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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 24, 2018 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 11: a blueprint to halve childhood obesity by 2030 — energy drinks, junk food adverts and the sale of sweet at supermarket checkouts could be restricted under new plans for england we know this is what people want. our research tells that parents really wa nt our research tells that parents really want to see all the things that are driving them to buy more and eat more cutback on. the health secretary, jeremy hunt says it's "completely inappropriate" for businesses like airbus to issue warnings about the government's brexit plans. we're in an absolutely critical moment in the brexit discussions and what that means is that we need to get behind theresa may to deliver the best possible brexit. women in saudi arabia finally get behind the wheel after an end to the ban on them driving. in football, england manager gareth southgate
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says his side can create their own history in the world cup. a win against panama later would send them into the knock—out stages of the tournament in russia. and the dateline london panel discuss the latest on brexit and take a closer look at the migration crisis — that's in half an hour here on bbc news. good morning and welcome to bbc news. the government has announced new measures aimed at halving the number of obese children in england by 2030. the health secretaryjeremy hunt says the cost of childhood obesity has become ‘too great to ignore‘. the new measures would include a ban on the sale of caffeine heavy drinks to children, better calorie labelling on menus, and plans to prevent shops displaying unhealthy food at checkouts. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, reports.
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the government's first obesity strategy for england, unveiled in 2016, was seen by many health campaigners as a missed opportunity. ever since, ministers have been under pressure to go further and so many of the measures that were ditched two years ago are now back on the agenda. the new obesity strategy includes a proposal to ban tv advertising of junk food before the 9pm watershed. there will also be curbs on supermarket promotion, such as buy—one—get—one—free deals on sugary, high—fat foods. and all primary school children in england will be encouraged to get active through schemes like walking or running a daily mile. we are delighted to see this new childhood obesity plan. it's brave and ambitious and it's where we should be as a nation. a great deal has happened, we have
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introduced the sugary drinks tax, which has seen half of manufacturers reform lating their drinks, that is about 45 million kilos of sugar taken about 45 million kilos of sugar ta ken over about 45 million kilos of sugar taken over the market. but every pa re nt taken over the market. but every parent is worried about this issue and we have a package of measures today. we are doing for the first time something bold and saying we wa nt time something bold and saying we want to hall v childhood obesity. the scottish government also plans to announce tough measures to reduce obesity, an issue that is now firmly established as one of the big public health challenges facing the uk. but after what was widely seen as a false start, the government's plans will now face close scrutiny. dominic hughes, bbc news. our health editor hugh pym joins me in the studio. the government's been criticised before for not doing enough to tackle childhood obesity. is this a fresh start for the government. yes,
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all these options were open to them two years ago and david cameron was about to go ahead with the plan like this and then theresa may took over and it was early days for her, but she watered it down and put something out that was considered to be weak by campaigners. i think what's happened is the climate has changed, businesses haven't been so resista nt to changed, businesses haven't been so resistant to policies like the sugar tax and started reducing shugg sugar in drinks before the implementation of the tax and other measures with reformulation they haven't been strongly against. downing street have been emboldened to come up with proposals which are quite wide—ranging. proposals which are quite wide-ranging. these are just proposals, they have got to be consulted on. but when might we see these actually coming into force? well, listening tojeremy hunt this morning, it seems clear that there
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will be a consultation period, there has to be on measures like this. but they want to get on with it. that will take a period of months. in the autumn should be ready to put forward a firm plan to legislate. these are quite big intrusions on the rights of advertisers and independent television companies to put out adverts for certain types of food on family viewing. there are restrictions on what you can advertise on children's tv. it is extending that to all tv and online up extending that to all tv and online up until 9pm. supermarkets from what i understand are happy to go along with changes that do apply across the board. they don't want to do things and others don't go along with it. restrictions on selling confectionary at tills, they will probably not resist. but that is quite a big change to how supermarkets do their business. cutting obesity is what the nhs
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wa nts. cutting obesity is what the nhs wants. it sees that as crucial. we have been hearing more about the future funding of the nhs from the health secretary, jeremy hunt. yes he was pushed on where this £20 billion extra will come from which the government has pledged to the nhs in england. there was talk of the brexit dividend. he rather skated around that, whether there was a brexit dividend in net terms and what contribution that would play. the rest most say will have to come from tax. he wouldn't go further on the that. he said it was up further on the that. he said it was up to the chancellor in the budget in the autumn. thank you. later in the programme i'll be speaking to june 0'sullivan from london early years foundation — who will be talking about the impact sugar has on nursery children and ways in which nurseries can tackle obesity in toddlers. the health secretaryjeremy hunt
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has also been talking about brexit and described the warnings by airbus about uncertainty as "completely inappropriate. " earlier this week, airbus warned it could pull out of the uk if the country exits the single market and customs union, with no transition deal. speaking on the andrew marr show, mr hunt said the government had to "stand firm" and "ignore siren voices." ijust i just thought it was completely inappropriate for businesses to make, to be making these kinds of threats for one simple reason — we are in an absolutely critical moment in the brexit discussions and what that means is that we need to get behind theresa may, to deliver the best possible brexit, a clean brexit and what businesses want and i was in business for 14 years, they want
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clarity and the more that we undermine theresa may, the more likely we are to end up with a fudge, which will be a disaster for everyone. for more detail on that dramatic warning from airbus and the health secretary's reaction to that, our political correspondent jonathan blake has some more analysis for us. some strong words from the health secretary in response to the warnings from airbus and bmw and siemens, the latest international company to warn about brexit and the implications of leaving without a deal. it is different to the language government ministers were using when airbus made that warning, they were striking a reassuring tone, saying we understand your concerns, but the best thing is if we get on with getting a good deal and the no—deal scenario has to be on the table, but we don't see it happening. what you saw from jeremy
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hunt was a stronger line and you heard him saying that we should stand firm, resist these siren voices saying it is inappropriate for businesses to be making warnings. airbus and siemens take a different view. they have voiced concerns in public. so it will be interesting to see what reaction the business leaders have to that. but it isa business leaders have to that. but it is a tricky time for the prime minister. because she heads into the next round of negotiations in brussels next week. obviously, a crucial time. the whole process has been fraught with difficulties and fraught with debate. and as you say, the prime minister heading back to brussels at a key time. we have seen an example of pressure she is under not only from business who say we need close ties with the eu and details on the relationship. but on open letter from 60 former cabinet members, mps and economists, saying the planning for a no—deal scenario,
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where we would revert to world trade 0rganisation rules should be speeded up 0rganisation rules should be speeded up and many would be happy in that scenario and saying that to have real leverage in the talks, the government needs to treat that as a real option and they say that the prime minister is up against intransigent and punitive strategy from the eu. pressure on the prime minister from from the eu. pressure on the prime ministerfrom all sides from the eu. pressure on the prime minister from all sides at these key face of the negotiations. president erdogan of turkey is facing a major test of his popularity as voters go to the polls in presidential and parliamentary elections. his islamist—rooted ak party has been in for power sixteen years. those looking to unseat him have started casting their ballots. meral aksener leader of the iyi party is the only female candidate for president. muharren ince seen as the strongest challenger
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to mr erdogan is expected to head to the capital ankara before the results are announced tonight. challenger selahattin demirtas cast his ballot in prison. 0n the stroke of midnight local time, saudi arabia became the last country in the world to allow women to drive. the lifting of the ban is being hailed as an important step towards modernisation by crown prince mohamed bin salman. but there's been criticism that some of the women who campaigned for the change are in prison on charges of treason. donna larsen reports. just after midnight in riyadh, and a piece of history is about to be made. a perfectly normal act in every other country in the world but, until now, not in saudi arabia. ujdeen al—ateek takes the wheel of the family car and drives into the street. all i can think about,
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i can still do my own stuff. i don't have to ask for anyone to take me around. that's very important. for us to drive, 0k, maybe a lot of us don't need to drive but, for me, i used to drive, i used to do my own stuff. so i'm not used to someone to drive me around. wow! i'm so excited, i'm so happy. honestly, i can't express my feelings. i haven't been sleeping for two days just thinking about this moment. and today we're actually on the roads, driving. people are waving, they're so happy. i'm so honoured. it's an amazing feeling. enjoying the freedom of the city, this change has been a long time coming. some activists have been demanding the right to drive for decades. back in 2013, this woman took the wheel in defiance of the law. some were punished for doing the same thing. change is under way in saudi arabia. cinemas have been allowed to open
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along with the first music concerts and the first fashion week. it's all part of a modernisation drive led by the crown prince, mohammad bin salman. but while some restrictions are easing, saudi women are still not free to travel, marry, divorce, or even leave prison without the permission of a male relative. and those who demand too much change are still being punished. 0nly last month, more than a dozen prominent women's activists were arrested for demanding greater rights. donna larson, bbc news. the leaders of 17 european union member states will meet in brussels later to discuss how to tackle the arrival of african and middle—eastern migrants from across the mediterranean. numbers have fallen since the crisis began in 2015, but italy and malta have banned charity rescue boats from coming to their ports demonstrating a rise in tensions. 0ur political correspondent kevin connolly is in brussels.
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what do we expect to come out of today's meetings? that is a good question. earlier in the week we had circulated a document as you often do perhaps absurdly in the european political process, draft conclusions ofa political process, draft conclusions of a meeting which had yet to take place at that point, those draft conclusions rather annoyed the italian government, in particular, because they appeared to be designed to address specifically german concerns. so now to address specifically german concerns. 50 now those to address specifically german concerns. so now those draft conclusions have been withdrawn. there will be what we are told will be an open—ended discussion with no conclusions set to be reached. that is an indication of how profoundly divisive this issue has been for
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european political leaders. the numbers falling sharply. i think the numbers falling sharply. i think the number of arrivals by migrant by sea this year so far around 28,000, two yea rs this year so far around 28,000, two years ago it was 200,000. so the numberare years ago it was 200,000. so the number are falling. but the tensions are rising. because there has been no proper political decision—making about what you do with those people who arrived all those years ago and whose fate are still to be decided. the difficulties and the divisions especially between germany and the new italian government, which feels it has a mandate to lift the burden on italy, the differences are profound. and embarrassing pictures that we have seen for the eu in terms of divisions, rescue ships being turned away from italy and
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malta and europe is divided on this. it is hard to see those differences being quickly resolved. yes, look, the eu loves to s to proclaim its euan tishgs it is —— unity, it is ha rd to euan tishgs it is —— unity, it is hard to see where a compromise will come. in eastern europe say they will not take a reallocation. angela merkel wants to stop secondary movement, people who have already registered in one country, then trying to move on to germany. the italian and maltese government said the problem is the waves of arrivals, there is no resolution about that. i don't think the italian government would find the idea of the charity ships being turned away embarrassing, the allegation in italy is the ships are
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providing a mechanism for getting into europe for migrants and they are part of a chain in thejourney which delivers the migrants to italy. italy is determined to do something about the initial flow of migrants. it sees restricts the activities of charity ships as a big pa rt activities of charity ships as a big part oo of that. but the broader search for a solution to satisfy all the concerns is very hard to see what it would be. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news: new measures aimed at halving the number of obese children in england by 2030 have been announced by the government. the health secretary, jeremy hunt says it's "completely inappropriate" for businesses like airbus to issue warnings about the government's brexit plans. women in saudi arabia are officially allowed to get behind the wheel of a car — after the authorities lifted a ban on them driving.
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england and panama kick off at the world cup in russia injust a few hours. england hoping for a win to make them favourites to reach the knockout stage. we can go to our correspondent in panama city ahead of kick—off. they must be pretty excited there. a lot of people here assuming that england are going to win. what is the expectation there? well, this is panama's first world cup, so what ever they do, they're proud of even being at the event. people have turned out in big numbers in panama city, outside the national stadium. a lot of people have come straight from the bars. it is, the sun hasn't risen yet. they have gone out on the beers the night
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before and gone straight to this event. they're very excited. the people i have been speaking to are hopeful of at least their first point. they are proud to be involved at all. and lots of panamanians in russia, we have been seeing pictures of huge numbers of fans for the game today? yes, the fact that people have made that journey today? yes, the fact that people have made thatjourney from here is extraordinary. such a long way and such a big investment to follow your national team. for those who can't and there are a lot of people who would love to be there, this is the next big thing — in the shadow of the national stadium where, the key, the national stadium where, the key, the goal that was in injury time that put them through in the qualifiers, was scored. a moment that was so celebrated that the president declared a national holiday following morning, such was the hangover from the party. holiday following morning, such was the hangoverfrom the party. it
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feels like it is still going on. they're being carried by that wave of sort of national pride and exuberance. so they‘ re of sort of national pride and exuberance. so they're no argentina or brazil, they know that, but they wa nt to or brazil, they know that, but they want to do themselves proud in front of england. thank you very much. we're seeing the england team bus there. live pictures taking the squad to the stadium in russia for that crucial game with panama. expecting a couple of changes in the line—up, we don't think dele alli will be fit after that thigh injury he sustained against tunisia. maybe an opportunity for marcus rashford, loftus—cheek may feature. a lot of speculation about the line—up after the pictures went around the world of what seemed to be the line—up in
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the hands of steve holland, one of the hands of steve holland, one of the england coaches earlier on. but thatis the england coaches earlier on. but that is the scene in russia, that beautiful city, as the england squad make their way to the stadium. and thatis make their way to the stadium. and that is the panama squad! we have both teams heading to the stadium. kick—off is at one o'clock in the uk. on bbc kick—off is at one o'clock in the uk. 0n bbc one of course. and now the rest of the sports news. to nizhny novgorov then where raheem sterling is expected to keep his place in the england side to play panama at the world cup in a couple of hours. our sports correspondent natalie pirks is in the stadium for us. so all the chat, the leaked teamsheets, it was all wrong — sterling starts? what a storm in a tea cup that was?
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yes it looks like sterling will keep his place. he hasn't scored in 21 england games and there are a few moments in the game with tunisia where he got his feet muddled up. it is that last missing part of his game. he has played so well for manchester city all season. but that just in an england shirt it is that final product. that led many to speculate that rashford would start. rashford was man of the match and scored against costa rica. we understand sterling will keep his place. actually his movement was fantastic in the game. it looks like the team will be unchanged. apart from dele alli, who has a thigh strain and reuben loftus—cheek will come in. we will get the team news in 40 minutes in this very hot stadium. we understand fifa will
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make a decision about whether to have water breaks. we should know about that in the next 40 minutes or so. about that in the next 40 minutes or so. ican about that in the next 40 minutes or so. i can bring you more on whether the players will get refreshment brea ks the players will get refreshment breaks in 31 degrees. we got the view in panama, what do we know about the team that will be play something well, i went to panama and to say they came from humble beginnings is an understatement. the national sport is baseball and they have had to work their way up, the league is poor, all the players play abroad. and you know they're 55th in the world and england if they can't beat them it would be like iceland. they're not great individual stars, but they're organised and gave belgium problems. thank you for joining us. let's have a quick look back at yesterday's results,
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and germany were just seconds away from an early exit last night. the last two world cups have seen the reigning champions out in the group stages and it looked like germany would be the third when 0la toivonnen gave sweden the lead. marco reus then equalised early in the second half. but germany had a man sent off and tthings were not looking good for them, until toni kroos stepped up in the 95th minute to keep them alive in russia. the result means germany are second in group f, behind mexico who beat south korea 2—1. west ham's javier hernandez on the scoresheet in rostov. and how about this for one of the happiest warm up
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sessions we've ever seen. this is senegal getting ready for their match against japan, and it's glorious — dancing away, beautifully choreographed. let's just nip to old trafford where england are on for a whitewash in their one—day series against australia. they're already four up in the five match series. another win would give them a first series clean sweep over the aussies in any format of the game. the visitors won the toss and chose to bat first and are currently 58—0. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. now back to the story about childhood obesity. june 0'sullivan is from the charity london early years foundation and can tell us about childhood obesity in toddlers and younger children. you're dealing with really young kids who are obese? yes i think the government hasjust kids who are obese? yes i think the government has just missed a trick, because they haven't focussed on the
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early years in this one or the previous one in 2016. if you get them young, early intervention is less costly and better all around. a lot of this is complex. i accept what they're doing is good, although i would like to see less of consult and more of the do. if you look at the ten, eight are encourage and talk. which don't need to talk about it. it is a problem. we know it. some of our toddlers are unable to cross their legs, because they're over weight. what sort of weight? two. that means they set off the chances of them becoming obese children and adults and if you want to be cynical, you say if they're leaving primary school at one 11 and you may want to employ them at 16, they may have long—term illness. so
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it is not good for the economy. £5 billion was spend on obesity in 14/15 and they're fight about the 20 billion extra we have been given. do you think it is easier to get pa rents to intervene you think it is easier to get parents to intervene on obesity when they're children are young than when they're children are young than when they're teenagers? there is more opportunity for conversation. we have chefs, so we have 38 nurseries and 5,000 children and we developed and 5,000 children and we developed a qualification for the chefs. we found the chefs often come from catering and didn't understand about portion size, balanced food and there is a reference to menus, but if you haven't got chefs that understand, then you're starting at a negative perspective. so we developed a qualification and i think that is important for the staff as bell —— as well. many have
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been brought up in modern education and are not familiar with traditional food and are not taught around food and i know 0fsted are thinking about that. you've to wrap that into fitness. if you can get your under fives fit and we do a lot of work with bikes, you start putting in place the practices from that early stage and parents get it at that point and are not offended like when you start telling them how to rear their children, they're keen to rear their children, they're keen to talk to you. we are keen to share. together we will learn this thing. but we have a problem. so we can't be consulting and intending, we need to be doing. thank you very much. now time for the weather. blue skies and high temperatures for
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the next few days. some hazy sunshine today in some parts. with some cloud on the eastern coasts. temperatures up to 27 degrees in the warmest spots. widely into the mid 20s. but cooler around the coast. dry tonight with temperatures just about into single figures. so a fresh start to monday morning. monday will be another beautiful day. if you like your weather dry and warm, that is how it is looking. a lot of sunshine. more cloud in the south—east and the north—west of scotland. in between, beautiful blue skies and temperatures on monday widely in the mid 20s. we could see 29 in the south—east. cooler around the coasts. some of us could see 30 degrees or more later in the week. you are watching bbc news. our
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headlines: new measures aimed at halving the number of obese children in england by 2030 have been announced by the government. they include plans to prevent shops displaying unhealthy food at checkouts and banning the sale of caffeine—heavy energy drinks to children. we know this is what people want. 0ur we know this is what people want. our research tells us that parents really wa nt our research tells us that parents really want to see all of the things that are driving them to buy more and eat more cut back on them. the health secretary, jeremy hunt says it's s "completely inappropriate" for businesses like airbus to issue warnings about the government's brexit plans. we are in an absolutely critical moment in the brexit discussions. and what that means is that we need

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