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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 24, 2018 6:00am-7:01am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. a plan to halve childhood obesity by 2030. energy drinks, junk food adverts and sweets at supermarket checkouts could be restricted under proposals being unveiled in england. good morning, it's sunday the 24th ofjune. also this morning: all chant: come on england! world cup fever for england fans in russia. a win against panama today would mean an automatic place in the last 16. as england prepare, germany were on the brink of being knocked out at the group stage, but toni kroos saves the reigning champions in the final seconds against sweden. finally in the driving seat. women in saudi arabia celebrate as the ban on female drivers is lifted.
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and sarah keith—lucas has the weather. blue skies and clear skies above london this morning, many set for a sunny sunday. good morning. another dry and warm day today with a bit more sunshine than yesterday. those temperatures will continue to build through the week ahead. i'll bring you more in about 15 minutes. sarah, thank you very much. good morning. first, our main story. a ban on the sale of energy drinks to children, tighter restrictions on junk food advertising on tv, those are just two of the government's proposals to halve childhood obesity in england by 2030. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, said the cost of obesity to individuals and the national health service is now too great to ignore. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes, reports. the government's first obesity strategy for england, unveiled in 2016, was seen by many health campaigners as a missed opportunity. ever since, ministers have been
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under pressure to go further and so many of the measures that were ditched two years ago are now back on the agenda. the new obesity strategy includes a proposal to ban tv advertising of junk food before the 9pm watershed. there will also be curbs on supermarket promotion, such as by one, get one free deals, on sugary, high—fat deals. and all primary school children in england will be in courage to get active through schemes like walking or running a daily mile. we are delighted to see this new childhood obesity plan. it's brave and ambitious and it's where we should be as a nation. the scottish government also plans to announce tough measures to reduce obesity, an issue that is now firmly established as one of the big public health challenges facing the uk. but after what was widely seen as a false start, the government plans will now face close scrutiny. dominic hughes, bbc news. at the world cup, england meets panama this afternoon. a win will take the team
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through to the next round of the competition in russia. despite injury, expectations are high, but panama, will appreciate the balmy conditions in nizhny novgorod, where the game is being played. natalie pirks has been talking to the fans ahead of the match. it was once a bastille of soviet secrets, but now nizhny novgorod is revelling in its role as welcoming hosts. it's fair to say we came with a little bit of trepidation because you never know until you get here, but in general we've always found if you're nice to people they are normally nice back. put your shirt on, people take photographs and shake hands and buy you a drink. it's the opposite, they love us. we thought it would be a war zone but the locals have been really friendly so so the locals have been really friendly so so far so good. awin against so so far so good. a win against panama in the last 16 —— this afternoon would guarantee england a place in the last 16.
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gareth southgate is determined to put past failures into the last century. we want to improve and show people england can play in a better way. we've got technically good players, we want them to get on the ball and express themselves and really attacked again, as we did from the opening minutes of the game the other night. this panama side is organised, their style is, let's say, robust. england can expect a physical test in the heat of nizhny novgorod this afternoon. but, if they play the way they played against tunisia, they should continue to thrill fans back home. that's what everybody wants to see, it excites fans, people who are happy back home to see a team play with such energy and forwardthinking team. so, yeah, keep that going. this has already been a world cup of shocks. defeat today to panama would be right up there. natalie pirks, bbc news, nizhny novgorod. how much do we know about nizhny
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novgorod? not very much i would imagine. 0ur correspondent sarah rainsford is outside the stadium ahead of today's game. the sun is shining, a warm day, there are concerns about that. how is it there? it is hot already, early morning, it's already steaming hot here. a bit ofa hot here. a bit of a challenge for england when they get onto the pitch later today, 3pm it will be really barmy and four panama, that's normal, but not so much for england. the conditions otherwise are great here, as we were hearing from natalie how much the fans are enjoying it here in nizhny novgorod. in soviet times this city was closed to all foreigners, so it has changed dramatically in the last weeks as russia has as a whole with this massive influx of tourists and visitors and football fans pouring in. people here in nizhny novgorod, not only from the teams playing in the city, but from lots of other countries involved in the world cup, soa
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countries involved in the world cup, so a total transformation of the city which has been transformed with lots of investment, a brand—new stadium and everything gearing up for the game this afternoon. hot for the players, there is expecting a co mforta ble the players, there is expecting a comfortable win, they hope it will bea comfortable win, they hope it will be a comfortable win, but the panama fa ns be a comfortable win, but the panama fans i have spoken to in nizhny novgorod say they are prepared to give it a day to go, they aren't ready to go home just yet, their first world cup and they won't want to go home yet. you always get involved in the cities where the teams play, some of the odd, quirky bits of knowledge we have heard. the rumours are the metro in nizhny novgorod is haunted and also the first tank was made there. quite an interesting place? curious. they are two new facts to me andi curious. they are two new facts to me and i have lived in this country for a long time. nobody normally comes to nizhny novgorod and here they are finding out weird things about the city even i didn't know. we will get our researchers getting more quirky facts for you through the morning. sarah, thanks very
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much! the things that you learn. more from sarah later on! it's emerged that some sewage companies in the uk are regularly dumping untreated human waste into the country's rivers. an investigation by the bbc‘s countryfile programme has found that 25,000 storm drains designed only to be used during heavy rain are frequently overflowing, mixing rainwater with raw sewage. the environment agency says water companies are committed to tackling the problem but campaigners say more needs to be done. we need first of all to be investing in the infrastructure to improve the sewage treatment facilities. we need to be issuing biggerfines for when illegal discharges do occur, and wheels only to do more to create sustainable drainage around new housing estates and areas where we are creating lots of hard services which are discharging large amounts of rain fall very quickly into the combined sewer and drainage networks, causing these overflows. a group of pro—brexit politicians and business figures have urged the prime minister to speed up preparations to leave
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the eu without a deal. former cabinet ministers are among those to have signed a letter saying the uk must show it is ready to walk away in order to have real leverage. tens of thousands of people marched in central london yesterday to demand a final vote on any exit deal. a 15—year—old boy has been stabbed to death following a party in east london. metropolitan police were called to a community centre in romford at around 9pm last night. three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder. there have been more than 70 murders in the capital so far this year. growing tensions over african and middle eastern migrants travelling across the mediterranean will be discussed by eu leaders in brussels later. it comes amid concerns about the use of charity vessels to rescue migrants off the coast of libya. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is on—board the aquarius, one of the ships at the centre of the debate. well, this is the charity run ship
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the aquarius, which has found itself at the centre of a political storm and how europe's leaders deal with theissue and how europe's leaders deal with the issue of illegal migration over the issue of illegal migration over the seas from africa. this ship has been travelling since wednesday afternoon from the port of valencia because the spanish government allowed it a 1—off this ship to port. a few days before that the italians and maltese government is said they couldn't come to port, they accused ngo, and charity run vessels, of encouraging people run smuggling and essentially being a taxi service for illegal migrants coming from libya. the charities disagreed strongly saying this was a humane way to rescue those in need and people would risk their lives a nyway and people would risk their lives anyway given the dire situation in libya. in the meantime those european leaders are meeting over how how to handle migration. 0ne european leaders are meeting over how how to handle migration. one of the issues, according to a senior source at the council, say many leaders agree with salvini over the points that these charity votes,
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boats are a hindrance in. so the issueis boats are a hindrance in. so the issue is what happens with these boats and what happens when they picked up migrants and where can they go? one of britain's main railway lines is back under state control this morning. the east coast line was returned to public ownership after the government ended the stagecoach and virgin franchise. it will now be known as the london north eastern railway, a name last used in the 1940s. the department for transport will run the service until at least 2020. saudi arabia has become the last country in the world to allow women to drive. the ban that was in place for decades was lifted last night after campaigning by human rights groups. the change was announced last september with the country issuing licences earlier this month. it's part of crown prince mohammed bin salman‘s programme to modernise some aspects of saudi society. we will speak to some of the women that took to the roads for the first
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times last night shortly. game of thrones stars kit harington and rose leslie have married at a ceremony in aberdeenshire. the couple, who played on—screen loversjon snow and e—gret, met on the programme in 2012. guests lined the path outside rayne church, near inverurie, showering the newly—weds with petal confetti. i was so worried about getting her name right, e—grit, i get inverurie wrong. it's a tricky one! if you can't do your rs! sorry to everyone who lives there! it looked lovely. congratulations to them and anyone else who got married this weekend! time now to take a look at the stories that have made the front pages of the papers. shall we take a look? a mixed bag this morning. let's have a look at the sunday telegraph. 0n the front
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page, dame helen merrin at royal ascot yesterday, presenting the prize for the hardwicke stakes. a shakeup only on par with a drive to build spitfires can save the tories, sir 0liver left wing, carrying out a major review for theresa may, saying infrastructure must be organised like wartime aircraft production to solve the housing crisis. a mix of stories on the front pages, no consensus on what would lead, but this is the front of the observer. a leading british rabbi has drawn worrying parallels between donald trump's policies on immigration, last week there was the big story about the separation of children of migrants passing from mexico to the us, saying history cannot repeat itself. you can see the picture at the bottom, 100,000 people took to the bottom, 100,000 people took to the streets in london yesterday for the streets in london yesterday for
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the largest demonstration over the final brexit deal. the mail on sunday looking at allegedly a row between gavin williamson, the defence secretary, and theresa may, the prime minister, he has threatened to sweep her from power in a bitter row over military cuts. he has worn heard that if he doesn't get an extra £20 billion for the ministry of defence then tory mps would bow down the next budget and essentially pass a motion of no—confidence. the quote they have used as i have made her, i can break, what he has boasted to service chiefs. 0n the sunday express, a brexit story again. the second anniversary of the eu referendum, saying the prime minister urged to get tough on brussels and say if there is no deal we will stop paying cash. where did they get married? inverurie. you can see the pictures of them there, of the wedding yesterday, kit harrington and new
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wife, rose leslie, getting married in inverurie. with her new husband, kit harrington. new wife, did i say that? it's a lovely this morning. kit harrington. new wife, did i say that? it's a lovely this morningm kind of smells nice, you know that nice summer smell? you should take some of that and use it! ramshaw sarah has that smell of sunshine about her. good morning. ——i am sure. it is nice to come in for an early shift and you don't have to pack a jacket, a fresh start to the morning but certainly the promise of some gorgeous weather to be seen outside today. this is cornwall taken by one of our weather watchers this morning, a little bit of listing is here and there high club around, but sunshine is breaking through really right across the country —— mistiness. that is really the story from much of the week
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ahead, dry, sunny too, and warming up, so today it was warmer than yesterday and the warming trend will stick around, we are likely to see temperatures up to 30 degrees later on this week. a big area of high pressure is driving the weather. it is keeping weather fronts at bay. the range of the northern isles but it is clearing through the day. dry across the british isles, white winds, some sea breeze is developing around the coast which will keep things cool if you're heading to the coast today at a beautiful day. perhaps more cloud drifting into coastal parts of east anglia towards the south—east at times but it will not be spoiling the field to the weather. the light winds, dry conditions, lots of fun trying, temperatures doing well so widely in the 20s, 25 in the warmest spot towards the south—east, call towards the north and east of scotland for a time. —— caller. a beautiful evening, dry, clear overnight, will see the temperatures dipping down to
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single figures i think in one or two spots, probably not quite as cool as it has been in recent times. it will get warm and later on in the week i think but not too uncomfortable for sleeping. 0ver think but not too uncomfortable for sleeping. over the next few days we are seeing warmer air spilling in from the continent. these orange colours are returning to the map indicating the warm air mass that is on its way so if we take a look at monday's weather, warm from the word go. again lots of fun time with light winds and cloud across the western isles, the northern isles, perhaps in the northern parts of mainland scotland but elsewhere, fairweather cloud and high cloud drifting around, and the temperatures doing well, up to the mid 20s widely, 29 also in the warmest spot and a similar day saw a case of deja vu i think. light winds, dry conditions with high pressure around , winds, dry conditions with high pressure around, some cloud here and there but temperatures into the high 20s once again, cooler around the
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coast where we will draw in the sea breezes. read the full conditions through the week ahead if you like your weather dry, sunny and warm but of course not everyone does. —— beautiful conditions. keeping the dry theme, temperatures up to 30. some spots through the middle part of the week. a week for packing your suncream and also remember those pollen levels are still pretty high at the moment. i was a bit sniffily this morning. you cannot give with one hand and take with another. we will debate about what faq suncream we will meet later. there is a bit ofa we will meet later. there is a bit of a debate in the studio. we'll be back with a summary of the news at 6:30am. now it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's
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releases is mark kermode. good to see you again, mark. what have you been watching? a very interesting week. we have maquia, which is a visually stunning anime. in the fade, a socio—political thriller with a brilliant performance by diane kruger. and 0verboard, the remake no—one was asking for! i'm looking forward to that, but let's start with something i know literally nothing about this. and i know you're a big fan of animation, tell us more. i knew nothing about this when i saw it. it opens on wednesday of next week, maquia — full title — maquia: when the promised flower blooms — written and directed by mari 0kada, making a directorial debut. the story is there is a mythical clan of celestial weavers who don't appear to age beyond teenage years. their idyllic land is invaded by marauders, by mortals. one of them is kidnapped and forced to marry a mortal king. another discovers a mortal child, a young baby,
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who was wrenched from his mother's arms, and decides to look after the moral child, but she herself won't grow up. —— and decides to look after the mortal child, but she herself won't grow up. so it's a story about mothers and sons, it's a story about mortality and immortality, and it's also a film in which we have spectacular visual set pieces and very small intimate scenes, one of which is here. so on the one hand, you have that. 0n the other hand, you have these really sort of extraordinaire visual set pieces with huge, great big cities in the sky, with marauding action, with flying beasties. the film is a — i think it is a 15 certificate for fairly strong violence — and what i liked about it was i knew nothing of the story beforehand. it worked because it's very, very over—cranked in its emotions. i mean, all the emotions are turned up to 11. it's got a score which is absolutely tugging at your heartstrings. and one of the things it's about — i said it's about mothers and children, but it's also about crying and trying not to cry. there are few things more
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cinematically winning than the sight of somebody saying "i'm not going to cry, i'm not going to cry," particularly when you're sort of in sort of in this genre in which that stuff can be sort of amplified. i mean, it's not up there on a level with your name, for me, which i still think was really wonderful and caused such a stir a couple of years ago, but i thought this was really interesting. as i said, i didn't know anything about the story beforehand, i thought it had real tenderness. there are certain moments in it that are really visually breathtaking. it's a little bit narratively contorting every now and then but i was never bored. it does have several endings, like return of the king. i was swept along by it because it seemed passionate and had a real intensity to it. actually, when you go to the pictures, that's what you want — you want something that engages you emotionally, and it did do that. yes, i'm quite a blubberer so i'm already thinking that's going to make me cry. very good.
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i think crying in the cinema is one of life's greatest joys. and clearly, it is to be seen on a large screen because it's so beautiful to look at? i thought so. i saw it projected on a big—screen and i thought that's how i want to see it. that said, when it comes out on dvd, i will argue... i'm nothing if not inconsistent. now in the fade, i'm really fascinated by. it made quite a hit at cannes — i think it got the golden globe for best foreign film. it did, golden globe best foreign language. and diane kruger won the best actress award at cannes back in 2017. so the story is she is a mother and wife in germany. there is a neo—nazi attack in which she loses people very, very close to her. and the film then is about the way in which the legal response is firstly to turn on the community that have been attacked and then the way in which the legal system attempts and perhaps fails to deal with what has happened to her. now on one hand, it's an art house movie, a serious socio—political thriller with a brilliant central performance by diane kruger. 0n the other hand, it does have one foot in the kind of revenge exploitation genre that dates back to things
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like michael winner's death wish. if you think of something like kelly reichardt‘s night moves over here and death wish over here, it's kind of somewhere in the middle. the film itself is, i have to say, somewhat uneven. but her performance is so convincing that you forgive it for the things that are perhaps less structurally convincing about it. for example, during the court room scenes — the court room scenes are shot are shot with a gliding camera — it's one of those depictions of the legal system in which i struggle to remember a more reptilian performance by a defence attorney. he was literally doing a sort of hissable villain, as the legal system lets her down. as i said, we seen a version of this story before but she is brilliant and she is absolutely the thing that holds it together. worth seeing it for diane kruger. absolutely. 0verboard, which i remember from my teenage years — did they need to remake this? no! end of review, that's it. i can't think of anyone crying out,
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saying, "do you remember that goldie hawn—kurt russell film that we all kind enjoyed up to a point? let's do it again." however, this time it's a gender swap, so in the original, russell, he convinces her that she is his wife. she's a millionaire and she's an amnesiac, and he wants to get his own back so he convinces her she's his wife. this time, anna faris goes to clean somebody‘s yacht, they are horrible to her, she gets pushed overboard, and then eugenio derbez himself becomes an amnesiac, and she figures the way to get my own back on him is that i will tell him that he's my husband. see what i've done? i see what you're doing. here's a clip. is any of this ringing a bell? nope, nothing! we dated every time i docked! we would get frozen yoghurt and watch the sunset over the playa tortugas. that's where we fell in love! sounds like you're a romantic, leo. look, look, look, iadmit there are many things
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i've forgotten. but from the depths of my soul, i know i'm not married to this woman. so unless i see some real proof, i'm getting a slice of pie at the cafeteria. good luck, crazy lady. wait, wait... wait, honey? i didn't want to say this because i know it embarrasses you. but you have a tattoo of a cartoon mouse on your right butt cheek. no, i don't. you're really my wife? for better or worse, baby! and it's hard to believe but it's all that funny. it was a really weird thing — i watched this in a fairly packed packed screening room. there is nothing louder than the sound of people not laughing at a comedy. and there is so much sort of gurning going on on screen,
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so much mugging, and yet, the comedy — the key reason is there is zero chemistry, absolutely zero chemistry between these people, and so consequently, you end up worrying about the plot and thinking, you know, "i didn't think this the first time round, but now that you mention it, this plot‘s really creepy." there's something... it's notjust that it doesn't make any sense, it's that it's actually really creepy. not funny, a real shame. some talented people involved in it, none of their talents being used. and, as you asked at the beginning, did we need a remake of it? really? why? no. why do they do this? let's find the producer and ask him sometime. lek and the dogs, which i've not seen — well—known dog owner, dog lover — i'm going to love this? ok, it's not primarily about dogs. 0h. it's an andrew kotting — i love andrew kotting, i think andrew kotting is like one—of—a—kind film—maker. the story is based on a play which is based on a real—life story
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about a russian child who, at the age of four, left his apartment or was thrown out of his apartment and lived on the streets of moscow with dogs. this is almost a futuristic fantasy directed by andrew kotting, the third part of his earthworks trilogy in which this guy has now grown up, remembers his life with the dogs and it's about a number of things — it's about identity, it's about the condition of the planet, it's primarily about time, about the way in which the past and present and future all coexist. it's a very difficult film to describe because, as with all of andrew kotting's films, the only way of describing them is saying you have to watch the film. i think it's really remarkable and i think andrew kotting is one of those filmmakers that we should celebrate. you really have to seek his film out — it's touring around the country. it's not going to be playing in your local multiplex, it's not going to be going up against 0verboa rd, unfortunately. but it's really, really something, and i think — there are dogs in it — but it's not turner and hooch.
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that may be a good thing. i like turner and hooch! dvd of the week is one of those extraordinary films that you think about and you think about afterwards... did you like it? phantom thread, and it put me in the mind of what we were saying last week about the piano where i really, really thought it was amazing and beautiful and so well made without necessarily enjoying it. 0k, fine, so here's the thing with phantom thread — so phantom thread, paul thomas anderson, daniel day—lewis's final performance, apparently, this is the last thing he's going to do. i've now seen phantom thread seven times. seven! and five of them in the cinema. the first time i saw it, i liked it. the second time i saw it, i loved it. the third time i saw it i was thinking, "actually, this is overtaking punch—drunk love in my affections." i'm starting to believe i've become a bit weirdly obsessed by it, and that perhaps my response is not completely rational. but a lot of people do love it, actually, and there's something so striking about this and the music... but some people — jonny greenwood score...
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is it? but some people absolutely hate it. i think it is a real... the first time you saw it, you admired it but didn't like it? i found that it lived with me and that i take as a positive. i loved the performances. and i'm someone who has been neutral about daniel day—lewis but i thought he was outstanding in this, absolutely outstanding. here is my advice — watch it six more times and you will find that it will really get its claws into you. right, well, that's my weekend sorted. thank you very much indeed. on that thought, just a reminder before we go, you can find all the film news and reviews from across the bbc‘s online. —— from across the bbc online. all our previous programmes are on the iplayer, as well. enjoy your watching this week, however many times you manage to watch the same film. thanks very much for being with us. thanks, bye—bye. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and naga munchetty. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. new proposals have been announced to try and halve childhood
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obesity in england by 2030. the government has published a set of measures which includes a ban on the sale of energy drinks to children, tighter restrictions on junk food advertising on tv and limits on supermarket promotions. labour's shadow health secretary jon ashworth criticised the plan as another watered—down, lame duck strategy. however, health officials have broadly welcomed the announcement. public health england are really pleased to see the depth and the breadth of this second chapter of the childhood obesity plan. it builds on the success of the first chapter, the introduction of a levy on sugar sweetened drinks, the structured refill relation programme, and it includes things like the ambition to introduce a 9pm watershed on advertising unhealthy foods to our children during family viewing. saudi arabia has become the last country in the world to allow women to drive. the ban that was in place for decades was lifted last night after campaigning by
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human rights groups. the change was announced last september with the country issuing licences earlier this month. it's part of crown prince mohammed bin salman's programme to modernise some aspects of saudi society. a 15—year—old boy has been stabbed to death following a party in east london. metropolitan police were called to a community centre in romford at around 9pm last night. three teenagers have been arrested on suspicion of murder. there have been more than 70 murders in the capital so far this year. a group of pro—brexit politicians and business figures have urged the prime minister to speed up preparations to leave the eu without a deal. former cabinet ministers are among those to have signed a letter saying the uk must show it is ready to walk away in order to have real leverage. tens of thousands of people marched in central london yesterday to demand a final vote on any exit deal. voting has begun in the presidential and parliamentary elections in turkey. president erdogan is hoping for another five—year
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term, during which he'd take on sweeping new powers. but he's facing a strong challenge in the presidential contest mainly from the centre—left, and in the parliamentary vote from a coalition of opposition parties. one of britain's main railway lines is back under state control this morning. the east coast line was returned to public ownership after the government ended the stagecoach and virgin franchise. it will now be known as the london north eastern railway, a name last used in the 1940s. the department for transport will run the service until at least 2020. do you like babies? yeah. couldn't eat a whole one at once? ! new zealand's prime minister, jacinda ardern, and her partner, clark gayford, have proudly shown—off their new born baby girl, neve. ms ardern is believed to be regaining her strength with macaroni cheese, has been swamped with congratulatory messages including a private
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emailfrom the queen. she'll spend a second night in auckland public hospital with her daughter, who has been dubbed the "prime miniature". we chose neve because we just liked it and when we knew her we thought she looked like she suited the name. also it means in various forms bright and radiant and snow, which seemed like a good combination for materiki and for solstice. i like her macaroni cheese strategy! you wouldn't find that in russia for the world cup! are they having it in russia? i haven't seen anybody tweeting about that. i've seen some unusual dishes but not macaroni. we we re unusual dishes but not macaroni. we were talking to down yesterday, he is food obsessed, like us, he has discovered a chocolate pie, basically a wagon wheels, he has
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been enjoying those and lots of bits of food. honey cake is the other thing. how are you doing, did you watch the german game last night against sweden? i was heartbroken for sweden. as an england fan we don't want germany to get through. it's interesting because if we look back at previous world cups, the la st two back at previous world cups, the last two world cups, the person who had won the previous one went out at the group stage. spain in 2010, they we nt the group stage. spain in 2010, they went out in the group stage in 2014 and italy in 2006, they went out in the group stage in 2010 and it looks like germany were going to do the same thing. those dying seconds... we've had a lot of that in this world cup. exciting. it has been good! we're going to hear from gareth southgate in a minute, but how close were germany to an early exit last night? i can tell you, 30 seconds from a draw with sweden that would have made it very difficult for them to get out of the group stages. the reigning champions have been
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knocked out in the group stages at the last two world cups and germany looked to be following suit when 0la toivonnen gave sweden the lead. marco reus then equalised early in the second half, but germany had a man sent off and they looked doomed until toni kroos stepped up in the 95th minute to keep them alive in russia. germany are now second in group f, mexico are top after they beat south korea 2—1. west ham's javier hernandez on the scoresheet in rostov. and england will have to win and score a bucketful of goals if they're to top group g tonight, that's because belgium beat tunisia 5—2 thanks to a couple of goals from a couple of premier league forwards. romelu lukaku and eden hazard both scoring twice in moscow. they play england on thursday. so englad then have made
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the almost 600 mile journey from their training base in repino on the gulf of finland to nizhny novgorod where they'll play panama in their second group game at this world cup at 1pm this afternoon. the players and staff arrived at their hotel yesterday, a handful of fans outside the gates waiting to greet gareth southgate's side as they look to confirm their place in the knockout stages, and the manager is in positive mood. history is not the important thing for this team. they have an opportunity to create their own history, and they should be excited about that. you know, they're a young team that are going to get better and better. i really enjoy working with all of them and i'm intrigued to see how far they can go and how well they can play, because i think we saw moments of that the other night and we've got to
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continue that and keep pushing and driving to be as good as we can be. plenty of england fans in nizhny novgorod too, very much making their presence felt in russia's fifth biggest city. kick—off, as i mentioned, is at 1pm this afternoon and the match is live on bbc one. away from the world cup and the england rugby union coach eddiejones says his side are better for the series defeat against south africa. they finished with a flourish in the final test, winning 25—10 at newlands. jonny may with england's try thanks to brilliant work from danny cipriani, starting his first international test for a decade. we wa nt we want to be the best team in the world, and you have to go through these periods to find out some things about yourself. we've done that, and now we want to kick on in november, it all starts again, we get another 400 caps back and we've got nine or ten club games to go through before we get the team together. so england finally got the performance they were after in south africa,
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but the same cannot be said for the zulu impi dancers who have become part of the pre—match build—up. it was rather wet at newlands, and they struggled to stay on their feet as they ran out ahead of the teams, perhaps a taste of the good old british weather was what helped england feel at home. you're so mean laughing at them! full marks for getting on with it, though! you can't help but laugh! they are very impressive, aren't they? very powerful but how can you not laugh when that happens? it's that classic thing, isn't it? we're sorry! ireland, meanwhile, wrapped up a historic series win against australia, their first in almost 40 years. their only try of the match coming from c] stander. the rest of the damage coming from the trusty boot ofjohnny sexton to give them a 20—16 win. it means they take the series 2—1. and scotland ended their summer tour with an emphatic win over argentina. peter horne scored two of their six tries in the 44—15 win. in rugby league, england
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came from behind to ease past new zealand in a test match that was played in the us city of denver. it was england's first match since losing the world cup final last year and they looked in great form debutantjake connor with one of the tries. 36—18 the final score. lewis hamilton is on pole position for today's french grand prix. the race hasn't been on the formula one calendar since 2008, and a decade on hamilton dominated qualifying, beating team mate valtteri bottas to claim the 75th pole of his career. it was a busy day for england's women cricketers. they played two twenty20 games yesterday, beaten by south africa in the first and then bouncing back to defeat new zealand. england now lead the tri—series group with four points, with one round of games left to play on thursday. the men are back in action later this morning as they take on australia in their final one—day game at old trafford. and rory mcilroy had
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an unwanted visitor on the tee at the travellers championship in conneticut. he was all set, ready to swing, when a squirrel wanted to get involved and put mcilroy off. look at that! he did take it well. i've been on the goals course when geese have got in the way and hitting a goose, i haven't hit one but i have seen people do it and it can be very upsetting —— golf course. you wouldn't want to hit a little squirrel! very traumatic. they are in groups and if you hit one it can be very bad. good aim, though! we will be talking about the world cup later. getting into the spirit of things. this one is the one people are excited about, it's been a slow buildup. i'm with you. maybe this
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one is the tipping point. we will get excited about it later. yes, we will chat about it later. some of the uk's sewage companies are regularly dumping untreated human waste into rivers. that's according to an investigation by bbc‘s countryfile. the programme found thousands of sewage outlets, designed to operate only in the heaviest downpours, are overflowing throughout the year. tom heap reports. when it comes to pollution, britain's rivers are facing a hidden threat from these. combined sewer overflows, or csos for short. their emergency storm drains that release excess shoe which in times of extreme rainfall to stop it backing up extreme rainfall to stop it backing up in our streets and homes. they are legal but csos in coastal areas like these have been campaigned against for years. take your sewage somewhere else! now countryfile has discovered there are nearly 25,000
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of these outlets across the uk dumping untreated waste into our rivers. they're only supposed to operate as a last resort, but we've discovered that some are operating throughout the year, dumping human sewage, which is a threat to our health, our environment and our wildlife. using requests under environmental information regulations, which water companies have to answer, we've discovered in england and wales alone there were some 70,000 recorded spills of untreated waste injusta recorded spills of untreated waste injust a year. recorded spills of untreated waste in just a year. tony recorded spills of untreated waste injust a year. tonyjuniperfrom the world wide fund for nature says our outdated sewer system has to change. we need, first of all, to be investing in the construction, to improve the sewage treatment facilities. we need to be issuing biggerfines for when illegal discharges do occur, and we also need to be doing more to create sustainable drainage around new housing, estates and areas where we are creating lots of hard services which are discharging large amounts
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of rain fall very quickly into the sewer and rain it in networks causing these overflows and. in england the sewage companies have committed to a £400 million upgrade. meanwhile, in the north—west there are 2000 csos operated by united utilities. so what's this company doing to relieve the pressure on a network that serves 3 million homes? this is a large open to their storm overflow detention tank. you weren't kidding about the large. that's amazing. what we do here is we try and store as much stormwater following a rainfall event as we possibly can and then when the storm subsides we return it back to the network and send it for treatment. meanwhile the environment agency says water companies are on course to have about 80% of csos monitored, but that won't be until 2025. tom heap, bbc news. and you can see tom's full report on tonight's countryfile, that's at 7 o'clock here on bbc1.
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you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: new rules on how shops sell sweets and fatty snacks are being introduced in a bid to hold childhood obesity in england by the year 2030. england fans are getting ready in russia to delay's match. england takes on panama. it was a nice walk into the office this morning. apparently it is nice everywhere, almost places, and sarah has the details. is it fair to say everywhere? it depends on your interpretation of nice. it could be too hot and too much pollen, yes! not everyone is a fan of the warm sunshine but if you are a fan of the dry, warm, sunny where you are in the entry things are set to stay
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fairand not the entry things are set to stay fair and notjust the entry things are set to stay fair and not just today the entry things are set to stay fair and notjust today but the entry things are set to stay fair and not just today but we the entry things are set to stay fair and notjust today but we are into this beautiful summary weather so it will stick around for much of the week ahead with temps on the rise. this is the sunrise in cornwall taken this morning by our weather watcher, a beautiful start of the day, many of us waking up to similar scenes with some sunshine around, quitea similar scenes with some sunshine around, quite a fresh morning, things will warm up and in the week they will warm up further the dry and sunny, a case of deja vu over the next few days with high—pressure staying in charge of our weather, keeping weather fronts at bay. there has been some rain across the northern isles at that is clearing the north in the weather fronts are things are drying up with shetland and 0rkney as well, some cloud the western isles and the far north—west of mainland scotland but elsewhere, the cloud is high and patchy in natures of the sunshine will be hazy but lots of sunshine on offer. we ever you are common dry, bright and sunny, light winds, and a bit more
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sunshine and light winds, feeling a little bit warmer. —— wherever you are, it will be. a little bit cooler in parts of northern and eastern scotland, a little more breezy there. late evening sunshine to be enjoyed out there and clear and dry overnight. temperatures falling into single figures are not particularly uncomfortable for sleeping. a reasonably fresh start to monday morning. the sunshine tomorrow right from the word go. if we look through the course of this week, this is the air mass, yellow colours with us at the moment but later on they turn increasingly orange which means a warmerair increasingly orange which means a warmer air mass drifting its way in from the continent, and the temperatures up on the up of a lovely warm sunny day to come on monday, more cloud again lingering for the north—west of scotland on this weak front here but it is producing any rainfall really, and the rest of the country looks dry, sunny, light winds and temperatures into the high 20s. sea breezes
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developing around the coast it will be that little bit cooler heading in a couple of days there. i cloud is drifting here and there on tuesday but it is looking dry, sunny and warm. we are likely to see the temperatures widely in the 20s, the warmest spots up to about 27 or 28 on tuesday. cooler for a time warmest spots up to about 27 or 28 on tuesday. coolerfor a time in warmest spots up to about 27 or 28 on tuesday. cooler for a time in the east and then it looks like it warms up east and then it looks like it warms up further through the middle of the week. we may well see 30 degrees in a few spots, particularly wednesday and thursday but it stays warm and dry usman khawaja into next weekend. quickly, which factor thingy do you use, suncream ? quickly, which factor thingy do you use, suncream? i go for at least 30. 30, then? today, 15, if the sun is like this it be higher. 50. do you wear red all over time? when i play golf and i am out and about. you cannot be too careful. let us know
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what you are doing in the sunshine and perhaps you do not want to watch the football. today is the day where you drag your tv to the window and you drag your tv to the window and you watch it outside looking in. we'll bring you the headlines at 7am. time now for the travel show. this week we're in cairo, where i get to check out a new style of music that has become a youtube sensation. we head to italy for a cut—price guide to florence. there are many, many places you can see forfree in florence. florence is an open—air museum. we start this week in florence. it's one of the most beautiful cities in italy, full of renaissance art and architecture. but recent price increases at art galleries and museums have scared off some travellers.
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so we sent keith wallace to see if there are ways to experience this iconic italian city on a budget. they call it the cradle of the renaissance, and you can see why. the streets, piazzas and galleries drip with pieces from some of the most celebrated figures in history. reel off the figures of people who worked there and you will see what the fuss is about. donatello, michelangelo, leonardo da vinci. here's where you go if you want to see all those masters in one place. it is the uffizi gallery and it is incredibly popular. you can tell that because there is a huge queue. are you paying the 20 euros? yes. quite expensive. yes, but i hope it's worth it. me too. this year, the uffizi has more than doubled its entry fee from 8 euros to 20 euros,
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if you go in high season. which is obviously a lot of money and frankly more than i could afford. if you bring your family here on holiday you will find your budget depleting quickly. so what they are trying to do is to drive you towards a new ticket. there's a 38 euro combined ticket, which gets you into a variety of museums and art galleries. and also a 50 euro annual subscription. for comparison, the equivalent ticket at the louvre in paris and at madrid's prado museum is 15 euros. at london's national gallery, admission is free. so much impressions. we see art from 400 years, i think. so i am very impressed. and the price, 20 euros? a little too high, i say. the art was pretty amazing but at the same time, i think it should be more inclusive, because that's what art is about. it is about making sure that
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everyone can see it. but if you're unable or unwilling to cough up, you will not completely miss out. there are incredible buildings and statues around every corner. ciao! i got you and ice cream! francesca tells me she thinks the city is one big open—air gallery. so, tell me about david. so he was made by michelangelo when he was just 26 years old. he made it for the city. at the end of the 1800s, the city decided to put the statue inside the museum and they made a copy. wait, so that is a fake david? yes, a fake david. well, it is a replica, we don't like the word fake. it is a replica from the 1900s, 1911, actually. it is a modern one. so we go this way to the right. but this is definitely real. just around the corner from david lies a tiny, unassuming chapel you would normally walk straight past. this is one of the hidden gems of florence, an institution which is probably unknown even
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to most florentines. the chapel is a charitable institution founded in the 15th century for middle—class is who had fallen on hard times. it still operates today and meets every friday to decide who should benefit from its donations. but it's the art we're here for. so, the frescoes were made by domenico ghirlandaio. he was the main renaissance artist and he was, by the way, the master of michelangelo. you always recognise the good men because of their clothing. they have the red and black robes. and also, they always have paper in their hands because it was a contract, they needed to leave everything written down, and the money in the other hand. seems like an odd place to bring me. it is. our next stop won't be on many itineraries but francesca maintains it gives you a fascinating insight into florentine history. we have chapels with spires and arches and pointed arches and marbles, egyptian
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style, for example, or neo—renaissance style. statues made by the greatest names, actually. if you didn't want to pay the 20 euros to get in to the uffizi there is still plenty to see in florence and you wouldn't feel like you've missed out. absolutely. there are plenty of places to see for free in florence. florence is an open—air museum. but the renaissance was about science as well as art. so here is one final recommendation i have been given. inside this florentine palace, they're attempting to find out the following — if i take a bean plant down a fast slide, will it feel less stressed as me? i'm serious. this is a good contraption, isn't it? i need one of these for pottering around the garden. the slide was designed by carsten holler, who has installed similar chutes in london's tate modern and new york's new museum. it's as fast as you would expect.
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—— and it's a bit faster than you would expect. once you're down, you hand over your little green friend for some tests. the florence experiment continues at the palazzo strozzi until the 26th of august. keith wallace, exploring the beautiful city of florence without breaking the bank. well, to finish this week's programme, here in cairo a new music genre has risen from the streets to inspire a fresh—faced generation of stars. this is mahragan. mahragan means festive,
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it means festival. it is very much a street music. it evolved from a previous genre, called chaabi, it means of the people or popular. and it's very, very unique to egypt, and specifically cairo. it's loud and brash and has roots very similar to the way hip hop evolved in new york. you will mostly find them, 90% of the time, in working class areas, in small alleyways. they will put on a show, bring out the lights and speakers and put on a show in the street. mahragan has launched the careers of a new generation of egyptian music stars. i'm about to meet a band that have a hit that has had 125 million youtube views. music plays. shobeik lobeik is a 3—piece
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band from alexandria. hassan writes and composes the songs. his friend and collaborator, ahmed, is one of the managers. and ahmed's cousin ferris is the singer. despite these defined roles, they still have some creative differences. what about your biggest hit single? what was it called? a lot of mahragan combines driving beats with performers singing about the issues that affect their lives. there is no friend is about friendships falling apart. and what about abroad?
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are you going to play in other countries? will you come to the uk and play some festivals? 0ther mahragan performers have started to play sets
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at european nightclubs. for now, club nights remain the best chance cairo's tourists to catch these modern egyptian beats. —— for now, club nights remain the best chance for cairo's tourists to catch these modern egyptian beats. sadly, that's your lot from us for now. join us next week when: mike is in bulgaria, diving for long—lost treasure in the black sea. there is a giant flying saucer slowly flying over your head. get an exclusive the travel show look inside a fascinating building from the country's more recent communist past. make sure you join us for that, if you can. don't forget, you can keep up with us in real—time on social media. all the details should be on your screens. but from me and all the travel show team here in cairo, it's goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and ben thompson. a plan to halve childhood
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obesity by 2030. energy drinks, junk food adverts and sweets at supermarket checkouts could be restricted under proposals being unveiled in england. good morning, it's sunday the 24th ofjune. also this morning: all chant: come on england! world cup fever for england fans in russia. a win against panama today would mean an automatic place in the last 16. as england prepare, germany were on the brink of being knocked out at the group stage. but toni kroos saves the reigning champions in the final seconds against sweden.
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