme. we will be looking to grant status as quickly as we can. we will not be looking for excuses at all to not grant status, of course, it will be very sort of driven by the default view that you provide us information and if you are not going to be granted status, there has to be a very good reason why you're not going to get that. to be eligible for settled status, you'll need to have been resident in the uk for five years and arrive before the end of 2020. to apply, you'll need to prove your identity, prove you live in the uk and that you have no serious criminal convictions. the home secretary's insisted he is determined to avoid the mistakes made with the windrush generation, where legal migrants were threatened with deportation. we are making sure that we are using
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government information, government records in a way that, sadly, we didn't with the windrush generation and other cases, but actually proactively using that information and i hope that sort of message comes through. but eu citizens want more reassurance. there is very little trust in the home office because of the windrush scandal and, also, they need to be able to fill applications, be able to go online, i think there are barriers, basically. this is a huge and complex scheme and after the recent windrush scandal, there's enormous pressure to get it right. sajid javid suggested, as the son of immigrants himself, he understands the concerns of eu citizens, but only a system that works smoothly and is up and running on time will give the reassurance that many are looking for. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw is here. they have outlined the process, 3
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million or more people will want to know how easy this is. is it as easy as filling in for a credit card?m you are someone familiar with computers and smartphones and you've beenin computers and smartphones and you've been in the country for over five yea rs been in the country for over five years and you have an employment history that has been documented, i don't think it will be hard to apply. it should be pretty straightforward. but if you are someone who has a more chequered employment history and you have in working cash in hand sometime or working cash in hand sometime or working in the black economy, or perhaps you are not someone familiar with online computer systems and its sway you are not happy about filling in online forms or you are someone who has lots of relatives or family members you want to bring in and register as well, i think the system will lobby is that straightforward and certainly the timetable that officials are saying where they can process arabic —— applications in
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days, i think that is looking very ambitious for those sorts of people. even for the others who are totally legitimate, 3 million, 3.5 million, this will be a new system and it's going to be a difficult project, isn't it? it's a hugely ambitious project. the home office is comparing it to the passport system and saying, the passport office processes more than 6 million applications every year and it's a service that seems to be delivering well but the passport system is not built from scratch. this one is being built from scratch. the first cases will be trialled this summer and then the system will be up and running from autumn and then operating from next march. they will have due process around 5000 cases each day to hit the deadline they wa nt to each day to hit the deadline they want to hit if those three and a half million people do apply. they are saying that the computer will be
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able to manage it and they are putting in all sorts of necessary technology to make sure it does not crash and that people will be told and updated about how long the applications will take. but i can really foresee trouble ahead. perhaps i am wrong but i think it's unlikely it will go smoothly. danny, thank you for that. joining me now is nicolas hatton — founder of the 3 million campaign — a group championing the rights of eu citizens in the uk. do you share the concerns of danny? yes, we do have concerns that despite the advertised simplicity of the scheme, a lot of people might struggle to provide evidence or they will struggle with the payment online, and it seems that when amber rudd said it was as simple as registering a loyalty card, i'm not sure it's as simple as this. i read
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the document and the document makes a lot of specific details. but at the end of the day i think people like me have got to understand that we have not got a choice. the environment is there, and the home secretary has not declared an end, so we have two assume that unless we get documented byjune 2021 we will be exposed to uncertainty, so it's not an option. it's not —— it's an opportunity to make the system simpler than it used to be for permanent residence, but i think the difficulty will have to be addressed because we cannot be the victims of a system because then if we cannot get the id, the digital id, we won't be able to stay. we are prejudging
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the system at this stage but there are concerns about the computer side of this but on the wider issue, do you accept what the minister said in parliament, that those who do not have a problem, those who are here legitimately and have lived here legitimately and have lived here legitimately will not have a problem? no, i welcome legitimately will not have a problem? no, iwelcome this. and that statement covered the 20th of june 2016th, if that had happened, but we have seen two years of an unprecedented rise in hate crimes and a lot of it is unreported. a lot of verbal abuse. there has been a change in the overall atmosphere in the country and i think that this will not address that psychological effect of the referendum, so i do agree with you that the home secretary is committed for people to stay, but we have to do feel welcome
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at the same time, so something has to change. it's notjust a procedural matter. it is an attitude problem? indeed, it is. iwould like to see as much work dedicated to fighting this attitude and the rhetoric on hate crime than there is on making sure that that can be as easy as possible for us to apply for citizen status. thank you very much for joining citizen status. thank you very much forjoining us. the conservative minister greg hands has resigned from the government, in order to vote against plans for a third runway at heathrow airport. greg hands is the mp for chelsea and fulham in west london and says he had promised his constituents he would oppose the scheme. a vote on the proposals is due to be held in the commons on monday. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the health secretary jeremy hunt has said a "blame culture" in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths at gosport war memorial hospital. the home secretary, sajid javid, has said the system
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for allowing eu nationals to stay in the uk after brexit will be as simple as can reasonably be expected. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parent. in sport, england's dele alli misses training as he rests a thigh problem picked up against tunisia on monday but he does think he will make it through to the second match at the world cup against panama on sunday. today's action sought christian eriksen fired denmark into the lead before australia drew themselves level with a contentious penalty award by the video assistant referee. and finally, danny cipriani will make his first england start for a decade after being named fly half for the third test against south africa in cape town. i'll be back with more on those stories just
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after half past. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration, after he backtracked on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents, following an outcry both in the us and abroad. families will now be kept together while their legal cases are considered. gary o'donoghue reports from the us—mexico border. this stretch of the rio grande in texas is where many tried to enter the united states. every week, some drown in the attempt. those who make it face arrest and prosecution. it is at centres like this that adults and children were being separated, leading to those now notorious images of children apparently housed in cages. leading to those notorious images. the national and international outcry was in the end too much, even for president trump. he struck a defiant tone while doing his u—turn. so the democrats want open borders.
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let everybody come in. let everybody pour in, we don't care. let them come in from the middle east, let them come in from all over the place. we don't care. we're not going to let it happen. and, by the way, today i signed an executive order. we're going to keep families together, but the border is going to be just as tough as it has been. thousands of children have been separated from their parents in recent weeks, and no—one really knows how long it will take to reunite them. it's going to be a herculean task, if you will, because it's going to require a lot of transparency in finding out exactly, where these children were separated from the families and where those parents are. the churches are often at the forefront of the immigrant welfare, but just hours after the stroke of the presidential pen, all
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denominations gathered in the rain to welcome the change of heart by the administration. everyone at this gathering will be glad the president has ended the separation of children from their parents, but they also know the policy of zero tolerance for people crossing the border illegally has not changed, and that could mean increasing numbers of adults and children in custody. let's speak to our state department correspondent barbara plett—usher, who is on capitol hill for us. a change of heart, backtrack, a u—turn. it doesn't matter, he blinked first, the president and yet he's coming out fighting. yes, and he's coming out fighting. yes, and he has not really addressed the fact he has not really addressed the fact he did a complete u—turn. he had been saying all the time that this was a law that had to be kept and it was a law that had to be kept and it was only congress that could change it and eventually he suddenly admitted that he could act and he
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did sign the executive order and you heard him there at the rally highlighting that bit that he wanted to remain tough on the border and on immigration and keeping families together because the blowback across the political spectrum was pretty harsh. it has been damaging but whether it will be politically damaging in the long term, we are yet to see. a poll that came out recently showed a narrow majority of republicans who support this tough policy although a majority of americans don't. the politics of it, we don't know, but it has been a very unusually damaging incident for the president. and a lot of anger out there, and a lot of upset, because there are still children separated from their parents and there doesn't seem to be the process to reunite them. how is that going to reunite them. how is that going to happen? well, we don't know. the executive order did not address that
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issue and did not address the issue of the children already separated from their parents and federal officials have been saying until recently that they're still waiting for guidance on what to do and whether they should take steps to immediately try to reunite the children with their parents or whether that will still follow the original plan of the children being reunited when they are deported or released from custody so that is an unknown at the moment. there are also issues with ending the family separation practice, that if you wa nt to separation practice, that if you want to continue treating them like criminals, even if you detain the families and keep them together there is a court order that says children cannot be detained for more than 20 days so i families are detained for more than 20 days, the courts may step in. the courts may be challenging that ruling and also on capitol hill there will be broader immigration legislation but pa rt broader immigration legislation but part of the bill to address the issue would make it illegal to hold
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children for longer than 20 days. barbra, thank you very much. with just nine months to go before britain is due to leave the european union, we've been taking a closer look at the impact of brexit on different groups of people. today we're examining the effect on young people. our education correspondent elaine dunkley is at coventry college and joins me now. there is a lot of uncertainty around brexit, but one of the key questions are the younger generation, are they being listened to in the negotiations? issues around the job opportunities, the freedom to travel and go on exchange programmes across europe. there is a lot of concern speaking to students at coventry couege speaking to students at coventry college and joining me now is simon gilbert, a political reporter and also the new from coventry live. what is the biggest concern around the city for the of brexit?” what is the biggest concern around the city for the of brexit? i think it probably is employment and where
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they go after they finish education. jaguar land rover is probably the biggest employer and they offer a lot of apprenticeships to young people and they have come up through the ranks and they expect to get jobs but they make no secret of the fa ct jobs but they make no secret of the fact that they wanted us to remain in the european union and they have appealed for tariffs to be waved as they go forward in the process and even on the record it says that if there is nothing needed from the brexit process they cannot expand in the country and that will have a knock—on effect for young people in the city and beyond. are you finding optimism or pessimism from young people in coventry? it is a mix. we get a lot of debate when it comes to brexit and when we put articles out around the issues and what we find from young people in particular is frustration with the way things are going. for them it's frustration with the way things are going. forthem it's a particular worry about this part of their lives and they want to know that there will be jobs for them and we re ce ntly will be jobs for them and we recently did a survey to see if opinions had changed in coventry
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since the vote and we found that 60% of people in total said they were unhappy with the negotiation process and that percentage increased for the younger age groups, people 18 to 24, sol the younger age groups, people 18 to 24, so i think there's a lot of frustration from youngsters in cove ntry. frustration from youngsters in coventry. this is a very young city, isn't it? our young people engaged? absolutely they are engaged and more than ever before as a result of the referendum. it's a young city, the average age is 33 or 34 in coventry and it's also a very diverse city as one infourof and it's also a very diverse city as one in four of the population was not born in the uk. you add those elements into it and that we are distancing ourselves from europe, you can see why they would be concerned about the future. a lot of young people said to me that they are concerned about things like eu funding and who will pay for youth services? absolutely. commentary is a good example for eu funding. we benefit more than most cities in the uk and good at applying for european
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funding more with new council houses being built by eu funding and new junction on the ring roads. we see visible projects in the city because of european funding and people will no doubt have concerns that what happens now, how refund development going forward? there was concern about rows must students on foreign exchange programmes across europe. our young people responding because we have the college of catering and a lot of people go on placement across europe? i think so. there is a huge amount of opportunity for students and young people in coventry and the main thing they want to know is that is still going to be there for them in one or two years' time and it really is something, we are a great city that, we have apprenticeships, jaguar land rover have a huge amount of opportunity for our young people andi of opportunity for our young people and i think it's something they want to know they will have that security and the impression we get from our readers is they don't feel like they
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have had their questions answered and they are not sure what is happening in the future with regards to that. a lot of young people are campaigning for this idea of the people's vote, so they have a say in the negotiations and conditions of brexit. do you hear a lot of conversation about that?” brexit. do you hear a lot of conversation about that? i think people largely in coventry feel they have already had their say. a lot of people in coventry voted for brexit, 69% turnout, 20,000 people more voted for brexit and i think people would say, we have had our say and we don't need another vote but there are debates to be had and how it would work on the ground would be a different matter. we struggled to get a referendum with two questions i hate to feel how one would be on the final terms of brexit. thank you for joining the final terms of brexit. thank you forjoining us, lots of discussion here at coventry college and it will continue. back to you. thousands of people have celebrated the summer solstice at stonehenge. i have not seen these pictures
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before, i willjoin you in watching them. on the longest day of the year, the sun rises behind the heel stone, the ancient entrance to the stone circle, and rays of sunlight are channelled into the centre of the monument. here's the moment, at 4.52 this morning, that the sun came up and it is believed that solstices have been celebrated at stonehenge for thousands of years. this year, more than 9,000 people attended. it is the equinox, it is the longest day and it is the moment that thousands of people celebrated at what is one of the uk's most famous monuments. fantastic pictures. a lovely morning there and i think we are going to have the same for the next few days? you know what? we are, it is going to be very nice that the next few days and will eventually get warmer. two great monuments in one shot. that is rich coming from you!
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anyway, juno awards, stonehenge is not the only stone circle, there are other ones —— do you know what. this is one sent in from cumbria, celebrating the sunrise. if you have more stone circle pictures, send them in, you might see them at 4:30 a:m., you never them in, you might see them at 4:30 a:m. , you never know. that wasn't in the script! a gorgeous picture here from cambridgeshire and this one from the highlands in scotland, people were out in force enjoying the sunshine because we saw quite a lot of it this morning. i wanted to show you this, it is the longest day, the summer solstice. in lerwick, the sun rose at 3:38am and doesn't set until gone 10:30pm, that is how long the day is. and the good news is there will be lots of sunshine right through the evening to enjoy. and the equinox, explain it.
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so, the earth goes around the sun and its axis is slightly tilted, so it is not sitting upright. no expensive graphics, you are using your hand. you can watch it on the website if you want to. the sun is tilted and goes round and this is the point where the earth is most tilted, the northern hemisphere, most tilted towards the sun and you get the longest day and in the arctic, you get daylight right through, there is no night, whereas conversely in the antarctic, it is night all day long. there you are, it is all due to the tilt and the way we are going around the sun. i will bring expensive graphics next time. no, the hand did it. tell us what is in store over the coming days. asi in store over the coming days. as i hinted at the start, there is something warmer on the way. today, lots of sunshine and lots of daytime to enjoy but temperatures nudged back on where they have been over the last couple of days but look at
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next week, some spots are very likely to hit 30 degrees. it is all because at the moment we have got some relatively cool air in place and with it, fairly brisk wind just accentuating the feel. next week, look at the orange colours spreading across, giving us some real potential, given some sunshine, to get very high temperatures. back to the here and now, we have sunshine but also the cool breeze, relatively cool air but also the cool breeze, relatively coolairand but also the cool breeze, relatively cool air and patchy cloud as well. here is the strength of the winds, pretty strong across northern and north—eastern scotland but temperatures through the rest of the afternoon topping out at around 16-21d, afternoon topping out at around 16—21d, no great shakes just yet. through this evening, along evening, there will be a lot of sunshine to enjoy, at the cloud will melt away but as we go through the night, once the sun does said, those temperatures are going to drop. you can see the green colours spreading across the chart, temperatures in
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town and city centres down to 6—9 but in the countryside, some places will get down to 3—4, so quite a chilly start if you are up and about early tomorrow morning but a lovely looking day with long spells of sunshine to be had. again, the northern half of scotland a bit more ofan northern half of scotland a bit more of an exception, more in a way of cloud, the odd spot of rain and quite a breeze in the north. lighter winds further south and temperatures beginning to nudge slowly upwards. as we head into the weekend, it is high pressure that will increasingly dominate. as we go into saturday, the hydrate is closer to our shores. the frontal still skipping across the coasts in northern scotland. the sunshine turning a bit milky and hazy but it won't spoil things too much and temperatures up into the mid—20s. sunday, look at this weather map, when you don't see cloud, that is when we get sunshine and you don't see much cloud, so a lot of sunshine on sunday. we will
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start to develop a bit of a sea breeze close to the coast so a trip to the beach, it might be a bit on the cool side, inland, 24 or 25. as isaid at the cool side, inland, 24 or 25. as i said at the start, temperatures next week are really going to lift. here isjust a next week are really going to lift. here is just a selection. parts of the south—east of england could get up the south—east of england could get up into the high 20s and perhaps, as i mentioned, up to 30. so a bit cooler for the time being, i mentioned, up to 30. so a bit coolerfor the time being, still with some sunshine but those temperatures are set to rise. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the health secretaryjeremy hunt says a "blame culture" in the nhs has to change
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to help uncover scandals such as the deaths at gosport war memorial hospital. the government says the system for allowing eu nationals to stay in the uk after brexit will be as simple as can reasonably be expected. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. sorry, it is the longest day, certainly feels like it. plenty of time. let's talk about andy murray, out at queen's but the chance for some nick kyrgios, the australian, very strong talent on his day, he knocked out andy murray in the first round at queens and he is looking to upset the home crowd again, facing another british talent in the shape of the
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british talent in the shape of the british number one kyle edmund. these are live pictures from bbc two. so far, the server has been keying in baron's court but the australian leading bad tie—break 4-2. the australian leading bad tie—break 4—2. the pair are both 23 years old but this is their first meeting and so far, like i say, very short rallies, the serve very much at the moment dictating things as kyle edmund looks to keep british hopes alive and avenge that defeat for his davis cup team—mate. let's talk about the world cup and england, preparations are under way, and a few niggles. yes, a few niggles and firstly one to the manager. gareth southgate dislocated his shoulder at a ball while jogging dislocated his shoulder at a ball whilejogging in the dislocated his shoulder at a ball while jogging in the forest in the training base in russia. they do have an injury concern away from the dugout, dele alli missed training today. he has got a thigh problem, meaning he could miss the panama came on sunday. he could be replaced
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by ruben loftus—cheek and we know that because the assistant manager steve holland seemed to reveal the starting line—up in his notes today as he walked out to training, ca ptu red as he walked out to training, captured by some eagle eyed cameramen. the players say they won't be too distracted by that league. -- leak. we haven't been directed told who of is starting and who is not so all of the positions are still up for grabs and until the manager actually names the team, thenit manager actually names the team, then it doesn't matter what has come at all leaked or anything like that, because the lads don't truly focus on stuff like that until it has come out of the manager's mouth. they are the only words that really matter to us at this moment in time. we are trying not to get caught up in articles and everything like that, we are trying to focus on ourselves andi we are trying to focus on ourselves and i think until the manager names the team, then everyone is still fighting for their position. the team, then everyone is still fighting for their positionm the team, then everyone is still fighting for their position. it has been a tournament that has been dominated by penalties. it has continued to date on that trend in
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australia's meeting with denmark. totte n ha m australia's meeting with denmark. tottenham hotspur‘s christian eriksen kept up his great run for his country, scoring his 13th goal in his last 15 games for denmark to put them into the lead. however, the video assistant referee was once again brought into play to award australia what looked to be a very fortu nate australia what looked to be a very fortunate penalty indeed, converted by millie jedinak of fortunate penalty indeed, converted by milliejedinak of aston villa. still denmark one, australia won, you can listen on radio 5live. later on, france face peyroux before argentina and line or messy take on croatia, which you can watch on bbc one —— lionel messi. in the last half an hour, manchester united have announced the signing of brazil international freight from sha kthar donetsk. the 25—year—old international freight from sha kthar donetsk. the 25—year—old midfielder has agreed to a five—year contract with the option to extend for a further year. jose mourinho says his creative brain and passing vision
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will give united another dimension to their game. and more goals, the fa ns to their game. and more goals, the fans will be thinking. emre can is close to finalising his move from liverpool to juventus after arriving in turin this morning. the germany international is expected to have a medical with the italian champions, his contract at anfield expires at the end of this month. he made his final liverpool appearance in last month's champions league final defeat. after their record—breaking score in nottingham on tuesday, england's cricketers are taking on australia in the fourth one—day international at chester—le—street. australia have opted to bat first, they are currently 64 without loss. england set a new odi record of 483 in a week and have an unassailable lead in the series but are looking for a whitewash. danny cipriani will make his first england start in ten years after he was named at fly—half for the third
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test against south africa in cape town this weekend. cipriani replaces george ford, who drops out of the 23 man squad entirely. brad shields misses out through illness and soap chris robshaw is back, joe mahler and nathan hughes. the match. that is all the sport for now, you listen to all of the sport over on radio 5live. or stay watching us, i keep saying that. the murder of a man by a violent schizophrenia patient was a result of racism, and could have been prevented — according to a report by the local safeguarding board. kamil ahmad, who was an iraqi asylum seeker, was stabbed byjeffrey barry in 2016, hours after he'd been released from a secure mental hospital. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan is in bristol. drunk and armed, jeffrey barry heads towards a neighbour's flat. a knife is visible. moments later it would be used in a frenzied attack that killed kamil ahmad.
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shortly after dismembering the iraqi asylum seeker, jeffrey barry called the police. today's report says kamil ahmad should still be alive and the failure to fully recognise his killer's races recognise his killer's racism contributed to his death. the two men, who both had mental health problems, lived in this sheltered housing complex. today's report says there were at least six incidents between the two men between 2013 and 2016 while they stayed at this property. they included barry punching kamil ahmad as well as a racially aggravated assault. despite that and barry's well—known violent history, the two men were allowed to continue living together at this supported housing complex. barry obsessed with ahmed
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because he was racist, the report said. the report says he was a person with racist views he was mentally ill, rather than a mentally ill person whose racism was a manifestation of their illness. the head of the local safeguarding board says improvements have been made. we can never stop all the risk, we can never do that. what we can do is try to mitigate against that risk. there are considerable resources, both people and money, being spent in bristol. we have a new hate crime and discrimination service that was launched by bristol city council last year. shortly before he killed, barry, who had a long history of violence and schizophrenia, was detained here. but a mental health tribunal, unaware of his history, decided to release him. the local mental health trust then failed to properly plan his discharge. jeffrey barry was out with a sheltered housing provider
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given just hours to prepare for his return. the family believe strongly that the chief executive of the nhs partnership trust must consider her position because it was under her watch that these catastrophic failings occurred, with calamitous consequences for the family and for kamil. kamil ahmad came to bristol to seek refuge and instead died at the hands of a racist, having been failed by the agencies meant to protect him. in a moment, the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the health secretary jeremy hunt has said a "blame culture" in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths at gosport war memorial hospital. more than three million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn, as the government outlines the process. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after a u—turn on his policy
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of separating migrant children from their parent. children from their parents. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the bank of england has held interest rates 0.5% — interest rates at 0.5% — but given a firm signal that they are likely to go up in august. more on this in a moment. the government borrowed £5 billion in may, that's £2 billion less than it did in may last year — and the lowest annual level of borrowing in 11 years. the borrowing level is lower than nearly any economist was expecting and so far this year stands at £11.8 billion, which is £4.1 billion less than in the same period in 2017. more information on the disastrous tsb it failure. tsb may not have carried out proper tests before transferring five million customers to a new it system — according
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to a report by ibm — the firm that tsb called in after its systems failed in april. that report's been published today by the mps on the treasury committee. and intel chief executive brian copernicus resigned after a programme revealed that a past consensual relationship with an employee violated company policy. the board named chief officer brian swa n the board named chief officer brian swan as interim chief executive. so, interest rates. not at this time, but my word... it was a 3—6, or 6—3 vote in favour of keeping them on hold and it was the governor of the bank of england mark carney who really sort of lead the resista nce carney who really sort of lead the resistance to an increase. but it seems it is still quite a lot of mixed messages coming through on the high street in terms of the prices are going up but i think the key one is probably wages. a lot of upward pressure on wages because we have
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got effectively full employment and once you have that, it is a sort of basic economic tenet that wages start to go up and we talked earlier to standard chartered and they explained the pressures on pushing up explained the pressures on pushing up inflation. we think rates probably will go up in august, if we look at what the monetary policy committee said today, though talked about strong household spending, strong confidence, employment doing well, business sentiment improving and even the global economy they expect will be a strong source of demand in future months and they also indicated that inflation was likely to rise over the next couple of months because of higher oil prices and the weaker pound, so all of these factors together suggest that they are limbering up for a rate hike at the next meeting on the 2nd of august. it is interesting because oil prices are definitely another upward pressure. the weak
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pound not so much because it is not changing very much and wages, that is definitely an inflationary pressure. now, this battle for fox and sky is hotting up. that is a big one. we have comcast and gives need going after —— disney going after box. disney went in with an offerand going after box. disney went in with an offer and comcast have come in... sorry, i have got those in the wrong order. we started with comcast, then we had disney, which increased its offer last night to 71 billion, so we are talking telephone number figures here. the key is that comcast has offered cash, but disney has offered cash and or shares and mr murdoch, who owns 17% of fox, he would like to have shares because it would like to have shares because it would lessen his capital gains bill
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and that seems to be very much in favour of a disney offer. so it is a bidding war. it is and the key to this is the content. what you have got here in terms of content is you have got things like the simpsons, you have got x—men, in terms of actual content that you got distribution, things like sky tv, star tv in india as well, so if you are going to look at what is going to happen with this merger if it goes ahead, it is really pa rt merger if it goes ahead, it is really part of a changing scene. you have already had a t&t and time warner as well get together —— with a get—together there and itjust got approval a few days ago, they are putting together new plans and we can go to paul blake in the states and ask him the latest developments because it seems to be setting some kind of pattern. tell us what is happening with at&t and time warner because that deal is fresh off the table, isn't it? yes, so folks who
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may not be familiar, at&t is the number two wireless provider in the us. the number—1 cable tv provider and they are starting to combine those two forces and they have said they are going to launch a new service called watch tv which will include 30 live channels but interestingly won't include live sport or local tv channels, but it all goes back to what you were talking about, the combination of content and distribution, getting content and distribution, getting content from in—house, straight down the pipes that they already own and into mobiles and tvs. there is a problem about competition, when chut have this vertical integration, this combination between content and distribution, there is a competition issue rising very quickly. and that was the concern, there was a court case earlier this month that at&t did win, the government was the other party, trying to stop the merger between time warner and at&t
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because they said it could harm competition and ultimately drive up prices for consumers. the issue that is there is if at&t is content distributor and then owns a content maker, it could drive up prices for its traditional rivals. it ended up winning that case and moved ahead and has launched a new streaming service, which has happened in the past couple of weeks. paul, thanks very much indeed. the interesting thing there is because they won that case, it makes it less likely that any deal that goes through four insta nce any deal that goes through four instance for disney and fox, that that deal will go through because it was approved, they won that court case between time warner and at&t. everything down, worries about trade wars, generally. but the pound doing very well, that is up about one and a quarter cents today, very strong looking at the moment. and that is because they are going to put of interest—rate in august.
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no time for that! i thought i would just mention it. the prime minister of new zealand, jacinda ardern, has become only the second world leader to give birth while in power. she and her partner clarke gayford had a daughter, theirfirst child, in hospital in auckland earlier today. ms ardern says she's taking six weeks maternity leave. hywel griffith sent this report. beaming parents and their new arrival. jacinda ardern chose social media over a state announcement to share news of her daughter's birth. the message reads, "welcome to our village, wee one." throughout her very public pregnancy, jacinda ardern made a point of continuing with business as usual. after six weeks of maternity leave, she plans to be back at work as her partner, clarke gayford, becomes the main caregiver. in a bbc interview in april, she suggested the baby could also join her on the international stage. there are certain places that are hosting meetings in the future, and places, particularly in the pacific, we'd obviously bring the baby. we're great with children —
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just bring the child, we'll take care of it. so i think it will take an international community to raise our child. the baby's arrival has been celebrated here as a national triumph. former prime minister helen clark was one of the first to tweet, lauding the family's parenting arrangements as gender equality in action. theresa may also sent her congratulations to the new parents on the birth of their little girl. the man in charge of new zealand for the next six weeks also sent his best wishes. wishing the prime minister the very best, and clarke gayford, as well, and that she gets a solid start to motherhood, so to speak. that solid start may be followed by some sleepless nights, but jacinda ardern says she will remain contactable and keep reading cabinet papers once she's taken her baby home. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich.
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good afternoon. for many of us, temperatures have ta ken good afternoon. for many of us, temperatures have taken a temporary tumble, 20 degrees pretty much sums it upfor tumble, 20 degrees pretty much sums it up for the top value today but i say a temporary tumble because those temperatures are going to start to climb again over the next few days and by next week, some spots are likely to hit 30 degrees. but for the time being, we are stuck in some relatively cool air and with a keen north—easterly breeze, but we push all of that away to the east as we go through the weekend and by next week, we bring these increasingly orange can colours across the country on the air must charge, that will allow temperatures to climb. cool temperatures for most of us what is left of this afternoon, still quite breezy up towards the north—east, cloud and a bit of rain across the northern isles of scotland. elsewhere, good spells of sunshine per temperatures at best 16-21. sunshine per temperatures at best 16—21. during this evening, stay fine, long spells of sunshine to be
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had and the sun will set pretty late. it is a summer solstice, the longest day of the year so in lerwick, the sun doesn't set until after 10:30pm. lerwick, the sun doesn't set until after10:30pm. in lerwick, the sun doesn't set until after 10:30pm. in london, lerwick, the sun doesn't set until after10:30pm. in london, more like 9:20pm. so plenty of evening sunshine to enjoy that out of the sunshine to enjoy that out of the sun has gone down, those temperatures are going to give away, you consider green colours spreading across the chart, town and city down to single figures, some areas of the countryside down to three or 4 degrees. a fairly cool start but lots of sunshine to be had. northern scotla nd lots of sunshine to be had. northern scotland will see more in the way of cloud, still fairly breezy and the spot of rain but elsewhere, the breeze not as strong as it has been today and those temperatures a little bit higher, 17—22 degrees. the progress of those temperatures beginning to climb goes on into the weekend, high—pressure nudging its way ever closer to our shores. a wea k way ever closer to our shores. a weak frontal system up to the north, so some cloud and outbreaks of rain across the north of scotland, still fairly breezy here. elsewhere, a lot
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of sunshine to be had, although that sunshine might turn hazy from time to time. temperatures a couple of degrees higher, 24 in the south and four sunday, high pressure by this stage likely to be parked right on of the british isles. lots of sunshine, generally light winds, sea breezes are likely to develop, making it cooler close to the coast but come inland, those temperatures getting up to the mid—20s. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3. health secretaryjeremy hunt calls for a shift from a blame culture into a learning one at the nhs — but there are still fears the scandal at gosport could be repeated. i have worked with a group of whistle—blowers who said that if you do blow the whistle at the nhs, you will be fired. more than 3 million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn — as the government
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outlines the process. throughout the process we will be looking to grant, not reasons to refuse. president trump vows to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. hugh, england may have let the cat out of the bag. we will be talking about england because they might have let the cat out of the bag. that is ahead of their second game of the world cup. we will tell you about it at half—past. thanks, hugh, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. ben rich has all the weather. temperatures have ta ken temperatures have taken a temporary tumble today but it is only temporary as things will get warmer again over the next few days. next week some spots mighty dirty. all the details on the way. and the new zealand prime minister has given birth to herfirst and the new zealand prime minister has given birth to her first child, he girl, making herthe has given birth to her first child, he girl, making her the only second
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leader to give birth while in office in modern history. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. it could be happening again — we just don't know. the frightening prospect from leading health academic professor sir brian jarman, who says that the scandal at gosport war memorial hospital is possible elsewhere in the nhs. his comments come as health secretaryjeremy hunt said the "blame" culture in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths in gosport. relatives of the more than 450 people whose lives were cut short by excessive use of painkillers say they want justice and are calling for prosecutions. our correspondent richard lister reports from gosport. mike hobday‘s father, alan, died in gosport war memorial hospital in 1999. he felt at the time that his dad was treated as a nuisance, given drugs to calm him down.
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now he knows there was no medical justification for the painkillers which ended alan's life. why is it going to take until the autumn to start an investigation? you could start investigating tomorrow. ok, nothing is going to happen until the investigation goes through, but why can't it start straightaway? so the question asked by these victims' families is this. when will there be a criminal prosecution of those involved in ending more than 650 lives? hampshire police have acknowledged that this report does contain new information about what happened at this hospital in the 1990s, but they haven't confirmed when or even whether the investigation will be reopened. the chief constable, olivia pinkney, has said it's important that processes are put in place to ensure that all of the relevant agencies come together to enable decisions about next steps to be made in a way that is well considered and transparent to all of the families. but one expert in hospital mortality rates has warned
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that there is still a culture in which health officials would prefer not to know, when he tells them of potential problems. he says the issues in gosport could exist elsewhere as well. i don't think it's on the scale of gosport at all, or anything like that. but i think that there probably are deaths in hospital that could be avoided, yes. yesterday's report held consultants, nurses and all the agencies involved responsible for what happened in gosport, but one key figure has yet to speak. drjane barton, who ran the hospital's prescription regime, was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the general medical council
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eight years ago. she is thought to be out of the country, but will be facing serious questions when she returns. joining me from gosport is our correspondent amanda akass. what do the relatives want now? they wa nt what do the relatives want now? they want a what do the relatives want now? they wanta criminal what do the relatives want now? they want a criminal prosecution, and we haven't heard from the police exactly what they are preparing to do. the chief constable has said one investigation looked at the deaths of 92 patients. she has put out a statement saying that the force one to get all of the relevant agencies together to look at what the next step should be in terms of what they should do next and we know that the health secretary has said in parliament that the police and crown prosecution service will get together. and he says it's likely to
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happen. responding to some of the concerns raised about whether what happened could be replicated across the eight —— nhs, he said there is confidence there has been more checks and balances introduced in the years since this happened so he believes that malpractice could be identified more quickly. he thinks if there was more to encourage whistle—blowing that could have been prevention. and right —— concerns we re prevention. and right —— concerns were raised as far back as 1991 and jeremy hunt says he wants to end the culture of blame and replace it with a culture of learning and says more work needs to be done with that. to make sure that doctors and nurses feel more comparable in raising issues or any mistakes that can be
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learnt from, so this kind of thing cannot happen again. joining me now isjulie bailey, who played a pivotal role in exposing the serious failings of mid—staffordshire foundation trust and founded the campaign group cure our nhs. thank you forjoining us. i am just wondering if you have a slight sense ofdj vu wondering if you have a slight sense of dj vu because we heard much of this before, didn't we? we have, sadly, it's a very sad time and once again, here we are, talking about blame. this is not about blame it is about accountability. and until we get accountability in the nhs and these type of people that will do things like this to vulnerable adults, they should be prosecuted and there must be accountability, otherwise the culture will never change and we will continue to harm people. the people understand that
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the nhs and those working in it make mistakes. and jeremy hunt is right. there needs to be a learning culture, but this is totally different. it's not about blame, it's about accountability and there should be prosecutions immediately. these families have waited all of these years, 20 years, to struggle to be heard. just imagine, put yourself in that position, to lose a loved one under those circumstances and have to fight to be heard and fight for more and more investigations and once they have had investigations they have to fight to get them exposed. and now they have to fight for committal proceedings. we were talking to brian jarman earlier on and proceedings. we were talking to brianjarman earlier on and he was saying that what happened at mid staffordshi re saying that what happened at mid staffordshire could be happening
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anywhere in the nhs right now and because of this culture of establishment cover—up, he used that phrase, is that something that needs to be addressed, and how would you do that? exactly. it comes down to accountability. we need to read the nhs of these type of people. they are still there. we know they are. we had a freedom to speak up review and these people have been identified, these leaders and they remain in the nhs. in fact we bring them back some times and they are like wildebeests, and until we address that there are bullies as leaders in the nhs and get rid of them nothing will change. there was a case this week where it was three yea rs a case this week where it was three years where her child had died and there was such a huge cover—up even after mid staffordshire and we are still trying to uncover what actually happened. it is just a culture that is so embedded and
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until we let fresh air in and light and start exposing these bodies and getting rid of them, they circulate through the nhs and nothing is ever done about them. there are officials in the department of health to silence this report, so let's expose them. why did they do it and they need to be talking about this in six months' time. these people need exposing. people have said that perhaps people should go to the newspapers and complain that way. we are in an era of social media where there are ways of highlighting issues, so people, are they still too afraid to do that is to not if you complain or whistle—blower, you lose yourjob and you are gagged. nhs staff are not protected through
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whistle—blowing legislation and we need a change in the law, which is what robert fran a recommended we need legislation that protects prosecute those who silence whistle blowers and i hear every day from people whose lives have been destroyed and all they have tried to do is raise concerns doing theirjob under the duty of candour. how many cases are out there that we are yet to be fully aware of? i have no idea. my main focus is complainants, patients and their relatives. there are so many of those coming forward and nothing has changed for patients and nothing has changed for patients and relatives who raise concerns. although we have the same complaints process , although we have the same complaints process, there's nothing wrong with the process itself, it is the people that implement the process, the behaviours of them. nothing has
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changed as far as that is concerned. we still have the same complainants coming forward with the same complaints saying the same thing. they have been silenced and their concerns have been minimised, dismissed and they are not listened to. they are silenced. terrified to even raise concerns when you're in a hospital bed. little has changed for complainants and little has changed for staff who tries to raise patient concerns in these organisations. julie bailey, thank you for your time this afternoon. eu citizens who want to stay in the uk after brexit have been promised there will be a simple process to confirm their status. the home secretary, sajid javid, said the system — which will start in the autumn — will be as easy and swift as possible and he insisted there would be no repeat of the failings in the windrush scandal. settled status is likely to be granted to anyone who can prove they've lived in the uk for at least five years and has no serious criminal convictions.
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our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. eu migrants coming to the uk at the moment are free to live and work here without a permit. but this freedom of movement will end with brexit. instead, eu citizens who want to stay will have to apply for settled status under a new government scheme. we will be looking to grant status as quickly as we can. we will not be looking for excuses at all to not grant status, of course, it will be very sort of driven by the default view that you provide us information and if you are not going to be granted status, there has to be a very good reason why you're not going to get that. to be eligible for settled status, you'll need to have been resident in the uk for five years and arrive before the end of 2020. to apply, you'll need to prove your identity, prove you live in the uk and that you have no serious criminal convictions. the home secretary's insisted he is determined to avoid the mistakes made with the windrush generation, where legal migrants were threatened with deportation.
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we are making sure that we are using government information, government records in a way that, sadly, we didn't with the windrush generation and other cases, but actually proactively using that information and i hope that sort of message comes through. but eu citizens want more reassurance. there is very little trust in the home office because of the windrush scandal and, also, they need to be able to fill applications, be able to go online, i think there are barriers, basically. this is a huge and complex scheme and after the recent windrush scandal, there's enormous pressure to get it right. sajid javid suggested, as the son of immigrants himself, he understands the concerns of eu citizens, but only a system that works smoothly and is up and running on time will give the reassurance that many are looking for. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw,
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said some people are likely to find the application process more time—consuming than others. if you are someone who is familiar with computers and smartphones, let's say you've been in this country for over five years and you've got an employment history that's documented, i don't think it'll be terribly difficult to apply, it'll be pretty straightforward. if, however, you are someone that led to say has got a chequered employment history here, let's say you've been working cash in hand for some of that time, perhaps you've been working in the black economy, perhaps also you are not someone who is familiar with online computer systems, something you are not happy about, filling in forms online, and if also you are someone who has got lots of relatives, family members that you want to bring in and register as well, i think the system will not be that straightforward and certainly i think the timetable that officials are saying, that they can process applications within days, well within two weeks, i think that is looking very ambitious
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for those sorts of people. the conservative minister, greg hands, has resigned from the government, in order to vote against plans for a third runway at heathrow airport. greg hands is the mp for chelsea and fulham in west london and says he had promised his constituents he would oppose the scheme. a vote on the proposals is due to be held in the commons on monday. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the health secretary, jeremy hunt, has said a "blame culture" in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths at gosport war memorial hospital. more than 3 million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn — as the government outlines the process. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parent. in sport, the video assistant referee is the issue again at the
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world cup as a contentious penalty decision helped australia earn a draw with denmark in their group c clash. england's dele alli has missed training in repino as the rests a thigh problem ahead of the second england match against panama on sunday —— as he rests. kyle edmund had lost the first set of his second—round match at this ‘s queens, as he battles it out against andy murray's concra wood, nick kiri oz. —— andy murray's conqueror nick keedy eos. the murder of a man by a violent schizophrenia patient was a result of racism, and could have been prevented — according to a report by the local safeguarding board. kamil ahmad, who was an iraqi asylum seeker, was stabbed byjeffrey barry in 2016, hours after he'd been released from a secure mental hospital. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan is in bristol. drunk and armed, jeffrey barry heads towards a neighbour's flat. a knife is visible.
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moments later, it would be used in a frenzied attack which would kill kamil ahmad. shortly after dismembering the iraqi asylum seeker, jeffrey barry called the police. today's report says kamil ahmad should still be alive and the failure to fully recognise his killer's races and contributed to his death. the two men, who both had mental health problems, lived in this sheltered housing complex. today's report says that there were at least six incidents between the two men between 2013 and 2016 while they stayed at this property. they included barry punching kamil ahmad as well as a racially aggravated assault. but despite that and barry's
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well—known violent history, the two men were allowed to continue living together at this housing complex. the report says he was a person with racist views he was mentally ill, rather than a mentally ill person whose racism was a manifestation of their illness. the head of the local safeguarding board says improvements have been made. we can never stop all the risk, we can never do that. what we can do is try to mitigate against that risk. there are considerable resources, both people and money, being spent in bristol. we have a new hate crime and discrimination service that was launched by bristol city council last year. shortly before he killed, barry, who had a long history of violence and schizophrenia, was detained here. but a mental health tribunal unaware of his history
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decided to release him. the local mental health trust then failed to properly plan his discharge. jeffrey barry was out with a sheltered housing provider given just hours to prepare for his return. the family believe strongly that the chief executive of the nhs partnership trust must consider her position because it was under her watch that these catastrophic failings occurred, with calamitous consequences for the family and for kamil. kamil ahmad came to bristol to seek refuge and instead died at the hands of a racist having been failed by the agencies meant to protect him. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after he backtracked on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents, following an outcry both in the us and abroad. families will now be kept together while their legal cases are considered. gary o'donoghue reports from the us—mexico border. this stretch of the rio grande in
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texas is where many tried to enter the united states. every week, some drown in the attempt. those who make it face arrest and prosecution. it is at centres like this that adults and children were being separated, leading to those now notorious images of children apparently housed in cages. leading to those notorious images. the national and international outcry was in the end too much, even for president trump. he struck a defiant tone while doing his u—turn. so the democrats want open borders. let everybody come in. let everybody pour in, we don't care. let them come in from the middle east, let them come in from all over the place. we don't care.
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we're not going to let it happen. and, by the way, today i signed an executive order. we're going to keep families together, but the border is going to be just as tough as it has been. thousands of children have been separated from their parents in recent weeks, and no—one really knows how long it will take to reunite them. it's going to be a herculean task, if you will, because it's going to require a lot of transparency in finding out exactly, where these children were separated from the families and where those parents are. the churches are often at the forefront of the immigrant welfare, but just hours after the stroke of the presidential pen, all denominations gathered in the rain to welcome the change of heart by the administration. everyone at this gathering will be glad the president has ended the separation of children from their parents, but they also know the policy of zero tolerance for people crossing the border illegally has not changed,
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and that could mean increasing numbers of adults and children in custody. let's speak to our state department correspondent barbara plett—usher, who is on capitol hill for us. a u—turn from a president who does not do u—turns. how politically damaging is this? it is damaging, and he did stick to this position in the face of a lot of opposition to quite a while, claiming, falsely, it was not up to him to change the policy and he was just fulfilling the law and congress would have to change the law and eventually doing this u—turn and showing he could in fa ct this u—turn and showing he could in fact change it with a stroke of a pen and could have done it with a phone call, if he wanted and he did so because of the negative images coming from the border and this outcry across the political spectrum. he certainly is trying to
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make a comeback after that miscalculation. politically damaging, we don't know, and we'll have to see how it plays out, because the polls show a narrow majority of republicans to support this type of policy, said the bases behind him. one analyst said where might suffer is from votes he got from suburban women, independent voters because a lot of them voted for him and this might make him change their mind in forthcoming elections but it has really been a damaging thing for the administration, especially the something like immigration, which is one of the big issues. is the role that he has played. he did play a role in the issue of children separated from parents. she did speak to separated from parents. she did speakto mrtrump separated from parents. she did speak to mr trump and said it was
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not acceptable and there was a middle ground between separating the children from their parents and locking everybody up. we understand that his daughter spoke to him about it and even a conservative radio commentators said it was something that really, that we want to have an immigration policy as republicans, but not this. so he did get this message from various quarters but from various reports it seems the thing that bothered him most was the negative coverage, and he watches cable tv news a lot and was getting a pummelling in the media and that would have been a factor as well in terms of his decision. with one i of course on the midterms. yes, this is the thing. it seems that what he was trying to do by sticking tough with the separations of families was to put pressure on congress to pass broad immigration legislation which
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he hoped would help in the midterms but instead this has backfired so he has had to reverse course. he actually reversed on the day of the immigration legislation which happened on capitol hill so now there is a question as to whether there is a question as to whether the pressure is there for them to pass it, and if they can pass it because they are divided amongst themselves. yesterday you have a president and also the attorney general and the homeland security ministers saying to republicans convincing them to pass the legislation even though the executive order had appeared to ease the pressure on the most immediate problem, but the midterms have been a factor in terms of how this has played out. have you got a holiday booked? i do, actually. we will see ifi booked? i do, actually. we will see if i have to reverse it. booked? i do, actually. we will see ifi have to reverse it. i always like to keep an eye on what is going on. barbara, thank you very much. with just nine months to go before britain is due
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to leave the european union, we've been taking a closer look at the impact of brexit on different groups of people. today we're examining the effect on young people. let's go now to our education correspondent elaine dunkley, whojoins me now from coventry college. there are many uncertainties around brexit and one of the key questions is the younger generation being listened to around the negotiating table? issues around job opportunities, freedom of access, travelling around europe and also exchange projects across europe. thousands of young people have joined a campaign for a people's vote to ensure that their voices heard during brexit negotiations. joining me is a mannish, the secretary of the young labour party and to campaigned for remain —— and jack kenner of the conservatives who voted to leave —— manesh. and joe gaffney, hate youth work in coventry. first of all, manesh, is
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there an appetite for getting involved in negotiations amongst young people? i think there's a big disconnect between what is in the media and people on the ground. a lot of people are focusing, especially journalists and politicians, on really technical issues like what happens when we leave the economic union and what it should look like, whereas more people are worried about what is going to happen in terms of workers' rights, paid for young people and environmental protections and human rights and those things will be affected by brexit and the negotiations but they are ongoing. young people have not had the living wage that the tory government are giving to people over 25 and there are issues that affect young people asa are issues that affect young people as a whole and brexit will exacerbate the concerns but i think the second referendum is not something that has taken off it is more people having a concern for when they will get paid will be able to afford to pay them. those material concerns are more the issues. jack, do you think we can
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get a good deal in brexit the young people? i am confident young people will get the best brexit possible andl will get the best brexit possible and i think the government is doing and i think the government is doing an excellent job in and i think the government is doing an excellentjob in securing the deal in the negotiations because the government will recognise that literally there is a world of opportunity on the horizon and they will give young people the best opportunity to embrace that. the young generation will be the one living with the impact of brexit for the longest, arguably, and a lot of people voted to remain in the european union and a lot of young people might not have that much conservative in the conservative party delivering that for them. at the moment you have seen the government go back to brussels and get a reduction in what they are asking for and we have been paying less into the eu pockets which means more spent at home and more providing young people so they can pay their rent and live their life. trust in government is the best thing we can do while jeremy corbyn
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and what is left of the front bench after 103 resignations, the tory party are doing the best they can the labour party failing. minesh, are you convinced by that? not at all. what is most important is who is in power during negotiation and who is in power afterwards. what is most important for guaranteeing we have workers' rights and environmental protections and guaranteeing people can afford to pay rent is having a labour government in power. they are the only people who have clarified the concerns and tried to address the worries of both leave and remain voters and the only people putting forward a manifesto that will help young people. take you are a youth worker in the city, what is the danger of not engaging young people in politics and this process? the implications are massive and really far reaching. if young people's voices aren't
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being heard, they aren't going to be considered in decision—making processes which all not only affect the here and now but also generations to come, if young people aren't considered. but what i am seeing isa aren't considered. but what i am seeing is a real change in the tide when it comes to young people engaging in politics and really taking an interest and making a stand and having their voices heard, which we weren't seeing ten, 15 or 20 years ago, so it is quite an exciting time for young people engaging in politics. after the referendum, did you notice a change in young people around campus?” did, there was a lot of anger, frustration, confusion, but i think that was people of all ages but young people, there seem to be a lot of frustration in their voices because they weren't able to have a vote. you feel this has galvanised young people into thinking about the political process and what it means to them? absolutely and i think the impact of social media, there is a lot more interesting news and politics on social media, which before they wouldn't necessarily
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watch news programmes, they are seeing it on their news feeds on a regular basis, sol seeing it on their news feeds on a regular basis, so i feel that is also having an impact. there has been a lot of debate here today, a lot of discussion about what brexit means that the future of the young people, a lot of decisions that will have an impact on them but they are all saying they need to be part of that decision process. thank you very much. these pictures we are showing new, just because we can. you may think you're experiencing deja vu — but you're not. it's happened again. prime minister teresa may suffered another speech mishap last night when the set fell apart around her — a reminder of her conservative party conference speech last october when her slogan "strong and stable" lost its letters. here's a clip of the latest malfunction. can i give a sincere thanks to policy exchange for everything you've been doing because it's 16 years now that you've been making the case for a modern, compassionate reforming... there aren't any letters falling down from behind me, are there? 0h, there's an entire set falling down behind me! laughter
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it is fairto it is fair to say she handled that a lot better and everybody rather enjoyed it. anyway, we will keep an eye on downing street because the nato secretary—general is about to arrive and when he does, we will ta ke arrive and when he does, we will take you over but first, let's catch up take you over but first, let's catch up with the weather with ben. good afternoon. temperatures have ta ken a bit of a tumble today, a cooler, fresher feel but there is still some sunshine to enjoy. long spells of sunshine out there, always more cloud up towards the north and east and for the northern isles of scotland, the cloud thick enough perhaps to bring the odd spot of rain. quite breezy, especially in north—eastern areas and on the cool side, 16—21 degrees. a beautiful evening, long spells of sunshine to be had but once the sun does go down, those temperatures are going to dip away. you can see the green colours spreading across our temperature chart. even in towns and cities, we are looking at single—digit temperatures but some spots out in the countryside could get all the way down to three orfour degrees. so a pretty cool start to tomorrow morning but a bright start,
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we are going to see a lot of sunshine to take us through the day. always more cloud across northern scotland, again perhaps with the odd spot of rain but elsewhere, the winds will be that bit lighter. temperatures beginning to nudge upwards a little bit with highs getting up to 22. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, has said a "blame culture" in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths at gosport war memorial hospital. more than 3 million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn — as the government outlines the process. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parent. children from their parents. sport now on afternoon
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live with hugh. we start with england at the world cup — there has been a bit of a gaffe regarding the starting x1? of the video assistant referee yes, exactly, something like that, simon. what you want to do building up simon. what you want to do building up to these big games at the world cup is prepare as best as you can add one thing you want to know is i guess what the opposition is going to be playing and maybe today england have handed that over to their opponents panama on sunday, because they have one injury concern, dele alli has a thigh problem and might miss that game and could be replaced by ruben loftus—cheek and marcus rashford could replace raheem sterling. how do we know that? steve holland's the assistant manager and seem to revealed the plans in his notes today, captured by an eagle eyed cameraman. it might be the team we see on sunday but so far, the
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players aren't getting distracted by this story. we haven't been directly told who is starting and who is not, sol told who is starting and who is not, so i think all the positions are still up for grabs, really and until the manager actually names the team, thenit the manager actually names the team, then it doesn't matter what has come out what has leaked or anything like that because the lads don't really focus on stuff like that until it has come out of the manager's mag they only —— they are the only words that really matter to us at this moment in time. we are trying not to get caught up in articles and everything like that, we are trying to focus on ourselves and until the manager names the team, everyone is still fighting for their position. and hopefully, things don't go from bad to worse for the in the manager gareth southgate who, if you haven't heard, dislocated his shoulder yesterday. right, we are all used to hearing or e, refs, are we hearing ora, b hearing or e, refs, are we hearing ora,ba hearing or e, refs, are we hearing ora, ba r? ——va hearing or e, refs, are we hearing or a, b a r? —— va are? hearing or e, refs, are we hearing or a, b a r? -- va are? it is getting a tough time. this world cup is getting known for penalties,
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there have been more in this world cup already than they were in the entire group stage last time around, 11 so far, the record is 18. denmark and australia have just drawn 1—1 in the first of the day's matches and again, the video assistant referee was involved. it started with a beautiful goal from tottenham's christian eriksen, keeping up his great run for his country, 13 in 15 games for denmark. he gave them the lead but then var called into play once again to award what seemed to be very fortunate penalty for australia, converted by aston villa'sjedinak. australia, converted by aston villa's jedinak. as i australia, converted by aston villa'sjedinak. as i said, 1—1 the final score and the other two teams in this group, france and peru will kick—off at 4pm. and later on, we will see lionel messi, can he
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recreate what cristiano ronaldo has done at this world cup? argentina ta ke done at this world cup? argentina take on croatia from 7pm. manchester united have announced the signing of brazilian international fred from shakhtar donetsk. the 25—year—old midfielder has agreed a five—year contract with the option to extend for a further year. jose mourinho says his creative brain and passing vision will give united another dimension to their game. away from football, kyle edmund is fighting back after losing the opening set of his second round match at the sheer‘s queens, up against the australian nick kyrgios, who knocked out andy murray. the british number one lost the first set on a tie—break. pretty close, things were in the second as well, edmund overcoming several break points to take the second set on a tie—break, currently 1—1 in that one. edmund very happy. it's his first meeting against nick kyrgios, the world number 21. so far, it has been a story of the serbs, this match hasn't lasted long at all. it
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has gone into a decider and you can watch it on bbc two or the bbc sport website and app. after their record—breaking score in nottingham on tuesday, england's cricketers are taking on australia in the fourth one—day international at chester—le—street. australia opted to bat first. england, of course, setting that new world record odi score of 481 earlier in the week. they will be thinking they can add that anyone at the moment. the hosts are 3—0 up, looking for a whitewash having sealed the series win. that is all the sports are now, i am backin that is all the sports are now, i am back in the next hour. thank you very much. today on afternoon live, we've been taking a closer look at the impact of brexit on young people. chris morris has been investigating the impact of the decision to leave on british students who are studying, or planning to study, at a university elsewhere in the eu. we all know that undergraduate tuition fees in england are pretty expensive, so what might brexit mean for the thousands of uk university students?
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university students who now choose to study elsewhere in the eu instead? well, current rules mean that eu students can study in any country in the european economic area — that's the eu plus norway, iceland and lichtenstein. — for the same fees as local students. so in 11 other countries — 10 in the eu plus norway — uk students can study for free, because home students don't pay any fees there. other countries also charge very low tuition fees. in france, for example, state—funded universities charge between 180 and 600 euros per year. of course there can be language hurdles to overcome in studying abroad. but many universities in germany for example offer courses in english, which obviously gives native english speakers from the uk a big advantage. we don't have exact figures for the overall number of uk students studying for degrees elsewhere in the eea, but in the netherlands where average fees are about 2,000 euros per year, a lot lower than england, there were 2,778 uk students in 2016/17,
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a 20% increase on the previous year. so the obvious question — what's likely to happen after brexit? well, the eu and the uk have agreed that during the proposed post—brexit transition period, from march 29th next year until the end of 2020, the rules will stay the same as they are now. and, importantly, as long as you start your degree before the end of 2020 you will retain those rights until your course comes to an end. but after that? well, as ever, it depends on what gets negotiated, but the working assumption is that uk students would have to pay the same as students from the rest of the world to study in the eu or eea. we can only find two countries, germany and norway, that charge no fees at all to international students — so, as things stand, those could well be the only places where uk students could study with no fees after brexit. even in france, international students still pay very little,
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usually just an administration fee, ut in the netherlands it can but in the netherlands it can be anything between 6,000 and 15,000 euros per year. don't forget that eu students coming to the uk would have to start paying the fees british universities charge to international students as well. in england, that can mean fees of as much as £20,000 per year. and eu students do currently come here in large numbers — more than 130,000 in 2016/17 if you include postgraduates as well as undergraduates. finally, it's worth saying that one thing we haven't discussed here are the thousands of students who travel abroad, often for one year university courses, under the eu's erasmus exchange programme. the government has said it wants that to continue, and it's prepared to pay into the eu budget for that for happen. a bbc investigation has found allegations of sexual misconduct against one of the world's biggest foreign aid organisations. former employees of medecins sans
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frontieres say they'd seen women, believed to be prostitutes, being used by aid workers during missions in kenya and two countries in central africa. msf says it is deeply saddened by the allegations and will investigate. anna adams has this exclusive report. medecins sans frontieres is one of the biggest foreign aid agencies in the world. it brings vital medical supplies and clinicians to incredibly dangerous countries. but we've spoken to people who say some aid workers exploited vulnerable women. we have spent months talking to women who used to work at medecins sans frontieres and they've all told us very similar stories. we've heard accounts of endemic bullying, misogyny and sexism inside the organisation, and in some cases even the use of prostitutes in the field. this investigation is not about the doctors or nurses. we're told it was some of the logistical staff who were abusing their power. a whistle—blower from london told us what she saw when she was sent to kenya. there was a senior member of staff
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who was bringing girls back to the msf house. these girls were very young and they were rumoured to be prostitutes. it was difficult for people to challenge him because he was quite senior. we met another whistle—blower who told us a senior member of staff had said it was possible to barter sex for medication. he said, it's so easy to barter medication with these easy girls in liberia. he was suggesting lots of the young girls who had lost their parents to the ebola crisis, that they would do anything sexual in exchange for medication. and had he been there himself? yes, he had. in fact, he bragged about it quite a lot. to say it in front of three or four people who were there, and to say it to me very directly — what's this all about? it was impossible for us to verify this claim because the whistle—blower was not in liberia at the time, and when we put this to msf they said they needed more information to investigate. another source, who worked for msf in africa, said she felt sexually harassed by some of the men
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she worked with. there was this other colleague of mine, he asked me out and i said, no. and from that point forth the atmosphere in the compound was toxic, and he also brought prostitutes back in front of me. i felt sick. we've seen an internal report that shows msf were looking into sexual harassment claims back in 2016. the report showed a third of female employees they'd spoken to said they'd been touched inappropriately at work. they sacked 19 staff for sexual harassment last year alone. msf say they've reviewed their files but couldn't find any record of the claims against the london office. they said they were saddened to hear the allegations but hoped more people might now come forward. anna adams, bbc news. primary school children who walk to school are exposed to 30% more toxic pollution than their parents
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because they're shorter, and therefore closer to exhaust pipes and fumes. the research from the environmental charity global action plan also shows that those children face two and half times more pollution if they are taken to school by car. rick kelsey has been to south london to see how much pollution the one family face as they walk to school. za ra zara and her kids take this walk through the city, one of the most polluted places. for an adult, walk through the city can be bad for their lungs, but if you come down here, it can be up to 30% worse. since moving to south london from the country a few years ago, three of zara's children have got asthma. it is quite polluted because lots of cars, around here because it is quite busy here, lots of things which release these fumes which can cause lung cancer and asthma. it's
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the pollution, there are lots of cars, lots of vans, deliveries, and the kids are asthmatic, they will be coughing. it's a long journey but what can we do? how much do you worry about the pollution on the walk? do you try and avoid it at all? i don't have a choice, but i would love to. i don't have a choice because i live in the middle of the pollution area. research from the environmental charity global action plans suggests exposure to pollution is 2.5 times lower if it is possible to ta ke is 2.5 times lower if it is possible to take a route to school along quiet backstreets compared to busy roads. zara is living in central london, within the central congestion charging zone. we know that air quality within this area is particularly bad, some of the worst in london and we know that the levels of pollution that the children are breathing in our very
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bad for the lungs and damaging the growth of their lungs and this could be damaging their health long term. sara hopes that few people —— fewer people would use their cars so her kids can have better lungs in the future. in a moment, the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, has said a "blame culture" in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths at gosport war memorial hospital. more than three million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn — as the government outlines the process. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parent. children from their parents. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the bank of england has held interest rates 0.5% — but given a firm signal that they are likely to go up in august. more on this in a moment.
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intel chief executive brian krzanich has resigned after a probe revealed that a past consensual relationship with an intel employee violated company policy. the board named chief financial officer robert swan as interim chief executive. the food and drink industry is urging the government to take swift action amid a continuing shortage of co2. the british poultry council said the shortage could have a potentially huge effect on food production. and the food and drink federation said it would affect much of the "farm—to—fork supply chain". new figures suggesting the finances are looking in good shape. new figures suggesting the finances are looking in good shapem new figures suggesting the finances are looking in good shape. it has definitely been a trend of the last couple of years to improve government finances, these are the figures for may, we saw that instead, last may, we had government borrowing at £7 billion. we were
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expecting about 61 5 billion in borrowing and it has come in at 5 billion, so everything moving in the right direction —— six and a half billion pounds. total spending to date, 11.5 billion, about 4 billion less tha n la ptop date, 11.5 billion, about 4 billion less than laptop —— last time, so not too bad. so we can put extra money into the nhs without putting taxes up. we are going to hearfrom the chancellor tonight. obviously, he doesn't want to increase borrowing and with the borrowing going in that sort of direction, so therefore it is probably going to come from taxes. there is another interesting calculation come out today from the alan smith institute, an institute which doesn't like the idea of government spending on a large—scale, it is always very critical on overspending as it would call it. it got this thing called the cost of government day. if you we re the cost of government day. if you were to add up all the spending done on the economy by you, me, government and everyone and to
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spread it out evenly over the whole year, the government starts off first and spends of it every day, todayis first and spends of it every day, today is the day it would finish spending. from now on, it is our time, we could spend the money, businesses and all the rest, so it is an indicator of how much the government is spending. let's talk to matt, the spokesperson for the alan smith institute who came up with this concept. let's just have a look at the figure, or today being the day that the government would have spent all it is going to spend. is it early? is it made chris rodgers the government spending a great deal in historical terms are not very much? well, today is the solstice so it is halfway through the year, the longest day of the year but the first day we get to celebrate spending our own money. that is all households, all businesses, the first day we start spending money and the government stops. that is quite late in the year and much later than comparable
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countries such as the united states, parts of australia and singapore, which have much earlier days when the government stops and the people start spending. of course, the us doesn't have to pay for a national health service and redo. if we have the the national health service, i presume this would lengthen up on this day would come much later in the year. you are right but philip hammond said he didn't want to have any more borrowing because today is the cost of government day, it includes all debt—financed spending as well as all actual tax financed spending. we celebrated tax freedom day last month, 23 days ago, which is much further down than it was, the gap between the two days is much less than it was in the heady days of 2008-9, less than it was in the heady days of 2008—9, when we built up that huge deficit, and it is moving in the right direction, but with the chancellor ruling out extra borrowing, it'll have to be met with tax rises, so we won't be seeing the cost of government day increasing but we will see tax freedom day moving later next year. so the day we stop paying taxes and earn for
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ourselves will move bit further beyond. where would that tax come from? what beyond. where would that tax come from ? what kind beyond. where would that tax come from? what kind of taxes you think it would be? there have been all sorts of suggestions, some awful suggestions for a hypothetical tax purely designed around the national health service, but more general tax removing capital expenses, increasing the national income tax rate, 1p on each threshold. now, it could come, of course, from reforming the nhs so it is more productive. thereby hangs a tale, or at least a debate. thank you very much, matt kilcoyne. a quick look at the markets, all looking a bit sad. all of that comment out from daimler today saying that because of a trade war that is going on between china and the united states, it has factories in alabama selling to china and because of the trade war, it is going to have a real problem.
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the pound is looking very strong against europe because they have been saying interest rates will go up been saying interest rates will go up in around two months' time. thank you very much. before we go to the weather... the prime minister of new zealand, jacinda ardern, has become only the second world leader to give birth while in power. she and her partner clarke gayford had a daughter, theirfirst child, in hospital in auckland earlier today. ms ardern says she's taking six weeks' maternity leave. hywel griffith sent this report. beaming parents and their new arrival. jacinda ardern chose social media over a state announcement to share news of her daughter's birth. the message reads, "welcome to our village, wee one." throughout her very public pregnancy, jacinda ardern made a point of continuing with business as usual. after six weeks of maternity leave, she plans to be back at work as her partner, clarke gayford, becomes the main caregiver. in a bbc interview in april, she suggested the baby could also join her on the international stage. there are certain places that
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are hosting meetings in the future, and places, particularly in the pacific, we'd obviously bring the baby. we're great with children — just bring the child, we'll take care of it. so i think it will take an international community to raise our child. the baby's arrival has been celebrated here as a national triumph. former prime minister helen clark was one of the first to tweet, lauding the family's parenting arrangements as gender equality in action. theresa may also sent her congratulations to the new parents on the birth of their little girl. the man in charge of new zealand for the next six weeks also sent his best wishes. wishing the prime minister the very best, and clarke gayford, as well, and that she gets a solid start to motherhood, so to speak. that solid start may be followed by some sleepless nights, but jacinda ardern says she will remain contactable and keep reading cabinet papers once she's taken her baby home. thousands of people have
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celebrated the summer solstice at stonehenge. on the longest day of the year, the sun rises behind the heel stone, the ancient entrance to the stone circle, and rays of sunlight are channelled into the centre of the monument. here's the moment, at 4.52 this morning, that the sun came up, it is believed that solstices have been celebrated at stonehenge for thousands of years. this year, more than 9,000 people attended. what a beautiful day it is, let's get a weather update. here's ben rich. good afternoon. for many of us, temperatures have taken a temporary tumble, 20 degrees pretty much sums it up for the top value today but i say a temporary tumble because those temperatures are going to start to climb again over the next few days and by next week,
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some spots are likely to hit 30 degrees. but for the time being, we are stuck in some relatively cool air and with a keen north—easterly breeze, but we push all of that away to the east as we go through the weekend and by next week, we bring these increasingly orange colours across the country on our air mast charge, that will allow temperatures to climb. cool for most of us what is left of this afternoon, still quite breezy up towards the north—east, cloud and a bit of rain across the northern isles of scotland. elsewhere, good spells of sunshine but temperatures at best 16—21. during this evening, it will stay fine, long spells of sunshine to be had and the sun will set pretty late. it is the summer solstice, the longest day of the year so in lerwick, the sun doesn't set until after 10:30pm. in london, more like 9:20pm. so plenty of evening sunshine to enjoy but after the sun has gone
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down, those temperatures are going to give away, you can see the green colours spreading across the chart, town and city down to single figures, some areas of the countryside down to three orfour degrees. a fairly cool start to friday but lots of sunshine to be had. northern scotland will see more in the way of cloud, still fairly breezy and a spot of rain but elsewhere, the breeze not as strong as it has been today and those temperatures a little bit higher, 17—22 degrees. the process of those temperatures beginning to climb goes on into the weekend, high—pressure nudging its way ever closer to our shores. a weak frontal system up to the north, so some cloud and outbreaks of rain across the north of scotland, still fairly breezy here. elsewhere, a lot of sunshine to be had, although that sunshine might turn hazy from time to time. temperatures a couple of degrees higher, 24 in the south and for sunday, high pressure by this stage likely to be parked right on top of the british isles. lots of sunshine, generally light winds, sea breezes are likely to develop, making it cooler close to the coast but come inland,
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those temperatures getting up to the mid—20s. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 4. health secretaryjeremy hunt calls for a shift from a blame culture into a learning one at the nhs — but there are still fears the scandal at gosport could be repeated. i have worked with a group of whistle blowers, who have said that basically if you whistle blow in the nhs, you will be fired. more than three million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn — as the government outlines the process. throughout the process, we will be looking to grant, not for reasons to refuse. president trump vows to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents. coming up on afternoon live all the sport.
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england only a few days left? yes they take on panama on sunday. but have they given away the secrets of their starting 11. more at half past. the weather, it is looking brighter. yes a bright day, not a particularly warm day, but it is the longest day, the sommer solstice, we will be talking all things summer solstice and news of how the temperatures will climb next week. also coming up — is this deja vu? the prime minister brings the house down again. there aren't any letters falling down behind me are there? oh, it's a whole set! hello everyone — this is afternoon live.
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i'm simon mccoy. it could be happening again — we just don't know. the frightening prospect from leading health academic professor sir brian jarman, who says that the scandal at gosport war memorial hospital is possible elsewhere in the nhs. his comments come as health secretaryjeremy hunt said the "blame" culture in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths in gosport. relatives of the more than 450 people whose lives were cut short by excessive use of painkillers say they want justice and are calling for prosecutions. our correspondent richard lister reports from gosport. mike hobday‘s father, alan, died in gosport war memorial hospital in 1999. he felt at the time that his dad was treated as a nuisance, given drugs to calm him down. now he knows there was no medical justification for the painkillers which ended alan's life. why is it going to take until the autumn to start an investigation?
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you could start investigating tomorrow. ok, nothing is going to happen until the investigation goes through, but why can't it start straightaway? so the question asked by these victims' families is this. when will there be a criminal prosecution of those involved in ending more than 650 lives? hampshire police have acknowledged that this report does contain new information about what happened at this hospital in the 1990s, but they haven't confirmed when or even whether the investigation will be reopened. the chief constable, olivia pinkney, has said it's important that processes are put in place to ensure that all of the relevant agencies come together to enable decisions about next steps to be made in a way that is well considered and transparent to all of the families. but one expert in hospital mortality rates has warned that there is still a culture in which health officials would prefer not to know, when he tells them of potential problems.
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he says the issues in gosport could exist elsewhere as well. i don't think it's on the scale of gosport at all, or anything like that. but i think that there probably are deaths in hospital that could be avoided, yes. yesterday's report held consultants, nurses and all the agencies involved responsible for what happened in gosport, but one key figure has yet to speak. drjane barton, who ran the hospital's prescription regime, was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the general medical council eight years ago. she is thought to be out of the country, but will be facing serious questions when she returns. joining me now is elkan abrahamson. he's a solicitor that represented 20 hillsborough families and is now calling for the introduction of a so—called ‘hillsborough law', which would make it a legal duty of public authorities to tell the truth, and provide greater accountability. thank you for your time. after
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yesterday's report, what we saw clearly was the difficulty that any campaigner has in taking on an institution. and we have heard that time and time before. that's right, i can't discuss hillsborough, because there are ongoing proceedings in the court, but time and again it crops up and one can see it not just and again it crops up and one can see it notjust with gosport but with grenfell tower, where public bodies are reluctant to admit accountability. the finger is always pointed elsewhere.” accountability. the finger is always pointed elsewhere. i want to talk about specifically gosport, what we saw there was not only an inability to tackle the problem, but a culture of establishment cover up in effect in not getting it out there. yes, that seems to be a natural reaction in large organisations, particularly public bodies. and one can understand why in the process of
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team—building you might try to get collea g u es team—building you might try to get colleagues to support each other. but for some reason we are not able to impress upon people that there is a line that should not be crossed when one supports one's colleagues. ata when one supports one's colleagues. at a certain point you have to whistle blow and say this far and no further will i cover for you. that has happened, whistle blowers as we heard, there is a tendency they get fired and gagged. i wonder how a new law would change that? the idea of the accountability law is to make it a criminal offence not to make full and frank disclosure where ever there are investigations. that has an effect on the rank and file, the morejunior people an effect on the rank and file, the more junior people in an effect on the rank and file, the morejunior people in an organisation, they would be able to say to their boss, i can't cover for you, i will go to prison. it gives them some form of protection and
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tilts the balance in the favour of the people trying to make honest disclosure. does it tilt the balance so far that seem people may say public work, work in the public sector is not for me, because i don't want to face that threat of litigation? well, i think the answer is firstly do the job properly. secondly, there is always a measure of protection for honest mistakes and thirdly it is only the most heinous cases, usually where deaths occur, that one looks for accountability. and that one expects people to be honest and frank. what at the moment is the problem with the law. what is that gap, where the most vulnerable, the patients in the case of gosport, who feel they have a grievance and they have been... a victim of an injustice, why can't they act at the moment? well,
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ironically, the health authorities do now have a duty of candour and there are some reports that it is beginning to change the culture. it is probably too early to see if there is a definite change. but in other bodies, the reason people can't expect accountability is because the staff are either feeling themselves under a duty to protect their colleagues, or feeling scared of repercussions if they're honest. it is good of you to join us. of repercussions if they're honest. it is good of you tojoin us. thank you for your time. we are getting some breaking news from the home office. we are hearing that there has been an independent overseer appointed to look at the windrush scandal. the home secretary, sajid javid, said the system — which will start in the autumn — will be as easy and swift
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as possible and he insisted there would be no repeat of the failings in the windrush scandal. settled status is likely to be granted to anyone who can prove they've lived in the uk for at least five years and has no serious criminal convictions. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. the home secretary said his aim is to right wrongs. lessons learned review. it will be headed by wendy williams. eu citizens who want to stay in the uk after brexit have been promised there will be a simple process to confirm their status. the home secretary, sajid javid, said the system — which will start in the autumn — will be as easy and swift as possible and he insisted there would be no repeat
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of the failings in the windrush scandal. settled status is likely to be granted to anyone who can prove they've lived in the uk for at least five years and has no serious criminal convictions. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. eu citizens will have to apply for settled status under a new government scheme. we will be looking to grant status as quickly as we can. we won't be looking for reasons not to grant status. it will be driven, you provide the information and if you're not going to be granted status, there has to bea to be granted status, there has to be a good reason. to be eligible for settled status, you will need to have been resident in the uk for five years and arrived before the end of 2020. to apply, you will need to prove your identity. prove that you live in the uk. and that you have no serious criminal convictions. the home secretary's insisted he is determined to avoid
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the mistakes made with the windrush generation. we are making sure we are using government information in the way we didn't with the windrush generation and using that information. but you citizens want more. there is little trust in the home office, because of the windrush scandal and also they need to be able to fill application, be able to go online. i think there is barriers. this is a huge and complex scheme and after the windrush scandal there is pressure to get it right. sajid javid said as a son of immigrants he understands the concerns, but only a system that works smoothly will give the reassurance that many are looking for. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, said some people are likely to find
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the application process more time—consuming than others. if you're someone who is familiar with computers and smartphones, let's say you have been in this country for over five years and you've got an employment history that's documented, i don't think it will be terribly difficult to apply. it will be pretty straight forward. if, however, you're someone that let's say has a more checkered employment history here, perhaps you have been working cash in hand for some of that time, perhaps you have been working the black economy, perhaps also you're not someone who is familiar with online computer systems, something you're not happy about filling in forms online and if you're also someone that has lots of of family members that you want to bring in to register as well, i think the system will not be that straight forward and i think the timetable that officials say they are going to process applications within days well within two weeks, i think that is looking very ambitious for those sorts of people. earlier i spoke to nicolas hatton —
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founder of the three million campaign — a group championing the rights of eu citizens in the uk. we do have concerns that despite the simplicity of the scheme, a lot of people might struggle to provide the right evidence or they will struggle with the payment that will be online. it seems that when amber rudd desclared clared as simple as registering with an online store, i don't think it is as simple. i read the documents and the document makes a lot of, there is a lot of detail about specific cases. but you know at the end of the day, i think that people, you know eu citizens have got to understand that we haven't got to understand that we haven't got a choice. the environment is there. the home secretary hasn't
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declared it would end. so we have got to assume that unless we get documented byjune 2021, we will need, we will be exposed to a set of arguments, so it is not an option. it is welcome the design of the system is ments to be simpler than what it used to be for residents. the difficulties will have to be addressed. because we can't be the victims of a system, then if we can't get the id, the digital id token, we won't be able to stay. we're pre—judging a system at this stage, there are concerns about the computer side of this, on the wider issue, do you accept what the minister said in parliament, that those who don't have a problem, those who don't have a problem, those who don't have a problem, those who are here legitimately will not have a problem? yes, no, i welcome this, in that statement if
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it had come on 24thjune 2016 it would have been really helpful. but it has been two years where we have seen an unprecedented rise in hate crimes and lot of it is unreported. a lot of verbal abuse. there has been a change in the atmosphere in the country and i think that this won't address that psychological effect of the referendum. so i do agree with you that the home secretary is committing for, is committed for people to stay. but we have got to feel welcome at the same time. something's got to change. it is not just a time. something's got to change. it is notjust a procedural matter.m is notjust a procedural matter.m is an attitude problem? yes, it is, andi is an attitude problem? yes, it is, and i would like to see as much work dedicated to fighting this attitude and the rhetoric on hate crimes than
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there is on making sure that it can be as easy as possible for us to apply for settled status. the conservative minister, greg hands, has resigned from the government, in order to vote against plans for a third runway at heathrow airport. greg hands is the mp for chelsea and fulham in west london and says he had promised his constituents he would oppose the scheme. a vote on the proposals is due to be held in the commons on monday. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines the health secretary, jeremy hunt, has said a "blame culture" in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths at gosport war memorial hospital. more than three million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn — as the government outlines the process. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parent. in sport, the video assistant referee is again the issue at the
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world cup as australia get a draw with denmark. have england accidentally given away their plans to their match with panama on sunday? finally, kyle edmond has been beaten at queens against the australian nick kyrgios, who also knocked out andy murray in the first round. morejust knocked out andy murray in the first round. more just after half past. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration — after he backtracked on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents, following an outcry both in the us and abroad. families will now be kept together while their legal cases are considered. gary o'donoghue reports from the us—mexico border. this stretch of the rio grande in texas is where many tried to enter the united states. every week some drown in the attempt. those who make it face arrest and prosecution. it is at centres
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like this that adults and children were being separated, leading to those now notorious images of children apparently housed in cages. the national and international outcry was in the end too much, even for president trump. he struck a defiant tone while doing his u—turn. so the democrats want open borders. let everybody come in. let everybody pour in, we don't care. let them come in from the middle east, let them come in from all over the place. we don't care. we're not going to let it happen. and, by the way, today i signed an executive order. we're going to keep families together, but the border is going to be just as tough as it has been. thousands of children have been separated from their parents
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in recent weeks, and no one really knows how long it will take to reunite them. it's going to be a herculean task, if you will, because it's going to require a lot of transparency in finding out exactly, where these children were separated from the families and where those parents are. the churches are often at the forefront of the immigrant welfare, but just hours after the stroke of the presidential pen, all denominations gathered in the rain to welcome the change of heart by the administration. everyone at this gathering will be glad the president has ended the separation of children from their parents, but they also know the policy of zero tolerance for people crossing the border illegally has not changed, and that could mean increasing numbers of adults and children in custody. let's speak to our state department correspondent, barbara plett—usher, who is on capitol hill for us.
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what swung it do we think finally and made this incredible u—turn. was it the worldwide condemnation, his party or his wife and daughter? well i think it was a combination of several of those elements. his wife and daughter were unhappy with the policy, with the images and they said to him that it was unacceptable, we understand from reports, so that will have had some impact. it was unpopular here on capitol hill with republican law—makers, who also felt that it was something that they didn't want to be associated with. but then also president trump does watch cable tv news and he saw all the negative coverage that he was getting. the negative images, the narrative. and that also i think was a factor in
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him deciding that he would reverse course. it was a real reversal, because he has been holding the line and saying that he was just fulfilling the law and congress had to change the law, falsely claiming that and then at the end taking the decision to end the policy himself as most people knew all along that he could do. it was a rare involvement by his wife. she wanted the government to govern with heart. that really shook a lot of people? well, melania has not spoken out very publicly, does not have that much of a public profile full stop. when she has taken on causes and spoken out, they have had to do with children. i think that that was not necessarily a surprise that she would be upset about the children being separated from their parents. and that she would put a word in her
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husband's ear. but i think she was probably one element of several factors. all that said, the president still has a tough political battle to get any bills he wa nts political battle to get any bills he wants through? well, yes, this is, this has been the calculation that he was holding on to this policy to use it as leverage to put pressure on congress, on republicans in co ng ress on congress, on republicans in congress to pass the bill on immigration reform that he had been looking for. he has priorities and he wants funding for his wall and more measures to deport immigrants who are illegally here. what he has in fronts of congress today, are two bills, one is hardline and it is believed it has little chance of passing. but there is a compromise one that meets some of but not all of his concerns. so we don't know if the republicans have enough numbers
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to pass it. the democrats, probably none will vote for it. there is a narrow window to get republican support and there was concern yesterday from some of mr trump's officials from homeland security secretary and the attorney general by him signing this executive order and taking away the immediate pressure there might be less impetus to get this bill passed and they have been trying to get republican co ng ress have been trying to get republican congress men and women to do that. thank you. with just nine months to go before britain is due to leave the european union, we've been taking a closer look at the impact of brexit on different parts of the population. well today, we examine the effect on young people. our correspondent elaine dunkley has been to coventry college to talk to students. they were too young to vote in the referendum. for these students, a course has been decided to leave the eu. so in a word, describe how you feel about brexit. whatever the
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feeling, brexit will have a big impact on their lives. in the referendum i would have voted leave, but now more facts has come out and the way it's going, i really wish people would have voted remain. and the future scares me. but nobody‘s told me how it's going to affect me. nobody‘s told me how it will affect my college life, my career. it is my future that will be affected and no one's told me how. so what do you wa nt to one's told me how. so what do you want to do with your career and how you think brexit will affect that.” wa nt you think brexit will affect that.” want to become a midwife that travels around the world. if we leave the eu, i think it will cause a lot of problems. because now i have to pay more for a visa to travel to spain. if i was still in the eu i could go there without having to pay. as we are leaving we will have to make new allies and trade, rather than going to someone like germany or someone else that
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was in the eu we could make friends with someone else and it could be a place to go. will be the biggest impact for your future?” place to go. will be the biggest impact for your future? i worked for the coventry youth forum, a lot that was was funded an eu scheme. they have affected both the youth of today but also i think it will have a substantial effect on the youth that will be around when we leave. there are more than 130,000 eu stu d e nts there are more than 130,000 eu students in the uk and more than 40,000 people from britain went to europe on exchange schemes. questions remain about the impact on education. right now, they're looking at the older generation to make a difference. i think it will be us that help in the future to build the economy. we have to live with whatever they decide. these young people feel they must be at
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the forefront of negotiations. the hope is for a bright future. the fear is of the unknown. a litter of four female mountain lion cubs have been found hidden in a den in southern california. officials in santa monica had been tracking the mother since january. the cubs have now been given a health check and marked with ear tags. they are four—and—a—half weeks old and weighed between four and five pounds each. follow that! one of them would have your hand off by the look of things. just allow their kittenhood to go past without worrying about the future. they're cute and lovely. why are we doing this? it is the summer
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solstice and that's stonehenge. and you're going to tell us about a heat wave. yes that this is stonehenge. the last time we did this, you were asking me why it is the summer solstice and wanted some expensive... you were using your hands which i thought was cheap. we have dug out some expensive graphics to explain this. here we are. the orbit of the earth around the sun is tilted, so what happens is at this time of year, the earth in its tilted orbit, there we go, it travels around the sun and the northern hemisphere is tilted most on this day towards the sun and hence we get this most sun light and the longest day of the year. how old are their graphics? they're actually not that old. but we had to really dig to get them. any way. it is good. it explained it. better than
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my tilty hands could. so it is a nice day today. and the next...” have some pictures hopefully. of? i was going to show you some pictures of, this has kind of ruined the rest of, this has kind of ruined the rest of the segment. i wanted to move from these expensive graphics and show you pictures of sum mer solstice and the forecast. but i can't do that. is your button not working. these expensive graphics have broken the button. what can i do is talk about the weather for a while if you would like.” do is talk about the weather for a while if you would like. i will fiddle with this and see if i can fix it. you talk i will see. today has been relatively cool. 20 degrees in most places. by the time we get to next week it will be like 30 degrees. we have a fine night with
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clear spells. it will turn cool and fresh with temperatures down around four or five degrees fresh with temperatures down around four orfive degrees in places. and then we get into tomorrow, what we will see is another nice looking day. blue skies and sunshine for most of us. northern scotland seeing more cloud. whereas today has been breezy, tomorrow will be less so and temperatures will nudge up. the weekend is mainly fine and dry with some spells of sunshine. you probably can't see it. this is cloud and that is sunshine. over the weekend we will look at sunny skies. you asked how old these graphics were! temperatures up to 25 degrees. if you're thinking of heading for the coast it will be cool we are sea breezes. next week, plenty more sunshine and temperatures up to 30 degree. if we had to have a day when the graphics would fail, this isn't bad, because the forecast is straight forward — dry with sunshine. what is going on? your
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battery's gone. and in is in as well! i'm sure there will be more weather in half an hour. i think i will stop now. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: health secretaryjeremy hunt calls for a shift from a blame culture into a learning one at the nhs, but there are still fears the scandal at gosport could be repeated. more than three million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn, as the government outlines the process. president trump vows to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents. also coming up before five — is this deja vu? the prime minister brings the house downagain. that aren't any letters falling down behind me, are there? there's an entire set falling down behind me! sport now on afternoon live with hugh, who has all the latest details from the world cup in russia. including some details perhaps we
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shouldn't be getting. yes, we will come to those in the moment because we will start by talking about the action on the pitch today. arlene foster is in moscow for us —— arlene foster. the video assisted rectory is having an impact. we have seen another var penalty and australia will be thankful for that because it led to an equalising penalty against denmark in group c. australia have kept themselves alive at this world cup after two matches. the dream for all in russia but no one expects these two to battle it out at the business end, kristin
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eriksson getting the danes infill voice early. it wouldn't last long. at first there was nothing to see here but with video assistance on offer, another look. lawson's hands touched the ball, penalty to australia. from that moment on it was they who looked more aggressive in attack, denmarkjust holding on. a late flurry from australia had the danes rocking but they couldn't find a way through. qualification to the knockout stage is still a possibility for both. france are playing peru in the other game in group c this afternoon. the two changes for the french. they have had more chances than per so far. griezmann has had a good chance
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although core aero has come into their side, the captain, although core aero has come into theirside, the captain, and he although core aero has come into their side, the captain, and he has just had a shot well saved by hugo rees. france can go through, her route trying to keep themselves alive. this is coming up cardinal argentina versus croatia. we will see how they go against croatia, can you imagine them going out before the knockout stages? and it looks like has put the french ahead —— mbappe has put the french ahead against peru. it is all going on here. we will see if the var has anything
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to say about that goal but at the moment france lead against peru. what is going on with the england camp? they never learn, an england team sheet. if you have the world's press and all those super zoom cameras, you don't waive your team sheet around, what we think will be their tea m around, what we think will be their team to face panama. it looks like marcus rashford will come in four raheem sterling. steve holland was carrying it. ruben loftus—cheek, we expected him to come in anyway because dele alli is nursing this thigh strain but i'm sure panama would be excited to see that, pretty much a second string in england could get past panama although don't say that in front of any panama
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fancier. england never learn with those careless team sheets. ollie, be careful you are not upsetting any fans in moscow. just to say, stradivarius has one against the jockey frankie dettori. the murder of a man by a violent schizophrenia patient was a result of racism, and could have been prevented according to a report by the local safeguarding board. kamil ahmad, who was an iraqi asylum seeker, was stabbed byjeffrey barry in 2016, hours after he'd been released from a secure mental hospital. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan is in bristol. drug and armed, jeffrey barry heads towards a neighbour's flat — drunk. a knife is visible. months later it would be used in a frenzied attack which would kill kamil ahmad. shortly after dismembering the iraqi asylum seeker, jeffrey barry called the police. today's report says kamil ahmad
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should still be alive and the failure to fully recognise his killer's racism contributed to his death. the two men, who both had mental health problems, lived in this sheltered housing complex. today's report says that there were at least six incidents between the two men between 2013 and 2016 while they stayed at this property. they included barry punching kamil ahmad as well as a racially aggravated assault. despite that and barry's well known violent history, the two men were allowed to continue living together at this housing complex. barry obsessed with camille ahmed
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because he was a racist, says the report. the report says he was a person with racist views he was mentally ill, rather than a mentally ill person whose racism was a manifestation of their illness. the head of the local safeguarding board says improvements have been made. we can never stop all the risk, we can never do that. what we can do is try to mitigate against that risk. there are considerable resources, both people and money, being spent in bristol. we have a new hate crime and discrimination service that was launched by bristol city council last year. shortly before he killed, barry, who had a long history of violence and schizophrenia, was detained here. but a mental health tribunal unaware of his history decided to release him. the local mental health trust then failed to properly plan his discharge. jeffrey barry was out with a sheltered housing provider given just hours to prepare for his return. the family believe strongly
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that the chief executive of the nhs partnership trust must consider her position because it was under her watch that these catastrophic failings occurred, with calamitous consequences for the family and for kamil. kamil ahmad came to bristol to seek refuge and instead died at the hands of a racist having been failed by the agencies meant to protect him. the inquiry into the grenfell tower fire which killed 72 people last year has been hearing evidence from firefighters. our correspondent tom burridge is at the inquiry. we have just been granted access to a report, essentially a detailed timeline from the london fire brigade of their tactics, their activities on that night to tackle
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the braes at grenfell tower. one thing that emerges is the desperate search to try and locate young jessica, one of the 72 people killed that night. we learned at 1:26am, roughly half an hour after it began, her sister met a firefighter on the stairwell and gave him the keys to their flat stairwell and gave him the keys to theirflat on stairwell and gave him the keys to their flat on the 20th floor. a minute later he tries to go up but has to come back because his error is low. later he tries to go up to the flat but in the meantimejessica urbano has made a long call to 999 and advised emergency services that she has gone up to several floors above to take refuge with neighbours. that information was not relayed and when the firefighter and
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his colleagues go up to flat 176 where jessica and her family lived, she is no longer there. the door is open and the firefighter has no idea where she is. what other evidence, because the design of the building was focused on? this week we learnt about the timeline in the early stages. we learnt within 15 minutes of the first 909 call by the man who was living in flats 16 where the fire began in his kitchen, within 15 minutes the flames had spread onto the cladding, which was combustible and the fire spread quickly. what we learnt today in this report is that firefighters are on the outside of the building, around the time the fla mes the building, around the time the fla m es we nt the building, around the time the flames went on to the cladding,
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requested permission to put a jet onto the fire from outside the building and were told by the commanders not to do it because two firefighters were inside going into flats 16 around that time and they didn't put the hose externally on the fire at that moment because of fears for the two firefighters inside. there was only a delay of one minute, it is hard to say what impact that short delay might have had but it is the very moment that the fire spread onto the external cladding and once that caught fire, we know it's bread with such a devastating effect. we also learnt about the scale of the firefighting response that night, 40 fire engines called in total. we have seen the words of one firefighterjust called in total. we have seen the words of one firefighter just after 15 minutes, who was concerned about
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the way the fire was barking and splitting and he wrote in his report that he compared the way the cladding was burning to the weight he had seen magnesium burn. tom burridge at the inquiry in central london, thank you. a bbc investigation has found allegations of sexual misconduct against one of the world's biggest foreign aid organisations. former employees of medecins sans frontieres say they'd seen women, believed to be prostitutes, being used by aid workers during missions in kenya and two countries in central africa. msf says it is deeply saddened by the allegations and will investigate. anna adams has this exclusive report. medecins sans frontieres is one of the biggest foreign aid agencies in the world. it brings vital medical supplies and clinicians to incredibly dangerous countries. but we've spoken to people who say some aid workers exploited vulnerable women. we have spent months talking to women who used to work at medecins sans frontieres and they've all told us very similar stories. we've heard accounts of endemic bullying, misogyny and sexism
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inside the organisation, and in some cases even the use of prostitutes in the field. this investigation is not about the doctors or nurses. we're told it was some of the logistical staff who were abusing their power. a whistle—blower from london told us what she saw when she was sent to kenya. there was a senior member of staff who was bringing girls back to the msf house. these girls were very young and they were rumoured to be prostitutes. it was difficult for people to challenge him because he was quite senior. we met another whistle—blower who told us a senior member of staff had said it was possible to barter sex for medication. he said, it's so easy to barter medication with these easy girls in liberia. he was suggesting lots of the young girls who had lost their parents to the ebola crisis, that they would do anything sexual in exchange for medication. and had he been there himself? yes, he had. in fact, he bragged about it quite a lot. to say it in front of three or four
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people who were there, and to say it to me very directly — what's this all about? it was impossible for us to verify this claim because the whistle—blower was not in liberia at the time, and when we put this to msf they said they needed more information to investigate. another source, who worked for msf in africa, said she felt sexually harassed by some of the men she worked with. there was this other colleague of mine, he asked me out and i said, no. and from that point forth the atmosphere in the compound was toxic, and he also brought prostitutes back in front of me. i felt sick. we've seen an internal report that shows msf were looking into sexual harassment claims back in 2016. the report showed a third of female employees they'd spoken to said they'd been touched inappropriately at work. they sacked 19 staff for sexual harassment last year alone. msf say they've reviewed their files but couldn't find any record of the claims
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against the london office. they said they were saddened to hear the allegations but hoped more people might now come forward. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, has said a "blame culture" in the nhs has to change to help uncover scandals such as the deaths at gosport war memorial hospital. more than three million eu citizens who want to stay in britain after brexit will be able to register to do so from the autumn as the government outlines the process. president trump has vowed to maintain his tough stance on illegal immigration after a u—turn on his policy of separating migrant children from their parents. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the bank of england has held interest rates at 0.5% but given a firm signal that they are likely to go up in august.
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more on this in a moment. more information on tsb's disastrous it failure which cut off thousands of customers from online banking — it may simply not have carried out proper tests beforehand. ibm has done a report into the breakdown and it's been published today by the mps on the treasury committee. intel chief executive brian krzanich has resigned after a probe revealed that a past consensual relationship with an intel employee violated company policy. the board named chief financial officer robert swan as interim chief executive. dixons carphone — a lot of bad news recently? yes, there was the hacking it reported last week when it had almost six million customers' bank card details stolen, then there are the results today. it's closing stores — about 13% of them. and today the profit numbers came
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£380 million profit against 500 million last year. daimler has a lot of manufacturing in alabama and it's worried that its sales to china are going to be hit — it's said profits are going to be lower. if you have a trade war between the us and china, that will create problems. they do look like they are going to go under. i have a few doubts about inflation and being quite as strong as people think it is that higher wages, full employment and higher oil prices point towards the fact we will have interest rates going up. let's talk
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to richard marwood, seniorfund manager at royal london asset management. my feeling is that pressure on inflation are not as big as people make out. the result that of u pwa rd as people make out. the result that of upward pressure on inflation, the oil price feeds into prices and inflation. people have been surprised that there hasn't been more wage inflation and if there we re more wage inflation and if there were to be, that would create pressure but we need to remember that even if interest rates go up a bit, they are still low by historical standards relative to work inflation and economic growth is. would people really notice if we went up from 0.5% to 0.75%?” suspect they wouldn't be because it
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is still close to normalised interest rates. carphone warehouse is another problem on the high street. if you look at dixons carphone, they have three businesses, the one we are familiar within the uk and that is struggling, their business in scandinavia is doing well and then the one in greece is growing its profits but the way we buy our mobile phones is changing, fewer people are upgrading as often and people are upgrading as often and people are upgrading as often and people are not as keen to go for contracts and it is impacting the profitability. and daimler are stuck in the middle of this trade war, the china— us trade work, but then a lot of companies which are not american or chinese will get caught up in this. you have a german car manufacturer being hit by a trade war between two other countries. the
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thing that has caught the attention of the markets is that it is the first tangible evidence we have seen that the posturing about trade wars is having an effect on companies. richard marwood, thank you. the ftse is suffering there, dixons carphone. that is quite a job, 2.3%?” is suffering there, dixons carphone. that is quite ajob, 2.3%? i think they have a plan in place, they are closing down these outlets and trying to keep costs under control and that speaks a fair amount in favour of their management. the pound is looking strong because interest rates are going up, the dax reflects problems at daimler and other car companies which might get caught up in the trade wars. jamie, thank you.
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you may think you're experiencing deja vu, but you're not. it's happened again. prime minister theresa may suffered another speech mishap last night when the set fell apart around her — a reminder of her conservative party you can see what happened, it was very windy. i want to give a sincere thanks to policy exchange for everything you've been doing because it's 16 years now you've been making the case for modern, compassionate reform... that aren't any letters falling down behind me, are there? laughter. there's an entire set falling down behind me! rather bizarrely, i can take you now have to theresa may at downing street with the nato secretary general, jens stoltenberg. not only do we exceed the nato target of spending 2% of gdp on defence but
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today thousands of our armed forces are standing shoulder to shoulder with nato allies around the world, in poland and estonia to deter russian aggression, they are training and venturing with our iraqi and afghan partners to help them build a brighterfuture. the royal navy has led half of nato's standing maritime forces for the past year and has declared our nuclear defence capability, and raf typhoon jets nuclear defence capability, and raf typhoonjets in nuclear defence capability, and raf typhoon jets in romania nuclear defence capability, and raf typhoonjets in romania are patrolling the skies over the black sea as part of nato's southern air policing mission. iam proud sea as part of nato's southern air policing mission. i am proud that when the call comes from nato, the uk is one of the first to respond, but we cannot allow nato to stand still, so today the secretary general and i welcome the progress made to modernise nato while recognising there is more to do.
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there has been discussion of the need to take on greater responsibility and we welcome the steps nato allies have taken since the wales summit four years ago. burden sharing will be an item on the agenda in the summit injuly we will take stock of progress since last may. europe is shouldering more of the burden must do more and as our challenges evolve, so must we, which is quite another priority is making nato more adaptable. next month we expect to agree measures to strengthen our deterrence and defence, increase efforts on tackling terror and address the threat represented by cyber and hybrid warfare. our values are the source of nato's strength but as an organisation of 29 based on consensus, we cannot always act as
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quickly as our adversaries, so it is reassuring that nato continues to adapt to make sure it can prioritise activity and implement decisions quickly. this will include improving readiness so we have the right forces in the right place to act to protect people. the uk plays an important part in this by supporting the design of the new nato command structure and will commit an additional 100 posts to that structure, taking our commitment to over 1000 uk service personnel. this is the first time the secretary general and i have met since russia's use of illegal nerve agent in salisbury. we saw the value of the alliance in its response to this andi the alliance in its response to this and i would like to thank the secretary general for nato's support. this act was the latest russian provocation in a pattern of
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behaviour, cyber disinformation and increased military posturing. we will be at the forefront of those opposing russia's malign activity and the abuse of the international rules —based system that are committed to the nato approach of deterrence backed up by meaningful dialogue. my message to the secretary general today is that the uk will lead by example, meeting the 296 uk will lead by example, meeting the 2% target on defence spending, contributing to alliance missions and continuing to encourage all allies to do the same. secretary general. thank you, prime minister, for welcoming me here and for your commitment to our alliance. the uk has long led by example in nato and you continue to do so. you lead the nato battle group in estonia, raf
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jets patrol the skies over the black sea and air forces are training afg ha n sea and air forces are training afghan troops to fight terror. these contributions help keep us all safe. the uk also lead by example, spending 2% of gdp on defence. i welcome the uk's investment in major new equipment, including the first f 35 fighterjets new equipment, including the first f 35 fighter jets which new equipment, including the first f 35 fighterjets which arrived here this month. i know that nato can rely on the uk. and the uk can rely on nato. this country did not have to respond to the attack in salisbury alone. it had the strength and the support of 28 allies behind it. when nato is needed most, allies
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stand together. as you said, we just discussed our preparations for the nato summit in brussels next month. allied leaders will meet and build on what we have achieved in recent years. we will further modernise and adapt nato to the challenges we face. we will agree to increase the readiness of our forces, to establish a new nato command structure, to launch a new training mission in iraq, to extend the funding for afghan forces and to deepen our corporation with the european union. we will also agree how we can strengthen our cyber defences, an area where the uk has played a key role for a long time. all this shows that nato is
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delivering and adapting for the future. what makes nato unique is the bond between europe and north america, for nearly 70 years america and europe have worked together to preserve peace and since the founding of nato the uk has been vital to keeping the transatlantic bond strong. today some are questioning the strength of that bond. allies have differences on issues like trade, climate change and the iran nuclear deal, but we have had differences before and the lesson of history is that we ove rco m e lesson of history is that we overcome these differences every time. we have continued to unite around our common goal, to defend and protect each other... jens stoltenberg, nato secretary general freezing britain for being one of
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the countries to meet its spending target and nato relies on the defence skew abilities of britain and it said that britain could rely on nato as well. the news with ben brown is coming up next. today at 5:00... staying in the uk after brexit — the government sets out plans for how more than three million eu citizens can apply to remain here. ministers say it'll cost applicants £65 and they'lljust have to answer three simple questions. the need to prove your identity. number two, that you live in the uk, prove that you actually live in the uk. and number three that you have no serious criminal convictions. we'll have more details of the scheme and also we'll be looking at what this means
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for the 900,000 british citizens living abroad in the european union. the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00... the health secretary says lessons must be learned from the gosport war memorial hospital scandal, as relatives of the victims call for a criminal investigation. interest rates are kept on hold but there's speculation
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