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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 22, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am. european aircraft maker airbus says it's rethinking its operations in britain because of the risk of a no—deal brexit. international businesses, significant uk businesses, have looked at what the future holds and for them it looks very uncertain and very risky. just a jacket — or a message to the so—called ‘fake news media'? melania trump's choice of clothing causes controversy. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic , as authorities there accuse him of using a fake diplomatic passport. we give this passport to who will deliver it, will give it to boris, boris becker. we're sitting in on a driving lesson which would be perfectly normal anywhere else in the world, but not here in saudi arabia because there's a woman behind the wheel. as saudi arabia lifts the ban
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on women holding driving licences, we'll meet some of the first women to take to the wheel in the country also, 70 years on from the arrival of the first caribbean migrants on the empire windrush a service of thanksgiving. with the scandal surrounding the immigration status of those arriving from the caribbean some of those who have already been deported speak out. good morning. it's friday the 22nd ofjune. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live our top story this morning: the plane maker airbus says it may pull out of the uk if britain leaves the eu next year without a transition deal on customs and the single market.
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while the government secured a brexit victory in parliament this week, they have said far from project there this is dawning reality. the design and manufacture wings for aircraft in the uk, employing around 14,000 aircraft in the uk, employing around 1a,000 people across 25 sites. they say their activity in the uk adds more than £7.8 billion to the economy. its main sites are in broughton, north wales; newport, south wales; bristol and portsmouth. former welsh secretary stephen crabb, conservative mp for preseli pembrokeshire, called to an end of the ‘ideological cage fight‘ over brexit and said a ‘coherent strategy‘ was needed from government. keir whiel shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer said the government‘s red lines need to be abandoned to protect
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british industry. nigel farage said they were lobbying for their own interests. andrew plant reports. it employs around 1a,000 people at 25 sites across the uk, making wings for passenger planes. now, in what they‘ve called a brexit risk assessment airbus said if the uk left next march without a deal it would lead to severe disruption and interruption of its uk production. put simply, it said, it would force the company to reconsider its business in the uk. we have become increasingly frustrated with the lack of clarity, obviously time is running out with less than nine months to go. we have to come to the point where we have to make a
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decision soon, and we had to make decisions that are long—term in nature. without clarity it‘s too dangerous for us to proceed. before the uk voted to leave the european union in 2016‘s referendum airbus wrote to staff warning them about the risk of voting to access the eu. french, german and spanish governments all hold stakes in the company. the campaign to leave the european union accused airbus, at the time, of being part of what is called project there. airbus said that was far from the truth, and on thursday they said its concerns over future business in the uk were now becoming a dawning reality. the chief executive of a ds, which represents the aerospace and defence sectors in the uk told the bbc the announcement is indicative of hard decisions businesses are being forced to make because of brexit.
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decisions businesses are being forced to make because of brexitlj don‘t think this is about leaving. this is the fact that the first stage of contingency plans, the first phase of any contingency planning stop making it worse. people are not exposing themselves to more risk by investing more in the uk. of to more risk by investing more in the uk. of itself, that is damaging to our economy. clearly, if we move to our economy. clearly, if we move toa to our economy. clearly, if we move to a point where this uncertainty continues, and the threat of a no deal brexit continues to grow, that is potentially catastrophic for the economy. we don‘t know what the customs arrangements are going to be, we have the bizarre situation where governor do that the government and cabinet are discussing to arrangements, neither of which businesses believe fit for purpose. we ask ourselves a simple question, if they are discussing ones that don‘t work, what is the likely outcome for us? you know, i think the result of those considerations is the likely outcome
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is extra cost, significant delay, and making the ukaea less competitive environment in which to operate. —— making the ukaea less competitive environment. we have concluded that despite the fact that all business organisations, individual companies, have presented evidence, the facts on which they make decisions to government, it is very clear to us, that those... evidence, is not leading the debate. we talk now to our correspondent who joins us from cardiff. you have two big airbus plants in wales, what would be the impact of airbus were to leave? in terms ofjobs and the supply chain? the biggest plant is in broughton, north wales, they employ around five to 6000 people. they have 900 down
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in newport. the wider impact is the effect on the supply chain, the businesses that feed into airbus across the uk. it‘s thought that the impact on around 12,000 or so jobs, across wales, and the overall figure for the uk is closer to around 100,000. the parts they make are worth around £1 billion annually. this isn‘t the first time they‘ve had this sort of warning. as was mentioned in your package. airbus did write to members before the brexit vote, saying that if a vote to leave may in part may impact on business further down the line. flintshire, will broughton is in north wales, actually voted to leave, now, it is a huge employer in north wales. when it comes to apprentices as well, a very good source of a decent wage in north
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wales, bringing in a couple of hundred apprentices each year. so if things were to go badly for airbus, and they were to move, it would have and they were to move, it would have a huge effect on north wales and the welsh economy. not only that, but the welsh government have reacted to the welsh government have reacted to the announcement saying that it‘s a huge and rolling announcement from airbus, the first minister has called an theresa may to stay in the single market if possible. this all comes from airbus‘s risk assessment, which outlines that a no deal scenario could cost them up to £1 billion a week in the inefficient work costs, delays, transferring of parts to want from europe, and the warning is as well, that they are not quite sure which regulation they would come and if a no deal scenario
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we re would come and if a no deal scenario were to happen. we've heard the concerns and frustrations of tom williams, the chief operating officer, but that must be a concern and frustration felt by every single employee as well, clearly, they want to know what the future holds? i think it‘s almost mirroring the scenario we‘ve i think it‘s almost mirroring the scenario we‘ve seen i think it‘s almost mirroring the scenario we‘ve seen in the steel industry, the other end of wales, in south wales over the last couple of yea rs. south wales over the last couple of years. warnings from the head of the company, filtering down to workers, hearing for the first time, these concerns, now, as mentioned, they we re concerns, now, as mentioned, they were given a letter before the brexit vote, so they have been murmurings that this was the view that a bus would take, nevertheless, as you mentioned, with a potential loss of a huge employer not only for people working in airbus, but the people working in airbus, but the people in the supply chain, it‘s hugely worrying for the people of north wales and wales and the uk as
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a whole, considering how many people are affected a whole, considering how many people a re affected by a whole, considering how many people are affected by airbus‘s working. thank you very much, thomas morgan in cardiff. much more on match airbus story throughout the programme today. the us first lady, melania trump, has caused controversy with her choice ofjacket for a trip to a child migrant camp at the mexican border. 0n the back of it were written the words "i really don‘t care, do you?" from washington, chris buckler reports. the first lady knows that in recent weeks, many families arriving at america‘s border have faced a very different sort of welcome. this is one of the centres where migrant children are being cared for having been separated from their parents. and this visit was a sign of the concern of melania trump of what is happening under the flag of the us and the orders of her husband‘s administration. i am here to learn about the facility. i would like to ask you how i can help to reunite these children with theirfamilies as quickly as possible.
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president trump reversed his policy after outrage at the images of children being held in cages and the stories of distress caused by families being split apart. there is still confusion over how and when those separated will be reunited. although melania trump travelled to texas to show sympathy, there were mixed messages and controversy because of the coat she wore. it was emblazoned with the phrase "i really don‘t care, do u?" donald trump said this about it. but it‘s certainly true washington is struggling to find solutions to america‘s immigration problems. as protestors staged a demonstration in the halls of congress, a proposal for a vote on legislation was delayed until next week,
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but there is no way of stopping the flow of families seeking shelter here. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. and we‘ll be live in new york for reaction, speaking to our cbs colleague, hena douba, in around 10 minutes. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic — after authorities there accused him of using a fake diplomatic passport. the former wimbledon champion tried to claim his status as a newly appointed sporting ambassador for the country meant he was immune from prosecution, leading to an increasingly bizarre controversy involving one of the world‘s poorest nations. 0ur correspondent catherine byaru hanga travelled to the capital bangui to see if she could find boris. if you want to find a boris becker in the central african republic where better to start than the local tennis club? monsieur, monsieur, ou est boris becker?
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the ambassador? the good will ambassador. right, right. laughter have you seen boris? yeah, he's somewhere over there. is he hiding? because everybody is looking for him. translation: i'm a tennis player. and if boris becker comes over here i‘ll be happy because he can come and organise a tennis tournament. so he‘s not at the local tennis club. how about a party full of diplomats? singing so what are people in bangui saying about this, in diplomatic hall? what do they think about boris being a diplomat? there are rumours. really? the rumours are all over the place. i am german, yes, but i haven't met any german yet in town. there seems to be only six german residents in central african republic.
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this is thought to be the document presented in court by mr becker‘s lawyers as proof he couldn‘t be prosecuted. so what does the man whose signature‘s on it have to say? it‘s completely fake. today i saved my colleague of justice. i asked him to help me. to know exactly what happened, who gave and delivered it. who gave the passport to sir boris becker. is mr boris becker a subject in the investigation you are carrying out? yes, because he has a diplomatic passport of central african republic. if it shows that he participated to have this passport in the wrong way, not really. we try to have cooperation with the court ofjustice for the land where he lives.
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the headlines on bbc newsroom live. european aircraft maker airbus says it‘s rethinking its operations in britain — because of the risk of a no—deal brexit. the controversy surrounding the jacked worn by the first lady controversy in the united states. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic , as authorities there accuse him of using a fake diplomatic passport. and in sport... the samba boys are back in action this afternoon — brazil take on costa rica at 1pm looking to earn their first win of russia 2018. but their old rivals argentina are in real trouble humbled and humiliated by croatia, they are on the verge of going out. and rory mcilroy is one stroke off the lead in the first round of the travelers championship in connecticut.
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after missing last week‘s us open cut, mcilroy carded a six—under—par 64. today marks 70 years since the empire windrush sailed into britain along with the hundreds of caribbean migrants who had spent more than a month travelling across the atlantic in search of a new life. the anniversary follows the recent windrush scandal which saw citizens wrongly targeted over their residency status, with fears many may have already been deported. nick davis has been to kingston to speak to some of those affected. newsreel: the empire windrush brings to britain 500 jamaicans. many are ex—servicemen who know england. 70 years ago, people left from across the caribbean to help rebuild britain — what they called the mother country. the uk needed workers after the war, and when the empire windrush docked here in jamaica, hundreds of people took up the call.
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passenger opportunity to united kingdom. at the national library, ken morgan is looking back on an event that shaped his future. he came up to the uk in the late 1950s as a nine—year—old on a british passport. after living in london for decades, he attended a funeral injamaica, and wasn‘t allowed back after his uk passport was confiscated by british consular officials. that was 25 years ago. so i‘m at the high commission, and i said, well, i need to have my passport. i need to travel, and i missed my flight, and how does it work? i had a return ticket, now how do i get home? he looked at me and he said, mr morgan, that was never a proper british passport. the changes in home office rules meant that a number of people had already been deported wrongly, or have been left stranded in the caribbean for years.
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the jamaican government is helping its uk counterpart by tracking down cases. some people have said they don't want any money, it's not about money for them. some people have just not responded. and then there's also the fact of reaching them in ruraljamaica, and the sensitivity that attached to the inability to return. utell bailey, a formerjockey, was deported in the ‘70s, and never saw his mother again. but, despite the racing community becoming his family, he says no money could make up for what he has lost. yeah, no price can be put on my mother's and my relationship, you know? but right now, i will leave that to the relevant authorities, to see what they think is justifiable for the wrongs that they have done. for the windrush generation, it is about a principle. that passport represents something for all the caribbean people
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who have sacrificed over the years, and i‘m not — i‘m not so keen on giving it up. here at kingston harbour, there is not much of it that remains of the original piers where those early pioneers would have boarded. but, for the windrush generation, the actions of the british government, then and now, are still creating waves. our correspondent helena lee is at westminster abbey for us, what‘s the atmosphere like there today — is their an air of celebration? it's it‘s a happy atmosphere, actually. today we‘ve spoken to a number of people who say it is a day of
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celebration, to celebrate the contribution that has been made over the years by the windrush generation. to britain. 70 years since the empire windrush docked at tilbury docks, nearly 500 people came here for a better life. and for jobs. and to raise families. the service here starting at midday today, there has been a long queue snaking around the outside of the abbey as people go inside. let‘s just hear from abbey as people go inside. let‘s just hearfrom our abbey as people go inside. let‘s just hear from our fellow who is the director of the windrush foundation. thank you forjoining us. i know you have to be in their very shortly. first of all, tell us what people will hear in the service today. they will hear voices of encouragement, a bit of history as well. a bit of singing, they will be
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a sermon. well. a bit of singing, they will be a sermon. and overall, a general celebration activity today. what does today mean to you? it‘s a big anniversary, 70 years to the day since nearly 500 migrants got off that boat, came here for a better life, for you, personally, what does it mean? it means that i could rememberthe it mean? it means that i could remember the co—founder of the windrush foundation, it was the foundation that got together and decided that we ought to be celebrating this arrival. so we got together with sam king in 1996, celebrating this arrival. so we got togetherwith sam king in 1996, so it's a culmination of 22 years, it's going to be important. we've heard from many people who are still facing problems in terms of the scandal of the last couple of months orso, do scandal of the last couple of months or so, do you know people who are still going through tough times? there are thousands of people. the
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government has promised to get things back to normal but that will ta ke things back to normal but that will take a while. people are suffering. we are going to pressure the government to do it quicker. much quicker. compensate those who need compensation, and put things right. 0verall, will you feeling today overs ha d ow 0verall, will you feeling today overshadow events? not at all. it will happen regardless. this has been in the planning for over a year now, then the windrush scandal came about, so there was going to be a celebration, but perhaps a bigger one now that we know we can move on. thank you very much indeed for joining us. i know you have to go back into the abbey to get seated. thank you very much. the services starting at midday, more on the bbc news channel is out today. thank you very much. chancellor phillip hammond has insisted his department is not "the enemy of brexit".in his annual speech in the city of london last night, mr hammond said
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he was focused on boosting prosperity by promoting ties with the european union after britain leaves. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity, reports. as gusts enjoyed a banquet, philip hammond served up something a bit harder to swallow. confirmation that taxes will have two rows. he made it clear that finding the boost to nhs spending and borrowing was unpalatable. the situation is simple, taxpayers will pay more to support the nhs. taxpayers will have to contribute in a fair and balanced way to support the nhs we all use. while delivering on our fiscal commitments. mr hammond sought to dispel suspicions of colleagues on the right of his party that the treasury was resisting brexit.
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that does not make the treasury, on my watch, the enemy of brexit. rather, it makes it the champion of prosperity for the british people. 0utside prosperity for the british people. outside the eu, but working and trading closely with it. it's not just taxes that will have to rise, today‘s six members of the bank of england‘s monetary policy industry voted to keep interest rates on hold, but a minority of the voted for rates to rise. the betting is in the city that a majority might be in favour as soon as august. the eu has introduced higher import tariffs on a range of american products including jeans, bourbon whiskey and motorbikes. it‘s in response to president trump‘s decision to increase european steel and aluminium import costs to the us. the european commission said it will do whatever is necessary to safeguard its trade interests. the future of dozens of house of fraser stores is set to be decided today.
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creditors to the high street chain will vote on plans to shut 31 of its 59 shops in an attempt to save the company from collapse. the closures would see the loss of 6,000 jobs. let‘s get more now on that choice ofjacket by the us first lady, melania trump. she boarded a plane for texas — to visit a child migrant camp — wearing a jacket with the words on the back: "i really don‘t care, do you?" well — what did it all mean? 0ur colleague from cbs news hena doba is in new york. thank you forjoining us. how often has a jacket being poured over so much to try and decipher what it means? donald trump says it‘s to do with these so—called fake news media, milani‘s attitude towards it. what is your thought? good morning.
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the trip was certainly overshadowed by the jacket, it said, i really don‘t care, do you? her spokeswoman said there was no hidden message, but just two said there was no hidden message, butjust two hours later her husband, president trump tweeted, the jacquard refers to the fake news media. melania has learned how dishonest they are and she no longer ca res. dishonest they are and she no longer cares. this comes two days after president trump signed an order that will keep families who illegally crossed the border together. questions remain about its real—world implications. republicans and democrats have been unable to work together to resolve any of theseissues work together to resolve any of these issues with the legislative. they were supposed to be a vote, that‘s been delayed, why? well... lots goes into this. the trump administration says that 500 of the more than 20,000 children separated from parents on the border
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have been reunited. but there is still no solution or timeline for the rest of the children. a senior official told cbs news that the government is working to set up a reunification process in texas. at the same time, the pentagon is examining the possibility of using military bases to hold up to 20,000 children who crossed into the us by themselves. all this comes as republicans tried, and failed, to pass an immigration bill yesterday. they postponed wrote on another bill until next week. that contains $25 billion for a border war, and pathway to citizenship for those dreamers. let me put this to you, given all of that, and what is going on on the border, do we have any concrete figures on how many children have actually been reunited with their families? 0r children have actually been reunited with their families? or the children have actually been reunited with theirfamilies? or the process thatis with theirfamilies? or the process that is supposed to do that?
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we are hearing 500 children have been reunited with their families since may, but think about it, more than 2300 children have been separated from their families. thousands and thousands are still left at what many people are calling a box warehouse in these immigration facilities. thank you for that update. time for the weather, here‘s helen willetts good morning. we‘ve got fine and dry weather forecast over the next few days. temperatures gradually rising, already we see 21 or 23 today, and highly again for the weekend. we are heading towards a heatwave. this is monmouthshire a little earlier this morning. beautifulskies, lovely pictures coming through. we‘ve got bad clouds towards the north, patchy
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rain and drizzle across scotland, but for most of us fine dry. temperatures into the high teens and low 20s. 23 could be warmer than yesterday. very strong, that son. as strong as it gets in the uk. it will be quite a chilly night again. temperatures down to one or two in the suburbs, not quite as chilly, but marginal. tomorrow plenty more sunshine to come, quite a bit of cloud across the far north, a bit more further south, but it won‘t spoil the day. the rain is limited to the far north and west and temperatures respond to that sunshine. i‘ll be backjust before 12 o‘clock. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines: european aircraft maker airbus has warned that a no—deal brexit will threaten the company‘s future in the uk. the company employs 111,000 people across 25 sites. just a jacket or a response to "fake news"? melania trump‘s coat caused controversy when she visited a centre for migrant children with the slogan "i don‘t really care, do u?" emblazoned on the back. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic after authorities claimed he used a fake diplomatic passport. the former tennis star told a london bankruptcy court he was entitled to diplomatic immunity. we‘re sitting in on a driving lesson which would be perfectly normal anywhere else in the world, but not here in saudi arabia because there‘s
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a woman behind the wheel. and history will be made in saudi arabia this weekend when the kingdom lifts its ban on women driving. lets head to the bbc sports centre now — and we‘rejoined by tim hague. good morning. another three world cup games, and we‘re starting with a good one as brazil take on costa rica in st peterburg, and that‘s where our reporterjohn bennett is now. we‘ll get to bristol in a moment, but what is going on with argentina?
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yes, the brazilian fans surrounding media were delighted with the result. more about home in a moment, but awful. exposed on the flanks, totally outplayed in midfield and they couldn‘t get the best out of they couldn‘t get the best out of the great messi. the argentinian head coach has begged for forgiveness. that‘s what he said in the post match press conference. he admitted they didn‘t gel at all. croatia were fantastic. we will talk about their performance shortly, but as for argentina, just woeful. they are now in a lot of danger, they could get knocked out of the world cup on tuesday year in saint petersburg. let‘s hearfrom the former argentinian international who is working with the bbc at this world cup. the argentinian people are waiting for this group of players, it is probably the last chance for a few of them to make something big with the national team. some of those
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players lost three consecutive finals. they were were in brazil in 2014 and then on penalties. it is probably the last chance for some of them to show something. it's going to be tough again, especially because they are being criticised, as well. soap next up for argentina is nigeria here in wind saint petersburg, but it‘s not in their hands now. if iceland win later against nigeria, iceland will be in the driving seat and argentina‘s world cup will be hanging by a thread. argentina were dreadful, the first goal symptomatic of their performance. but how good were the croatians? it brings back memories of 1998 when they finished third in france. yeah, they won 3-0 despite being wasteful forward their chances. i watched them win 2—0 against nigeria without really
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getting out of third year. that shows how good they are. they haven‘t been at their best and its two from two. that last time they won their two opening games after world cup was 1998. they got to the semifinals. a fantastic run back in france. if their players can stay fit they have a real chance of going far here at russia 2018. they‘ve played very well so far. haven't conceded a goal, either. brazil are back in action today. didn't brazil are back in action today. didn‘t have a great start but costa rica today. lot of expectation. you can see the atmosphere building behind me at saint petersburg. a draw in their opening match, they started very well. then they got pegged back. all the talk was about neymar. he became the most fouled player in recent history. he hasn‘t
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reached the heights yet. his manager says he needs about five games to be fully fit before we can see the real neymar. costa rica are difficult to break down but brazil should be the strong favourites. they‘ve had to make one change. danilo is injured. a massive test for the play at right back. i wonder if we will see the real brazil here today. babe were pretty spectacular in the first 20 minutes against switzerland. let‘s see if they can continue. thank you very much for now. so these are the three games today. day nine of the world cup. the serbians beat costa rica in their opening game. and finally we hear of many fans making arduous journeys to watch their team at the world cup. cancelled flights and long road trips the norm. although there may be longer
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distance road trips than switzerland to russia — few will have taken as much time. especially when your mode of transport is a tractor. beat studer rumbled into kalingrad on thursday after a 12—dayjourney from lucerne to watch switzerland against serbia later on. the swiss but that every point against brazil, hoping for the same today. translation: i said that if we win and the swiss team qualify for russia i will go to the world cup, and then i asked werner if he also wa nted and then i asked werner if he also wanted to come and he replied, only with the tractor. i told him, if they win i accept the bet. since then, we have been planning it and planning it and now we are here. that‘s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that‘s bbc.co.uk/sport. thank you very much. unlikely things
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to say in the sports bulletin! let me bring you up—to—date with some information coming from a spokeswoman for the prime minister in response to what the manager of airbus has been saying about his concerns and frustration over what he says is a lack of progress towards a final brexit deal. his concerns how that could impact on airbus with its thousands of employees in the uk. she is saying that britain is confident of getting a good trade agreement with the eu when it leaves the block, which will include the aerospace sector. airbus obviously warning about the potential impact of a no deal withdrawal from the eu, potential impact of a no deal withdrawalfrom the eu, but potential impact of a no deal withdrawal from the eu, but the prime minister‘s spokeswoman says the government is confident of getting a good trade agreement, one which ensures trade is as free and frictionless as possible, including
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for the aerospace sector. airbus says it needs to see progress by the end of the summer as it has longer term decisions to make. a claim challenging the government‘s policy on gender neutral passports has been refused at the high court. christie elan—cane had claimed the uk‘s passport application process, which required individuals to indicate whether they are male orfemale, was "inherently discriminatory". 0ur correspondent vishala sri—pathma is with me now. tell us more first of all about the background to this. about the argument. christie's argument is that the uk passport application process involves an individual to identify as agenda either female or male and therefore is inherently discriminatory to people like christie who identifies as gender neutral, neither male or female. christie who identifies as gender neutral, neither male orfemale. so the argument was that this is a breach of human rights laws, that it was breaching the right to privacy and also breaching the right to not
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be discriminated against. have we heard any more detail about what the court said in itsjudgment? the judge said that although he was not at present satisfied that the current policy was unlawful, part of the reaching the decision was not a competitive review and that hadn‘t been completed. it wasn‘t a complete shut case in the sense he was quite open to the fact that a review into the policy had not been conducted. the lawyers representing the home 0ffice the lawyers representing the home office is arguing that human rights laws are not being violated and actually the cost in terms of finance and also time of administrating and issuing a gender neutral passport was too much of a burden. 600,000 people in this country identify as gender neutral, it is quite a significant amount of the population, around 1%. lots of other countries have issued a gender neutral passport. australia and
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canada have. thank you. the church of england "botched" its investigation into alleged cases of abuse, according to the author of a report into its handling of child sexual abuse claims. in 2010, the church conducted a review of more than 40,000 files but found just 13 cases which needed formal action. sir roger singleton, who reviewed the investigation, said it was "flawed" and "failed to give a complete picture" of the abuse. donna birrell reports. the church of england‘s handling of sexual abuse claims is under intense scrutiny. survivors claim failures by the church to accurately record the number of abuse allegations in 2010 may have led to abuse continuing. the church is now asking for survivors to come forward with their views on how the church has responded to them, but some say it‘s too little too late. the response from the church to survivors i think
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has been wholly inadequate. i think there has been a sense of paralysis almost on part of the church of not quite knowing how to deal with it. they are seeing survivors as the problem. there is an enquiry into how the anglican church handled abuse claims. it has seen e—mails showing discussions and disagreements within the church about which cases should be recorded. 0ne e—mail worries about damage to the reputation of the then archbishop of canterbury rowan williams, referred to as the abc, though he told the enquiry he had never seen the e—mail. all the documents highlight serious cases which didn‘t make it through to the final report after confusion about the criteria. alleged cases left out included a cleric who was addicted to pornography and another said to have an obsessional interest in satanic ritual abuse. sir roger singleton was asked by the church to review the 2010 past cases review and his report is due out next
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month. we found no evidence whatsoever of a deliberate intention on the part of the church to mislead. however, what the church did do was that it narrowed the criteria for reporting in a way which didn‘t communicate the full nature of the concerns. the church said criticisms have been taken very seriously and acted upon. just this morning it announced new proposals to improve its safeguarding, including an independently chaired survivors panel and a look at options to redress past cases. turkey‘s elections. the winner of the upcoming poll will preside over a brand new presidential system of government. the current administration says it compares with other presidential systems in the west. but does that stand up to scrutiny? in another of our reality check series, the bbc‘s chris morris has gone to istanbul to assess the evidence.
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what‘s the biggest issue for most turkish people in this election? the state of the economy. but whoever wins will also inherit a new residential system of government. wins will also inherit a new residential system of governmentm was approved in a controversial referendum last year and it is a system that seems to have been designed with one man in mind. himself. the office of prime minister will be abolished and executive power transferred to the president. he or she will appoint a directly judges, president. he or she will appoint a directlyjudges, bureaucrats and one or more vice presidents. a national budget previously drafted by parliament will now be drafted by the president. parliament could dismiss the president if there is a two thirds majority. the government says this will be a better system.
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the president is elected by the people, he is directly responsible to the ballot box. this is a new case of democracy because the president is directed by the people. just like other presidential systems, they say in the west, but does that really stack up? in the usa, the separation of powers is clearly established, executive, legislative, and judicial. if congress rejects budget, the federal government shuts down until compromises found. the president nominates judges and cabinet members, but congress has two approve them. in france, the prime minister is still head of government, sometimes from a different party than the president. the french president appoints three out of nine judges to the country‘s top court. in turkey, it will be 12 out of 15. there‘s also a broader point, you can‘t assess a constitution without looking at the politics that surround it. and the opposition worries about one man‘s rule. unfortunately, for now, he has a lot of power.
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if he was going to be elected again, it will be worse for the country. i‘ve been following erdogan‘s careerfor a long time. i was living in turkey when he was imprisoned for reciting a nationalist poem at a political rally. he speaks turkish a few years later he was prime minister, telling me about his political views. turkey has been developing fast in the last few years. now we are hoping to raise its standards to the level of other countries by making it more secular, and more democratic. a place where the rule of law prevails. but is he now picking and choosing what that means in practice? the president argues turkey needs a strong leader to deal with the many threats it faces, but the opposition worries that checks and balances could begin to fade. in a moment a summary of the business news
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this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: european aircraft maker airbus says it‘s rethinking its operations in britain — because of the risk of a no—deal brexit. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic as authorities there accuse him of using a fake diplomatic passport. a jacket worn by first lady melania trump has provoked controversy in the united states. hello. in the business news: a warning from airbus. the european aircraft manufacturer says it could leave the uk because of the risks arising from brexit. the group says the warning was part of dawning reality. airbus employs about 14,000 people at 25 different sites in the uk. the house of fraser rescue plan faces a vote this morning — creditors will be voting
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on a company voluntary arrangement proposed by management. the department store chain wants to shut 31 of its 59 shops and impose huge rent cuts on ten others that it intends to keep. the european union has introduced retaliatory tariffs on us goods as a top official launched a fresh attack on president donald trump‘s trade policy. the duties on £2.4 billion worth of us goods came into force today. tariffs have been imposed on products such as bourbon whiskey, motorcycles and orange juice. the european aerospace manufacturer airbus is warning that it could pull out of the uk, risking thousands of jobs, if the government can‘t agree a brexit deal with the eu. the company, which employs 14,000 staff across 25 sites in the uk, has published a brexit
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assessment warning outlining the risks. it says it could reconsider all of its uk investments, if britain crashed out of the single market without a transition deal. simonjack has been speaking to the senior vice president of airbus uk operations, katherine bennett, about why they are speaking out today. we publish this memo, we‘ve been looking at the implications for many months, since the referendum. and really we felt it was time to put on the table some hard facts about the true implications of this decision if it was to go the wrong way. what others implications? we're looking at potential future investments across our sites. across this great country which produces great aircraft, and satellites, we have the most productive people based in the most productive people based in the uk from the whole of our european union operation and we want that to continue. the uk is an important home nation for airbus but we have to say to people listening that future investments will be
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under review. creditors are voting today on whether to accept house of fraser‘s plans to close more than half its stores. the ailing department store chain needs its creditors and landlords to back a rescue plan called a company voluntary arrangement which would see half its branches closed, rent cuts on others, in the hope of salvaging the rest of the business. as part of the rescue deal, 2,000 jobs will go, along with 4,000 brand and concession roles. diane wehrle, marketing and insights director at springboard. explain what this vote means and what you expect to come out of it. the vote means the creditors will vote for these closures and it means that the stores will close and those that the stores will close and those that remain open, the rent on those will be heavily discounted so the landlords who own these stores will be receiving less income. a key issueis be receiving less income. a key issue is here, i suppose, the impact on the landlord. yes, it's the landlords that seem to take the hit
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much more than other creditors on tv eight —— cv eights. it‘s the last ditch attempt before administration. a cva is the preferred option. landlords do seem to take the hit. their voting rights are discounted heavily so under insolvency rules, they don‘t have a huge amount of say in the cva. it‘s the other creditors that get that through. they are the ones that actually suffer more financially. what are the landlord saying? what is their argument and what is house of phrase at countering that with? landlords are saying they didn‘t sign up to that, they signed up to a long lease, they possibly gave house of fraser capital contributions towards fit out at the very beginning and landlords use the money from the rent too often fund pension funds, so your pension fund and mine are affected by this. they are really saying that lost revenue will impact
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very heavily. 0n the counter ‘s side, house of fraser saying they have paid upward only rent, so their leases don‘t allow that to reduce the rent and they have paid a long time and they simply cannot afford to pay that rent on stores and continue to trade. there are two dinners to the story. it seems like a bit ofa dinners to the story. it seems like a bit of a mess, doesn‘t it? where does this leave management? will management stay on board to try to change things or will there be changes at the top? the issue of management is interesting. it‘s very important. it‘s always difficult in retail with management. the management who are in situ have a huge amount of experience and knowledge about the store and the store chain and therefore their role is very important. however, they are the team that actually got the store into that position in the first place and for retail to continue to thrive and prosper it needs fresh thoughts and fresh blood. it‘s very ha rd to thoughts and fresh blood. it‘s very hard to attract new blood into a business that is struggling, so the
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opportunity forfresh business that is struggling, so the opportunity for fresh ideas to come out of the cva will be fairly limited and therefore the upside of the cva, ifear, will also be fairly limited. it remains to be seen what happens today. thank you. a quick look at the market. they are looking good because we have seen energy stocks lifted because oil prices are higher. we have an important meeting going on in vienna. the cost of crude oil is high and that has helped markets like the ftse keep in positive territory. that‘s all the business. history will be made in saudi arabia on sunday when the deeply conservative kingdom will lift its ban on women driving. human rights campaigners say it‘s "a small step in the right direction", which is long overdue. and they say the move comes amid an unrelenting crackdown on human rights. from riyadh 0rla guerin reports. we are sitting in a driving lesson
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which would be normal anywhere else in the world but not in saudi arabia because there is a woman behind the wheel. we are at the campus of the princess nourah university outside riyadh, and driving instructors tirelessly as waiting list of women who want to come for tuition. they are so keen to finally be able to drive in their own country. there is plenty of empty road here, just a few speed bumps here and there, but it‘s a safe environment to learn to drive. the ban on women driving has been lifted by the crown prince, mohammad bin salman, he‘s introduced other changes in recent months — cinemas have opened for the first time in more than 30 years, and women can now go to sporting events. many women we‘ve spoken to here tell us that this is a moment of freedom that they will now be able to do things for themselves. they feel that other changes will follow. the process of change here is very tightly controlled, it‘s directed from the top, and it‘s the authorities who set the pace. some of the women who campaigned
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hardest for the lifting of this driving ban, the key activists, several of them were arrested in may, they are facing serious charges, and human rights campaigners say that while women will now be allowed to drive, the climate for human rights is still stifling, instead of being behind the wheel, key activists are behind bars. the time is 11:55am. an electric car sharing scheme in paris has run into difficulties and has been cancelled. the scheme allowed cars to be hired by credit cards and part in designated spaces around the city. french authorities refused to help fund the scheme after it announced a multi—million euro hole in its
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budget. small, silver and made for sharing. these cars have become a familiar sight on the streets of paris over the last seven years. but despite their popularity, the french authorities are pulling the plug on the capital‘s electric cars and they are putting the brakes on so a bru ptly are putting the brakes on so abruptly it‘s left many in the lurch. translation: even just lurch. translation: evenjust for lurch. translation: even just for the next week, i don‘t know what i will do in the mornings. there are two days when i‘ll start work early in the morning. i‘ll figure it out but it‘s a little brutal. launched in 2011, the cars were bought by credit card with charging point across paris. a way to meet commuter needs and curb air pollution. but financial difficulties followed. a recent request by the group for 230 million euros towards a budget shortfall was
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refused by french authorities. campaigners felt are determined the keim should continue. translation: we are all very happy that it exists. we say it all the time. it‘s very practical. it‘s changed the way we experienced commuting in the city. now it‘s as if someone told us that tomorrow we are cancelling the bus service, no more buses. the cars had issues with cleanliness, problems with parking, as well as stiff competition from apps like uber. brazilian authorities have now suspended the service. there will be an appeal. an abrupt end to an appeal road—macro scheme which many once saw as the cleaner greener future of inner—city commuting. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. much more on the airbus story in the next hour with interviews with the senior vice presidents of airbus uk
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operations and also hearing from mps on their views about what the boss of airbus has been saying. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather, that‘s with helen willetts it's it‘s been a tad chilly to start the day. temperatures into single figures quite widely but they will respond to the strong june sunshine. if anything, temperatures will creep a little higher than those we had yesterday because the wind isn‘t so much of a feature. however today we have very high levels of uv forecast for england and wales in particular but even higher levels for scotland and northern ireland. it‘s unusual, about the highest we ever see in the uk. temperatures will respond, it will feel warm and yesterday for most. again under the clearing skies, with still fairly cool air across the country, temperatures willdip into across the country, temperatures will dip into single figures by saturday morning. more cloud for the
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western and northern isles, a little drizzle in the highlands of scotland. that‘s the theme through today and tomorrow. it should clear by sunday. for most tomorrow, despite the chilly side, temperatures will creep a little higher than those of today and that trend continues into the rest of the weekend. in fact come into next. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. european aircraft maker airbus says it‘s rethinking its operations in britain because of the risk of a no—deal brexit. we are very fearful of chaos at the borders and we want things to be as smooth as is. borders and we want things to be as smooth as is. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic as authorities there accuse him of using a fake diplomatic passport. just a jacket, or a message to the so—called ‘fake news media‘? melania trump‘s choice of clothing causes controversy. as saudi arabia lifts its ban on women drivers,
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we‘ll meet some of the first of them taking to the roads also, 70 years on from the arrival of the first caribbean migrants on the empire windrush a service of thanksgiving. with the scandal surrounding the immigration status of those migrants from the caribbean still fresh, some of those who‘ve already been deported speak out. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live our top story this morning: the plane maker airbus says it may pull out of the uk if britain leaves
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the eu next year without a transition deal on customs and the single market. the company‘s chief operating officer tom williams expressed his frustration with ministers, and said "far from project fear, this is a dawning reality for airbus." airbus designs and manufactures wings for its commercial aircraft in the uk, employing around 14,000 people across 25 sites. airbus says its activity in the uk adds more than £7.8 billion to the economy each year. its main sites are in broughton, north wales; newport, south wales; bristol and portsmouth. former welsh secretary stephen crabb, conservative mp for preseli pembrokeshire, called to an end of the ‘ideological cage fight‘ over brexit and said a ‘coherent strategy‘ was needed from government. shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer said
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the government‘s red lines need to be abandoned to protect british industry. but former ukip leader nigel farage said that airbus was merely lobbying for its own interests. andrew plant reports. it employs around 14,000 people at 25 sites across the uk, making wings for its passenger planes. now, in what they called a brexit risk assessment, airbus said if the uk left the eu next march without a deal, it would lead to severe disruption and interruption of its uk production. put simply, it said, it would force the company to reconsider its business in the uk. we have become increasingly frustrated with the lack of clarity and obviously now time is running, it‘s coming up to nine months to go, and now we have to come to the point where we have to make serious decisions, and quite often those
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decisions are long term in nature and without clarity then it‘s too dangerous for us to proceed. before the uk voted to leave the european union in 2016‘s referendum, airbus wrote to its staff, warning them about the risk of voting to exit the eu. french, german and spanish governments all hold stakes in the company. the campaign to leave the european union accused airbus at the time of being part of what it called project fear. airbus said that was far from the truth, and on thursday said its concerns over its future business in the uk were now becoming a dawning reality. the bbc‘s business editor simonjack has spoken to senior vice president of airbus uk operations, katherine bennett, about why the company is speaking out today. ano
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a no deal scenario is not what the government wants, it doesn‘t want to use doesn‘t seem to be what brussels once, you were warning about something no one wants to happen? we all agree no deal is what we want, we felt we had a responsibility to speak out about our fears. why are you speaking up now? we published this memo i‘d been looking at the implications for many months. since the referendum we felt it was time to put on the table hard facts about the true implications of this decision if it was to go the wrong way. what are those implications? potentially future investments across our sites, and across update country which produces great aircraft, we have been most productive people in the uk from the whole of our european operation and we wa nt whole of our european operation and we want that to continue. the uk is
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an important home nation for airbus, but we have to say to people listening that future investment will be under review. are they under review now? it is over a period of several months and years. we are a long—term industry. their iraqi things coming up industry. their iraqi things coming up over the summer about future investments, yes. white rabbit should be clear what clarity do you need for those investments to go the right way for britain? it‘s notjust a matter for the uk right way for britain? it‘s notjust a matterfor the uk government, we are calling on the eu 27 to be as supportive as possible. we‘ve had clever ideas come up and are working closely with all parts of government to ensure they understand the implications. that was catherine bennett,. 0ur political correspondent is in westminster. we heard a little while ago that britain is confident of a good trade agreement with the eu when it
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leaves, which will include the aerospace sector. the problem, as we heard from airbus today, is that the time frames aren‘t necessarily suitable for industry? 0n suitable for industry? on that issue of progress about a bus has raised today, the prime minister‘s spokesman said, look back on the progress we‘ve made so far. the implementation phase we agreed with the negotiators, the deal on citizens‘ rights. she said we are now focusing on getting that trade deal right. a trade deal that will work for the whole of the uk, including the aerospace industry. it's including the aerospace industry. it‘s interesting to hear the reaction from politicians here in westminster. we‘ve had labour mps echoing the words of the shadow brexit secretary, who said, look, ministers need to start listening to legitimate concerns of businesses, and geta legitimate concerns of businesses, and get a grip on the negotiations. he also said that the government‘s
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strategy was putting jobs and the economy at risk. we‘ve heard back from labour before. what we are hearing from brexit supported a blue from the conservative side of the party is that this warning is actually just scaremongering. just playing politics. everything will be fine when it comes to business transactions when we leave the european union. mps who have constituencies that are close to some of the factories and plants, like stephen crabb, the conservative mp, say this is a wake—up call, and the government needs to find a pragmatic solution to this trade deal. he said that was a vital when he was commenting on the situation. we are, i think, getting the predictable reaction from those pro—eu mps and those who have always fought for and want to see a real
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cut off from the eu when we leave next year. the view from westminster, thank you very much. we will have more on that story shortly when i‘ll be speaking to the conservative mp who thinks airbus is playing political games. at 12:30pm we‘ll hear from darrenjones whose bristol constituency contains one of airbus‘s factories. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic after authorities there accused him of using a fake diplomatic passport. the former wimbledon champion tried to claim his status as a newly appointed sporting ambassador for the country meant he was immune from prosecution. leading to an increasingly bizarre controversy involving one of the world‘s poorest nations. 0ur correspondent catherine byaru hanga travelled to the capital bangui to see if she could find boris. if you want to find boris becker in the central african republic where better to start than the local tennis club? monsieur, monsieur, ou est boris becker? the ambassador?
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the good will ambassador. right, right. laughter. have you seen boris? yeah, he's somewhere over there. is he hiding? because everybody is looking for him. translation: i'm a tennis player. and if boris becker comes over here i‘ll be happy because he can come and organise a tennis tournament. what is he going to do? he can't even manage his own finances. so what are people in bangui saying about this, in diplomatic hall? what do they think about boris being a diplomat? there are rumours. really? the rumours are all over the place. i am german, yes, but i haven't met any german yet in town. there seems to be only six german residents in central african republic. this is somebody that
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a lot of people know. this is thought to be the document presented in court as proof he couldn‘t be prosecuted. it‘s completely fake. today i saved my colleague of justice. i asked him to help me. to know exactly what happened, who gave and delivered this passport. who gave the passport to sir boris becker. is mr boris becker a subject in the investigation you are carrying out? yes, because he has a diplomatic passport of central african republic. if it shows that he participated to have this passport in the wrong way, not really. we try to have cooperation with the court ofjustice for the land where he lives. it's
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it‘s clear for us. the future of dozens of house of fraser stores is set to be decided anytime now. creditors to the high street chain are voting on plans to shut 31 of its 59 shops in an attempt to save the company from collapse. the closures would see the loss of 6,000 jobs. the us first lady, melania trump, has caused controversy with her choice ofjacket for a trip to a child migrant camp at the mexican border. 0n the back of it were written the words "i really don‘t care, do u?" from washington, chris buckler reports. the first lady knows that in recent weeks, many families arriving at america‘s border have faced a very different sort of welcome. this is one of the centres where migrant children are being cared for having been separated from their parents. and this visit was a sign of the concern of melania trump of what is happening under the flag of the us and the orders
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of her husband‘s administration. iam here i am here to learn about your facility, which i know you how is children on a long—term basis. i‘d also like to ask how i can help to reunite these children with their families as quickly as possible. president trump reversed his policy after outrage at the images of children being held in cages and the stories of distress caused by families being split apart. there is still confusion over how and when those separated will be reunited. although melania trump travelled to texas to show sympathy, there were mixed messages and controversy because of the coat she wore. it was emblazoned with the phrase "i really don‘t care, do u?" donald trump said this about it. but it‘s certainly true washington is struggling to find solutions
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to america‘s immigration problems. as protestors staged a demonstration in the halls of congress, a proposal for a vote on legislation was delayed until next week, but there is no way of stopping the flow of families seeking shelter here. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. a little earlier i spoke with our colleague from cbs news , hena doba, who was in new york. she spoke about the reaction to melina trump‘s jacket. the trip was certainly overshadowed by the jacket, it said, i really don‘t care, do you? her spokeswoman said there was no hidden message, butjust two hours later her husband, president trump tweeted, the jacket refers to the fake news media. melania has learned how dishonest they are and she no longer cares. this comes two days after president trump signed
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an order that will keep families who illegally crossed the border together. questions remain about its real—world implications. republicans and democrats have been unable to work together to resolve any of these issues with the legislative. they were supposed to be a vote, that‘s been delayed, why? well... lots goes into this. the trump administration says that 500 of the more than 2,300 children separated from parents on the border have been reunited. but there is still no solution or timeline for the rest of the children. a senior official told cbs news that the government is working to set up a reunification process in texas. at the same time, the pentagon is examining the possibility of using military bases to hold up to 20,000 children who crossed into the us by themselves. all this comes as republicans tried, and failed, to pass an immigration bill yesterday.
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they postponed wrote on another bill until next week. that contains $25 billion for a border war, and pathway to citizenship for those dreamers. ——border wall. let me put this to you, given all of that, and what is going on on the border, do we have any concrete figures on how many children have actually been reunited with their families? or the process that is supposed to do that? we are hearing 500 children have been reunited with their families since may, but think about it, more than 2300 children have been separated from their families. thousands and thousands are still left at what many people are calling a box warehouse in these immigration facilities. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. european aircraft maker airbus says it‘s rethinking
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its operations in britain — because of the risk of a no—deal brexit. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic , as authorities there accuse him of using a fake diplomatic passport. a jacket worn by first lady melania trump has provoked controversy in the united states. no tractors this time. it‘s day nine of the world cup and five time winners brazil are back in action, they are taking on costa rica in the next hour. the brazilians were brilliant for the first half of their opening game against switzerland but were pegged back for a score draw. and whilst there were doubts neymar would miss today‘s match through injury —
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he‘ll be in the brazil side though. john bennett is at the game for us. there‘s a lot of expectation. you can see the atmosphere building in saint petersburg. a draw in the opening match, they started well and got pegged back. the talk was about neymar, the most fouled player in the last 20 years of world cup history. he hasn‘t reached the heights yet. he needs about five games to be fully fit before we can see the real neymar. costa rica were difficult to break down, but brazil are strong favourites. they have one change, danny lowe is injured. 0ne of three brazilian players in the squad have played club football in brazil, it‘s a massive test for him. i wonder if we‘ll see the real brazilian saint petersburg today. it‘s the quarter finals at queen‘s club today. novak djokovic is the biggest namein action this afternoon. nick kyrgios is fast becoming
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the home crowd‘s least favourite player at queen‘s club! after knocking out andy murray and kyle edmund the australian takes on adrian mannarino in the quarterfinals. former world number one novak djokovic and marin cilic are also in action looking to reach the semi finals. the french grand prix returns to formula one this weekend after a ten year absence. it was last held at magny cours in the middle of france. but it‘s moved to paul ricard circuit near le castellet in the south of the country. it last held the french grand prix in 1990 when home favourite alain prost won. but don‘t expect a french winner this year. first practice is under way and has proved tricky for some with traffic causing world champion lewis hamilton problems, but he‘s gone on to clock the quickest time so far. there were also spins for ferrari‘s kimi raikkonen and the haas of marcus ericsson as they get to grips with the unfamiliar track. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. plastic bags, straws and micro—beads
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have been targeted in the war on waste but now mps are turning their attention to so—called ‘fast fashion‘. the environmental audit committee is launching an inquiry into the sustainability of the fashion industry. lets take a look at some of the figures the production ofjust one cotton shirt takes nearly 3,000 litres of water , more than one person drinks in two and a half years. but it‘s also what we do with them when we don‘t want to wear them anymore. the average lifetime for a garment in the uk is estimated at just over two years. and many of our old clothes end up in landfill. nearly 300,000 tonnes of clothing is binned in the uk each year. but that figure from 2015 is 50,000 tonnes less than it was three years earlier joining me now is labour mp mary creagh who is the chairman of the environmental audit committee. thank you for coming along. we
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didn‘t mention coffee cups in that list. you are a very busy committee. why fast fashion? we've seen the power of a garment in your previous story about the first lady‘s jacket. what we see with the british high street is a £28 billion industry that‘s got us all hocked on buying stuff, wherein it once or twice, and then getting rid of it. we want to shine a light on the industry. there is good work going on, but what is the carbon footprint? what happens when we take these clothes, wash them to heart, and send microfibres into our rivers oceans? what do we do at the end of their life? how do we create green jobs by reusing those textiles? this is a fact—finding mission at this stage, are you aware that in terms of the public consciousness versus something people aren‘t really focusing on? the good thing
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is that everybody wears clothes, in most places, most of the time. although with the heatwave next week, who knows! we think this is a way of talking to people about the impact of what they choose to buy, where they choose to buy it, and looking at the global supply chain. five years ago we had the collapse ofa building five years ago we had the collapse of a building in bangladesh where garment workers making clothes for fast fashion without a trade union, did they are in a decent wage? we need to make sure that slavery and child labour is stamped out in the supply chain. we want to hear from the good brands about the work they are doing. we want to shine a light on other brands who are hiding behind big names i‘m not pulling their weight in this area. shoppers expect a good choice at a relatively cheap price point, do you think it‘s possible to continue to offer that, and to be sustainable at the same time? or and to be sustainable at the same time? 0rwill
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and to be sustainable at the same time? or will people‘s shopping habits have to change? time? or will people‘s shopping habits have to change ?|j time? or will people‘s shopping habits have to change? i think we've seen a transformation of the high street. when we were young we got our uniform and haul it until it fell apart. now you can buy cheap school uniforms in high street supermarkets, and they are good quality and lasting long time. this isn‘t a question about having to choose between cheap and good quality, or expensive and high quality, or expensive and high quality, this is about and picking what the industry is doing, looking at the great work that‘s been done by new fashion designers, making it british and keeping it in britain, and looking at how we can focus on some of these big issues, because if the fashion industry carries on as it‘s going, it will use up one quarter of the world‘s carbon budget in the next 30 years. it‘s a big industry, and after transport and housing, it‘s one of the biggest polluters in the global economy. we we are having a look at this and
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shining a light on the good stuff, asking questions like the bad stuff, and making recommendations to government and fashion chains about what they could better. i'm sure we will hear about those recommendations in due course. thank you. let‘s return now to our top story — and that announcement from airbus warning that it will have to reconsider its future in the uk if the country leaves the european union with no deal. the company, which employs about 14 thousand people in britain, said it needed clarity from the government within weeks , and it was already taking what it called "crisis actions". 0ur correspondent dave harvey is at the company‘s filton site near bristol if you have flown an easyjet you flown an alan airbus craft. they are designed by 4000 peoplejust north of bristol, and made in north wales. the company is basically the most
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european company you could imagine, the wings are assembled into losers, with parts and across europe. today‘s comments, that continuing without a strong deal after brexit would be difficult, have sent shock waves through the company. let‘s chat with mike byfield, how our staff reacting to this? it's not unexpected, it's something that we've seen coming for a long time. the company are worried about the situation, there is no apparent plan in place, we need to ensure that the final plan, when it's delivered, gives those conditions as close to the ones we've got already as we can possibly get. there are massive, massive implications if we get the wrong deal. airbus in the uk has over 110,000 people in its supply chain. there are 14,000
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people who work directly for the company, we've got 80,000 flights to europe, a year, and any restrictions that are placed on those conditions will obviously impact the company. cani will obviously impact the company. can ijust will obviously impact the company. can i just ask you, people will obviously impact the company. can ijust ask you, people outside the business through one... you make fantastic wings, you need those for a i rcrafts, fantastic wings, you need those for aircrafts, so surely there is a way of waiting this out? why is it vital that you have some kind of european single market to carry on? to duplicate the conditions we've already got. the frictionless trade, free movement of labour, we've got 600 eu nationals who work here in the uk, 1300 uk nationals who work overseas, in the eu countries. any form of restriction on them is going to impact on the company at additional costs. the real implications are for future work. if
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the uk becomes unattractive, because of the tariffs, all restrictions in place, then it makes as fearful where the future work will be placed. a difficult day for the 4000 people working here and 14,000 across the uk. brexit is still very much a big negotiation in westminster and brussels, right here, it‘s got a bit personal. marcus fysh is the conservative mp for yeovil and hejoins me now. thank you for your time today. airbus is saying they must make investment decisions by the end of the summer, that‘s the time frame they would like to see some clarity on what‘s happening next. it the government able to deliver those a nswe rs government able to deliver those answers in that time frame? the government is working hard on trying to get a deal with the eu, that will cover all of the issues of
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concern. i know that they are working very hard, and i‘ve been helping them on some of the details, for example, the dover calais crossing to make sure that continues to flow seamlessly. i think that really is the nub of airbus‘s concerns. there are other lesser issues. from a political point of view, airbus is quite a political company, it‘s one of the prot g of the eu, the idea that different countries can work together. i understand that they are concerned that, perhaps, the parent firm might look less favourably on the uk, but i think if we can make a business environment you are as competitive as it can be, then they should be no reason, actually, to worry about those things. the government does
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need to redouble its efforts to make sure that the seamless flow across the dover calais crossing is addressed. you can appreciate why airbus needs to put pressure on, con judo? it has to make long—term investment decisions, it needs to know the direction of travel. indeed, but i talked to aerospace majors all the time, i have a couple in my constituency. they are making contingency plans to make sure that they have the authorisations for all of their parts, that is not beyond the wit of man. it‘s annoying, but it is possible. i don‘t think the situation is as dire as they are making it out to be. you don‘t think it‘s as dire as they are making out? are you saying it‘s... are making out? are you saying it's... i are making out? are you saying it‘s... i mean, nigel farage is talking about political games and project via? do you put it as strongly as that?
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airbus is a very political company, it‘s not a major surprise that you see the cbi it‘s not a major surprise that you see the cb! and the pressure piling on. they are trying to force the government into deciding things that are not in the long—term interests of the majority of the country, they are obsessed with the customs union... they are in the interest of the 14,000 employees union... they are in the interest of the 14, 000 employees directly employed and the 100,000 plus employees in the supply chain though, aren‘t jobs? they don‘t need to worry. we don‘t need to be in the customs union for their future to be entirely assured. you say they don‘t need to worry, but they clearly are. the government needs to demonstrate more solidly and tangibly to businesses, notjust airbus, bmw, and other big businesses, but it can secure future trade and relationships? i think it‘s absolutely right that we need to secure our future trading
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relationship with the eu. that is why the government is working hard on these matters. it is eminently doable. i have been critical of the government in the past. i think the treasury has been holding up some investment, but smoothness at the border is doable. it‘s is doable without being in the customs union that would deny the future of everybody in the country, the ability to trade around the world. to control our own trade defences. these are things that matter to the steel industry and all sorts of industries. if you‘re talking about responsibility it‘s all so mps horo i insisting the prospect of a no deal scenario is still on the table. that is specifically the thing that is frightening airbus in their state m e nts is frightening airbus in their statements today and they say they are worried about are no deal. statements today and they say they are worried about are no deallj statements today and they say they are worried about are no deal. i am in favour of getting a deal and i
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think that the government does need to be clear. i would agree with airbus in one respect. we need to put free trade agreement on the table and say, this is what we want to discuss with you. we want signed agreements on all such things that will keep things as possible. that‘s absolutely that for the doing right now. ok. thank you very much again for your time. time for the weather forecast. here is banned. 0ur things looking? pretty silly, i hope. they are looking like this for the next few days. very little change. the weather is set fair and beyond long spells of strong sunshine and increasingly high temperatures. through this afternoon we are looking at largely fine weather across the country. cloud across scotland, small chance of a shower across northern ireland was generally dry out there. temperatures around 17—23d. higher than yesterday but those temperatures will dip through this evening and overnight. another
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fairly cool and fresh night with towns and cities down to eight or 9 degrees. in the countryside, one to places like last night down to one, two or three degrees. saturday getting off to a cool start if up early but another lovely looking day for the majority. always a bit more clout across scotland with a bit of rain, fair breeze, otherwise relatively light winds and temperatures and nudge higher. temperatures will climb further still on sunday and particularly into next week we are looking at high 20s, perhaps 30 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live — our latest headlines: european aircraft maker airbus has warned that it could pull out of the uk, risking thousands of jobs, if the government can‘t agree a brexit deal with the eu. "i don‘t really care — do u?" the slogan that caused more controversy for the white house after melania trump visited a centre for migrant children
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with the phrase emblazoned on the back of herjacket. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic after authorities claimed he used a fake diplomatic passport. the former wimbledon champion claimed he was immune from bankruptcy proceedings due to his role as a sport ambassador. with the scandal surrounding the immigration status of those migrants from the caribbean still fresh, some of those who‘ve already been deported speak out. today marks 70 years since the empire windrush arrived at tilbury docks with hundreds of caribbean migrants who had answered the call to come and take upjobs in britain. but the anniversary comes as many are still waiting to find out if they can remain in the uk, and following a government apology that many immigrants from the windrush generation were denied benefits or wrongly deported. nick davis has been to kingston, jamaica, to speak to some of those affected.
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newsreel: the empire windrush brings to britain 500 jamaicans. many are ex—servicemen who know england. 70 years ago, people left from across the caribbean to help rebuild britain — what they called the mother country. the uk needed workers after the war, and when the empire windrush docked here in jamaica, hundreds of people took up the call. passenger opportunity to united kingdom. at the national library, ken morgan is looking back on an event that shaped his future. he came over to the uk in the late 1950s as a nine—year—old on a british passport. after living in london for decades, he attended a funeral injamaica, and wasn‘t allowed back after his uk passport was confiscated by british consular officials. that was 25 years ago. so i‘m at the high commission, and i said, well, i need to have my passport. i need to travel, and i missed my flight, and how does it work? i had a return ticket,
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now how do i get home? he looked at me and he said, mr morgan, that was never a proper british passport. the changes in home office rules meant that a number of people had already been deported wrongly, or have been left stranded in the caribbean for years. the jamaican government is helping its uk counterpart by tracking down cases. some people have said they don't want any money, it's not about money for them. some people have just not responded. and then there's also the fact of reaching them in ruraljamaica, and the sensitivity that attached to the inability to return. utell bailey, a formerjockey, was deported in the ‘70s, and never saw his mother again. but, despite the racing community becoming his family, he says no money could make up for what he has lost. yeah, no price can be put on my mother's and my relationship, you know? but right now, i will leave that
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to the relevant authorities, to see what they think is justifiable for the wrongs that they have done. for the windrush generation, it is about a principle. that passport represents something for all the caribbean people who have sacrificed over the years, and i‘m not — i‘m not so keen on giving it up. here at kingston harbour, there is not much of it that remains of the original piers where those early pioneers would have boarded. but, for the windrush generation, the actions of the british government, then and now, are still creating waves. 0ur correspondent helena lee is outside westminster abbey where that commemorative service is now getting under way. a short while ago she spoke to one of the organisers patrick vernon about the significance
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of today‘s anniversary celebrations. the of today‘s anniversary celebrations. service here at abbey the service here at westminster abbey is one of celebration. celebrating the valuable work, the contribution that has been made by thousands of migrants from the caribbean since 1948 to britain. many of them came over to getjobs, to get a better life, and also to raise families, and the service here at westminster abbey will reflect that. i‘ve got with me patrick vernon who has been influential. you‘ve been on the organising committee for this event. tom us about the service. it's about celebrating. it‘s called the spirit of windrush. it‘s about the spirit in terms of the rise of the black church movement, the pentecostal movement, it‘s about the spirit of the caribbean energy, innovation,
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which has shaped britain in terms of people working in the nhs, across public life. it‘s the spirit of britain, about reminding britain that we are a multicultural multi—secular society and often we forget that, especially as we move towards brexit. i think it‘s important that this isn‘t simply about celebrating the windrush generation but about celebrating britain and migration because we are pa rt britain and migration because we are part of britain. what does it mean to you today personally? it's been a personal journey to you today personally? it's been a personaljourney because i‘m a child of the windrush generation, my pa rents of the windrush generation, my parents came to britain from jamaica in the late 1950s and i grew up in wolverhampton. it‘s really important to me and for the last ten years i‘ve been working with a number of people to convince the government and the public that we need to have and the public that we need to have a windrush day and now the government has announced it. they have officially backed having a windrush day and so every year on the 22nd ofjune will be windrush
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day. there is also earmarked funding. this will start a wider conversation. we need to mainstream the contribution of the windrush generation and migrants of britain. if we look at nhs, public life, we have influence in many ways. but we have influence in many ways. but we have more work to do. we have to still recognise the right issues around the windrush scandal, sort out the rights of those individuals, but more importantly let‘s move forward , but more importantly let‘s move forward, create a britain where young people, black and white, feel britain is part of an. you say your pa rents a re britain is part of an. you say your parents are part of the windrush generation. what kind of stories did they tell you about what it was like when they first arrived? the usual stories about the weather, dress was the same us in the 50s. there was no colour. it was after the worlds war, it was dropped. we lived in an industrial area and i think we brought that vitality. they never shared their personal experiences of
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discrimination because i think most caribbean parents at that time wa nted caribbean parents at that time wanted to create a protected household for us to thrive. luckily myself and my sisters have done well in terms of our careers and professions. that applies to tens of thousands of families, notjust caribbean families but others who are part of the commonwealth. in one sentence, if you can, what does today mean to you? it means to me that we... this is part of a long journey britain. this is one chapter of the windrush generation. we have more chapters to write but we have cha pters more chapters to write but we have chapters in the past to recognise. i hope that the public, everyone supports windrush day up and down the country and also to remind eve ryo ne the country and also to remind everyone that windrush is part of... everyone is part of windrush, the windrush experienced. thank you very much indeed for talking to us. today is about celebrating, day of celebration, to recognise the value do work that the migrants brought
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and continue to bring to britain. more now on the warning from airbus that the aerospace company could leave the uk in the event of a "no deal" brexit. airbus currently employs more than 14,000 people across 25 sites in the uk. joining me now from bristol is the labour mp darrenjones — whose bristol north west constituency contains the airbus plant at filton. thank you very much forjoining us today. you must be obviously greatly concerned by this statement. the news today from airbus is potentially devastating, notjust for my constituents in north bristol but for the vital aerospace industry in the south west and wales and its clear that government is failing to listen to businesses and workers and continuing to listen to a hardline tory brexiteer ‘s. they are putting people‘s livelihoods at risk, british industry at risk, and it‘s
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time they acted. the government spokesperson has been saying today that a deal will be worked out that ta kes that a deal will be worked out that takes into that a deal will be worked out that ta kes into accou nt that a deal will be worked out that takes into account the concerns of various industrial sectors including the aerospace sector. of course the issueis the aerospace sector. of course the issue is the timing. do you think the government can deliver the sort of clarity that airbus is looking for, which their boss said today is really the end of the summer? the government have been saying things for the last two years and is delivering very little. airbus and other businesses would not make these statements publicly if they had confident in the ability for the government to get the deal and be able to implement it. the fact that airbus have had to make a statement todayis airbus have had to make a statement today is deeply worrying and it‘s time for the government to take this seriously, to stop the internal aetiological fighting and to realise we must maintain our membership of the single market and customs union to protect thousands ofjobs and a huge percentage of our gdp. couldn't you‘re huge percentage of our gdp. couldn't you‘ re partly huge percentage of our gdp. couldn't you‘re partly do do more to prevent this? why did jeremy corbyn instruct
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labour mps two weeks ago not to abstain from the vote on dominic grieve‘s amendment to give parliament a greater say on a final brexit deal? i voted for the ea amendment and will continue to vote for the best possible options to keep us in the single market and the customs union. the labour party position is better than that of the government. we have spoken prolonged time now about our continued membership of the customs union, which is vitalfor membership of the customs union, which is vital for the membership of the customs union, which is vitalfor the movement through the port in my constituency in behalf of airbus and others. we need to persuade the government to changes direction of travel to be realistic about what can change and went on to prioritise british industry and workers. does labour need to do a betterjob of prioritising at making clear it needs that jobs versus prioritising at making clear it needs thatjobs versus brexit? prioritising at making clear it needs that jobs versus brexit?” welcome the move to supporting cousins union but i agree we need to carry on making the argument for the single market and the customs union,
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only then will we have the bestjobs post brexit for the country. what do you say to those people, brexiteers among them, whose eight airbus is playing politics with this statement? airbus wouldn't play politics with their business and workers. we wouldn‘t —— they wouldn‘t make these statements public unless they felt they had no other choice but to do so. the fact of the matter is this isn‘tjust an airbus issue. we just of the matter is this isn‘tjust an airbus issue. wejust had of the matter is this isn‘tjust an airbus issue. we just had the hostile takeover of another major employee in bristol, gkn. if airbus has delayed the uk because the actions of this government the whole house of cards could fall down. how manyjobs do we need to put at risk, how many families do we need to risk devastating before we wake up to reality in our parliament and take the right decisions on behalf of the country? time is running out and the leadership is not good enough. do you thinkjeremy corbyn as labour leader can do more to present a distinctive route compared to what the government is offering? jeremy
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corbyn and the labour party position is much better because we recognise we need to be members of the customs union and need to maintain the benefits of the single market. i think we need to go than that and i will continue to make the case. i will continue to make the case. i will be surprised if the trade unions don‘t agree, certainly after the announcements today which put a high number of good quality well—paid unionised jobs at risk. we got to wake up and start smelling the coffee now. thank you very much for your time. more needs to be done to listen to whistle—blowers when they raise concerns about the nhs, in the wake of the suspicious deaths of hundreds of elderly people at a hospital in gosport. that‘s according to damejanet smith, who led the inquiry into the harold shipman case. she says some of the recommendations she made about how complaints should be handled still haven‘t been implemented. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, says he‘s confident that checks are now in place to ensure similar problems would be identified quickl. this is what damejanet had to say.
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it seems to me in the nhs that they close ranks when somebody seeks to criticise them. people who raise complaints, they‘re not treated as well as they should be. the complaints system... the recommendations i made in shipman have not been fully implemented. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: european aircraft maker airbus says it‘s rethinking its operations in britain — because of the risk of a no—deal brexit. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic, as authorities there accuse him of using a fake diplomatic passport. a jacket worn by first lady melania trump has provoked controversy in the united states. for turkey‘s president erdogan, the snap elections he called for this weekend were meant to be almost a formality. he wanted a mandate to take up the greatly increased presidential powers which he himself proposed last year.
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but he‘s facing more opposition than he would have liked — with many weary of the ongoing security crisis, or hit by the slow down in the economy. mark lowen has been travelling across turkey to canvass opinion ahead of the polls. two—year—old neval never knew her mum. she was shot in the neck by turkish police and died after the birth. her grandma raises her, herfather is in prison, and she doesn‘t know the truth. they were, say the family, innocently caught up in clashes between pkk kurdish militants and government forces. the same government president erdogan is hoping to lead again after sunday‘s election. translation: when neval grows up, i‘ll tell her the state killed her mother
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and put herfather in prison. i hate erdogan for what he‘s done to my family. if he came here i‘d spit in his face. god damn him! but he did come here to kurdish dominated south—east turkey. not a region where he has a majority. but in this tight election he needs kurdish votes to win. women are separated from men at his rallies, unheard of before he took office. 0ne nation, one flag, one homeland, one state, he cries. they cheer the leader of a big nato power, and a key western ally of syria and the migrant crisis. the reverence president erdo an still commands from pious turks is almost godlike. the question is whether it can beat the acute loathing felt by the other side of the nation. this election is now a fight between two halves of profoundly polarised turkey.
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a battle for the soul of this pivotal country. security is heavy here. the pro—kurdish party is called terrorists by the government. its candidate‘s standing for election from prison. many fear vote rigging by the erdogan machine. across this vast country, a different picture in the president‘s black sea stronghold. he‘s built support with new schools and hospitals. the economic boom is now stalling, but this is a region of loyalists. like this man, whose family has tended hazelnut groves for generations, and whose default following is cultivated by the islamist president. translation: if erdogan says a road will be built here, it‘s done in three days. we are happy that a muslim country is ruled by a muslim president. he‘s not a dictator, he‘s a world leader. beneath a cloak of fear, dissent here is whispered. we met the wife of a police chief jailed after the failed coup. one of over 200,000
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arrested or sacked. critics say it‘s a purge of all opponents. translation: the hardest is the loneliness, that my daughter is without a father. we don‘t know what‘s worse. destroying our future, or turkey‘s justice system. what‘s erdogan is doing is a crime against humanity. this political choice will determine livelihoods. a vote for the shape — perhaps the survival — of turkish democracy. after 630 migrants on board the aquarius migrant rescue ship were refused entry to italy, they were taken hundreds of miles away to the spanish port of valencia instead. italy‘s new government has since declared all ngo ships to be an illegal taxi service for migrants. with the aquarius on its way back to libya, it‘s unclear what will happen if more migrants are rescued by the ship. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is onboard and has sent this update. well, this is the view
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from the deck of the migrant rescue ship the aquarius, a charity—run boat run by doctors without borders and sos mediterranee and it‘s been out at sea since wednesday afternoon from the port of valencia, going towards the libyan coast now and after an extraordinary week in which the italian government said no, the 630 migrants can‘t come ashore in sicily, and the interior minister matteo salvini said that they were not welcome in future ngo boats because they were effective taxi service for migrants. well, now this ship is going back out to sea and we‘ve already heard of another ship that had the same thing, the lifeline picking up migrants at sea, the italians saying no, as well. let me bring in antoine laurent, the operations manager for sos mediterranee. tell me about effectively what happens now and what happens next. those are the big question. right now we are proceeding back
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to the area where the distress are very high potential, so we‘re going to bring back the aquarius. it should be ready to rescue people in distress. can you explain what the effect would be of having to continually perhaps do the same journey you‘ve just made to the libyan coast, to valencia — 1,000 nautical miles, four—dayjourneys, can you feasibly cope continuing to operate if you had to like that? well, it‘s going to have consequences and huge consequences on the nature of what‘s currently in place in the central mediterranean sea. practically, there are rescue assets like us but also the italian ships we were together with to valencia will not be in the area very often. we are going to reduce the capacity on—board because we cannot sail for six days like we do put two days. we could take on maybe 150 people maximum. when you hear the italians say you
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are an effective taxi service for migrants, what would you say to that? of course we're not a taxi service, we arejust that? of course we're not a taxi service, we are just here to provide an answer to the people in distress. people are unsafe at sea. their safety is not insured because there is no proper rescue capacity. ngos are here to fill a gap and provide a medical rescue service to those people in danger, that‘s all. nothing else. i given talking to us. at the moment the sea is reasonably calm. it‘s looking like it will be the early hours of sunday morning that this ship will arrive and once again the question will be, until there‘s a resolution agreed between european leaders, there‘s no sense of where the could end up. history will be made in saudi arabia on sunday when the deeply conservative kingdom will lift its ban on women driving. human rights campaigners say it‘s "a small step in the right direction", which is long overdue. from riyadh, 0rla guerin reports. we are sitting in on a driving lesson, which would be perfectly
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normal anywhere else in the world, but not here in saudi arabia, because there‘s a woman behind the wheel. we are at the campus of the princess nourah university outside riyadh, and driving instructors tirelessly as waiting list of women who want to come for tuition. they are so keen to finally be able to drive in their own country. there is plenty of empty road here, just a few speed bumps here and there, but it‘s a safe environment to learn to drive. the ban on women driving has been lifted by the crown prince, mohammad bin salman. he‘s introduced other changes in recent months — cinemas have opened for the first time in more than 30 years, and women can now go to sporting events. many women we‘ve spoken to here tell us that this is a moment of freedom that they will now be able to do things for themselves. they feel that other changes will follow. the process of change here is very tightly controlled,
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it‘s directed from the top, and it‘s the authorities who set the pace. some of the women who campaigned hardest for the lifting of this driving ban — the key activists — several of them were arrested in may, they are facing serious charges, and human rights campaigners say that while women will now be allowed to drive, the climate for human rights is still stifling. instead of being behind the wheel, key activists are behind bars. just before we go to the weather, a preview of a rather special guest appearance coming up with simon on afternoon live. hello, hello, hello, hello. i‘m basil—cam brush and i were to look at the papers and are becoming up later today to talk about my career. 50 yea rs later today to talk about my career. 50 years in show business! boom boom! you can see his full interview
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with simon herejust boom! you can see his full interview with simon here just after 2:30pm. ina in a moment the news at one but let‘s ta ke in a moment the news at one but let‘s take a look at the weekend weather. there will be plenty more scenes like this one as we head through the next few days. the weather is set fair, barely any rain in the forecast and temperatures will climb. i‘ve chosen birmingham just as an example. it shows as we get into next week temperatures will get up into next week temperatures will get up into the high 20s, perhaps 30 degrees. all the while, the knights will not be particularly warned. not as chilly as they have been recently, but into next week those night—time temperatures will dip away, providing some relief from the heat. back to the here and now, the satellite picture shows we‘ve had a lot of sunshine so far today. some extra cloud across scotland and northern ireland. small chance for a shower here as we go through the rest of the afternoon. 0therwise, dry with good styles of sunshine and those temperatures a little higher than yesterday, up to 22 or 23
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degrees. this evening and tonight, temperatures will again dropped. particularly once the sun has set. these green shades spreading across our temperature chart, even in some of the town and city centres we will get close to single digits. 0ut of the town and city centres we will get close to single digits. out in the countryside, could get down to one, two, three degrees, just as we did last night. saturday is high—pressure increasingly taking control of the scene. this frontal system running across the northern half of scotland, bit of a fly in the ointment. there will be more in the ointment. there will be more in the way of cloud, some outbreaks of rain and stilla the way of cloud, some outbreaks of rain and still a fairly clean breeze here, as well. elsewhere, lighter winds, long spells of sunshine, strong sunshine. uv levels are pretty high, they‘re that in mind if you‘re out and about for any length of time. temperatures continuing to climb, particularly where you get the sunshine inland in the south. 23-25d. the sunshine inland in the south. 23—25d. with about the pollen levels are high or very high acrossjust about all parts of the country. the exception in northern scotland where you have that extra cloud. here on
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sunday they should be a good deal of sunshine. sunny skies across all parts through the day on sunday, just a bit of patchy cloud. temperatures will climb. you can see the orange on our chart. around the coast, if you look closely, the colours are lighter. we will develop sea breezes. coastal areas a bit cooler, inland those temperatures low to mid 20s. temperatures will climb further as the go into next week. sunspots could well hit 30 degrees and not much rain in the forecast. the aerospace giant airbus threatens to pull out of the uk, if britain leaves the eu without a deal. the firm employs 14,000 thousand people in the uk, but says it‘ll have to reconsider its long term presence, if no transition agreement is reached. we‘re very fearful there‘ll be chaos at the borders and we want our factories to be able to operate as smoothly as possible. the government says a no deal scenario won‘t arise — we‘ll have the latest from westminster, and one of airbus‘s factories.
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also this lunchtime: from jeans to bourbon, the eu slaps import tariffs on a wide range of american goods, in retaliation for president trump‘s levies on european products. why did she wear that coat? controversy around the first lady‘s slogan clothing, on her way to visit child migrants. boris becker could face prosecution in the central african republic,
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