Skip to main content

tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  June 21, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

7:00 pm
you're watching beyond 100 days. the president backs down on separating immigrant families but not on his hardline approach. in the past hour he says that democrats have let millions of children into the us illegally. mr trump has changed his policy but he's not happy about it — complaining how much his administration has to pay to look after those children. for the softer white house image look to the first lady — melania trump makes a surprise visit to the texas border. they are here without their families. i want to thank you for your hard work, your compassion and your hard work, your compassion and your hard work, your compassion and your kindness in these difficult times. europeans living in britain get an answer to their post—brexit fate — with £65 and a few online questions they can apply to stay in the uk. also on the programme: president macron in hot water again, over the cost of a swimming pool he's building at his summer residence. they say the bill could be far
7:01 pm
in excess of the dinner plates he bought, for over 50,000 euros. why are they lead? i have a much better apartment than they do. but then those who already have the bling, still don't get the recognition, they say they're due. when will mr trump be accepted by america's elite? get in touch with us using the hashtag 'beyond—one—hundred—days' hello and welcome, i'm katty kay in washington and christian fraser is in london. president trump backed down but that may not mean much for the 2,300 children already separated from their parents on the mexican border. it's not clear when, how or whether those kids will ever be reunited with their families. we do know that separated immigrant children are being flown to holding centers around the country, sometimes in the middle of the night. melania trump made a surprise trip to texas today to see the facilities for herself after reportedly pushing
7:02 pm
the president to end the separation of families. back in washington her husband made it clear he still wants tough immigration restrictions. since 2014 alone, nearly 200,000 unaccompanied alien miners have been released into the united states as a result of democrat backed loopholes, including catch and release, which is one of the worst. you catch them and then release them. save your time, don't bother catching them. this is what we are stuck with, the worst immigration laws in the history of the world. the whole world is laughing at the united states and they have been for years. well right now a debate is taking place on capitol hill to see if any legislation can be passed to addrress immigration. joining us now from capitol hill is our correspondent, barbara plett usher. does it look like anything decided
7:03 pm
in the building where you are is going to affect those children who are now separated from their families who came into the country illegally down on the border with mexico? in terms of the two republican bills up for a vote, nothing will be decided that will impact the children who are already separated from their parents, because this legislation is forward looking. it will basically say from 110w looking. it will basically say from now on, if illegal migrants coming, the families will be detained together. but there is a limit to how long the children can be detained, 20 days. but the whole separation policy is only one element of this. these bills looking at broad immigration issues, issues that are contentious. the democrats will not support them so you need a lot of republicans and they are divided. even this so—called
7:04 pm
compromise version the speaker, paul ryan, put forward. there is a discussion on whether to hold the vote on the compromised version and maybe delay it so it shows you how divided the republicans are. thank you, barbara. with me now is our political analyst ron christie, who formerly served as an advisor to president george w bush. we have talked a lot about the fate of these children and it is a grim situation. let's look at the politics and assess that in terms of the president's political fate at the president's political fate at the end of this week. this couldn't be any worse for president trump. you are looking at children in cages. you have republicans, former first lady speaking out against this president and his policies. where does this leave us? the president signed an executive order yesterday which will allow children to remain
7:05 pm
with theirfamilies. which will allow children to remain with their families. but i which will allow children to remain with theirfamilies. but i don't think it is legal and i don't think it will stand up to a court challenge. so even if the president tried to avert the situation in the short time, he will be told he cannot contradict a statute written by konon daily—macro congress. cannot contradict a statute written by konon daily-macro congress. while he has made a u—turn on the separation of families, he's sticking to his guns on zero tolerance. if you are sticking to your guns on zero tolerance, he might be holding them together, but in 20 days, according to the law he has to release them because they are with children? that is completely right, this is the floras decision, it was decided in 1997 with donald trump and his zero tolerance policies, you can hold these kids for more than 20 days and this is an immigration process that takes up to 715 days, nearly two years. after 20
7:06 pm
days the children are released but the parents can be held for nearly two years. so congress has two step in and fix the situation and i don't see, based on the report wejust heard, republicans cannot find any democrats tojoin them heard, republicans cannot find any democrats to join them to fix this ina democrats to join them to fix this in a legislative manner. what do you make of the first lady going to texas. the visit wasn't announced and we understand she was the one that pushed it and she wanted to go down there. she has not been at a facility where many of the children are, those who have been separated, these are minors who came in unaccompanied into the country. but she has made the trip to texas, what do you make of that? brilliant optics. for her all president? both. you see the first lady of the united states sitting and talking with children, not in cages but in a warm and less hostile environment. i
7:07 pm
think the first lady going down there will help take the sting out of the images we have seen over the last several days. but the president has got to find a way to solve this problem and i do not seek a solution in the near term. he keeps blaming the democrats cover what about the speaker, paul ryan? he is in a fix with the chair of the freedom caucus. there are two builds on the house floor, can he get anything through? no, the house of representatives cannot be governed. the freedom caucus determines the fate of what paul ryan and the leadership are able to bring up. the freedom caucus are adamant, they don't like any of the bills. they will vote no and they cannot get a bill out of the house and the president cannot find a way legislated lead to sign something in the law to fix this problem. who
7:08 pm
would be the speaker! to understand why people are trying to cross america's southern border in such numbers you need to look beyond mexico. instead it is the violence, drug cartels and poverty in many central american countries which have forced people to flee. for more on those factors and what is being done to address them we are joined now by jason marczak, director of the atlantic council's latin america center. the president said it was like taking a walk in central park crossing mexico. but i am assuming from the stories we have heard, it isa from the stories we have heard, it is a lot tougher than that? that is right, these immigrants are largely not coming here because they want to, but because they have too. they are escaping violence and fear in their own communities. we have a task force looking at what must be done to improve conditions and you need sustainable, economic development, better law and without that's, people will continue to come north. it is worth looking at the
7:09 pm
figures. look at how many came across last year in april, 15000 and then this year, compare it with this year, we are up then this year, compare it with this year, we are up over then this year, compare it with this year, we are up over 50,000. why do you think the numbers havejumped year, we are up over 50,000. why do you think the numbers have jumped so much? the numbers havejumped even looking back a few years. they have jumped from 2014, there was a major crisis with unaccompanied minors and families crossing the southern border. at that point, the united states worked with the three countries of the northern triangle to put together a comprehensive plan, there was a boost in funding. a lot of the funding has taken time to trickle down to the countries. in the vacuum that has been left, what happens is, the situation continues to deteriorate in el salvador,
7:10 pm
guatemala and honduras. there is a lack of state presence and people are afraid of walking out their front doors. jason, the argument in favour of development aid to these countries seems to be a long—term fix. what we're looking at is short—term political crisis. how do you marry those, people opposed to more people coming into the country illegally, don't have the patience to sit around for aid programmes that may or may not produced results in stopping people leaving those countries? it is a long-term solution. you are not going to have results overnight. you look at the us efforts with regards to colombia. it was a 15 year, 10,000,000,000-dollar it was a 15 year, 10,000,000,000—dollar plan so you will not reverse the trajectory of these countries in 12 years. you need a long—term approach as well as
7:11 pm
short—term fixes. 0ne need a long—term approach as well as short—term fixes. one of the development since 2014 is a greater response on the part of mexico. these immigrants come through mexico ona these immigrants come through mexico on a very treacherous journey on the way to the united states. mexico has stuck with its efforts in as far as reinforcements and enforcement on its own borders. jason, thank you very much. melania trump in texas, is she distancing herself from the president and his policies or is she dared to exercise some damage control, which is it? it is hard to know what goes on in the mind of melania tramp because she says very little. she has waded in on this issue, which is almost unprecedented because she hated seeing these families being separated and now with this trip, and we understand the trip did come from her office, she wanted to initiate this. you might think this is a way to give
7:12 pm
herself a softer image, but it also helps the president. he announced a visit at the cabinet meeting, he made it public and seemed to embrace it because it does help him get away from that. he could not have gone, it would have been difficult for him to go there. and it was her influence? it was her influence and ivanka trump's influence but republicans running in suburban districts who know that independently voting mothers in particular, women, don't like these pictures. every time i hear and speak about this over the course of the last 24 out of is clear he is not embracing the idea of this policy shift. in that press conference in texas, she asked the people around the table how often these children get to talk to their parents? two times
7:13 pm
a week and that is a phone call. but it wasn't clear they were getting up because of the processing procedure. i was struck by that also. let's move on. nearly four million eu nationals will be given the automatic right to settle in the uk as part of the brexit negotiations. the british government revealed today they are planning for 3.8 million applications — more than previously expected, because they don't know how many european nationals are living in the uk already. anyone from the eu who comes to the uk before the end of the implementation period, at the end of 2020, will have the right to apply for settled status. they will also get the right to bring their parents, grandparents, siblings, boyfriend or girlfriend, to the uk under the new rules. 0ur political correspondent john piennar reports. what's the hardest job you've done — cooking? cleaning? across the country there's eu nationals doing jobs brits can't or won't do, living on low wages and promises they can stay after brexit. elena?
7:14 pm
cheese omelette, please. 0k, thank you. at this blackpool seafront hotel, elena has been worried about her future. i'm worried because i don't want to go back to italy because it was my dream since i was a child to be in england. so now i realise my dream and i want to continue it. government ministers say you can stay. yeah, but i still worry anyway. i've been here for five years now. blackpool is now my home. my boyfriend is spanish as well and we are planning to stay here for a long time now, yes. we're not planning to go back to spain. today, for those settled in this most traditional of english resort towns and across the country, the future has become clear. you were going to tell me the future? notjust predictions and vague promises. settled status will be open to around 3.3 million eu nationals, here for five years by 2020. there'll be checks for id and criminal records. close relatives will be allowed to join their families in the uk.
7:15 pm
applications will cost £65 — that's less than a passport and half that for children under 16. we will not be looking for excuses at all to not grant settled status. of course we will be very driven by the default view, you provide this information and if you're not going to be granted settled status, there has to be a very good reason why you are not going to get that. change might have come too quickly for some. you don't get more british than blackpool. voters here also voted to 2—1 for brexit and views on migrants are mixed. like i say, these europeans will take more menial jobs, which they will, cleaning and things like that. i say, if we need the work in this country, it's got to go to the british people. you think they are taking british jobs? i do, really. they only take those jobs which they find they can do. if the brits were there to do them, they would have taken them themselves. so i don't see a problem with them coming over here at all.
7:16 pm
this is about more than the needs of business or the right to remain. britain is redefining its role in the world. john pienaar reporting there. welljoining me now isjulien hoez, french citizen and spokesperson for the 3 million campaign, a group championing the rights of eu citizens in the uk. good to see you. sajid javid, the home secretary says it is about as registering for a loyalty card? the government is saying a lot in relation to eu citizens and brexit. 0ne relation to eu citizens and brexit. one is very welcome to hear about the 3.7 million european citizens living in the uk. like many things the government says, we will take it with a pinch of salt. but he said the government's default position on this will be too grand and not refuse claims, doesn't that reassure
7:17 pm
you? it is being spoken about now at the 727 days of brexit. the issue for me personally, it isn't legally binding yet. for all intents and purposes it is an announcement of opposition, like many things in brexit is likely to change. but if you have settled status, you have settled status, do people take pack settled status, do people take pack settled status? we don't know, look at the windrush generation and although there have been assurances it will not be repeated, we just don't know what will happen five yea rs 01’ don't know what will happen five years or ten years down the line. some people in the windrush generation were here for 40 years and found themselves being deported 01’ and found themselves being deported or completely cut off. i understand, for somebody in your position it is an unsettling time, the whole process is unsettling. you have lived in the uk and you want to
7:18 pm
carry on doing so but you say having to fill in an online form is an insult but it doesn't seem that arduous to go online and fill in a few details, does it? ijust want arduous to go online and fill in a few details, does it? i just want to clarify, i did not use the word rds. it is meant to be relatively simple, you can do it online. the issue lies in the fact that for many people, they use iphones and not android phones and the application only works on android mobile phones. secondly, well they are saying it is simple to do, the issue is, we don't know what the error rate will be for the application process. right now the application process. right now the home office has a temper sent error rate when it comes to immigration applications and general decisions around immigration. there isa decisions around immigration. there is a lot of danger and it will never be as simple as they like to say. recent articles in the guardian have
7:19 pm
explained that. i am sorry, i misquoted you. do you feel this process , misquoted you. do you feel this process, once you have filled in the form and page £65 and you have settled status, will that reassure you as much as anything could do that you will be able to stay? for me it will be basic assurance that for now, i am 0k. it is very much a case of, we don't know what will happen down the line. we don't know if my papers, despite being born and raised here all my life, will be enough. we don't know what brea kd owns enough. we don't know what breakdowns will happen of the system. this was supposed to be in place in august and then it was pushed back to october and then december. no sajid javid has said it will be in place early next year. it seems like a lot of errors are happening in the testing stages. it is good they are delaying it but it is good they are delaying it but it is adding more pressure to the
7:20 pm
system for the amount of people who will be applying straightaway. thank you very much indeed. the spending habits of the macrons are in focus again. last week, the french president and his wife were criticised for spending 50,000 euros to replace a dinner service at the elysee palace. almost as much as your dinner service! now french taxpayers may be billed for a swimming pool. the president wants one at his summer retreat so that paparazzi can't take pictures of him and his wife brigitte, swimming at the beach. it's expected to cost tens of thousands of euros. i have some sympathy for them over this. the beach, we know previous first ladies have been snapped by the paparazzi while they were slumming. carla brunei had pictures of hirst smacked all over the tabloids, it is stressful running
7:21 pm
france, maybe they should be able to swim in private. yes, that is one... you don't need one, you have a private yacht. the optics, as they say on your side of the pond are not too clever because he is moaning about french spending on welfare and then you cannot have bills like this. i have been looking back. there was 26,000 euros on his make—up in the first three months, 50,000 euros on dinner plates and 150,000 euros on cuisine. i have had a look at what swimming pools cost andi a look at what swimming pools cost and i think he can do it a bit cheaper. i think one of these is the a nswer to cheaper. i think one of these is the answer to his problems. 100 euros in any place in france. i have one of these. you get a pump and a ladder with it. you do feel a bit like a
7:22 pm
crouton swimming around in it, but they are private. it is not massively presidential. 0n the scale of glamour? do you think donald trump would like that? well, that is a very good question, it leads us on very nicely... what makes someone part of the elite? is it money? power? lineage? whichever combination of those catapult a person into the top tier of society, you might think being president of the united states would be enough to get you there. but this president doesn't think so, and he's not happy about it. at a rally last night in minnesota, donald trump complained that he doesn't seem to get the social recognition he feels he deserves. you ever noticed they always call the other side, and they do this sometimes, the elite. the elite! why are they elite? i have a much better apartment than they do. laughter and cheering. i'm smarter than they are, i'm richer than they are.
7:23 pm
i became president and they didn't. cheering. and i'm representing the greatest, smartest, most loyal, best people on earth. the deplorables. remember that? the deplorables. cheering let's get the view of the elite. is this what it is all about, is this why he attacks the media and attacks the commentators, because hejust doesn't feel he is getting the recognition? i think it goes all the way back to donald trump when he was in high school. he went to a military high school and he felt he never got the recognition he deserved. we have talked about crowd
7:24 pm
sizes at the inauguration and all sorts of different things and he never feels he gets his due sorts of different things and he neverfeels he gets his due here in america and that speech last night was more indicative of frankie is in security. can you imagine george w bush talking about the size of his apartment? isn't it something usually american presidents... and george w bush came from the right side of the tracks, but didn't like to brag about it? his money, his education, he would never have done that. we do know however, when we talk about elite, you do not have an aboveground pool. we know you have one of those elite pools. we might have to see a picture of christian in his pool. the peanuts they pay me, you know it isn't true. you are in the pool, floating around. the
7:25 pm
pool as in a yacht. how are you doing, christian? pretty good. i want to say quickly, if you look back before he became president, he was in manhattan. is it about one—upmanship? president, he was in manhattan. is it about one-upmanship? yes, that is what it has been about with him. the way he is acting he wants the biggest, best toy, want the biggest crowd. it is about attention rather than governing, christian. thank you. i will invite you to the yacht in the summer. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news: the robotic revolution — from fruit picking to presenting, will machines see many of us replaced by robots? hello.
7:26 pm
it was a beautiful day across the uk today. technically speaking the first day of summer, the 21st ofjune. temperatures were actually a little bit below average for the time of year, but the sun is very strong so it felt pleasant. the air is coming in from the north. if you look at the motion of the clouds, you can see the clouds are coming in from the north—west, moving in a south—easterly direction, so that north atlantic air over us, hence it felt a little bit cooler and fresher for some of us. with clearing skies tonight, it's going to turn quite cold in northern parts of the uk. in rural spots of scotland and northern england, i wouldn't be surprised if it's around three or 4 degrees, and even some of the major cities around dawn will be hovering around 6 degrees, for example, in newcastle, eight in plymouth, and just about nudging up to double figures in central london. it starts off fresh in the morning on friday, but the
7:27 pm
sun will be out and it's promising to be a stunning day, a beautiful end to the week on the weather front at least. a little bit more cloud across scotland, and fresher, 16 for aberdeen, getting up to around 22 in london. that's friday. friday night into saturday, nothing really changes on the weather map. this high pressure is very much in charge of our weather. there are a couple of weather fronts just to the north of us, so the thinking is that, on saturday, the north of the country, just a bit closer to the jet stream and weather fronts, will have perhaps a bit more cloud, a bit of rain for our friends in lerwick but, to the south of that, the weather is looking stunning. the mid—20s on saturday in london and then, on sunday, few were clouds across scotland, much lighter windthe sun is very powerful, very strong sunshine out there. once again, a sunny, beautiful sunday, so both saturday and sunday across the uk is looking absolutely smashing. i want to emphasise the strength of that sunshine at this time of the year. next week, no real changes. the jet stream is very far to the north of us. in fact, it's right over iceland.
7:28 pm
the thinking is that the whole of europe, right across into scandinavia, will be warming up, so temperatures are set to soar. in fact, i would say a little bit of an underestimate for some parts of the south. we are expecting those temperatures to probably nudge up to around 30 degrees or more, so there is a bit of a heatwave on the way next week. that's it. this is beyond 100 days, with me, katty kay, in washington. christian fraser's in london. our top stories: melania trump makes a surprise visit to the us—mexico border camp where detained migrant children, separated from theirfamilies, are being held. the british government sets out plans for more than three million eu citizens who want to remain here after brexit. coming up in the next half—hour: hot shoe shuffle — are canadians really smuggling american footwear out of the us? 0ur toronto team looks into it. securing the sahara — we've a special report from niger,
7:29 pm
where we join the us army fighting terrorism. let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag #beyond100days. returning now to our main story — the us battle over immigration policy. a day after president trump signed an executive order ending the separation of parents from their children at the border, his wife melania made a surprise visit to texas to visit a facility where immigrant children are being held. meanwhile, a fierce debate is happening on capitol hill over how to address the issue long term. joining us now from capitol hill is republican congressman francis rooney from florida. it looks like your party has not been able to come up with some kind of compromise on immigration that will address this issue in the long
7:30 pm
term, and that's the problem, isn't it, that america has been trying to address this for the past and nothing really happens. yeah, i worked on the 2007 george bush bill, and we thought we would get it done, and we thought we would get it done, and the problem has festered and got worse ever since. why has the position got more hardline since 2007? that was the last time america got close to thinking it could have comprehensive reform and it seems then that both sides have become more polarised. it's less likely now, isn't it? why is that? it's a polarising issue. the democrats, no democrat seems to want to join in reforming immigration or visas right now, so the republican party is left to do it by it self. we have a wide range of ideology in our party, and it's hard to bring the moderates together with us conservatives, who would like to see a serious reform
7:31 pm
of the defects in the immigration system, not just of the defects in the immigration system, notjust grant residency status. the problem will always be getting the president to sign on, because i think you are a problem despot could you are a supporter of paul ryan's compromise bill, and he says let's have morejudges, and the president says, i don't want more judges, i want funding for the wall. this does contain funding for the wall and it tightens up the asylum standard, two of the president's top priorities, so i'd have to assume he'd sign the compromise bill as it has been configured. i don't know if they're going tojoin it —— change it before friday. why do you think this is the problem of our age? it isn't unique to the states. there is a meeting in europe, the german government is under pressure, and it seems, no matter how much we put at the border, no matter out of the policies are, you can't stop the
7:32 pm
tide people coming in. you make a very good point. a panel at the us institute of peace yesterday talking about this, and immigration has been exploited by russia to undermine and to change some of the government in italy, germany, hungary, even the conservative party of france. it's a worldwide issue. we were speaking to somebody who's studied latin america earlier in the programme, who made the point that you can do whatever you like in terms of restrictive measures on this side of the border but, until you address the problems in the countries these people are coming from, you still have a long—term problem because people will always want to escape what are effectively dangerous areas in their countries, but this administration has cut aid and development to central america. is that strategy wise in the long term? should put more into development? first of all, ido more into development? first of all, i do agree that, as long as people
7:33 pm
are fleeing abject poverty and persecution, they will try to get to a different place, whether they are clea n, a different place, whether they are clean, somalia, syria, honduras or el salvador. what we can do to stabilise those countries is important, and we put money back into continued the important democracy building projects the state department handles. thank you for joining state department handles. thank you forjoining the state department handles. thank you for joining the programme. a bbc investigation has found serious allegations of sexual misconduct against medecins sans frontieres, once of the world's biggest foreign aid organisations. a whistle—blower who is a former employee claimed that there was widespread use of prostitutes by some msf staff working in africa. the charity said it does not tolerate "abuse, harassment or exploitation". there will be no brexit deal without agreement on the irish border — that is the warning from the european commission president, jean—claude juncker, who's in dublin. he's been meeting with the taoiseach, leo varadkar, and the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier. we wanted to make it clear again
7:34 pm
and again that ireland is not alone. we have ireland backed by 26 member states and by the eu commission. this will not change. i am strongly against any temptation to try to isolate ireland and not to conclude the deal on ireland. ireland has to be part of the deal. the prime minister of new zealand, jacinda arden, has given birth to a baby girl. her partner announced the news by posting this photo on social media. the baby weighed 3.3 kilos and the name has yet to be revealed. ms arden is only the second world leader to give birth while in office. the first was pakistan's benazir bhutto. an air asia pilot has been heavily criticised after he tried to flush out passengers who refused to get off, using the jet‘s air—conditioning blower system. passengers of the domestic flight in india were told to get off the plane after a delay of four hours, but refused to because it was raining heavily outside.
7:35 pm
the pilot then put the air—conditioning on full blast, sending dense clouds of air into the cabin. eyewitnesses reported seeing children crying and other passengers vomiting. another two countries are lining up to tax goods from the united states, in response to donald trump's tariffs on non—american steel and aluminium. turkey says it's going to target american coal, tobacco and cars, while india plans to tax us iron, steel and agricultural. tomorrow, the european union will introduce new tariffs on american goods like jeans, motorbikes and alcohol. this tit—for—tat over tariffs took a rather peculiar turn this week, when the us president claimed canadians cross the border only to take american goods back into their country. among the items being smuggled, said mr trump — footwear. but are they really? we've been to canada to find out. they buy shoes and they wear them. they scuff them up.
7:36 pm
they make them sound old or look old. there was a story two days ago in a major newspaper talking about people living in canada coming into the united states and smuggling things back into canada because the tariffs are so massive. never, no. no, i don't smuggle. never. i'm too scared! if we have half a bottle of wine left, we still have our full litre in the back, but we said to the guy, you know, we've got a couple of ounces of wine in the bottom. and he's, oh, fine. so i guess that's smuggling, but we've already admitted to it, so... i always try to buy
7:37 pm
canadian products first. i think that's kind of pointless for a country this size. it's like you know, a flea on an elephant. thinking about it. just thinking about the job losses and all that. i usually buy canadian, if i can. i'm not going to drive all the way over there. if you shop around, you can get good deals right here. never mind those guys. ijust might buy a niagara bottle of wine instead of a california bottle of wine, but it's probably going to make no difference. i'd just like to give him a kick, you know, in my own way. i love that lady because, not only does she bring it in, it's only a
7:38 pm
little bit of wine, but she tells the customs officer. i don't think that counts as smuggling. you know we are living in a strange world when the canadians have become the bad guys. that's worth repeating, and the tone of his rhetoric the other day, oh, they helped us in the second world war, and we are kind of grateful for that, but now they come and take our shoes and wander back across the border, you just think, where does this go? yeah, there is a broader problem with this. when america wants to take on chinese trade practices, it will be in a better position to do so if it has a united front from western economies, and you can already see the deterioration from the g7 meeting, from the canadians being one of the countries that spoke out against the separation of families on the mexican border to these trade policies. there hasn't been a lot in the last month to boost canada's relationship with the united states, or they could well. —— or their
7:39 pm
goodwill. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — the robots are coming and will they take over our jobs? a new survey finds over half of us think that within 30 years robots will be so advanced they'll be able to clean, cook, and do all our most hated work. hampshire police have apologised tonight for not investigating properly the deaths of hundreds of elderly patients who died prematurely at gosport hospital after being given dangerous doses of drugs. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, has the latest. for tracy today was the first chance to look at the full report. that's appalling, isn't it. listed were details of her own father's death, robert wilson died at gosport war memorial hospital in 1998 aged 75. he had gone for rehabilitation after breaking his collarbone and other health problems. like others, he died after a huge doses of painkillers. the report said drjane barton
7:40 pm
was responsible for prescribing on the wards in the 1990s but other staff are also involved. she was later disciplined but not barred by regulators. afterthe hospital doctor barton worked as a gp at this local practice. one patient told me she was well regarded. she was very brisk in her manner, she did not suffer fools gladly. but she was a very good doctor. we were happy with her. what do you think know you have seen the report? i am still uncertain. but i do feel that one person is a scapegoat i do not think it's right. a lot of others involved. hampshire police apologised today to families of patients for any distress caused because investigations were not high quality. they said they would step back and let another force take the lead. the report of the independent panel published yesterday makes clear there were numerous warnings
7:41 pm
about potential problems at the hospital which went unheeded. some nurses raised concerns about prescribing as far back as the early 1990s. tracy and other relatives are relieved that what they have suspected for many years is now confirmed after the first detailed account of what happened. you're watching beyond 100 days. we've a special report for you now from the sahara desert, which is becoming a new flashpoint in the war on terror. islamist groups are growing in strength across the sahel — as it's known — and so international troops are moving in to stop them. french forces are tracking terror groups across the region. there are thousands of un peacekeeping troops in mali, and the united states is building a huge new airbase in niger. and our africa correspondent, alastair leithead, joined them. as we move to the door...
7:42 pm
american special forces troops training their african counterparts in the sahara desert. i'm going to try to peek inside without showing my muzzle. for african nations, this major exercise is a chance to learn how western armies work. it goes here. for visitors, it provides partners willing to fight terror for them. the sahel is really an important place for us to focus now because of al-qaeda and isis—affiliated violent extremist organisations which are growing in strength and if we don't take this opportunity to deal with it now, where it's at a level that is affordable and sustainable, then it may cost much, much more to deal with at a later time. islamist fighters ambushed four us soldiers in niger... many americans did not know 800 american troops were in niger until four were killed by islamic state, and questions were asked about what they were doing here. but the us is rolling out
7:43 pm
resources across africa. this multimillion—dollar runway is one of many bases, often secret, that are projecting us power across the sahara. the scale of this new us airbase is huge. when this runway is finished, it will be able to land some of the biggest cargo planes the military has got and will be also able to fly armed drones. it's a dramatic indicator ofjust how much the american military footprint in africa is growing. just on the other side of the wire is agadez, the heart of the sahara's people smuggling business since libya collapsed into chaos in 2011. it hides and bankrolls islamist groups, but corrupt officials in niger have no incentive to shut it down. are you frustrated by the amount of corruption that allows this to happen? yes, of course i'm frustrated. it's a very old
7:44 pm
phenomenon, growing up. i know it generates a lot of money. even the violent extremist organisations are also involved in this. they are making a lot of money out of it. their presence is bringing international troops into the sahel. thousands of un peacekeepers in neighbouring mali and french forces on a long—running counterterrorism mission. it is creating a new front line in the war on terror in the sahara desert. turkey holds parliamentary and presidential elections this sunday and the polls suggest president erdogan's ak party could lose its parliamentary majority. kurdish minority votes could be decisive, and so it all depends on how the pro—kurdish hdp party fares. selin girit has travelled across turkey from east to west, and sent this report. life isn't easy in this remote
7:45 pm
village in turkey, and these residents say the government has made it even harder. they used to vote in their village but now their polling station has been moved 17 kilometres away. the government says it is to protect the ballot from kurdish militants. translation: some of us can't afford to travel, some of us are too poor or old. but even if we have to carry them on our backs, we are going to vote. translation: in 19 kurdish cities, polling stations have been moved or merged. the opposition says votes could be rigged and voters intimidated. the only way out of the village into the town centre is
7:46 pm
through a checkpoint, and once you are in town you see a heavy police presence. under a state of emergency, turkey faces one of its tightest elections in years and every vote counts. kurds could ask l —— end up as keen makers. when the ceasefire happened in 2015, drug use would played in several cities and major military operations took place. —— curfews were declared. the government accuses these people of having links to the pkk. nine mps are still injail, including the pa rty‘s are still injail, including the party's presidential candidate. recently, president erdogan hinted at reinstating the death penalty for him. his wife travels thousands of kilometres every week for an hour—long visit. translation: he is behind bars, and
7:47 pm
he tries to compete with the other presidential candidates. he can't even call this a fair contest. in a democratic country, how can his president promised voters death and bloodshed? this president promised voters death and bloodshed ? this proves president promised voters death and bloodshed? this proves how scared they are of us. in istanbul at a major hdp rally just they are of us. in istanbul at a major hdp rallyjust days before the election, people hold their breath to watch the speech. it was recorded in prison, and broadcast by the state tv channel, a first in tu rkey‘s state tv channel, a first in turkey's modern history. the hdp needs to win more than 10% of the vote to enter parliament. if it fails, the seats would go to president erdogan's akp, the second most popular party in the kurdish region. the kurdish vote could be a
7:48 pm
game changer. wouldn't it be nice if you never had to clean the house, do the laundry or show up to work ever again? well, many think we are getting closer. i thought you were offering! a new survey found 52% percent of adult internet users believe, within 30 years, robots will have advanced to the point where they can perform most of the activities currently done by humans. and yes, that includes all the house chores and work duties you want to avoid. darrell west is the vice president of governance studies and director of the center for technology innovation at the brookings institution. hejoins us now. does this huge revolution in the workforce that is about to take place make people anxious, or are they excited? it makes them anxious. they can see robots are starting to appear ina they can see robots are starting to appear in a lot of sectors, in robots, session restaurants, security robots patrolling grounds, and people understand they are coming but they are worried about what it will mean for humans. how
7:49 pm
much knowledge is there about the size of the disruption and when it's going to happen? people know there's going to happen? people know there's going to happen? people know there's going to be a lot of disruption but people are uncertain how far down the road it is. there is anxiety on the road it is. there is anxiety on thejob the road it is. there is anxiety on the job front. they can see the workforce being disrupted with a lot of automation coming into virtually every sector. they worry about what it will mean for them and their children. i want one of those who we re children. i want one of those who were robots and one of the grass cutting ones, but they are expensive. what people say about the cost? —— one of those who were robots. people worried? we asked people in a survey how much people would pay, and about 50% said they would pay, and about 50% said they would pay, and about 50% said they would pay up to $500. very few would pay more. one thing i thought was interesting is there is a difference in the age between people who want regulation of robots and the whole
7:50 pm
automation industry and those who don't, and i was surprised that younger people want more regulation. i thought they were the tech savvy ones. a tech savvy but they tend to be more liberal and they have worries about what the robots will mean for them and society as a bowl and, as you point out, they were more interested in regulation and senior citizens were. what does this mean for policy? not long ago during the french election, the socialists said they wanted to start introducing a tax on robots to pay for those who would be put out of work. does this sort of research affect what policies will come from government? there are certainly a lot of government is thinking about how handle robots and especially the workforce disruption. we definitely need to put a lot more effort into worker retraining for people who lose theirjobs as a result. the problem is there will be newjobs created but many people will not have the skills. does that mean the
7:51 pm
next step in artificial intelligence, when these robots become more useful, in contexts like looking after elderly patients, that is when we will see a step change in how many robots are involved in our lives? definitely. certainly, in the next five to ten years, i think people will be shocked at the degree of robots coming into their lives, the use of artificial intelligence, automation in general. all of these types of technology innovations are accelerating, and they will be with us accelerating, and they will be with us injusta accelerating, and they will be with us in just a few more years. what jobs will not be taken over by robots? we asked people what type of report they would be interested in having, and the category that fared the worst was caretaking, so people don't chuck —— trust them to take ca re of don't chuck —— trust them to take care of elderly people or children and people don't want those tasks to be automated. thank you for coming
7:52 pm
in. somejobs be automated. thank you for coming in. some jobs can be automated. thank you for coming in. somejobs can never be taken over by robots, and one of those is editing this programme. we have been on—air with this programme for 516 days, and somebody has been with us all through that time. today our editor in london is leaving the programme and we'd like to ta ke leaving the programme and we'd like to take a chance to say goodbye and thank him. his name is adam and he's been here 600 days plus, and he doesn't want to stay until the end of days, no parole, but we are sending him off under a slogan. they are sending him to the domestic news channel in the uk under a slogan make adam great again, but it's no easy thing, doing this show. apparently, you have to keep track of the timings, and sometimes they tell me we've run over, now and again. you, we, you, you talk too much. i think adam deserves a huge
7:53 pm
amount of credit. he is incredibly patient with you. we are looking at a bank of people. behind me in the green shirt, the man in the... with the beard. i think he joined you in singapore and you had a good time, kristian, i understand. yes, it was very hot and i was sweating a lot on camera, but he kept me cool with plans and the daft perspiration from my top lip, for which people gave him some stick, but i have to confess him some stick, but i have to co nfess eve n him some stick, but i have to confess even took me for dinner and we didn't really know where we were going in singapore and we ended up ina going in singapore and we ended up in a rather salubrious neighbourhood, and he left me as i would get some cash, because he calls himself a good producer but he came with no money. i have to confess, i fell asleep and woke up with two ladies offering to walk me home. so not the best producer. er, ok. this is our very favourite
7:54 pm
picture. it's a reminder, adam, of when we all came over to cover the royal wedding. i don't know quite what it was you said but you said something that clearly caused myjaw to drop on the floor. adam, we will miss you enormously. thank you for sticking with us and being so patient with wrist june. will see you next week. it was a beautiful day across the uk today, technically the first day of summer, the 21st ofjune. temperatures were a little bit below average for the time of year but the sun is strong so it felt pleasant. the air is coming in from the north. looking at the motion of the clouds, you can see them coming in from the north—west and moving in a south south—easterly direction, so that's north atlantic air, so it felt a bit cooler and fresher for some
7:55 pm
of us. with clearing skies tonight, it's going to turn quite cold in northern parts of the uk. in rural spots of scotland and northern england, i wouldn't be surprised if it's around three or 4 degrees, and even some of the major cities around dawn will be hovering around 6 degrees, for example, in newcastle, eight in plymouth, and just about nudging up to double figures in central london. it starts off fresh in the morning on friday, but the sun will be out and it's promising to be a stunning day, a beautiful end to the week on the weather front at least. a little bit more cloud across scotland, and fresher, 16 for aberdeen, getting up to around 22 in london. that's friday. friday night into saturday, nothing really changes on the weather map. this high pressure is very much in charge of our weather. there are a couple of weather fronts just to the north of us, so the thinking is that, on saturday, the north of the country, just a bit closer to the jet stream and weather fronts, will have perhaps a bit more cloud, a bit of rain for our friends in lerwick but, to the south of that, the weather is looking stunning.
7:56 pm
the mid—20s on saturday in london and then, on sunday, fewer clouds across scotland, much lighter winds. the sun is very powerful, very strong sunshine out there. once again, a sunny, beautiful sunday, so both saturday and sunday across the uk is looking absolutely smashing. i want to emphasise the strength of that sunshine at this time of the year. next week, no real changes. the jet stream is very far to the north of us. in fact, it's right over iceland. the thinking is that the whole of europe, right across into scandinavia, will be warming up, so temperatures are set to soar. in fact, i would say a little bit of an underestimate for some parts of the south. we are expecting those temperatures to probably nudge up to around 30 degrees or more, so there is a bit of a heatwave on the way next week. that's it. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm. the government sets out the plans for more than three million eu citizens if they want to remain here after brexit. the home secretary says it will be a simple process involving three questions. the need to prove your identity.
7:57 pm
that you, number two, that us in the uk, proof that proof that you actually live in the uk at number three, that you have no serious criminal convictions. the bank of england holds interest rates, as the chancellor prepares to make his annual mansion house speech on the state of the uk economy. a report finds the racist murder of an iraqi asylum seeker could have been avoided. the us first lady, melania trump visits a child migrant detention centre on the us—mexico border, and says she's there to learn. also in the next hour, can argentina get back to winning ways at the world cup?
7:58 pm
7:59 pm
8:00 pm

18 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on