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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 23, 2018 8:00pm-8:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 8pm: tens of thousands of people march through london to demand a vote on the final deal on the uk's departure from the eu. the will of the people is to have a proper, informed referendum where we know what a brexit deal means. we can't keep going into this absolute disaster without stopping and thinking if we really want to do this. senior cabinet ministers stress the uk is still prepared to walk away from brexit talks without a deal. the prime minister has always said that nothing is agreed until everything is agreed and that no deal would be better than a bad deal. also ahead this hour: an explosion at an election rally attended by zimbabwe's president. he was unharmed in the blast but at least two senior government officials were injured. new evidence of the devastating impact of plastic pollution on seabirds, with scientists going to extreme lengths to save chicks. germany's world cup hopes under threat
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as sweden take the lead against the world champions. and at 8.30pm, clemenecy burton—hill talks to a panel of authors about stories they think have shaped the world. good evening and welcome to bbc news. two years after the brexit referendum — tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets of london — demanding what they call a "people's vote", on the final terms of britain's departure from the eu. the demonstration came as senior cabinet ministers insisted they are prepared to walk away from negotiations with brussels — rather than accept a bad deal. ben wright reports. this was a mobilisation
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on a big scale by people who had come to the capital from across the country. many of hoping brexit can be stopped. # brexit, what is it good for. # absolutely nothing! two years on from the referenda to leave the eu, the march organisers said more than 100,000 people turned up to demand another vote on the final brexit deal. sam is a gardenerfrom somerset. ian runs a business in surrey. i can tell you right now, running two businesses that this is the last thing i want to be doing on a saturday. but i am having to do it because i see it's the only democratic opportunity i have to make my voice heard. the criticism would be from leave supporters, "look, we've done this. you're trying to rerun the whole argument again." well, i can take that point, but it is an entirely different context this time. it's not whether we leave or stay, it's what the deal is. first—time protesters joined veteran marchers fired up by recent warnings from businesses like airbus and now siemens about the potential economic costs of brexit.
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nobody voted to the damage the country in this way. and the people that lose are our children who lose the right, the freedom that we've enjoyed all of our lives. and there isn't enough of a reason to do this. but some people in the path of the march had a very different view. it's pathetic! it's anti—democratic. we know what we voted for, we voted to leave! today's march included very few politicians and absences were noticed. # where is jeremy corbyn. labour's leadership and the government are both opposed to the idea of a new public vote on the terms of the brexit deal. labour membership and labour voters are changing their mind and so i've always been clear the leadership has to catch up with the people. leave supporters will look at this and think, "you're just trying to un—pick the referendum. well, you know what is happening? this is what i'm doing. —— picking up. a lot of people who voted leave are like a lot of people who voted remain — really worried now about how this is all playing out
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as brexit reality dawns. the tens of thousands of people marching past theresa may's front door today are adamant that brexit is not inevitable and can be stopped. but government insists that brexit must and will happen. next week, theresa may will be back in brussels for the next round of negotiations. ministers insist talks are on track. but they are prepared to walk away. the prime minister has always said that nothing is agreed until everything's agreed. and that no deal would be better than a bad deal. and i think it is essential as we enter the next phase of the negotiations that the european union understands that and believes it. in another part of westminster, there was a smaller demonstration in support of brexit. clashing protests that prove again how divisive the decision to leave the eu remains. ben wright, bbc news. our correspondent, jon donnison, went to
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the ‘people's vote' rally this afternoon to get the thoughts of protestors. the organisers say they think there are at least 100 hours and people, i would say certainly in the tens of thousands, and the biggest anti—brexit march since the referendum. but in our due to leave in nine months' time but people here say it is not a done deal. you have supported this march today. what did you want? we absolutely need a people's vote. it shouldn't be for the politicians to decide the biggest decision of our generation and that is what we are demanding hair today and that is what we should get. another referendum? it will be the first time that we are looking at what brexit actually means. the cabinet have an even decided. people's vote, that means another never referendum, not the
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same referendum again but another one? yes, but basically, it is important to understand that it is the first time that we would be looking at what he'll put government brings back and what our current terms are. the only benefit of this roasted has basically been that we are starting to have the kind of conversation which should have had two years ago. what does it mean for people. airbus, yesterday, 14,000 families have woken up knowing that youtubeis families have woken up knowing that youtube is compromised. we need to know how much of that is going on. the other side with day, there was a vote, there were months and months of discussion in the lead up to the referendum and it was closed but the 48% last. referendum and it was closed but the 4896 last. i would say that number needs an update was that we have had a poll this week that shows 53% of people want to stay in there, and thatis people want to stay in there, and that is without either of the political main parties having a line to stay in. people in this country among art, they can see what is going on, they understand their
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future is being compromised and we say the only thing that is fair is what the people started, the people need to end. if anyone is a big fan of the will of the people, bring it on, what is there to be scared of? me the best deal winds. and remember you can keep up to date with every twist and turn of the brexit negotiations and the political ramifications by going to bbc.co.uk/politics. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are robert fox, the defence editor of the london evening standard and rachel cunliffe, comment and features editor at city am. zimba bwe's president has narrowly escaped injury in an apparent assassination attempt. a bomb detonated at an election rally moments after emmerson mnangagwa had left the stage. the country is preparing for its first elections since robert mugabe was removed from power. 0ur africa correspondent,
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will ross, reports. the rally in the bulawayo's white city stadium had just ended and it looked as though as a successful day of campaigning was coming to an end when suddenly president emmerson mnangagwa had a close escape. several people were knocked to the ground by the blast and senior government officials, including a vice president, were seriously injured. as emergency workers rushed people to hospital, the politicians were ushered to safety. hours later, president mnangagwa was out in the city's hospitals comforting those caught up in the blast. he appeared unflustered by events and brushed off what he considered to have been an attempt on his life. these are my normal enemies. and the attempts are normal. this is not the first attempt on my life. it doesn't intimidate me. it's normal. it exploded a few inches away from me. but it is not my time. this is a critical time
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for zimbabwe, the first election since robert mugabe was ousted. so far, the campaigns have been largely free from the intimidation and violence that have marred previous polls. but an explosion so close to the man seen as favourite to win the next month is a worrying sign. will ross, bbc news. turkey's president, recep erdogan, has called on voters to return him to office with sweeping new powers on the final day of campaigning in the country's elections. but he's facing a tough challenge, from a newly united opposition. mark lowen reports from istanbul. turkey's opposition has finally found its voice. for 15 years it's been fractured, unable to challenge president erdogan. but then came muharrem ince — a fiery centre—left man of the poeple who draws enormous crowds and is giving the turkey's president the battle of his political life.
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"turkey needs not a tired president but one with fresh blood," he told his last rally in istanbul. they believe the opposition can win a majority in parliament and force mr erdogan to a second—round runoff in the presidential election. this is taksim, the most iconic square in turkey. mr erdogan is here. he's there. he's everywhere. there's not a single opposition poster in sight. that unlevel playing field doesn't worry the erdogan side also out today. conservative pious turks revere him as their saviour in once secular—dominated turkey. he repeated his slogan. "one nation, one flag, one state". and invited them to give his rivals a slapped her. mr erdogan may still prove his doubters wrong but for the first time in 15 years and it seems
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possible that the erdogan magic is running out. joining me is dr esra ozurek, chair of contemporary turkish studies at the london school of economics. thank you forjoining us. it was at one of his last rallies in our conservative stronghold, never had problems there but we hear talk of a lot of surprises in store, why? probably one of the biggest reasons is that turkey is facing the biggest economic crisis since 2001 so that isa economic crisis since 2001 so that is a major disadvantage for him. tu rkey‘s is a major disadvantage for him. turkey's foreign policy has collapsed, there is a major deficit of justice and collapsed, there is a major deficit ofjustice and freedom in the
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country, people are unhappy how things are going on but until now, there was no strong opposition but during this election, a number of opponents did surprisingly well in their election campaign and challenged erdogan. we are talking here, this is mr ince, mr erdogan is on the right. what are his top—selling points? on the right. what are his top-selling points? up until now, the republican people party has been accused of being elitist but ince is accused of being elitist but ince is a person who has appeared as one of the people. his wife doesn't have a head scarf but his sister does have a headscarf, and until now, erdogan has said he represents the poor people, he says he represents the blacks of this country but now he lives in a palace, he is living in
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ructions and ince has been able to show that this is a contradiction. —— he is living in luxury. show that this is a contradiction. -- he is living in luxury. mr erdogan has never won an election but there are clearly a number of lessons he must have taken on board following the referendum in april of last year. it has been something of an eye opener for mr last year. it has been something of an eye openerfor mr erdogan, hasn't it? he changed his discourse and is adapting a lot of the things that his buddhism are saying, for example, he said, i may lifta his buddhism are saying, for example, he said, i may lift a state of emergency, —— that his opposite —— opposition are saying. of emergency, —— that his opposite -- opposition are saying. why have there been so many concerns regarding fraud in this election? we have even heard mr ince sending out this rallying call at the polls, why
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so this rallying call at the polls, why so much concern? many people are worried that ince will not leave. —— erdogan will not leave. they are concerned people will be charged with corruption. they inc he may consider it as an major challenge. there was the claim that there were two and a half million votes without sta m ps two and a half million votes without stamps so people are very worried, they want to make sure that their votes are counted. very quickly, obviously, in this election there has been an alliance, it has been referred to as the people's alliance and yet we have had warnings from the mhp who are part of this alliance to mr erdogan are saying that everything will be over if they make the same mr lakes, what are
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they referring to there? —— the same mistakes. mhp is quite a small party, ultranationalist mistakes. mhp is quite a small party, ultra nationalist party mistakes. mhp is quite a small party, ultranationalist party they are also losing their votes to an opponent nationalist party so he is trying to look important and powerful in the coalition that he has had with erdogan so i think he is trying to show that he is important if him and his parties needs are not taking seriously that he will step out of it. ok, we will find out from tomorrow. from tomorrow, we will start to get the results coming in. i believe parliamentary elections also taking place tomorrow. thank you very much. the french president, emmanuel macron, has said eu states should face financial sanctions if they refuse to accept migrants who are entitled to political asylum. the migrant rescue ship aquarius has now been barred from all ports in malta as well as italy, according
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to the charity operating the vessel. of the mind of our headlines. tens of thousands of people marched through london to demand a vote on the final deal. senior cabinet ministers stress the uk is still prepared to walk away from brexit talks without a deal. and an explosion at an election rally in zimbabwe injures at least two senior government officials. the president escaped unharmed. it is that time of day where i think we are going to catch up on that all—important sport, we are going to catch up on that all—importa nt sport, let's we are going to catch up on that all—important sport, let's cross to the bbc‘s sports centre. what a busy
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all day you've got. a busy few ten days. into the world cup, more drama from russia today and as we speak, germany staging a fightback just to stay and as we speak, germany staging a fightbackjust to stay in this yea r‘s world fightbackjust to stay in this year's world cup. the defending champions were second best throughout the first half and fell behind sweden after a surprise gold by —— behind sweden after a surprise gold by——a behind sweden after a surprise gold by —— a surprise gold. but after the break, germany level things up. the draw would just about keep them in the tournament but it would mean they need to win their last game and hope sweden lose to mexico. 0f course, this comes after mexico ‘s 2-1 course, this comes after mexico ‘s 2—1 victory course, this comes after mexico ‘s 2—1victory over south course, this comes after mexico ‘s 2—1 victory over south korea course, this comes after mexico ‘s 2—1victory over south korea earlier given them two wins out of two in group f. meanwhile, the england camp will have an quite impressed, i would say, with belgian‘s 5—2 demolition of tunisia in group g. romelu lu ka ku demolition of tunisia in group g. romelu lukaku and took his tally in
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a tournament with —— two for with his double. roberto martinez‘s when —— team made it two wins out of two with eight goals so far. england we re with eight goals so far. england were put through their paces with a final training session today for travelling 800 miles east ahead of their second world cup match tomorrow. dele alli back in training but over for the first part and he is expected to miss the match tomorrow against panama. everyone expect england to win and secure their place in the last 16 alongside belgium but the manager isn't getting ahead of himself. we have seen already that the difficulty big countries in terms of rankings have had in breaking down lower—ranked teams. that has been a thing right the way throughout. so there is no way there is any complacency in the way we have prepared for the game. the situation in the group obviously is a healthy one for us, but we've got to focus
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on our performance. the series had been tied after the first two tests but ireland got the only try of the game shortly into the second half, putting them ahead. australia fought back but the irish fought on to hold 20—16, sparking wild celebrations at the end of a very successful season. england ended a run of five straight defeats in test matches by beating south africa 25—10 in cape town. danny cipriani playing for england for the first time in ten years set up for the first time in ten years set upjohnny for the first time in ten years set up johnny made for for the first time in ten years set
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upjohnny made for england's only try. it was therefore victory ever in south africa. in and had already lost the series which finished 2—1. mercedes will line up on the front row. lewis hamilton topped the time sheets in every session. he held off team—mates about every bottas to claim the 75th pole of his year. —— va ltteri claim the 75th pole of his year. —— valtteri bottas. in tennis, novak djokovic had returned to form and fitness and continues at queens as he booked his place in the final tomorrow. it was a straight sets win for the former world number one. this pair have met 11 times and his opponent has yet to wina 11 times and his opponent has yet to win a single set against djokovic. he will play marin cilic in
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tomorrow's why not. it's been a while, that i have played for a title. so this is definitely a very special moment for me. considering what i've been through in the last year or so. so it's just a great occasion. that is all the sport for now. still 1-1 that is all the sport for now. still 1—1 between germany and sweden. there is live commentary on the bbc sports website. new evidence of the devastating effect of plastic pollution on wildlife has been recorded by the bbc. a team filming on a remote island for the bbc one documentary — ‘drowning in plastic‘ — revealed seabirds there starving to death because there stomachs were so full of plastic — that there was no room for food. victoria gill reports. flying through the ocean in search of food, but these sea birds are all too often finding and eating
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pieces of plastic. tens of thousands of flesh—footed shearwaters nest on this remote island hundreds of kilometres off the east coast of australia. but even here plastic is killing them. and another. scientists are finding young birds with so much of it in their stomachs that there is no room for food. these chicks have starved to death. but the researchers stepped in to save them and this bbc documentary crew filmed up close as the birds had their stomachs flushed out. 0h! it was shocking to see just how much would come out a chick. i mean, we saw 90 pieces come out of one of the chicks on the second night but the scientists were telling us they sometimes pull out as much as 200, 250 pieces of plastic out of either dead birds orfrom the regurgitation. it is just one example of how our discarded plastic is damaging marine wildlife around the world, an issue that was thrown into sharp focus by the bbc series blue planet ii. efforts are under way to stem
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the tide of plastic. here in england's south coast, sea bins have been installed that can suck up half a tonne of plastic waste per year. there's a plastic bottle there, that's fairly obvious, and a coffee cup lid. but there's also some smaller pieces of plastic. i think that's the lid off an aerosol and there's two cigarette buts there. there are also plastic fibres. but some parts of the ocean now contain more pieces of plastic than plankton so scientists say we all need urgently to change how we use and dispose of what has become a floating menace. victoria gill, bbc news. ‘a plastic planet‘ — is a campaign group that aims to reduce consumer use of plastics. and earlier, its co—founder, sian sutherland told us how the group's enjoyed great success in its efforts to reduce the amount of plastic in use. we've had a phenomenal three months.
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we've had a phenomenal three months. we launched the first world's first plastic free aisle and that has been rolled out into 74 dutch supermarkets. 0nly rolled out into 74 dutch supermarkets. only a month ago, we launched the world's first consumer trustmark, the cos we'd believe the power lies with the people and we as shoppers can vote with our wallet and now we know what we know, and we see these images, and it is so fantastic the bbc announcing what they are doing today, now we need to know, we need to vote with those wallets a nd know, we need to vote with those wallets and championed those products that are plastic free. i don't know what all this funny recycling symbols are and how we actually find out that we don't recycle anyway. of the six .3 alien tonnes of plastic waste on the planet, only 9% is recycled, you only ever down cycle pro stick ——
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elastic. production is ramping up, we think probably it is slowing but it isn't, trust me, and often food and ring patch again is contaminated and ring patch again is contaminated and valueless and untiljanuary this year, we have been sending it to china, expecting someone else to deal with it. what does that say about ask? when the legislation will be the thing that changes everything. many supermarket bosses that we meet with, we need to say we need more rustic free products, can we introduce a plastic free aisle? many say we wish we could be legislated into this, then we've got an excuse for doing it. but i feel now the momentum that has built up and of course it is so much down to the influence of blue planet to as we know and it is so tremendous what the bbc are launching today, we need to keep it up. ifilled can no longer be a use. why is it ok for us
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to wrap perishable food and drink in this indestructible material that we know this on the planet for ever. if you laid all the bottles and two and, just the ones made in 2016 alone, it goes halfway to the sun, where is this plastic going to go? we know it exists for ever stop the idea that we can catch up with recycling is misleading. we need to turn off the plastic tap. crude oil has leaked in two train in iowa, forcing residents to evacuate. li na cruise —— clean—up track —— off—macro in ethiopia, there has
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been an attack. these are the chaotic scenes as people scramble for safety moments after the explosion. the attack was just metres away from the podium where the prime minister had moments ago addressed thousands of his supporters. emergency services rushed to help dozens of people, injured as the full scale of the blast sank in. this angry mob is seen beating up a woman, who they claim was carrying an explosive. some of those who had been injured in the explosion have been brought to this health facility. they are being taken care of by emergency staff, who are scrambling to take care of those in need. what we know so far is that the explosion happened just immediately after the prime minister had finished his speech. i was right behind him, the podium, where he was. he was safe. he was quickly taken away by security officers.
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in the last few hours he has given an address to the nation. he has said he is safe. the prime minister has described this as well planned attack, even as the police announced they had arrested several people in connection with the attack. no—one has yet claimed responsibility. earlier, thousands turned up at the city's in square in support of the new prime minister who has brought unprecedented reforms and promised freedoms in the country. after more than three years of deadly anti—government protests, the premier has inspired millions with his message of love and reconciliation. but, today's attack showed he still has more work to do to heal a deeply divided country. emmanuel igunza, bbc news, in addis ababa. at the world cup in russia — england have arrived in nizhny novgorod ahead of their match against panama tomorrow. victory for gareth southgate's side will see them join belgium in the knockout stages, who beat tunisia 5—2 today. 0ur correspondent natalie pirks reports.
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it was once a bus but now it is revelling in its role as welcoming host. with the mercury topping 30 degrees, gareth southgate and a feel for the heat today. in russia's 13th century city, he is keen to sign past tournaments to history. we want to improve and show people that an england team can play in a different way, we've got technically good players, we want them to get on the ball and express themselves angrily attacked the game as we did from the opening minutes of the game the other night. up until even a quarter ofa other night. up until even a quarter of a century ago —— century ago, —— the welcome was nothing like they
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expected. everyone shakes your hand and by stuart drink, it is the opposite, they love us. we thought it would be a war zone and the locals have been really friendly. russia is on the charm offensive and so are russia is on the charm offensive and so are england, their attacking style is winning friends everywhere, including pam's coach. that's what eve ryo ne including pam's coach. that's what everyone wants to see, it excites fans, people are happy back home to see a team play with such energy. keep that going. while england were flying, belgium were just defined being one of the pretournament favourites, threshing tunisia 5—2. romelu lu ka ku favourites, threshing tunisia 5—2. romelu lukaku got two goals. belgian will wrest

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