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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 25, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11. the grenfell inquiry hears from the fire brigade watch manager who was one of the first on the scene of the blaze. mps gear up for crucial vote on whether to build a third runway at heathrow airport — which the government says will create thousands ofjobs. turkey's leader recep tayyip erdogan will asume sweeping new powers after winning a new five—year term as president. police injamaica are trying to determine the motive behind the killing of british couple charlie and gayle anderson who recently retired to the island. also...prince william visits an ancient city injordan as he continues his royal trip to the middle east. his five day tour will include the first official royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. and as england qualify for the last 16 of the world cup — we look at potential routes to the final. good morning.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. the grenfell tower enquiry has heard from firefighters who were called to the blaze first. watch manager michael dowden has been giving evidence as phase one of the investigation continues. the inquiry heard that firefighters outside grenfell tower delayed using hoses to prevent the fire escaping from the flat where it started because they were concerned about colleagues inside the building. we can cross over live to the enquiry where firefighters on the night are giving evidence. you knew that was the policy. but
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you were left to your own discretion, on you were left to your own discretion, - on your own discretion, based on your own experience, as to... how to decide what to do with the advice. that was the case, however you can alter it. that's a step outside our control and policy. the weather is in charge at the time, that is how it is confirmed between that individual and the commander. i cannot recall i've received any training on how thatis i've received any training on how that is done. and by way of circumstances. we exceptional circumstances. we trained in what exceptional circumstances? no. it may be a convenient moment for a break. is this a good time? yes, we are going to have a break now. 20 minutes to give you time for a break, cup of
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coffee, whatever. may ask you this, how coffee, whatever. may ask you this, now you have started to give your evidence i have to ask you not to discuss the case with anybody else until you have finished giving your evidence. that will apply... studio: the watchman giving evidence in the enquiry. they are going to break. procedures just been explained. —— being explained. we will keep you updated on the evidence from that enquiry. our correspondent is covering the enquiry and we will hear from them a little bit later. mps will vote today on whether to approve plans for a third runway at heathrow airport. the government has told its mps to back the the vote. but foreign secretary borisjohnson who has opposed the runway for some time is out of the country today. another tory minister, greg hands, quit his post last week so he could vote against expansion. labour is officially exposed to the a third runway, but is allowing mps to vote either way. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminsterfor us. difficulties on both sides, but very
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much the focus on borisjohnson who said he would lie in front of the bulldozers to stop them going ahead. and now he won't be voting on it at all. we know he won't be in the country. the foreign office will not tell us where he is. downing street won't tell us where he is. the transport secretary this morley, chris grayling, said he doesn't know where he is. fellow brexiteersjonah where he is. fellow brexiteersjonah where he is. fellow brexiteersjonah where he is. it's a mystery. —— the transport secretary this morning. he was going to be one of the figureheads of the anti—heathrow movement. that'll have a effect with regards to the side of —— assize of revolt theresa may will have on the backbenches, especially as boris johnson cannot be bothered to put his head on the block. that coupled with the fact chris grayling has gone out of his way to offer reassurance to unhappy mps. saying,
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for example, no tax payers money will go into building the third runway. there will be no night flights. there will be a six and a half hour period where there will be no night flights allowed. he is also suggesting that if heathrow breaches any of the conditions put on it then that will be legally challenged. and that will be legally challenged. and that could result in fines. he was talking about the £2.5 billion compensation package that is also being offered. what we have got in place for local communities — a world beating compensation package, a 6 and a half hour night flight plan and that's a difficult decision. there are people who will have to move house — and i regret that — but if take decision in interests of the country as a whole —
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it will effect some people . people tend to think of heathrow as a passenger airport — actually it's our biggest freight port — as much about trade as passenger coi'ii'iectioi'is. the revolt will be fairly limited. 70 or 80 the revolt will be fairly limited. 70 or80 mps the revolt will be fairly limited. 70 or 80 mps will back theresa may. it is almost a certainty it will go through. you might think that is the end of it. but hang on, this has a long—running saga, going on been a long—running saga, going on for nearly 50 years. first, we will get a battery of legal challenges from some local councils, environmental groups, the mayor of london, local residents, and the real danger is if this process gets snarled up work on heathrow does not begin until after the next election. the danger there is ifjeremy corbyn was to win, then would he ordered a rethink? he was asked this morning, would he ripped up the plans for
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heathrow. this is what he said. would he ripped up the plans for heathrow. this is what he saidm depends what the state of it is by then. we will look carefully at airport capacity across the south—east. because there is underused capacity at both luton and stansted. i think there is a need to up stansted. i think there is a need to up the usage of birmingham at other airports. and manchester is developing as a hub, as well. not everybody wants to fly in and out of london. there is increasingly a pattern of direct destinations from a numberofairports, pattern of direct destinations from a number of airports, particularly to cities in china. air travel is changing. we hope greatly improved rail services in the uk and the extension of eurostar that amsterdam and next year to germany, then it seems to me that the likelihood of an increase in european near destination flight is going... they are not going to increase as fast. putting out altogether, jeremy
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corbyn sounding sceptical about the merits of heathrow. but if the legal challenges slow down the prospect of any construction work beginning on heathrow before the next election it is quite possible that a labour government, underjeremy corbyn, would say, you know what, we need to ta ke would say, you know what, we need to take another nugget. it isn't over yet. victoria, it still does not feel like a dead cert. it doesn't. britain has successfully not been building this for 50 years. if mrjohnson or in the country and able to talk to us today he might say that the war on the new runway is farfrom over, regardless say that the war on the new runway is far from over, regardless of how mps is far from over, regardless of how m ps vote is far from over, regardless of how mps vote today. here with me now is james hook and from the freight transport association, who is a big backer of the new runway should it go ahead. why is it so important for freight? heathrow is the country's only cargo hub airport. it offers a
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whole range of destinations right across the world to british exporters and importers. it gives a unique connection with other global markets that have always been important to the uk economy. and are going to be really important in the future as we seek a life outside the european union. part of this is the economic argument that this will boost trade. pretty embarrassing that the trade minister felt he had to resign last week as a result of this. all mps need to vote to their conscience. our role is to promote the economic benefits and the hidden success the economic benefits and the hidden success story that is heathrow and cargo. and the way it brings opportunities for british business all around the world, through the means of these many destinations the passenger aircraft serve. the cargo, the hold is full of goods made in britain, sourced in britain. being distributed right around the world. heathrow is a fantastic success
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story in that. we need it to retain its hub status on an international stage. it is under intense pressure from other continental airports, such as amsterdam and paris and frankfurt, who would love to have the connections heathrow has got. we are promoting the third runway expansion because it will keep heathrow centre stage and give british exporters the opportunities they need in the future to trade. the argument is we need a better hub for connectivity, for business. but this is happening at a time when the economics of hubs look shaky. when you look at passengers, they want to travel point to point. they don't wa nt to travel point to point. they don't want to have to come down from a flight want to have to come down from a flight from manchester or glasgow to come here to get a flight to new york. flights are happening from regional airports now. isn't this expansion really about business and not about passengers or people at all? there is a side of this which is being hidden in the discussions about the passenger aspect. the
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freight transport association is bringing to before those arguments, making sure they are fully understood by mps as they make their decisions on their way to vote. it really important to preserve the economies of scale at the airport. it isn'tjust economies of scale at the airport. it isn't just about the runway and aircraft, there is a cargo centre in operation on the other side of the airport from where we are standing. hundreds if not thousands ofjobs depend on that locally. as well as the means by which the trade that flows through heathrow is distributed right across the country, right up into scotland, the midlands, and other parts of the united kingdom. heathrow provides those connections, which means the cargo lands here rather than on the continent. it's really important that mps, as they file into the lobby is this evening, understand that economic argument as well as the passenger discussions. thanks very much. that's the big case for this, the economic debate, that there is an opportunity, cost of doing nothing, and competitors
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taking over on the global trade front. and that is at the heart of all of this. and he's very much at the moment discussing what goes on in terms of trade, important in terms of brexit, and our future relationships with other trading nations. thanks very much, victoria. we can go back to the grenfell tower fire enquiry where fire fighters have been giving evidence. tom burridge it's at the enquiry. we heard from the nightwatchman earlier. bring us up the nightwatchman earlier. bring us up to date. it's important to explain why this is so crucial. there are questions about whether the london fire brigade should have changed its policy quickly on the night. remember, they went with the state that strategy. they've claimed in other evidence that that comes from the way the buildings are designed. the fact residents were told to stay in theirflat a the fact residents were told to stay in their flat a long time after the fire broke out, despite evident it was spreading quickly up the building. we were hearing from
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michael dowden this morning. he was the watch manager at north kensington. he was the most senior officer in charge on that night at g re nfell tower. officer in charge on that night at grenfell tower. he was therefore the incident commander on the ground in the initial phases of the fire. he has been questioned by richard miller qc, the leading barristerfor the enquiry. he has been questioned repeatedly about his training. how he was trained in terms of fighting fires in high—rise buildings, like that of groenefeld tower, but also more specific issues which relate to the way grenfell tower fire spread and whether they should have reacted differently. —— like that of g re nfell tower. differently. —— like that of grenfell tower. and whether he had been trained to facilitate a mass evacuation of residents want a fire had breached the idea of compartment nation. therefore the state that strategy should have been null and void perhaps. he was questioned over whether he had trading on that and
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he said he could not remember any time when he had been on a training course which would facilitate the idea of actually deciding when and evacuation of residents out of a tower block was necessary. he was also questioned by richard miller qc about whether or not he had been trained on spotting that the building materials on a high—rise tower we re building materials on a high—rise tower were affecting the fire. there we re tower were affecting the fire. there were plastic materials around the window of flat i6. were plastic materials around the window of flat 16. let's listen to that part of this morning's evidence. it says the incident commander must consider the impact of building materials and impact on fire spread, such as plastics and aluminium frames can be subject to early failure, leading to vertical and horizontal fire failure, leading to vertical and horizontalfire spread. failure, leading to vertical and horizontal fire spread. just looking at that, my question is, why you
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ever trained in those matters? —— we re ever trained in those matters? —— were you. it's difficult to say if i've received particular training on that. but that will become hopefully apparent... familiarisation visits? not that i can recall, no. that was michael dowden, the watch manager at north kensington. he was the commander in the initial stages of the grenfell tower. the long pauses there are not a typical of this morning's evidence. there have
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been other questions when michael dowden has taken a long pause when questioned about what training he received in relation to spotting when this idea of compartmentation had failed. a fire should be contained within a specific flat in theory. in theory, if it isn't, according to policy documents which have been read out this morning, the tactics and strategy should have been changed. we also heard evidence about the training facilities. michael dowden said this morning that they have training towers but nothing like a high—rise building to train on. he will give evidence throughout today. thanks very much. our headlines: the grenfell inquiry hears from the fire brigade watch manager who was one of the first on the scene at the blaze mps gear up for crucial vote on whether to build a third runway at heathrow airport — which the government says will create thousands ofjobs.
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turkey's leader recep tayyip erdogan will assume sweeping new powers after winning a new five—year term as president. england are guaranteed a place in the last 16 of the world cup in russia with a game to spare after their 6—1 victory over panama. safe standing at football grounds will be debated in the commons today after more than 100,000 people signed a petition. the current policy is that all seats are safest but the time is right to look again at the issue. andy murray plays the second match of his comeback in eastbourne this afternoon. his opponent is stanislas wawrinka, another grand slam champion come on the way back from injury. -- champion come on the way back from injury. —— another grand slam champion on the way back from injury. the world cup now, and england fans might still be recovering from their team's trouncing of panama yesterday. david ornsten's at
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england's camp at repino. good morning. everyone is continuing to savour the moment, aren't they? quite incredible victory for england yesterday their biggest in major tournament history. and really the celebrations both here in russia among england fans and back home are extraordinary. it is only panama are ranked 77th in the world, referred to many as minnows, but this is the world cup. england have only twice before won their opening two matches. they have scored more against panama compared with their previous seven world cup matches. this is a statement of intent from gareth southgate's side. they are backin gareth southgate's side. they are back in training today. those who we re back in training today. those who were not involved from the start and yesterday's match have been put through their paces. dele alli among them, despite carrying a five strain. the rest of the players,
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those who started, were back at the hotel which is a short distance from here. —— thigh stra. just ahead of the third and final group game against belgium on thursday. england are ina against belgium on thursday. england are in a wonderful position. they are in a wonderful position. they are guaranteed a place in the last 16 with a game to spare. they have goals in them, and notjust from harry kane. it is a young side, the third youngest squad england have ever had at a world cup. they have threats from all areas. now they can start putting their route. if they we re start putting their route. if they were to win the last match on either monday or tuesday they can look forward to a quarterfinal a week on friday or saturday. while we are not getting ahead of ourselves, and people are trying to keep their feet on the ground, people back home can start getting excited. coming into the tournament expectations were so low. they will now rocket. viewing figures yesterday showed that, 82.9% share of the television audience on
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bbc one at its peak. one of the biggest television audience shares in british television history. people are getting excited now. definitely, but it is always dangerous, isn't it, the hope? but great result. thanks very much, david. it's not only on the pitch that there's been a fierce rivalry between the countries involved. yesterday's game between senegal and japan saw the two sets of fans trying to outdo each other afterwards in the stadium. you may remember how both sets of fans hit the headlines after taking time to clean up after their earlier matches. well, as you can see, they carried on their anti—litter operations after sunday's match. the result — a draw — in which everyone was a winner. we don't come here to leave our rubbish. we must take it out after every game. to show the world that we are nice people. you know? when we are nice people. you know? when we do that next time, wherever we 90, we do that next time, wherever we go, we have to do that, that is why
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we are doing it. we have to clean for ourjapanese we are doing it. we have to clean for our japanese mind whenever we entera stadium. the office for national statistics has published higher education suicide rates for the first time. the figures show 95 recorded university student suicides for the 12 months to july 2017 in england and wales. this is lower than for the general population of similar ages, but does not include suicides among students at further education colleges. to explain more, our correspondent chi chi izundu joins me now. talk us through these statistics. up until now there hadn't been any robust research papers into student suicide. this is the first time the office for national statistics has looked at it. but they have focused solely on higher education, rather
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than further education. they looked into the coroner ‘s report and inquest reports, and the verdicts given at those, plus what the occupation was put on death certificates. then worked in conjunction with the higher education statistics agency, who asked universities specifically to correlate these figures. and they have found that in fact over all the figures are low, but over the last ten yea rs figures are low, but over the last ten years they are creeping up ever so slowly. broadly, there have been warnings about the mental health pressures on students. some saying it ranks above even the financial concerns and, it ranks above even the financial concerns and , you it ranks above even the financial concerns and, you know, it isjust one of those big issues that everybody needs to get to grips with. indeed. we've been speaking to many university students who have said that because they feel they have to pay more than £9,000 per yearfor have to pay more than £9,000 per year for their course they feel pressured to obtain the best grades
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possible. as well as that, there is getting the best degree possible in order to get a good job. they are also having to transition from being also having to transition from being a student at school into being an independent adult. sometimes living away from parents come up a lot of student in our studies found they are already starting university with are already starting university with a number of mental health issues. it isn't being addressed. then they are compounding those with the pressures when they first start university. how is it being recognised? universities uk have said they are trying to get universities to put a step by step plan into progress at the university, so they start from day one and make sure those students are guided throughout their course and supported. a lot of universities have things like therapy dogs. they are also trying to get peer—to—peer conversations going so that students don't feel so clinical when they
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have to go, or if they manage to get onto a waiting list to see a gp or councillor. we know the child mental health and adolescents services, paea too old, sadly, to be part of that group. but the general list of very long. —— they are too old. and if this has brought up any issues for you when it comes to mental health — you can find details of organisations offering information and support at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000155 998. turkey has re—elected recep tayyip erdogan as president for another five years , after securing outright victory in the first round of a presidential poll. mr erdogan secured almost 53% of votes with his closest rival gaining around 31 percent of votes. gaining around 31% of votes. he'll now assume sweeping new powers, which were approved in a referendum last year.
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these give the president a five—year tenure, for a maximum of two terms. he becomes chief executive and will be able to directly appoint top public officials. thejob of prime minister will be scrapped. the president will have the power to intervene in thejudiciary, selectjudges and rule by decree if he deems it necessary. and he can decide whether to impose a state of emergency. critics are warning his rule is increasingly authoritarian. mr erdogan addressed his supporters outside party headquarters in the capital, ankara, a few hours ago. our turkey correspondent selin girit is in istanbulfor us now. what has he said? erdogan promised he would reinstate the judiciary.
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that he would respect human rights. that he would respect human rights. that he would be gracing the whole nature. that isn't something the opposition agrees he has been doing and will be doing. the main challenge of president erdogan has faced the cameras today in his first speech since the first elections came out. he said turkey was entering a dangerous regime of one man rule. this country feels more polarised than ever. he said the president must embrace the whole nation, that is what he would do. i have a guest with me, from turkey human rights watch, ehmer, do you agree this is a polarised nation? human rights watch, ehmer, do you agree this is a polarised nation7m certainly is. you have a situation where half the population has a little trust in the government—controlled media, in the
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judiciary, and in the decision making of the ruling party and erdogan himself. to win back public trust, now that he has won these elections, is absolutely the priority. the state of emergency has beenin priority. the state of emergency has been in place for two years. do you expect that to be lifted soon, because that is one of his promises? it is one of his promises and we expect that as a first step. but it is only a first step. the state of emergency has shown us what rule by decree is like. he continues to have many of the powers he already had under state of emergency. it would mend a broken judiciary under state of emergency. it would mend a brokenjudiciary to under state of emergency. it would mend a broken judiciary to lift them. sorry for interrupting, i need to hand over to london. there was a lot at stake for these elections. president erdogan is expected to embrace the whole nation. this feels like a polarised nation more than ever. thank you very much.
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in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather with simon king. we have lots of sunshine across the uk at the moment. it is strong sunshine, so the uv levels will be very high. this is the scene in scotland, lots of sunshine. the far north and north—west of scotland have more in the way of cloud and it is cooler here this afternoon. elsewhere, beneath that sunshine, those temperatures really ramping up this afternoon, looking as high as 23 to 28, 30 degrees across the south—east of england. do this evening and a night, with those clear skies temperatures will fall away. it won't be warm or humid, it won't be particularly cold, temperatures between nine and 1a. things will remain hot and sunny. goodbye. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: the grenfell inquiry has begun hearing evidence from the fire
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brigade watch manager who was one of the first on the scene. mps vote later today on the controversial plans for a third runway at heathrow airport. transport secretary chris grayling says he's cautiously optimistic it will win approval. turkey's leader recep tayyip erdogan wins a new five year term as president and says he'll implement sweeping constitutional reforms, including scrapping the post of prime minister. police injamaica are trying to determine the motive behind the killing of british couple charlie and gayle anderson. the grandparents, who had recently retired to the island, were found dead in their home. now for the sport. it's all about england this morning,
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through to the last 16 at the world cup thanks to that emphatic win over panama yesterday. here's joe lynskey with all the details. england are now back and their training base just after that stunning 6—1victory over panama which are sealed their place in the last 16 at this 2018 world cup in russia. england have wasted no time starting their preparations for their next game on thursday against belgium, and those who didn't play yesterday trained this morning. but there could be a number of changes to the english team with both sides are sure of their place in the knockout already. so many good
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performances to look back at yesterday. england's biggest win in their history. it was a surprise score to break the deadlock, john stones. he also got two goals in this game, meaning he has more strike that a world cup event wayne rooney manage. one supporter may just be regretting that this morning, jess on twitter. another defender has offered to fit the bill. harry kane's hat—trick takes them out on the front and the golden boot charts for this world cup. here's clear of cristiano ronaldo and lukaku, although ronaldo might have something to say later when he plays. he is just have something to say later when he plays. he isjust the have something to say later when he plays. he is just the third have something to say later when he plays. he isjust the third english player to score a hat—trick. gary lineker back in 1986 and a surge in
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house dust i suggest hirst back in 19 86 will stop i didn't really like the performance. i didn't like the start and i didn't like the grace reid at the end but i guess the bits in the middle were pretty good. no, on being hypercritical. ijust thought we were a little bit anxious at the start and it was a very difficult challenge because six at the back and three at midfield and they pressed well off of that. but once we had worked that out i thought we played some really good stuff in the 35—40 minutes and the second half is very difficult matter what you say to the players at half—time, at 5— no. we talked about the importance of one more ball to be top of the group, which is why the grace reid at the end is disappointed. let's go to england's base in repino then and speak to our correspondent david ornstein. we know it is belgium next for england on thursday. should we get
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excited? what could happen after that much? why not? if you can't get excited at the world cup, when can you? the thursday march will determine who finishes second and first in the group. living and top it, they will play on monday if they come second, they will have an extra day to prepare and will play on tuesday. both of those matches are seven o'clock kick—off in the uk and it will be between colombia, japan and senegal, because that group is still to be decided. if we are going to dream even further than that we can look towards the end of next week on friday at 7pm when the first possible quarterfinal for england will take place. less than 2a hours later on saturday afternoon is the other possible match in the quarterfinals. but we are all keeping our feet quarterfinals. but we are all keeping ourfeet on quarterfinals. but we are all keeping our feet on the ground, certainly the england camp who were backin
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certainly the england camp who were back in training this morning. you might want to book some time off work or create your diaries just in case. but no time off work for you, david, if this run continues! well, let's go from the gulf of finland, to st petersburg, around 25 miles down the road. argentina have arrived there ahead of their crunch match with nigeria. john bennett is there for us, and this is a squad in all sorts of problems john? editors. they draw against iceland, heavy defeat against croatia. rumours of a rift between the players and their head coach. that has been denied by one of the senior players, who talked about this in a press co nfe re nce players, who talked about this in a press conference and said we have a normal relationship with our coach. we have discussed tactics behind—the—scenes but we haven't fallen out. the latest twist is that the ago maradona has demanded to meet the players here in st petersburg ahead of their game. the players are just outside moscow as
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we speak where they are training. they will arrive here later today for their pre—match press conference. that will be very interesting with the coach facing the very critical argentine press. today's games are fascinating as always. in group a, two teams who are going to progress are russia and uruguay. we do not know who will win the group. russia can win with the draw and the manager has said they are going to go into win. the other match in the group is a dead rubber. but the focus is on mohammed salam and if egypt can win their first ever world cup match. spain are playing against morocco which will bea playing against morocco which will be a very interesting game to see who will progress from group b. really interesting stuff. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's get more now on the vote taking place later today in parliament to approve plans for a third runway
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at heathrow airport. the government has told its mps to back the vote. long—standing opponent boris johnson will not be present. labour is officially opposed to the third runway, but is allowing mps to vote either way. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminsterfor us. forestjohnson may forest johnson may be forestjohnson may be absent but the former trade minister will not be absent. he resigned in protest at the decision to prep press ahead with the third runway. new quit, should others who share your views also think about quitting? should others who share your views also think about quitting7m should others who share your views also think about quitting? it is for every mp to justify to their own constituents. i made a clear pledge to the residents of chelsea and fulham just one year ago that not only was i posted to a third runway at heathrow but i would be voting against it in parliament. it was a clear la kes
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against it in parliament. it was a clear lakes and hedge —— election pledge from me i feel duty bound to fulfil. do you know where boris johnson is? i don't. he treated last night that you would not want to be abroad for these commitments, seen asa dig abroad for these commitments, seen as a dig at mrjohnson. it is all about the pledges that you make. i made a pledge to make constituents are now about 50,000 alleging leaflets that i would be voting against the proposal in parliament, which i think will be damaging for my constituency and for london as a whole and against the national interest. is it game over, though? because we know there is 70 labour mps who will probably side with theresa may once again so go ahead in parliament. that's it, isn't it? i'm expecting it to be passed in parliament tonight but i don't think the fight ends there. i think we in the fight ends there. i think we in the no third runway group will
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continue fighting against this proposal. there are very good alternative options out there, alternative options out there, alternative airports that are better placed and more in the national interest to be rid expanded. how do you respond to the charge that we have been faffing about this for the next 50 years, we need to make a decision rather than going round in circles ? decision rather than going round in circles? i agree, but we have to make sure it is the right decision in the first place. that is why the other options really are better. expanding heathrow is already in a very constrained site and breaks all the pollution limits for that part of london, it rips aircraft directly over the centre of london, it is almost unique in that regard of any major world city as having aircraft directly over the city to be able to reach the runway. that is fundamentally by the case for a third runway at heathrow is false. there has been criticism that a report from the climate change committee looking at the impact of a third runway in terms of our climate
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change obligations will not be published until thursday yet mps will be voting today. do you think that should be brought forward? will be voting today. do you think that should be brought forward ?|j think it is obvious that preferable for mps to have all of the information in front of them before making this decision tonight. i think there's a whole host of factors in there, notjust environmental but also collectivity, the importance of britain as a trading nation, being able to connect with the rest of the world. there's a whole host of different factors. in an ideal world, mps would have all of the information available in front of them. thanks very much. i should tell you that maybe it isn't game over, because listening tojeremy corbyn this morning, the he seems to be leaving the door open for a future government to revisit the go—ahead for heathrow. he was asked if he would overturn the decision and he said it would depend what stage it had got to. he means that if the building work hadn't started, labour could look again at it.
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well — there's no sign of an early end to the sunnyjune weather — and in fact temperatures are still climbing. last week saw the hottestjune day in a0 years and bookmakers have slashed the odds of this summer being the hottest on record. so, how can we make sure we make the most of the beautiful weather — without it getting to our heads or damaging ourskin? with me is dr thomas waite from public health england. thank you very much for coming in. their 30s, we are experiencing temperatures that do happen but we are not temperatures that do happen but we a re not really temperatures that do happen but we are not really used to them. what's the best advice you can give to people? it will be worn all b, which is great news for many of us, but there are some precautions everyone can take to make sure the enjoy this weather and stay well. some of us are at greater risk than others, older people, those with long—term health conditions like heart disease and lung conditions, but obviously very young children can be at risk of illness and the sort of weather.
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common—sense steps to stay cool and hydrated and keep your home call. tell us more about the level of health risks. what sort of typically happens in statistical lie when we do experience in such hot weather? how quickly do people become vulnerable if they have a predisposition to a health issue? it's different to cold weather in that when it is hot, people notice it very quickly in terms of the impact on their health. that is down to how the body tries to stay cool. you push blood across to the skin so you can lose heat that way and on top of that year also sweat, meaning you lose moisture and fluid. that white weenie to stay hydrated. the extra strain it puts in your heart is why people notice a number of different side effects, swollen ankles, a heat rash and potentially also feeling dizzy all signs that you need to get into the shade, somewhere cool and top up and fluid. do you see in the statistics numbers
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of people being admitted to hospital, numbers of people having potentially fatal heart issues increasing? sadly, yes, and particularly with their first hot weather spell of any summer. this is the first time it has been very hard all over the country this summer. we see a rise in heart attacks, strokes, and people contacting the nhs and gp about a number of different types of conditions related to the heat. that is why taking those first steps as why we can all enjoy a safe and enjoyable week. we were saying earlier that the importance of keeping your blinds, curtains shot in the daytime, just keeping the heat out of your house. closing the curtains a few sun is shining on them, maybe opening windows to get a draft. but if it is hot in the middle of the day, remember it's mostly cooler
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outside and it might be better to go toa outside and it might be better to go to a shopping centre or supermarket, somewhere it is called just get some respite the heat of the day. stick your head in the fridge, i've even done that only hot today! lots of cool drinks is a great way to help. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the commons prepares for a crucial vote on whether to build a third runway at heathrow airport — which the government says will create 100—thousand jobs. the grenfell inquiry hears from the fire brigade watch manager who was one of the first on the scene at the blaze turkey's leader recep tayyip erdogan will assume sweeping new powers after winning a new five—year term as president. the taxi hailing company uber goes to court in london today hoping to win an appeal to keep its licence to operate in the city. last year the transport regulator tfl refused to renew uber‘s licence because of concerns about public
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safety and security shares in countrywide, the uk's largest estate agent group, have fallen more than 20% after it issued its second profit warning this year. countrywide, which has brands including bairstow eves and gascoigne pees, said it expected first—half earnings to be about £20 million lower than last year. paper bags for fruit and vegetables have made a comeback at supermarket chain morrisons as the backlash against plastic continues. the uk's fourth—largest supermarket chain says it has introduced them into a93 stores, and will roll them out to the rest of its stores by the end of the summer. mps will decide whether to build a third runway at heathrow airport later today. it's thought they will probably approve the expansion plans. business groups say a third runway would improve connections to the rest of the world and boost the transport
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infrastructure and economy. mike spicer, director of research and economics at the british chambers of commerce, says heathrow needs another runway. we wa nt we want mps to vote in favour of it. heathrow is a really important economic asset for the uk, more than 80 million passengers a year, the third largest pot by value for markets outside the eu. it will be hugely important in the future for any independent trade policy. what we're saying is, you can't call yourself a champion of free trade, as the government wants us to be seen, unless you as the government wants us to be seen, unless you are as the government wants us to be seen, unless you are willing to invest heavily in international collectivity. at heathrow, private investors stand ready to do just that. a london court will consider later today if uber is fit and proper to hold an operator licence in the capital. the taxi app company will make its case at westminster magistrates' court in a hearing expected to last several days. last september, transport for london refused to renew uber‘s licence
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on grounds of public safety and security. joining us now is anna mccaffrey, senior lawyer in the employment, pensions and mobility group at taylor wessing. thanks forjoining us. talk me through what exactly we are expecting at the magistrates' court today and in coming days. the hearing is to determine if uber should be granted renewal of its licence. a key point to notice we understand the court will be considering whether uber is currently fit and proper to have a license rather than reviewing whether it was fit and proper in september last year. they can take into consideration changes uber have made in the interim period. what exactly is tfl‘s argument? made in the interim period. what exactly is tfl's argument? in september last year, has published a 25 page report as to why it decided not to renew the licence. chief amongst the concerns were things
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such as amongst the concerns were things such as passenger amongst the concerns were things such as passenger safety, particularly in relation to reporting of crimes and background checks on drivers. it says that it needed to see significant improvement from uber in relation to passenger safety and security and in september, didn't think uber was doing enough. what did uber say counter that? it has taken a different approach than it has done previously and has definitely been proactive in trying to be conciliar cheer with tfl and has taken steps to improve. it claims is proactively reports concerns to police, provide passengers with details of drivers licenses with tfl, restricts hours drivers can work with outbreaks in order to improve health and safety and that it has made changes to its uk management team in order to address concerns. i think its message is very much they are listening and have made improvements and should still be fit to operate in the capital. while those changes
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and improvements we have seen the crew and make be enough to sway the cause? it will be quite a close run battle. what uber has to do is persuade the courts they have made significant changes and it is not simply windowdressing. that said, a lots of people would find it difficult to envisage london without uber. it's certainly possible that they may be unsuccessful, but if they may be unsuccessful, but if they are it is likely they would appeal and this could theoretically go to the supreme court, which would ta ke yea rs go to the supreme court, which would take years to determine a final outcome. thank you very much indeed. trade tensions between china and the us have taken their toll once again on markets at the beginning of the week. britain's biggest listed estate agency countrywide, set for biggest ever one—day drop after cutting profit guidance. it is down nearly 25%, a massive fall in its share price value. crude oil prices are low as well. that's all the business news.
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prince william has begun a five—day tour of the middle east, which will include the first official royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. first, though, the duke of cambridge has been spending time in neighbouring jordan, from where our royal correspondent nicholas witchell sent this report. a gentle start to a royal tour of more than usual sensitivity. how are you? very nice to see you. amman, the capital ofjordan, is the first stop for prince william, in a week when he will break new ground for the british royal family. up till now, no member of the family has paid an official visit to israel or the palestinian territories. it is happening now, at least in part, because britain wants to send a signal that middle east peace can only come about by dealing equally with both sides of the conflict. for a royal visit, it is challenging. it's hard to avoid politics in this part of the world, and that's essentially why there hasn't been an official
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visit by a member of the british royalfamily to israel and the palestinian territories before. but later today, william will step into that cauldron when he arrives in tel aviv. the programme for the visit has been carefully choreographed by british diplomats, the speeches carefully written. injordan, there was just a glancing reference to the region's political instability. i greatly admire the resilience you injordan have shown, in the face of the many security and humanitarian challenges that have confronted you, as a result of conflicts in this region. it will be this afternoon, when william arrives in tel aviv for three days, carefully divided between israel and the palestinian territories, that the test will begin. for him, and for the evenhanded british policy, which he will represent. this morning, the prince has been visiting the roman ruins atjerash. our correspondentjonny dymond went there earlier to give us a preview
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of what he'll be seeing and give us an assessment of the trip so far. prince william landed injordan yesterday and after a quick dash into a tech laboratory, he went to the ambassador's residence and gave a short speech at the queen's birthday party event there and then he spent the evening with the crown prince. there have been strong ties between the british and jordanian royal families for decades now and people are pretty keen to see those extended into a new generation. he is coming tojerash, and you can see some of it now, at this astonishing archaeological site, roman archaeological site, dating from the first and second century ad. and he will no doubt enjoy strolling around the ruins here. he has a couple of other events after that, and in common with the rest of the trip there is an emphasis on young people, technology as well. and then he'll fly out of oman and to ben gurion airportjust outside tel aviv for the most sensitive part of his trip, and that is israel and the occupied palestinian territories.
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it's a place where no official royal visit has happened before. he will no doubt tread very carefully. but in the meantime, he has all of this to enjoy. now, what has 13 sides, a hole in the roof and has suddenly appeared in a car park in york? the answer? europe's first full—sized pop up sha kespearian theatre. the rose theatre opens today, and our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been to see it. in much ado about nothing, shakespeare wrote, would my horse have the speed of your tongue? well, what would he have made of the speed of this? in three weeks, a car park right in the centre of york, turned into a full—sized pop—up shakespeare theatre, the first ever in europe. and it was all the idea of one man. someone said, oh, pop—up, i thought it would be inflatable. i was like, no, it's not inflatable. there were a number of elizabethan theatres, all different shapes, bizarrely, and why wouldn't there be?
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people were trying out new things. theatre was in its infancy then. if they came here today, they'd recognise it. they'd go, it's just the same. what's this stuff? you used scaffolding, we used oak and you're using something else! but they would recognise inside, and they would say, you are using flying, we used flying! they'd recognise trap doors. the whole enterprise is costing around £3 million without any subsidies. 660 people can be seated with another 300 standing, exposed to the elements. it's incredibly exciting to be in it and it is very intimate on the stage. it feels like being you are embraced by the audience. no—one is more than 15 metres away, which is very special. it is being called a pop—up. it didn't pop up. this was like so much effort, gargantuan work and design. it has worked and paid off. and in the back, a pop—up costume room in use for both macbeth and a midsummer's night dream. these are the costumes for two of them. they are for two of them. don't want them getting confused.
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we do not want lady macbeth coming on as half a fairy, do we? how has the fact you've got this shakespearean theatre influenced you ? massively. you have to be very robust in your design and design decisions. you have to be very bold and committed. and look how bold and committed i was to this costume. this is a strong look. that's a strong look. so, finally, did shakespeare actually ever make it to york? we know his troupe did, but there's no historical records that he got here, but we think he did. the inference is that if his troupe did, he came with them, but he did not sign any graffiti saying, will was here. but now it is shakespeare in york all summer—long. let's catch up with the weather.
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lots of sunshine up there at the moment and throughout the rest of this week, many of us will see little or no cloud at home. this is the scene at the moment in north yorkshire. just high—level cirrus cloud in the sky but no such cloud in norfolk at the moment. look at that scene, a lovely day to beach. temperatures this week could reach 30 celsius across across the southern areas of the uk but widely, temperatures will be up into the mid to high 20s. the reason for this is the area of high pressurejust anchored across the uk at the moment. it is cold a blocking high and it stops the nasty weather fronts to the west heading our way. around this, winds flowing in a clockwise direction. the ground just gets hotter and there's very little change as we go through the week. for the rest of this afternoon, it is dry for most and sunny, barely
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any cloud in the sky. however, the far north and north—west of scotland there is a bit of cloud and a little bit cooler in shetland, about 13 degrees, 16 degrees in the western isles. elsewhere in the mid—20s, 230 celsius perhaps in the capital this afternoon. through this evening and tonight, clear skies, meaning temperatures will fall. it won't be too hot and muggy like it has been in previous weeks, or indeed to cold. temperatures down to 9—15, a fairly pleasant started tuesday morning. we may see a bit of low cloud and messed around the north and see that could lap on sure from time to time. but it will burn away quickly. lots of sunshine expected on tuesday. high—level cloud along northern and western areas, making sunshine hazy. temperatures for many enter the mid—and high 20s. fresher
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along northsea course. fresher wednesday again along the coast so if you don't like the very warm weather, that surge ahead to. but elsewhere, temperatures 27, 28 degrees quite widely across the uk. for the rest of the week, little change. the hot and sunny weather will continue. temperatures even into mandy into the low to mid—20s. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at midday. mps are set to vote on a third runway for heathrow airport — the government says its essential forjobs — but labour hints it could scrap the plans if elected: yes we need airport capacity. yes we need better connectivity between airports. we have put that down, it hasn't been met, so we will be voting on it.
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one of the first senior officers at the grenfell fire tells the inquiry he wasn't trained to decide when to fully evacuate a high rise building during a blaze. turkey's leader recep tayyip erdogan will assume sweeping new powers after winning a new five—year term as president. rescue divers enter a flooded cave in thailand in the hope of finding a teenage football team trapped since saturday. also...prince william visits an ancient city injordan as he continues his royal trip to the middle east. his five—day tour will include the first official royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. good afternoon.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. mps will vote today on whether to approve plans for a third runway at heathrow airport. the government has told its mps to back the vote, although foreign secretary borisjohnson, a long—standing opponent, is out of the country. several other conservative mps are expected to vote against. labour is officially opposed to the third runway, but is allowing mps to vote either way — and this morning jeremy corbyn left open the possibility of scrapping the plans if elected. in a moment will take to our transport correspondent, victoria fritz, who's at heathrow — first to our assistant political editor, norman smith, who's at westminster. we don't know where he is. we don't know what he is doing. and we do not know what he is doing. and we do not know why he is where he is. but we do now know what borisjohnson thinks. the evening standard have been able to get hold of mrjohnson. he says there is not any point
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resigning over this. but mr hands has because of his position over it. borisjohnson said his resignation would achieve nothing. he went on to predict that heathrow will never be built so he will never have to fulfil his promise of lying down in front of a bulldozer. be that as it may, tonight all the signs are that mps will vote overwhelmingly in favour of giving the third runway the go—ahead. this after the transport secretary offered reassu ra nces to transport secretary offered reassurances to mps, including that no tax payers money would be involved in building the third runway, that there would be tight restrictions on night flights, and there would be a significant compensation scheme. what we have got in place for local communities — would be a world beating compensation package, hour night flight ban. as many improvements as we can
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deliver. and that's a difficult decision. there are people who will have to move house — and i regret that — but if we take decisions in the interest of the country as a whole — it will effect some people . people tend to think of heathrow as a passenger airport — actually it's our biggest freight port — so it is as much about trade as passenger connections. is it full steam ahead? maybe not. because there are a host of groups prepared to launch legal challenges. and jeremy corbyn appeared to leave open the door to a future labour government revisiting any decision ona government revisiting any decision on a third runway if building work has not begun by the time of the next election. have a listen to jeremy corbyn. it depends what the state of it is by then. we would look carefully at airport
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capacity across the south—east. because there is underused capacity at both luton and stansted. i think there is a need to up the usage of birmingham at other airports. and other airports. and manchester is developing as a hub, as well. not everybody wants to fly in and out of london. there is increasingly a pattern of direct destinations from a number of airports, particularly to cities in china. air travel is changing. we hope greatly improved rail services in the uk and the extension of eurostar to amsterdam and next year to germany, then it seems to me that the likelihood of an increase in european near destination flights is going... they are not going to increase as fast. the shadow chancellor was asked the same question about whether labour could overturn a heathrow decision. he said we must block it otherwise
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labour will never be taken seriously on climate change. he also compared the level of disruption involved with building, with homes being demolished and people being moved, he compared it to the highland clea ra nces. he compared it to the highland clearances. it is not over yet. indeed not. thank you. our transport correspondent victoria fritz is at heathrow. still not a dead cert, victoria? absolutely. at the heart of this is an economic debate. heathrow, where iam, has an economic debate. heathrow, where i am, has been at full capacity for yea rs. i am, has been at full capacity for years. it's the busiest airport in the uk and one of the busiest in the world. it is looking for more capacity, more gross, getting people in and out, and crucially more business too. —— more growth. cargo and freight is a big part of the story, a big part of the trade story for britain. that is why this is so
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crucial for for britain. that is why this is so crucialfor mps. it for britain. that is why this is so crucial for mps. it is embarrassing that greg hands, the trade minister, felt he had to resign in order that his feelings would be made known today during the vote. how this will be built, when this will be built, we don't know much detail. we know it will be a north—west runway which would go out in this direction. this would go out in this direction. this would add capacity. at the moment they are consulting on plans to add perhaps a satellite terminal rather than a full terminal to keep costs down. costs are at the heart of this. they think it will be £14 billion worth of new airport capacity. but this will be privately funded. since the government decided to privatise infrastructure in 1986 companies have had to fund this themselves. there are question marks about whether heathrow would be able to fund this in the first place. they say they would. but they are the most indebted, highly geared,
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leveraged airport company in the world. they are funded by big backers across the world. but at the moment they are taking more money out than heathrow is making. there are big questions. despite the legal challenges, despite the fact mps will vote for this in the first place as to whether it will be built, and if it does, what shape and form it will take. thank you very much. the grenfell inquiry has begun hearing detailed evidence from the firefighters first called to the tower soon after the blaze was reported. the man who was initially in charge, watch manager michael dowden, said he hadn't had specific training on deciding exactly when to order a full evacuation of a high rise building. let's go to our correspondent tom burridge, who's been listening to the evidence this morning. bring us up—to—date, tom. the major takeaway this morning is that the policy, in terms of fighting a fire in a high—rise building, and the specific issues
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which arose in relation to grenfell tower, was there. in terms of commits from the london fire brigade and national documents. the enquiry has been looking at this document and quoting specific paragraphs which relate to issues like when a fire preaches the flat of origin in a high—rise building. —— breaches. when the commander on the ground fighting the fire, what size should they spot when it reaches the compartment, as it is called, and start spreading up the building. and how that incident commander should think about whether a mass evacuation is appropriate. on the night of grenfell tower, the state put strategy was kept in place for more or less two hours after the fire broke out. therefore residents stayed in their flats. fire broke out. therefore residents stayed in theirflats. therefore residents got trapped in their flat as the fire rose up the external cladding of the building. michael doughty was the watch manager at
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north kensington station, very close to g re nfell north kensington station, very close to grenfell tower, so he was the incident commander on the night. —— michael dowden. he told the enquiry that he had not been trained in practical terms as to when a full evacuation was necessary. he said he could not remember being on a training course which would have addressed that particular issue. he said he hadn't received specific training in relation to spotting potentially hazardous material, like combustible cladding on the outside of the building. listen to this exchange this morning. the first person you will hear is the leading barrister for the enquiry, and person you will hear is the leading barristerfor the enquiry, and he is questioning michael dowden. it says the incident commander must consider the impact of building materials and contents on fire spread, such and aluminium frames or panels can be subject to early failure, leading to vertical and horizontalfire spread. just looking at that,
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my question is, were you ever trained in those matters? it's difficult to say if i've received particular training on that. but that will become hopefully apparent... familiarisation visits? not that i can recall, no. that is significant because the evidence we have heard so far in the public enquiry really points to the fa ct public enquiry really points to the fact the fire spread initially out
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of the kitchen of flat 16 in g re nfell tower of the kitchen of flat 16 in grenfell tower by a plastic materials on the surrounds of windows and therefore got onto the cladding and spread rapidly up the building. we know that the initial fire engines, two five engines from north kensington when michael dowden was based, he and his colleagues arrived just before the fire had really showed signs of spreading rapidly on to the cladding. —— fire engines. we are talking about five minutes later, 15 minutes later, then the fire really took hold of then the fire really took hold of the cladding. within half an hour it spread right up the building. they had to react quickly. what we are getting is a sense of the training, the expertise michael dowden, the man initially in charge of fighting the fire, at grenfell tower, what training did he have. we are getting a sense that he knew about the policy and series which were in place. the policy document stated that incident commanders should look at the potentially hazardous
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materials on the building, and think about an evacuation of all of the residents. in reality, according to his evidence, he had not had much practical training on that. we also got a sense that the training resources available to the london fire brigade. because he has been questioned about how regularly he would facilitate or take part in training in the firefighting on high—rise buildings. he said, simply, there are not the training facilities. there are training towers but they are not comparable towers but they are not comparable to high—rise buildings in reality. michael dowden, the watch manager on duty on that night will be giving evidence all day today in the public enquiry. thank you very much. turkey has re—elected recep tayyip erdogan as president for another 5 years — after securing outright victory in the first round of a presidential poll. mr erdogan secured almost 53% of votes with his closest rival gaining around 31% of votes.
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he'll now assume sweeping new powers, which were approved in a referendum last year. these give the president a five—year tenure, for a maximum of two terms. he becomes chief executive and will be able to directly appoint top public officials. thejob of prime minister will be scrapped. the president will have the power to intervene in the judiciary, selectjudges and rule by decree if he deems it necessary. and he can decide whether to impose a state of emergency. critics are warning his rule is increasingly authoritarian. mr erdogan addressed his supporters outside party headquarters in the capital, ankara, a few hours ago. david campanale has been following the election. this vote winning machine in turkey held on to power despite a fierce opposition campaign. translation: one nation, one flag, one country, and won the state, for this we will be one. the primary challenge he faces is just that, bringing the nation
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together. this country feels more polarised than ever. president erdogan is either despised or adored. he will now receive a sweeping new powers such as appointing his cabinet, his vice president, and even seniorjudges. that concerns the opposition. president erdogan's main rival warned that turkey was entering a dangerous regime of one man rule. he called on president erdogan to embrace the whole nation. translation: president erdogan, from now on please don't act like you are the leader of the etp. bring people together. the president for the 81 million people. i suggest you use my campaign slogan, everyone's president. president erdogan's governing party lost seats in parliament but will still be able to secure a majority with the help of the nationalist party, who did much better in the election than expected. since 2016 over 100
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thousand public workers have been dismissed or sacked from their posts. more than 50,000 were arrested. 90% of the media here in turkey is controlled directly or indirectly by the government. president erdogan is adamant that turkish democracy is strong. and a huge turnout yesterday proved it. our turkey correspondent selin girit is in istanbulfor us now. we were hearing your report that president erdogan is insisting democracy in turkey is still strong. nonetheless, a lot of power concentrated in the hands of one man. how is that being seen? that is a question the opposition figures and opposition voters have been asking themselves and have been asking themselves and have been asking in front of cameras, as well. that question was posed today and
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said turkey is entering this phase of one—man rule. sweeping powers we are talking about, pointedly vice president, his own cabinet, issuing decrees with the force of law, and declaring a state of emergency without the approval of the parliament. these are very important powers. without checks and balances, the opposition says. but president erdogan says these are necessary to bring turkey to a different level. this is necessary, these steps are necessary to bring stability to turkey and to make sure that turkey is even more successful on the world stage. apparently the majority of the turkish voters have agreed with him. we expect that the economy was to be one of the major factors when people were casting their votes yesterday. but although the figures have been on the down, the turkish
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lira has plummeted almost 20% in the last few months, and inflation is at 1196, last few months, and inflation is at 11%, the voters have agreed that tu rkey‘s growth 11%, the voters have agreed that turkey's growth is important. they believe president erdogan is the figure to bring stability to turkey and to make the economy better. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the commons will vote later on whether to build a third runway at heathrow airport. the government says it will create tens of thousands ofjobs, opponents say the environmental cost is too high. the grenfell inquiry hears evidence about the training received by the fire brigade watch manager who was one of the first on the scene of the blaze. turkey's leader recep tayyip erdogan will assume sweeping new powers after winning a new five—year term as president. we canjoin we can join term for a sports update.
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if you did not already know, england are into the last 16 of the world cup are into the last 16 of the world cu p after are into the last 16 of the world cup after their biggest win in world cup after their biggest win in world cup history. they beat panama 6—1. john stones scored the first of his two to get things going. before jesse lingard got the third. probably the pick of them. an absolute beauty that was. another day another three harry kane goals, this time a couple of penalties, unlike tunisia. and he got his hat—trick soon after that one to com plete hat—trick soon after that one to complete a remarkable day for him and england. he was fortunate with his third. gareth southgate and company have been back at it on the training ground. they landed back in saint petersburg last night. those players who did not start against pan am are already preparing for the match against belgian wit is on thursday. —— against panama. england know they will face one of three sides from this group. —— which is on thursday.
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japan scored a late equaliser against senegal. the third possible opponent is colombia. they beat poland 3—0 last night. they were really impressive. juan cuadrado getting the final goal. it means poland are out of the tournament effectively. today sees the final round of fixtures in groups a and b. ronaldo will continue his nearly single—handed attempt to take portugal into the last 16. one other football line, the one otherfootball line, the issue of safe standing will be discussed in parliament today. the debate has been called up after more than 110,000 people signed a petition. it has been banned since 1989.
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all—seater stadium are safest, according to parliament, but they say the time is right to look again at the issue. andy murray plays the second match of his comeback in eastbourne this afternoon. his opponent is stanislas wawrinka, who is a fellow third time grand slam champion on the way back from injury. both of them have slipped away down the rankings. and they are both aiming to be playing at wimbledon next week. nearly wimbledon! monday. thanks very much. police in jamaica are investigating the murder of an elderly british couple who had recently moved to the island. grandparents charlie and gayle anderson from manchester, were found dead at their home in mount pleasant on friday. ben ando reports. charlie anderson, who was 74, and his 71—year—old wife, gayle, were, say friends, hugely popular and loved by many. they'd retired to jamaica about a year ago, but now they've been found dead and their dream home set on fire. the house was partially burnt,
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however, one room was totally destroyed by fire. the bodies we observed to have the wounds to the neck and face, however we are not able to say at this time what could have caused those injuries. the couple had been married for 55 years. in a statement, their family said: one former neighbour said the couple may have been the victims of fraud. he told me about some money, which was taken from either himself, or his wife's account, which he came to personally investigate. jamaica has a high crime rate. last year, there were 1,600 murders, but, at the moment, the police say
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they have no—one in custody and have given no clue as to why the andersons were killed. ben ando, bbc news. a man and a woman have been arrested in cyprus on suspicion of the murder of a british tourist, killed in what's suspected to be a hit—and—run. the collision happened in the early hours of yesterday morning near the popular resort of paphos. a second british man was also injured. the metropolitan police is refusing to reveal the names of a secret blacklist of construction workers its special branch shared with some of the uk's biggest building companies. more than 3000 people were on the list which was used to prevent workers regarded as troublemakers getting onto sites. an investigation by this programme has revealed that scotland yard knows which workers were affected but are refusing to release a confidential report detailing their names. a court will consider later today if the taxi app firm uber is "fit and proper" to hold an operator licence in the capital. last september, transport for london refused to renew its licence over concerns about passenger safety.
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uber has been allowed to continue pending an appeal. rory cellan—jones has more. last september transport for london refused to grant a new licensed hooper, saying it was concerned about the way drivers were vetted as well as the compa ny‘s about the way drivers were vetted as well as the company's failure to contact police about assaults and other crimes. —— a new licence to uber. they are questioning whether they are a fit and proper company to hold a licence. the company has tried to show it has changed its ways, agreeing to report crimes to the police and offering drivers sick pat’- it's also seeking a licence that lasts just 18 months, rather than fight years. the new boss dara khosrowshahi has tried to mend fences, admitting that uber had got things wrong. london is one of the american firm's important markets worldwide, with over 3.5 million regular users. uber has clashed with regulators
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in other uk cities and has also been denied licences in york and brighton. the london hearing is expected to last three days, with executives from uber and the transport regulator giving evidence. for the first time the office for national statistics has published suicide rates among students in higher education. the figures show 95 university student suicides for the 12 months tojuly 2017 in england and wales. this is lower than for the general population of similar ages, but does not include suicides among students at further education colleges. let's talk tojennifer pennington, a senior mental health advisor at the birkbeck university of london. thank you for coming in. what do you make of these figures, and the pressures on students, and the story
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behind this statistic? it is good to see the figures have come out. working in universities we have known for a long time that the numbers of students who come with mental health problems, or they develop them while studying, it is growing year on year. it is good to have an open and transparent view of what is happening. why do you think it is growing year on year? student numbers are going up. widening participation. enabling access to education for students who previously have been denied that has meant that students who might have failed at university, or are looking at university as an option to develop themselves, are taking that opportunity now. we are seeing a lot more student diversity and a broad range of ages. what are your thoughts, charlotte, on the pressures on students? there are
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understandably increased pressures on student at the moment with the issue around fees and the economics of study. she —— what she says is valid. one of the changes means we are getting students from much more diverse backgrounds and university is more accessible to students these days. with that comes challenges. universities are arranging to meet those challenges by looking at implementing approaches to mental health through increasing their services. and working with staff with academics training them. we have been doing at this year. we've reached over 200 academics and front line staff who are working with students, teaching them about how to spot changes in emotional and psychological health of students, and to start those conversations quite early on with students to see what is going on and refer them to the services and monitor. how well
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resourced are your units? are you able to help every student who comes to you needing support? absolutely. the service is growing. universities are investing in them. but we have more and more students declaring mental health problems. at this time of year where we have additional pressures and exams, we see an increase. there are peaks and troughs. on the whole the services and the universities are supporting the development of mental health help. it takes a lot for a lot of people who are in a situation where they are struggling with mental health issues to put their hands up and go to your areas where they can get support. sure. are they quite open? are you finding that generally it is an openly discussed issue on the campuses? what happens? much more so in general emotional issues.
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the students we are seeing coming through now, compared to when i started 20 years ago, are much more willing and open to talk about things with each other and encourage each other to come forward for support. that's one of the things we can thank the mental health charities for, which is promoting, talking, and working against the stigma of mental health. that's a positive thing. maybe it isn't so much that the issues are getting more prevalent, but people are potentially just more more prevalent, but people are potentiallyjust more ready to stand up potentiallyjust more ready to stand up and say i'm struggling can you help me. absolutely. there is that aspect but where somebody has a serious and enduring mental health problem we are coming across stu d e nts problem we are coming across students who may have been treated in secondary care services. as part of their recovery plan they are being encouraged to take up university studying so they can make a difference to their lives. we are
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working closely with secondary services to help manage the transition. you said about teaching the members of staff who are working with the students to actually spot changes, but when kids arrive at universities there are unknown quantities so it could be difficult to spot if somebody‘s behaviour is changing. what's the best advice that you give? for new students, it is about establishing themselves with a peer group. in that respect we run a lot of workshops that help stu d e nts we run a lot of workshops that help students come together and to talk about their struggles. that's the way forward. we want to build their resilience and ability to manage themselves and their studies. thank you. we do also have quite a strong campaign around the universities which raises student awareness of mental health problems and difficulties, and we signpost them
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to the various services. we received funding last year to look specifically at groups of students who were not accessing the service as much as others, which included men and refugees and care leavers. we are coming to the first year of researching perhaps what some of those barriers are and are demanding a campaign to encourage them to come forward , a campaign to encourage them to come forward, and looking to see how we might need to adapt our services to meet the needs of those service users. thank you both very much. a further conversation has brought up a further conversation has brought up any issues for you when it comes to mental health, we can comes to mental health — you can find details of organisations offering information and support at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000155 998. let catch up with the weather. this
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one is shining and the temperatures are climbing. we are already well into the 20s across many parts of the uk and by the time the afternoon is out, some spots towards the south—east may have reached a 30 degrees. not quite as warm across northern ireland and scotland but that will change later in the week. lots of dry weather tonight, some areas of cloud towards the north sea coast by the first part of tuesday morning. temperatures will do away across north—eastern areas but a warm night across the south—west. we do it again tomorrow. lots of sunshine to be hard. cloud for parts of this whole coastal strip. the small chance of some showers across northern ireland but hospitals looking fine. the warmest weather across parts of the midlands, wales and the west country. it stays warm for most of deeper into the week. a
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bit cooler on the northsea coast but the chance of a shower by the weekend. roughly speaking, we are set. this is bbc newsroom live, our latest headlines: mps will vote later on whether to approve the controversial third runway for heathrow. long standing opponent borisjohnson is facing criticism for missing the vote. he once said he would lie down in front of the bulldozers to stop it being built. labour'sjeremy corbyn has given no guarantee — that if elected — he would build the runway. the grenfell inquiry has heard from one of the first senior fire officers on the scene of the blaze — he said he couldn't remember having specific training about when to evacuate a tower block rather than follow a stay put policy. turkey's leader recep tayyip erdogan wins a new five year term as president and says he'll implement sweeping constitutional reforms, including scrapping the post of prime minister.
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rescue divers enter a flooded cave in thailand in the hope of finding a teenage football team and their coach who have been trapped since saturday. let's get more now on the vote taking place later today in parliament to approve plans for a third runway at heathrow airport. with me is our environment analyst, roger harrabin. it is still far from certain there's a vote but where it goes today and after that is really unclear. there have been for a long time and still processed serious environmental obstacles. one is noise, the easiest to overcome. heathrow can just offer a large amount of money to people underneath the flight paths. the
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next, local air pollution emissions, is much more difficult to overcome. at the moment the local air breaches quality standards, it is illegally pulitzers. to be able to get within those targets, heathrow would have a massive expansion of public transport to stop more and more cars going to the airport. it's hard to see how that will be funded. the third is that of climate change. the uk has adopted its own laws on climate change and we are only long—term trajectory of cutting emissions. aviation has been given special dispensation to expand on the grounds that people want to fly more but if it wants to expand even more but if it wants to expand even more beyond its allowed limits, other sectors of the economy will have to cut even more. people will have to cut even more. people will have to cut even more. people will have to get rid of their boilers and start using hydrogen to heat their homes, perhaps use their cars less, perhaps clamp—down on industries emissions more. aviation already has
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a special deal on climate change and there is fierce aviation in trying to expand is looking to even burst past that. climate that all cup become clear? but as part of the debate that has become clear yet. it will potentially have an impact on eve ryo ne will potentially have an impact on everyone around the country in terms of having to change lifestyles and costs in putting new devices into their homes, potentially. the committee on climate change are very unhappy about this. it is the government's official watchdog that system the limits within the uk which it must keep in order to get a cut of 80% in our emissions by 2050, which is what we are committed to. they have a major report coming out on thursday, the annual report on which it is expected to say that the uk is not going to meet its long—term targets if it keeps going the way it is because although it has done very well with electricity,
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the other sectors have not clamped down enough in transport and housing. if the patterns follow on thursday, we are already not doing well enough. if aviation air expands, we will be facing an even bigger challenge. the committee is extreme the unhappy that this debate to today in parliament is being conducted the days before their annual report. also that the transport secretary, when he unveiled the legislation as proposal for heathrow, doesn't even mention climate change at all. there's a real sense in the department for transport they are wanting to which theissue transport they are wanting to which the issue away. let's hear the thoughts of boris johnson, the issue away. let's hear the thoughts of borisjohnson, because there is a loss of focus on where he is. no one knows, he's abroad, so he won't be voting on an issue he previously cares so much about. he would lie down in front of the bulldozers were a new runway to be
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built. the london evening standard says it has obtained a letter from the foreign secretary to councillors in his uxbridge and south ruislip constituency. he goes on to say that heathrow will never be built anyway. it's a real question, isn't it? we have seen the usual questions surge and airbus over decades. there always seem to be more and more new problems. that is climate change one is going to look even more difficult if the uk agrees to do what it says publicly it would do, said internationally it would do, which is to stick to the
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paris agreement on climate change, which implies the uk will need to go even further than we are at the moment in terms of cutting emissions. that is going to put even more of a squeeze on aviation. if aviation tries to burst out from that, other sectors of the economy will have to pick up this like. things will not get easier for aviation and the emissions front, they will get harder. what about new technology for aviation? how much does that change things? technology for aviation? how much does that change thing57m technology for aviation? how much does that change things? it is really radically improved, planes are much more fuel—efficient. because they are so much more fuel—efficient, the committee on climate change has agreed that aviation has some flexibility to expand without bursting existing targets. but that flexibility is only to a limited degree and if we are going down to the levels of the paris climate change agreements, aviation will feel the squeeze as well. as you say, the report you are
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talking about will only be coming out three days after mps voting today. there will be lots more coverage of that vote on heathrow later today. rescue divers have entered a flooded cave network in northern thailand, in the hope of finding 12 teenage football players and their coach. the team was trapped inside the tunnels by a flash flood on saturday. richard galpin reports. this photograph of the youth team was taken by a coach just before they all went into the cave on saturday afternoon. since then, nothing has been heard from them. but outside the entrance to the cave complex, their bikes and other belongings left as they set out for what should have been a fun adventure. instead, a major rescue operation is under way with members of the thai special forces also involved. there have been flash floods inside the cave and there are reports that rescuers found sandals and backpacks at one spot inside. the tham luang cave is a tourist attraction in the far northern
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region of chiang rai. it extends for many kilometres underground. for relatives, this is now day three of the harrowing wait for news from inside the cave. it is likely the boys and their coach have been trapped by the recent flooding. for the rescue teams, this is a particularly difficult operation as water levels inside the cave have been rising. navy divers reportedly managed to reach the main chamber in the complex and saw footprints, but nothing else. prince william has begun a five—day tour of the middle east, which will include the first official royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. first though, the duke of cambridge has been spending time in neighbouring jordan, from where our royal correspondent nicholas witchell sent this report. a gentle start to a royal tour
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of more than usual sensitivity. how are you? very nice to see you. amman, the capital ofjordan, is the first stop for prince william, in a week when he will break new ground for the british royal family. up till now, no member of the family has paid an official visit to israel or the palestinian territories. it is happening now, at least in part, because britain wants to send a signal that middle east peace can only come about by dealing equally with both sides of the conflict. for a royal visit, it is challenging. it's hard to avoid politics in this part of the world, and that's essentially why there hasn't been an official visit by a member of the british royalfamily to israel and the palestinian territories before. but later today, william will step into that cauldron when he arrives in tel aviv. the programme for the visit has been carefully choreographed by british diplomats, the speeches carefully written. injordan, there was just a glancing reference to the region's political instability.
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i greatly admire the resilience you injordan have shown, in the face of the many security and humanitarian challenges that have confronted you as a result of conflicts in this region. it will be this afternoon when william arrives in tel aviv for three days, carefully divided between israel and the palestinian territories, that the test will begin. for him, and for the evenhanded british policy which he will represent. this morning, the prince has been visiting the roman ruins atjerash. our correspondentjonny dymond went there earlier and gave us an assessment of the trip so far. prince william landed injordan yesterday and after a quick dash into a tech laboratory, he went to the ambassador's residence and gave a short speech at the queen's birthday party event there and then he spent the evening with the crown prince. there have been strong ties between the british and jordanian royal families for decades now and people are pretty keen to see those extended
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into a new generation. he is coming tojerash, and you can see some of it now, it's this astonishing archaeological site, roman archaeological site, dating from the first and second century ad. and he will no doubt enjoy strolling around the ruins here. he has a couple of other events after that, and in common with the rest of the trip there is an emphasis on young people, technology as well. and then he'll fly out of oman and to ben gurion airportjust outside tel aviv for the most sensitive part of his trip, and that is israel and the occupied palestinian territories. it's a place where no official royal visit has happened before. he will no doubt tread very carefully. but in the meantime, he has all of this to enjoy. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: mps are set to vote on a third runway for heathrow airport. the government says it's essential forjobs, but labour hints it could scrap the plans if elected. the grenfell inquiry hears from the fire brigade watch manager
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who was one of the first on the scene at the blaze. turkey's leader recep tayyip erdogan will assume sweeping new powers after winning a new five—year term as president. coming up, plenty more sunshine to look forward to as summer temperatures are still climbing. what a super sunday for england fans. the side are through to the last 16 with a game in hand after that 6—1win against panama. the first time england have scored four goals or more in the world cup since that final in 1966. england fans across the country and around the world have been reacting that's a header for john stones that's in! two goals at the 2018
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world cup for harry kane. oh, how emphatic was that? jesse lingard, jesse lingard! he puts the ball in, and it's a cross for sterling! and now it's in! number two forjohn stones! and the referee has given it! yeah, it's a penalty! here's the chance for five.
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same place! loftus—cheek. loftus—cheek‘s shot deflected. harry kane's got another goal! england fans are not the only ones who have been making the headlines. yesterday's game between senegal and japan saw the two sets of fans trying to outdo each other afterwards in the stadium.
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you may remember how both sets of fans hit the headlines after taking time to clean up after their earlier matches. well, as you can see, they carried on their anti—litter operations after sunday's match. the result — a draw in which everyone was a winner. we don't come here to leave the rubbish here. we have to take it out after every game to show the world that we are nice people. when we do that, wherever we go, we have a good reception. that's why doing that. because we get big fun from the stadium, we have to clean from our japanese mind. the uk's official music chart will now take into account videos that have been downloaded or streamed online, as well as audio downloads, and sales of cd and vinyl. tracks can often have billions of views on video sites such as youtube, but they have previously not counted towards its position in the chart. lizo mzimba reports. this week's number one single, solo by clean bandit and demi lovato. its chart position was calculate it
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using a formula that combines the number of times the song has been bought with the number of times it's been streamed, through audio services such as spotify. but online video sites have become one of the main ways that young people in particular consume music. the video for despacito has been viewed more than five billion times. so now the weekly charts will also take into account how often a song's music video is watched on platforms like youtube. like many acts, chart—topping synthpop group years & years put a huge amount of effort and creativity into their videos. they've welcomed the new move. so many people nowjust watch streaming sites or watch videos online as a way to kind of engage with the music of the artist, you know? some people just watch the video, they're not even aware of, like, the song separate from it, so i think it's
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definitely about time. the new rules come into effect from today, with the official chart company keen that their weekly charts reflect the song's popularity as accurately as possible, however it's being accessed by fans. now, what has 13 sides, a hole in the roof and has suddenly appeared in a car park in york? the answer? europe's first full—sized pop up sha kespearian theatre. the rose theatre opens today, and our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been to see it. in much ado about nothing, shakespeare wrote, would my horse had the speed of your tongue? well, what would he have made of the speed of this? in three weeks, a car park right in the centre of york, turned into a full—sized pop—up shakespearean theatre, the first ever in europe. and it was all the idea of one man. someone said, oh, pop—up, i thought it would be inflatable. i was like, no, it's not inflatable.
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there were a number of elizabethan theatres, all different shapes, bizarrely, and why wouldn't there be? people were trying out new things. theatre was in its infancy then. if they came here today, they'd recognise it. they'd go, it's just the same. what's this stuff? you used scaffolding, we used oak and you're using something else! but they would recognise inside, and they would say, you are using flying, we used flying! they'd recognise trap doors. the whole enterprise is costing around £3 million without any subsidies. 660 people can be seated with another 300 standing, exposed to the elements. it's incredibly exciting to be in it and it is very intimate on the stage. it feels like being you are embraced by the audience. no—one is more than 15 metres away, which is very special. it is being called a pop—up. it didn't pop up. this was like so much effort, gargantuan work and design. it has worked and paid off. and in the back, a pop—up costume room in use for both macbeth and a midsummer's night dream.
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these are the costumes for two of them. they are for two of them. don't want them getting confused. we do not want lady macbeth coming on as half a fairy, do we? how has the fact you've got this shakespearean theatre influenced you ? massively. you have to be very robust in your design and design decisions. you have to be very bold and committed. and look how bold and committed i was to this costume. this is a strong look. that's a strong look. so, finally, did shakespeare actually ever make it to york? we know his troupe did, but there's no historical records that he got here, but we think he did. the inference is that if his troupe did, he came with them, but he did not sign any graffiti saying, will was here. but now it is shakespeare in york all summer—long. well, there's no sign of an early end to the sunnyjune weather,
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and in fact temperatures are still climbing. last week saw the hottestjune day in 40 years and bookmakers have slashed the odds of this summer being the hottest on record. so, how can we make sure we make the most of the beautiful weather without it getting to our heads or damaging ourskin? earlier i got some advice from dr thomas waite from public health england. there are some common—sense precautions everybody can take to make sure they stay well and enjoy this weather, because some of us are at greater risk than others, people who are older, people with long—term health conditions, like heart disease or lung conditions, but also very young children can be at risk of illness in this sort of weather. so, yes, common—sense steps to stay cool and hydrated and to keep your home cool. tell us more about the level of health risk. what sort of typically happens statistically when we do experience such hot weather? how quickly do people become vulnerable if they do have a predisposition to a health issue? it's a little different to cold
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weather in that when it's hot, people notice it very quickly in terms of the impact on their health. that's really down to how the body tries to stay cool. you push a lot of blood closer to the skin so that you can lose heat that way and on top of that, you also sweat, which means you lose moisture and fluid. that's why you need to stay hydrated. and the extra strain it puts on your heart in terms of pushing the blood to the skin. that is why people notice a number of different side effects — swollen ankles, for example, a heat rash, which is quite a fine, itchy red rash on the skin, and potentially also feeling dizzy are all signs you need to go into the shade, seek somewhere cool and top up on fluids. do you see in the statistics numbers of people being admitted to hospital, having potentially even fatal heart issues increasing? sadly, yes, and particularly with the first hot weather spell of any given summer, and this is that, this is the first time it's been very hot all over the country this summer.
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we see a rise in heart attacks, for example, strokes, and people contacting nhs111 and their gp about a number of different types of conditions related to the heat. which is why taking those first steps, looking out for each other as well as looking after ourselves, really will make sure we can all enjoy a safe and enjoyable week. and we were just talking before we started talking in front of the camera, the importance of keeping your blinds, curtains shut in the daytime to keep the heat out of the house. practical stuff, yes. closing the curtains if the sun is shining on them, maybe opening the windows, two windows so you can get the draft through when it's colder outside than in is a very effective way to cool down your house. but if it's hot in the middle of the day, remember it might be cooler outside. it might be better to go to a shopping centre or a supermarket or a museum, somewhere where it's nice and cool, just to get some respite in the heat of the day. in a moment, the news at one. first, a look at the weather. the sun is shining, the temperatures
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have been climbing, there is plenty of hot summer weather to come through the rest of this week. certainly it will stay dry for the vast majority and the sunshine very strong with high uv levels. high pressure firmly in charge of the scene. underneath this, temperatures have been rising, heat has been building and approaching 30 degrees in the south—east. further north and west, things will also hot up, high 20s and likely for parts of scotland and northern ireland. plenty of that strong sunshine this afternoon, temperatures as high as 30 degrees. those temperatures will hold up nicely into the evening. once the sun goes down it will turn a little cooler across parts of eastern scotla nd cooler across parts of eastern scotland and north—east england, down to 7—9. but further west, those temperatures hold up. it will be a
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warm night here. tomorrow we do it again. lots of hot, strong sunshine. pa rt again. lots of hot, strong sunshine. part of extra cloud into northern ireland could produce a shower, only a small chance, though. the hottest weather perhaps spreading further west by this stage so those temperatures into the west country, parts of wales and the midlands getting up to 27—28. high pressure firmly in charge across the uk. many western parts of europe in decent shape. in the south—east, an area of low pressure dominating across parts of greece particularly, some really heavy rain here and strong and gusty winds. pretty disappointing if you chose this week for your holiday plans across this week of europe. back, wednesday it will be another glorious day. high uv levels, high pollen levels. we will develop an easterly breeze bringing slightly lower temperatures, slightly lighter
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colours along the east coast, some cloud are lapping onto the shore. further west, the heat continues, to produce in the high 20s. parts of northern ireland and scotland learning more about the stage. at the end of the week, little changes. staying cool close to eastern course but warm elsewhere. the future of heathrow — mps will vote today on whether to allow a third runway to be built at europe's busiest airport. the government says the expansion is essentialforjobs — but labour hints it could scrap the plans if elected. we'll have all the latest from westminster and heathrow ahead of the crunch vote. also this lunchtime. the fire—fighter in charge when the grenfell tower fire began tells the inquiry he wasn't trained to decide when to fully evacuate a high rise building. police injamaica investigate the deaths of british couple charlie and gayle anderson who recently retired to the island from manchester. prince william in the middle east — he'll be the first member of the royal family on an official
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trip to both israel and the palestinian territories. back at their training camp, england prepare for their next match on thursday safe in the knowledge that they're now through to the knockout stage. and coming up on bbc news. crunch time at the world cup — as the final group matches start,
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