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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 26, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. if you want to maintain influence with washington and nato you need to spend more money — mps call on the government to dramatically increase the uk's defence budget. there is a real concern expressed by the united states, who spend much more than any of the rest of europe on their collective defence and want europe to bear its fair share. prince william meets the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu — on the third day of his tour of the middle east. i, like you, look forward to understanding lots about the region and about hoping that peace in the area can be achieved. two men are killed, including a bus driver, and seven people seriously injured after a crash between a double decker bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with tim haig. world cup?
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welcome back, part—time! it has all been happening for years var controversy and i will update you on england ahead of their match against belgium. dele alli is back for injury for that one. just because you do not see me does not mean i am not working, tim! and more sunshine and warmth and if anything, the heat more widespread. if it is all a bit hot, how about pictures of snow elsewhere in europe? i will have those in half an hour. don't let the wheels fall off our industry — britain's motor manufacturers says investment has fallen by nearly a half in a year — they call on the government to end the uncertainty over brexit. hello — this is afternoon live.
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it's being described as one of the toughest battles facing britian‘s military — the battle for more funding. today it opened on a new front — as the commons defence committee said the uk will have to significantly increase spending if it is to maintain influence with washington and nato allies. they argue the defence budget should rise from 2% of gdp — that's £40 billion — to 3% — that's 60—billion pounds. it's needed, they say to — among other things — counter possible threats from russia. it's a political battle too — reportedly leading to an increasingly acrimonious row between the defence secretary, gavin williamson, and the treasury and the prime minister. richard galpin reports. the first of a new generation of stealth fighter aircraft arriving in britain earlier this month. the raf and navy are due to have 138 of these american—made planes. the price tag for each one — more than £90 million.
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these, plus the construction of two aircraft carriers and other expensive equipment, landing taxpayers with a bill estimated in the tens of billions. sinking the defence budget. and for some, the solution is a big increase in military spending. the first thing in our report is saying — does defence matter, does nato matter, do we need to provide the capability to ensure the defence and security of our country and our people? and if that requires some additional money, then that surely is one of the first priorities of government. will you break the prime minister if she doesn't give you more cash? the defence secretary, gavin williamson, is also pushing very hard for a hike in spending. and there is pressure coming from further afield. these nato exercises are partly designed as a show of unity amongst members of the western alliance, particularly with the increased
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threat from russia. but washington is demanding that member states contribute much more to the costs of the alliance. for britain and its military forces, this is turning into a key moment, according to some analysts. can it afford to remain a major global power? we have slightly deluded the public of late that we have a defence programme which, frankly, we know, the insiders know those who run the select committees are aware, is unaffordable. so we are to an extent living a lie. and, so far, there is little sign the government will agree to any significant increase in defence spending. richard galpin, bbc news. joining me now from our westminster studio is madeleine moon, labourmp and member of the defence committee. just how worried was the committee
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that we are losing influence? clearly from the report, which is unanimously endorsed by every member of the committee, we are extremely worried. we do not make pronouncements such as the one in the report lightly. the reality is that if we don't, our security will be compromised and capacity to defend ourselves and capacity to be a credible member of the nato alliance will be damaged. significance is one thing but you have to to back it up with hardware. what are the threats that particularly worry you? some of the things that worry us are the fact lots of things are not in place. for example, we are buying p8 orions, poseidons, control aircraft, we do not have yet so we no maritime control capability. we have problems
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with the fact we have two aircraft carriers but not the capability to do the fleet support to secure safety of the aircraft carrier. personnel are stretched and desperately trying to do so many different commitments that we are committed to as result of membership of nato but it is becoming unrealistic to say we can sustain without growing capability and personnel. is it all about money? a lot of it. part of the problem has been this government has bought a lot of its equipment from america. that means because of the depression in the value of the pound, it is costing more. if they've bought from british companies it would perhaps be closer to what we can afford but the reality is we will have to reinvest, to look more at the value of the defence pound, so if you
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invest in british companies you get money back to the treasury from tax and insurance. those are the realities that will help us afford future defence capability you hope. the government argues we are committed and already spent more than nato would expect, 2% of gdp, but how do we rate against other countries? it is about a number of things, not just the countries? it is about a number of things, notjust the cash. it is also about capability and contributions. america has been clear in saying that it thinks we are falling short in terms of capability and contribution. it wa nts capability and contribution. it wants us to take a greater responsibility for the safety and security of the north atlantic. russian submarine activity in the north atlantic has increased tenfold. if they are in the north
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atlantic, they will have access to damaging underwater cable networks that provide our data sharing between north america and europe, if they are there, they would potentially threaten shipping and they certainly, if there were conflict, they could prevent the reinforcements coming across the atla ntic reinforcements coming across the atlantic from america. and from canada. making sure the north atla ntic canada. making sure the north atlantic is free for shipping and excluding russian submarines is a vital task of britain cannot seek to fulfil. we also have a threat in the mediterranean, because as we have been successful in iraq and syria, al-qaeda and isis are moving into sub saharan africa and more wars breaking out there which leads to
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people thinking life here is not sustainable and violence is forcing people to go north and that is where you are getting the migration and immigration conflict coming from, across the mediterranean into southern europe. that is also a potentially dangerous thing in terms of leading to a destabilisation of politics and also potentially terrorism finding a way into europe to add additional problems of terrorist threat across the continent. thank you. prince william has remembered the six millionjewish people killed in the holocaust — during the first official royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. the duke of cambridge met the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, after paying his respects at yad vashem — the world holocaust remembrance centre. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports from jerusalem — his piece contains some flash photography. there can be few places with a more solemn resonance. william came to yad vashem,
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israel's memorial to the six million jewish people killed by the nazis in the holocaust of the second world war. it is the first obligation of any official visitor to israel to pay their respects here. in the museum, william spoke to survivors of the holocaust. two men who, as children, were rescued on the kindertransport trains but who left their parents behind. i remember thejourney very well, yes. what i can't remember is leaving my parents. my father and mother were dead already. i can't remember the parting. singing. then, in the hall of remembrance, as the choir sang an anthem written by a jewish parachutist killed in hungary in 1944, the victims of the holocaust were commemorated. we unite with the blessed memory of six million of our people who died a martyr‘s death
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at the hands of the german nazis and their collaborators. chanting. william laid his wreath and stood for some moments in silence. this first official royal visit to israel has been long in coming, but the fact that finally it is happening is appreciated. this is an historic day. the excitement is felt throughout israel and britain, around thejewish world. and just to see prince william here is something very, very special. from yad vashem, william went on to the official residence of israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, and his wife. a formality, but an important one in the context of a visit when william will also meet the palestinian leadership. a visit to yad vashem has historical resonance, a meeting with the prime minister
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is a diplomatic courtesy. but it will be what william does during the rest of his visit which will define the underlying messages that the visit is seeking to convey. that message, conveyed through meetings with cross—community groups and his visit to the palestinian territories, is that peace can only be found through co—operation. nicholas witchell, bbc news, jerusalem. yolande knell is injerusalem. the prince is treading on eggshells during this visit but how is it going down there? this is being well received certainly at official level. it was at israeli invitation to the prince as well as from the palestinian leadership to come and he came on the request of the british government. we have seen big crowds, well—wishers standing in the streets. and watching prince william
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as he goes about his engagements. this is a time when the royal family is much more popular, because of the royal wedding between prince harry and meghan markle. this is staring up and meghan markle. this is staring up some controversy because of course this is a place which really everything is politically sensitive and he is coming here at a sensitive time. there have been israeli commentators, an israeli minister complaining about the fact the official schedule for the prince lists his trip where he will go to the old city ofjerusalem as being in the occupied palestinian territories. the palestinians said thatis territories. the palestinians said that is realistic and true. british diplomats told us this is consistent with the usual language used by the british foreign office because there has been a lot of coordination and careful choreography around this visit where they know everything the
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prince does and says will be closely watched. the british consul in jerusalem said he had come here to learn about the situation and to meet those who will shape the future. they said also, the british diplomats, he was ready to engage in this was coming at the right time. given britain's historical legacy in this region, this is difficult as far as being diplomatic is concerned. on the palestinian side there were some interpretations this was perhaps meant as an unofficial apology for the balfour declaration, this british foreign policy document of 100 years ago that supported the creation of a national home for jewish people in historic palestine. british officials have said this is coming ata british officials have said this is coming at a time where the prince was simply invited by the different
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parties and it seemed to be the right time for this young prince to come here. they are playing down any of those interpretations and the israeli media is also being linked to brexit and the idea britain is searching for trade deals post—brexit. it has been pointed out there have been changes in the arab world recently. they say in the past, israel seems to have been subjected to an unofficial boycott and point out british royals have gone around arab countries in the region, places like saudi arabia, but seemed to have avoided here because of the long—running israel palestinian conflict. now that is changing and something seen by both sides. kensington palace are trying to avoid political interpretations. they are keen to emphasise how the prince, a young man, is meeting young people on both sides, doing cultural activities, and a lot of
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sports activities. he is trying to speak to a bigger diversity of people then you would see if this was say a ministerial visit. a couple from southwest london have been jailed for life with a mimimum term of 30 years for murdering their french nanny last year. sabrina kouider and ouissem medouni beat and starved 21—year—old sophie lionnet before burning her body in their back garden in wimbledon. our news correspondent richard lister is at the old bailey. a very distressing case. yes, neither of the couple showed any real reaction as the sentence, the life sentence with a minimum term of 30 years before they can be considered for parole, neither gave any great reaction. they had anticipated something along those lines i think. thejudge said it was a case of high seriousness and he made clear the sentence was going to be something of this order. that said, as they were led from the
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dock, ouissem medouni looked back and stared directly at sophie's pa rents, and stared directly at sophie's parents, who have been in the trial throughout, hearing distressing details about how their daughter died. sophie went to work for the couple in 2016 and a year later, they became obsessed with the bizarre fantasy that the ex—boyfriend of sabrina kouider, mark walton, somehow conspired with sophie to sexually abuse and drug family. there was no truth in this, it was a fantasy from sabrina kouider, who seems to have persuaded ouissem medouni to go along with this and it became more beating sophie, interrogating her and ultimately tortured her in a bath and eventually she was killed. it is not sure how that happened. it did and the next morning, they tried to burn her body and it was only when neighbours called 999 that the couple were arrested. in mitigation
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today, sabrina kouider‘s lawyers said he had a letterfrom sabrina kouider address to sophie that he wa nted kouider address to sophie that he wanted to read and he said from sabrina kouider, iwish wanted to read and he said from sabrina kouider, i wish everyone to know how deeply sorry i am for what happened to sophie. it feels like a horrible dream and i wish i could turn the clock back so it did not happen and you sophie would still be alive today. the judge said to the couple, the suffering and torture you put her through was prolonged and without pity. he said her spirit had been entirely broken by the couple and he said not to mention the broken ribs, cracked sternum and fractured jaw that gave an indication of what she went through before she died. he says sophie was shy, gentle, good—hearted, and he said the attempt to burn her body was the most dreadful desecration of her remains and he said he had no
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hesitation in adopting a stance whereby they would serve 30 years before being eligible for parole. thank you. in the last few moments in the old bailey, thejury has convicted a british man of planning a terror attack in westminster, khaled ali, he denied charges. jury taking two days of deliberation and have just convicted him. taking two days of deliberation and havejust convicted him. he taking two days of deliberation and have just convicted him. he was arrested on parliament street in april last year by armed police and was found to have three knives. he had returned to the uk in november of 2016 after more than five years away and was questioned by counterterror police at heathrow. fingerprints were taken and these we re fingerprints were taken and these were later matched to 42 prints found on bomb components recovered
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from afghanistan in 2012 before being passed on to the fbi. two explosives charges related to the components and the court heard he had spent his years away from the uk asa had spent his years away from the uk as a taliban bomb maker. more on this case, we have a report. leaving, mate. the moment when armed officers stopped an al-qaeda supporter launching a knife attack on whitehall. do you have everything on whitehall. do you have everything on you? it was april last year, barely a month after the traumatic westminster bridge attack. khaled ali was carrying three brand—new nines. he had bought them two hours earlier. he had been born in saudi arabia to a somali father and ethiopian mother, but grew up in
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north london. he first came to the security service's attention on an aid convoy to gaza in 2010. kieren turner was in charge of logistics on the convoy and remembers him well. at that point i thought a nice young man, this will be one of the people fun to travel with. he had a sense of humour. i remember him because he smiled. also on the convoy were die—hard extremists, including thomas evans, later killed fighting with al—sha bab thomas evans, later killed fighting with al—shabab in kenya. within a few months, canada lee was in him, sta n few months, canada lee was in him, stan —— khaled ali was himself in afghanistan. in police interviews, he admitted setting off 300 bombs himself. how many times have you press the button to cause an
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explosion? more than 300 times? the main target for his bombs or ieds we re main target for his bombs or ieds were ordinary afghan soldiers like this person. he injured his leg and shoulder and lost an eye when his vehicle was blown up. translation: ieds are more dangerous than anything else, more than face—to—face fighting. most of my friends killed or injured, it was by ieds. when callard ali return to heathrow in 2016 suspicious counterterrorism officers took his fingerprints. —— khalid ali. this huge warehouse of improvised bombs found in afghanistan and iraq, police got a match. by then he resumed his life in north london but, as a suspected bomb maker, he was kept under surveillance and last march was seen talking to police at the gates of downing street. in
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april he was recorded walking past m16 april he was recorded walking past mi6 ona april he was recorded walking past mi6 on a reconnaissance trip. on april the 27th, he bought three knives in ealing. he to the tube to victoria and walk to westminster, dropping his phone in the river thames and an oyster card in a rubbish bin. having dumped the evidence and now carrying an empty backpack and three knives, khalid ali headed to whitehall and downing street. he was armed and ready. by this point, so were the police. when he headed to whitehall in possession of knives, that is when we decided to act. until that time we managed the risk, using techniques to manage that risk, but he was arrested at the appropriate time using armed police officers. the al-qaeda bomb maker had been stopped 200 metres from the downing street gates.
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khalid ali, 28 years old from north london had originally denied preparing acts of terrorism and two cou nts preparing acts of terrorism and two counts of possession of an explosive with intent. we will talk to our correspondent covering that case shortly. the firefighter who led the first response to the grenfell tower fire said he had no idea the cladding was flammable and would cause such a devastating blaze. watch manager michael dowden told the inquiry it initially appeared to be a kitchen fire, but quickly spread into something far more serious and unpredictable. this report from daniela relph contains images you may find distressing. the firefighters' stories are a mix of raw, personal accounts, facts and professional assessments of what went wrong. at the start of the inquiry today, a reminder of how stressful things are for all involved. michael dowden was one of the first firefighters to arrive at grenfell tower. yesterday he felt unwell and finished his evidence early.
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today, there was reassurance from the lead barrister. may i say how grateful we are, as the inquiry team, to you for coming along yesterday and spending the entire day answering questions from me. i want you to know that you are doing a public service, and we are extremely thankful to you for it. michael dowden described arriving at the tower and seeing an orange glow from inside a flat. but said he was unaware of the dangers that lay on the outside of the building. could you see, from your initial look at the building, that the exterior of the building was covered in a cladding or envelope? at that point, i wasn't aware that it was cladding. at that point, ijust thought it was the external part of gre nfell tower. michael dowden was shown a photo of firefighters arriving at the tower. he confirmed he was on the left, in the white helmet, in position as incident commander.
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he also confirmed that this was one of the first residents he spoke to, behailu kebede, who told him the fire had started in his flat on the fourth floor around his fridge freezer. but the situation changed quickly. firefighter dowden said, as embers began to fall, this was no longer a containable kitchen fire. he described it sparking and spitting, behaving unusually, and it made him feel uncomfortable. daniela relph, bbc news. more on the conviction of khalid ali, found guilty at the old bailey of plotting a knife attack. what sort of reaction when he was convicted? the jury at the old bailey took around two and a half days to conflict khalid ali of the charges. the trial had lasted three
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weeks. you remember when he was arrested dramatically on whitehall last april, intercepted by armed police and wrestled to the ground on a pedestrian crossing, found, when searched, carrying three knives and thejury searched, carrying three knives and the jury found him guilty of preparing an act of terrorism, targeting an mp, member of the military, or a member of targeting an mp, member of the military, ora member of the targeting an mp, member of the military, or a member of the police. khalid ali had been scoping possible targets before his arrest and in the previous month. at a demonstration ca ptu red previous month. at a demonstration captured on cctv scoping downing street, the mod, scotland yard and the m16 building. his story did not begin there because six years previously, khalid ali disappeared from his family home in north london, telling his family he was taking on work as a plumber in birmingham. infact, taking on work as a plumber in birmingham. in fact, he taking on work as a plumber in birmingham. infact, he made taking on work as a plumber in birmingham. in fact, he made his way to afghanistan and it was there he
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joined the taliban and became a bomb maker. eventually he returned to the uk after five years away and came back through istanbul, turning up at the british consulate in istanbul saying he lost his passport. in 2016 he arrived at heathrow without this passport. he is questioned by officers at the airport, his fingerprints taken and it was then his fingerprints were matched to bomb component parts that were found in afghanistan by american forces in 2012. so khalid ali also convicted of two charges of possession of explosives with intent to endanger lives. when he was arrested, in interview he admitted to police he was a terrorist, he said, and he said he pressed a detonator on bombs more than 300 times so khalid ali found guilty at the old bailey of all charges he faced and he will be sentenced in july. thank you. now
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the weather. a very short forecast, i suspect. i could say hot, dry and sunny and goat. but you have another two minutes. what we will do today, this is interesting, we will take a look further afield. at the moment we have high pressure and you know that pa rt have high pressure and you know that part of the story, fine and dry but to the south—east of europe, there is low pressure and parts of greece particularly have seen heavy rain, thunderstorms. you can see showers and storms continue spreading across the ball comes, romania and towards the ball comes, romania and towards the outs. what i will show you next might surprise you. it will be snowing. sorry to take the wind out of your sails! i gave the game away in the
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headlines! these pictures from slovenia. that is today? i think it is yesterday. 3000 metres, pretty high up, but snow is falling on this particular place in the alps. it is not unusual, they do get snow sometimes that high up at this point in the summer but according to local sources it has become less and less usual in recent years, so pretty impressive and surprising scenes. for those people wishing they were there now because it is so hot, we need to stop whingeing. if you like it hot, you are in the right place, because this heatwave will continue. how long? until the end of the week. a change at the weekend and i will tell you about that in a moment. imap this is how it looked in east sussex earlier on. blue skies and sunshine. if anything sussex earlier on. blue skies and sunshine. ifanything in sussex earlier on. blue skies and sunshine. if anything in the next two days, the becoming more
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widespread. yesterday's top temperature 30 degrees close to london, today we are edging the heat further west and then in the next two days, further north. northern ireland and scotland likely to get to 30 degrees to bat on thursday. i showed you the high pressure area earlier on but if you watch, it is drifting subtly northwards at the moment, introducing more of the flow ofair. moment, introducing more of the flow of air. the winds are scooping up the wind from the south are moving it further west and then further north over the next few days. this is what is going on at the moment, the satellite picture. a bit of cloud close to the east coast, that will be a running theme. some cloud from northern ireland to western scotla nd from northern ireland to western scotland could produce some showers but for the vast majority, hot sunshine, 29th at 30 degrees in parts of the west country, west midlands and wales. as we go through this evening and tonight, clear skies for most but this lump of cloud in the north sea will roll its wa ke cloud in the north sea will roll its wake a little inland. eastern counties of england and scotland
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could start tomorrow on a grey and murky note, 11—14 for the first part of the day. as we go through the day, i'm hopeful much of this cloud in the east will roll back towards the coastline and dernbach out to sea but if you're planning a trip to the east coast tomorrow, bear in mind that missed and low cloud won't be far away. on the east coast of scotla nd be far away. on the east coast of scotland and england, we will see some slightly cooler weather. you can see the yellow shades on the temperature chart, those little suppressed along the east coast. not so further west, deep oranges, strong sunshine. for those east coast towns, editor of fog and crowd at times, not all the time over the next few days, but the temperature a little suppressed. much of scotland, northern ireland and northern england seeing hot sunshine, could get to 30 degrees in aviemore tomorrow believe it or not. in the south, the heat keeps coming, high 20s, perhaps 30. at the start we
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hinted at a change. high pressure will be with us to start the weekend. there is some uncertainty about this but it looks like this area of low pressure will start to drift its way up from the new continent, ahead of it pulling in some humid air. the weekend, spells and sunshine, it will turn more humid and just the chance of some thunderstorms later. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: a british man has been convicted of planning a terror attack in westminster and making bombs for the taliban in afghanistan. mps have warned that britain will lose its influence with the us and other nato allies, unless it increases defence spending by billions of pounds a year. the duke of cambridge meets the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, after paying his respects at the world holocaust remembrance centre injerusalem. two men have been killed and 18 other people have been injured, after a collision between a bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. the british car industry has blamed uncertainty about britain's trade relationship with europe after brexit for a sharp fall in investment.
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sport now on afternoon live with tim hague. we talk world cup and england and words you never really here but more good news? you are not used this and neither am i. dele alli back full training with the squad after me missing the game against panama. ruben loftus—cheek came in for him and dele alli may find it hard to get into the starting 11, given the performance of ruben loftus—cheek and cow on sunday. would it be better for england to lose the match with belgium and dust and come second in group g? our metallic tea is to win every game we play and we wa nt is to win every game we play and we want to win every game and i feel if we win every game, it keeps building momentum to keep going in the tournament. we know belgium are a top opponent and we need to be on out top opponent and we need to be on oureight—game to top opponent and we need to be on our eight—game to get a win. i feel out our eight—game to get a win. i feel our squad in the camp, we want to win every game we're playing, so it
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can't look at that. our squad want to keep winning and winning. that will put us in good stead. it doesn't matter who we could play next, because they need to get as faras next, because they need to get as far as you next, because they need to get as faras you can next, because they need to get as far as you can and to do that you need to play top teams. so get playing them early, that's how it's going to be. england currently top of the group due to a better disciplinary record than belgium. will temper my play a big part in more group games? it did yesterday between portugal and spain. cristiano ronaldo had already missed a penalty which was given banks to var when he was nearly sent off for that. it looked like an elbow. in the last few minutes, iran given a contentious penalty after the referee consulted with the video assistant referee. they scored it and it finished 1—1. portugal came second in their group because spain scored in injury time against morocco. there it is, a little
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backflip. it was disallowed initially and then var was consulted and the goal was given. final score 2-2 and the goal was given. final score 2—2 and spain will play russia in the knockouts, and portugal have a tougher test against uruguay and a direct result of var. studio: nothing contentious about that penalty, it just wasn't nothing contentious about that penalty, itjust wasn't one. we will speak to a couple of referees to discuss it further. let's talk about what may happen, because the type of crocodile tails but lionel messi could be out? one of the stars of the tournament. he and argentina are playing today and all the tension will be on them because they have to win. they take on nigeria in st petersburg and only three points will give them a chance of progressing from group d. they drew with iceland in the opener, edge missing a penalty and outplayed by croatia after that, losing 3—0. messi has been a shadow of his former self so far. a former
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barcelona team—mates as he has been under immense pressure for argentina for years. he is carrying the whole country on his back on his own. you know him well, how does he carry that kind of expectation, that pressure? is it different than when he is at barcelona? i think so, i think so. he feels it. he feels more people are expecting much more from him than what he is required at barcelona. at barcelona i think obviously the quality is higher, so here they expect him that he needs to score three games every single game like he does at barcelona and i'm sorry, football is not that simple. as much as he is the best, it is difficult. of the little man with a lot of pressure on his shoulders. that one of four games today. denmark and france, second place in the group still to be claimed. france already through and later we will find out who qualifies alongside croatia. those matches are on bbc tv. anthonyjoshua's planned
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unification fight with deontay wilder could be in doubt after the wba gave them 2a hours to sign a deal to face their mandatory challenger. eddie hearn was reportedly close to finalising negotiators with deontay wilder's camp but the wba have lost patience and demanded he takes on alexander perversion or risk losing his title. that fight with dion to milder wilder is worth a lot of money. thank you, talk to you later on. you are watching afternoon live. two men have died and 18 people have been injured following a crash between a double—decker bus and a lorry in the cambridgeshire fens. one of those killed is believed to be the driver of the bus. the crash happened around 7:30 this morning on the a117 in guyhirn near wisbech. angus crawford reports. the injured has been taken to
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hospitals in peterborough and king's lynn. and an investigation has already begun. on dry roads with good visibility, how could this have happened? police in jamaica are questioning a man in connection with the murder of a british couple at the weekend. charlie and gayle anderson had retired to the island a year ago from manchester. from jamaica, nick davis reports. picturesque and idyllic.
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moving to their home in an area called mount pleasant, it was a new start for the retirees. but on friday, charlie and gayle anderson were brutally murdered and their homes set on fire. gayle's partially burned body was found here at the front of the house. at the bottom of a steep embankment, charlie was discovered close to a fence. police think he was trying to escape and was only feet away from his neighbours' home before he was killed. he, too, was set alight. his neighbour says she looked over her fence and saw a body in the back yard next door. after she called her friend for help, they realised who it was. she also went to school with charlie and remembers how well he was liked in the community. she says everyone cried, and that he didn't deserve what happened, and they all spoke highly of charlie. as you walk up this driveway to charlie and gayle anderson's home, you can understand why
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they decided to retire here. there's the blue mountains in one direction, there's the caribbean sea in the other. it was their perfect home. unfortunately, now it's an active crime scene. there's police tape everywhere. last year, jamaica saw over 1600 people murdered. there are states of emergency in two areas, but this part of the country is supposed to be one of the safest. well, we have one of the lowest crime rates anywhere for the past 15 or so years. although we are at seven murders this year, we are still the lowest injamaica. the couple had been back in the uk recently, after thousands of pounds was fraudulently taken from their bank account injamaica. police investigating locally have made two arrests, but it's not clear if the fraud is linked to their murder. nick davies, bbc news, portland, jamaica. rescuers in thailand have stepped up their search for a group
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of children believed to have been trapped in a flooded cave in the north of the country since saturday. 12 children aged between 11 and 16, together with their football coach, were exploring inside the cave's narrow tunnels, when a section near the main entrance was flooded. the underground network in chiang rai province is a popular tourist attraction in thailand, attracting thousands of visitors every year. the bbc‘sjonathan head is near the cave complex in chiang rai province. they brought hundreds more people in to join the operation. these guys came from the army. there's probably 50 or 60 people here. what their exact role will be isn't clear. you can see everything here has been churned into an appalling sea of mud by the numbers of people.
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the navy divers who have been trying to get through for the last couple of days have had no success at all up to now and it's only now we start to see people with real caving experience going into the cave entrance which is just around those bushes there. here's another lot going in. it's really quite a narrow area at the cave entrance. we're not sure whether they've got any good news or whether they're going to help with the rescue. we've seen this coming and going of all sorts of units, people from the border patrol police, people from the marine police going in and out all day long. so far, they have nothing to show for their efforts. this is where you come into the cave complex. as you can see, these are the bikes that the boys left when they went in on saturday afternoon. they've been down there now for three days. obviously there is real concern about their state of health, although it's reasonably warm, possibly not too cool inside. the assumption is that they got cut off by rising floodwaters and that they're still alive. the trouble is, this is a complex that goes back ten kilometres. the navy divers simply couldn't get through the narrow passages and they are hoping that some
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of the volunteers who have got more caving experience may have more success. we've seen a lot of oxygen tanks brought up here, they also have pumps on the other side, which we expect them to start using. it's not clear where they'll pump the water from but they are trying to get the water levels down, although with the constant rain it's not clear what success they'll have, but this is very, very worrying for the relatives who have been coming up here and praying — at makeshift shrines they've put up in the forest — for a good result, for some kind of good news. they still haven't had it and they've still got no idea what state those boys are in, or which part of the caves they may be located. now the business news injust a moment, but first, our headlines on afternoon live: taliban bomb—maker khalid ali
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is found guilty of plotting a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament. calls on the government to increase defence spending or risk influence with washington and nato allies. prince william meets the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu — during his tour of the middle east. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: investment in britain's car industry has fallen by half, according to figures from the motoring sector. the trade body the smmt is blaming uncertainty over brexit. scotland's biggest pig processor is about to run out of carbon dioxide today, leaving it in danger of welfare issues. the gas is used to stun farm animals before being slaughtered. quality pork may have to send some animals to england to be processed. carpetright made a loss of around £70 million last financial year. sales also fell. the company's closing 81 stores as part of a rescue plan. harley—davidson, they are indeed in
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hot water with donald trump who has used the phrase white flag? this is all about the decision by harley—davidson, an iconic american brandt, to move some production overseas. that is because they want to avoid taxes for importing into the eu. the eu introduced these ta riffs the eu. the eu introduced these tariffs in retaliation to tariffs imposed by washington and steel and aluminium from europe and elsewhere. as you say, the american president is really upset. he has accused harley—davidson of waving the little white flag and has also said they could be taxed like never before. let's get more on this from paul blake on the floor of the new york
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stock exchange. can he do that, can he threatened a company with a huge taxation? we have seen donald trump bully, threaten companies and twitter before. one option he would potentially have in talking to people here is he could essentially tariffs any motorcycles built overseas as they come back in. even if it's an american company, the fear among traders here is he could tariffs the motorcycles they are planning to start building overseas, as they come back here to be sold in the american market. essentially making the motorcycles built overseas more expensive as opposed to the motorcycles here in the us. donald trump engaging in heavy rhetoric this morning against harley— davidson. rhetoric this morning against harley-davidson. we are in the midst of what looks like a looming trade walk. his statement is designed to send a message notjust a harley davidson but other companies who might want to ship companies overseas to avoid eu tariffs? that
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isjust that. he has a history overseas to avoid eu tariffs? that is just that. he has a history of volleying companies. when he first came into office, gn, the american motor company with claiming to start building zonnebeke cars down in mexico, which along with nafta would allow them to sell with low trade barriers. there is a chilling effect of this, companies don't want to be seen on the president's twitter account, especially in a negative light. companies around the us will be looking at how harley— davidson responds, the president continues over the next few days in calling out harley— davidson, whether this spat between the president and harley— davidson goes on spat between the president and harley—davidson goes on and how it will affect harley— davidson's share price decision—making over the next few days about what they do with their production motorcycles. away from the angry president, what is the feeling amongst the public in the feeling amongst the public in the us that about this move by harley—davidson? certainly we saw yesterday on the new york stock exchange, we saw
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their shares drop about 7%. a lot of concern over the losses as they shift production, over the public relations hit they're taking. among the public, a poll came out yesterday shown for the first time a majority of americans are confident in the way the us president is conducting business around the economy. was in within the margin of error, but about 50% believe the president is handling economic affairs well. there is a mixed message, people who see the president is protecting american jobs, the american worker and american industry versus traders, wall street and big business, who are worried about protectionist measures on how the president's decision—making could affect their bottom lines and decision making. thank you. let's look at the markets. the ftse rebounding slightly after steep losses yesterday, because of fears about the escalating trade tensions.
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carpetright is feeling the pressure because of its £70 million loss, so investors not liking that at all. carnival, the cruise ship company, thatis carnival, the cruise ship company, that is making good progress, but again, it's recovering from losses yesterday. anglo—american, that is seeing a bounce in its share price after people have stopped being quite so frightened about the possibility of a lower commodities. 0k, possibility of a lower commodities. ok, you will be back later. it's a deal. thanks very much. now, as the nhs celebrates its 70th birthday, we'll be hearing from some of the people who have worked for it or been treated by it since it was created in 19118. nola ishmael came to britain from barbados in 1963 as a young nhs trainee nurse. after — as she puts it — burning the midnight oil and early morning toil, she rose up the ranks to become the first black director of nursing in london. this is her story. my name is nola ishmael, obe. i was born and educated and brought up in barbados.
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i came to this country at the age of 19. i came to be a nurse. this was a big job with a purpose. nursing requires confidence. confidence to say what is right, to do what is right, and not to be afraid to be your patient‘s advocate. in the early days, we never called it prejudice. idon't think we knew the word. we just knew that some people got promoted and you didn't get promoted. the level of knowledge that you gained. this was the account. and when i was appointed director of nursing in greenwich, it was a breakthrough moment for black nurses. i got telephone calls far and wide offering congratulations to me. and one particular question i got asked — was it a fluke? i said, no, it wasn't.
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it was midnight oil, early morning toil, and reading and learning as i got on with thejob. the nhs is one of the best institutions in this country. it is there for the people, by the people. the people trust it. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning, because of the high temperatures hitting much of the country. yesterday, the thermometer topped 30 celsius in the capital, and similar is expected today. network rail has introduced speed restrictions, because of concerns that the tracks won't be able to cope with the heat — which is expected to last until the weekend. reporting for us now and this, danny savage. across virtually all of the uk, the heatwave continues, and quite understandably,
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many people, like those in this park in london, are making the most of the glorious weather. yeah, we were looking for a break from the queensland heatwave coming here, and it's the same! it was 102 degrees when we left california, so this is not so bad. but as too often happens there have been tragic accident as people try and cool off. a search for a missing child at westport lake in stoke—on—trent resumed this morning, after emergency services were called last night to reports that three youngsters were in difficulty in the water. two of the children are safe and well. the third is still missing. it is very difficult for us all. we are fathers, we are mothers. this impacts on us and the local area, and we are doing all we can just to work with that family, just to reassure them and give them any type of comfort. in surrey, the body of a man was recovered from a lake in nutfield. the message from police is not
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to swim in open water. further north, a large wildfire has left a pall of smoke hanging over large parts of greater manchester. it has been burning since sunday. people living close to the blaze on saddleworth moor are being told to keep their windows closed, as firefighters try and contain it. the heat has slowed trains down too. network rail says track temperatures could reach as much as 20 celsius above the air temperature, meaning the steel rails can expand and buckle. the reduced speeds are intended to lower the force exerted on the track, reducing the risk of problems. but when it comes to the hottest weather this week, west is best. day—trippers were lapping it up in blackpool this afternoon, with blue skies, blue sea and tranquil conditions. summer is here for a good few days yet. a video of a spanish police of a dog peforming cpr has, as you might expect, gone viral.
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(tx 00v) the madrid police department shared the video on social media of a dog performing cpr on a officer. his name is poncho and the madid police have praised him (tx 00v) the madrid police department shared the video madrid police have praised him for practising cpr on what they call a masterful way. it then licked into death. here's a look at the weather now with ben rich. this hot spell of weather shows no sign of letting up, if anything, the heat is becoming increasingly widespread. yesterday brought temperatures up to 30 degrees in the london area. today the heat edging a bit further west. as we get into tomorrow and thursday, parts of northern ireland and scotland will get very close to 30 degrees. it's unusual to see
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temperatures so high this far north at this time of year. the fine weather comes courtesy of high pressure, never too far away in the next few days, but shifting its way subtly northwards, allowing more ofan way subtly northwards, allowing more of an easterly breeze, or which will keep some eastern coasts cooler but will bring more heat from the south northwards into northern ireland and scotland. this is how we finish up this afternoon, lots of sunshine. very small chance for a shower across northern ireland and some extra cloud perilously close to these north sea coast of eastern scotland and eastern england. you go through this evening and night and we will bring them back cloud with mist and mark a little further inland into these eastern areas. further west, clear and starry skies overhead, temperatures no lower than 11—14. wednesday getting off to a relatively warm start, a lot of sunshine for many. eastern areas likely to start off a bit cloudy and murky. i'm hopeful that much of that will burn back out to sea but some patches of cloud and fog could
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linger close to some areas of these guys. as you can see from the yellow colours on temperature chart, it is going to be a bit cooler closer to these eastern coastal areas. further west, deep orange, temperatures well into the mid—20s. some patches of cloud in the east end temperature suppressed over the next few days. but for much of scotland, northern ireland and northern england, a lot of sunshine to enjoy. temperatures in glasgow very close to 30 degrees and further southee heat goes on with some long spells of strong sunshine. so when do things change? well, the weekend does bring something of a change. high—pressure likely to drift northwards. low— pressure likely to drift northwards. low—pressure approaching from the south. there is some uncertainty about the timing, it looks like we could see some thunderstorms working on. we will see some sunny spells to dig through the week but also turning more humid, with a risk of thunderstorms later.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 3. breaking in the past hour, taliban bomb—maker khalid ali is found guilty of plotting a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament. if you want to maintain influence with washington and nato you need to spend more money — mps call on the government for a big increase in the uk's defence budget. there is real concern expressed by the united states, who spend much more than any of the rest of europe on their collective defence and want europe to bear its fair share. two men are killed — including a bus driver — and 7 people seriously injured — after a crash between a double decker bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with tim haig. and the latest from the world cup. the final matches in group c are under way. will denmark or australia join france in the last 16? i will
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also bring you the latest from the england camp with dele alli back from injury in time for the belgian match on thursday. and with the latest weather, ben rich. no real change. plenty more strong sunshine and, ifanything, the change. plenty more strong sunshine and, if anything, the heat becoming more widespread. thanks ben. also coming up — prince william meets the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu on the third day of his tour of the middle east. hello, this is afternoon live. a british man has been found guilty of planning a terror attack in westminster and making bombs for the taliban. khalid ali was arrested in april last year in parliament street, where he was caught carrying three knives. he had recently returned from afghanistan, where he made
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and detonated bombs. a jury at the old bailey convicted him of preparing an act of terrorism in the uk, and two counts of possessing an explosive substance with intent. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has the details. go back, go back, go back! leave him, mate. you got him? the moment when armed officers stopped an al-qaeda supporter launching a knife attack on whitehall. do you have everything on you that may hurt, or hurt anyone else? it was april last year, barely a month after the traumatic westminster bridge attack. another knife. third knife! khalid ali was carrying three brand—new knives. he had bought them just two hours earlier. he had been born in saudi arabia to a somali father and ethiopian mother, but grew up in north london. he first came to the security service's attention on an aid convoy to gaza in 2010.
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we are going to do it out here in gaza. taking it to the next level. you feel me? one love. kieren turner was in charge of logistics on the convoy and told me he remembers ali well. at that point i thought, a nice young man, this will be one of the people that's fun to travel with. he had a sense of humour. i remember him because he smiled. also on the convoy were some die—hard extremists, including thomas evans, who was later killed fighting with al—shabab in kenya. within a few months, khalid ali was himself in afghanistan, making bombs for the taliban. his fingerprints later found by the americans on these detonators and remote controls seized in the south—east of the country. in police interviews, he admitted setting off 300 bombs himself. how many times have you pressed the button to cause an explosion? probably more than 300 times. the main target for ali's bombs
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or ieds were ordinary afghan soldiers like this man. he injured his leg and shoulder and lost an eye when his vehicle was blown up. translation: ieds are more dangerous than anything else, more than face—to—face fighting. most of my friends who got killed or injured, it was by ieds. when khalid ali suddenly returned to heathrow in 2016, suspicious counterterrorism officers took his fingerprints. when these were checked with prints kept by the fbi at this huge warehouse of improvised bombs found in afghanistan and iraq, police got a match. by then, ali had resumed his life in north london but, as a suspected bombmaker, he was now kept under surveillance and last march was seen talking to police at the gates of downing street. in april, he was recorded walking past mi6 on a reconnaissance trip. just after noon on april the 27th, he bought three sabatier knives
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in wilko's in ealing. he took the tube to victoria and then walked to westminster, dropping his phone in the river thames and his oyster card in a rubbish bin. having dumped all the evidence and now carrying just an empty backpack and three knives, khalid ali headed towards whitehall and downing street. he was armed and ready. but, by this point, so were the police. when he headed to whitehall in possession of three knives, that is when we decided to act. until that time we managed the risk, using techniques to manage that risk, but he was arrested at the appropriate time using armed police officers. the al-qaeda bombmaker had been stopped just 200 metres from the downing street gates. leila nathoo is at the old bailey. any reaction from him on conviction?
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no, no reaction at all from khalid ali when he heard the verdict, it has been a three—week trial at the old bailey and the jury tookjust over two days to convict him and that dramatic footage you saw of him being arrested in whitehall, back in april last year, you remember the context of that was just after the westminster bridge terror attacks and it was the knives, three knives along with the fact he had carried out surveillance of the area in previous days and a month before at a demonstration, that led thejury to convict him of planning a terror attack, intending to target a police officer, member of the military or mp on the day he was apprehended by armed police. he had also taken himself to afghanistan six years earlier, disappearing from the family home in london, telling them
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he was taking on plumbing work in birmingham but he made his way to afghanistan where he became a bomb maker. through his trial, khalid ali's defence was he had gone to pakistan as a tourist and had been held against his will, held captive and forced to make the bomb components his fingerprints were found on in order to prove he was not a british spy. the jury here rejected that defence from him. he will now be sentenced next month. thank you. it's being described as one of the toughest battles facing britian's military — the battle for more money. today it opened on a new front as the commons defence committee said the uk will have to significantly increase spending if it is to maintain influence with washington and nato allies. they argue the defence budget should rise from 2% of gdp — that's £40 billion — to 3% — that's 60 billion pounds.
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it's needed, they say to — among other things — counter possible threats from russia. it's a political battle too — reportedly leading to an increasingly acrimonious row between the defence secretary, gavin williamson, and the treasury and the prime minister. richard galpin reports. the first of a new generation of stealth fighter aircraft arriving in britain earlier this month. the raf and navy are due to have 138 of these american—made planes. the price tag for each one — more than £90 million. these, plus the construction of two aircraft carriers and other expensive equipment, landing taxpayers with a bill estimated in the tens of billions. sinking the defence budget. and for some, the solution is a big increase in military spending. the first thing in our report is saying — does defence matter, does nato matter, do we need to provide the capability to ensure the defence and security of our country and our people?
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and if that requires some additional money, then that surely is one of the first priorities of government. will you break the prime minister if she doesn't give you more cash? the defence secretary, gavin williamson, is also pushing very hard for a hike in spending. and there is pressure coming from further afield. these nato exercises are partly designed as a show of unity amongst members of the western alliance, particularly with the increased threat from russia. but washington is demanding that member states contribute much more to the costs of the alliance. for britain and its military forces, this is turning into a key moment, according to some analysts. can it afford to remain a major global power? we have slightly deluded the public of late that we have a defence programme which, frankly, we know, the insiders know, those who run the select committees are aware, is unaffordable. so we are to an extent living a lie. and, so far, the government
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is standing firm rejecting a significant increase in defence spending. two men have died and 18 people have been injured following a crash between a double—decker bus and a lorry in the cambridgeshire fens. one of those killed is believed to be the driver of the bus. the crash happened around 7.30 this morning on the a117 in guyhirn near wisbech. angus crawford reports. a straight road, good conditions, then this. the lorry pulling out of its depot. the bus with 20 passengers on board. the driver's cab and front of the upper deck crushed and broken. the first call came early this morning. seven ambulances and other specialist teams were sent. a major incident was initially
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declared and the air ambulance scrambled. the injured have been taken to hospitals in peterborough and king's lynn. and an investigation has already begun. on dry roads with good visibility, how could this have happened? angus crawford, bbc news. prince william has remembered the six millionjewish people killed in the holocaust during the first official royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. the duke of cambridge met the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, after paying his respects at yad vashem — the world holocaust remembrance centre. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports from jerusalem — his piece contains some flash photography. there can be few places with a more solemn resonance. william came to yad vashem, israel's memorial to the six million jewish people killed by the nazis in the holocaust of the second world war.
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it is the first obligation of any official visitor to israel to pay their respects here. in the museum, william spoke to survivors of the holocaust. two men, who, as children, were rescued on the kindertransport trains, but who left their parents behind. i remember thejourney very well, yes. what i can't remember is leaving my parents. my father — my mother were dead already. ican't remember the parting. then, in the hall of remembrance, as the choir sang an anthem written by a jewish parachutist killed in hungary in 19114, the victims of the holocaust were commemorated. we unite with the blessed memory of six million of our people who died a martyr‘s death at the hands of the german nazis and their collaborators. william laid his wreath and stood
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for some moments in silence. this first official royal visit to israel has been long in coming, but the fact that finally it is happening is appreciated. this is an historic day. the excitement is felt throughout israel and britain, around thejewish world. and just to see prince william here is something very, very special. from yad vashem, william went on to the official residence of israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, and his wife. a formality, but an important one in the context of a visit when william will also meet the palestinian leadership. a visit to yad vashem has historical resonance, a meeting with the prime minister is a diplomatic courtesy. but it will be what william does during the rest of his visit that will define the underlying
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messages that the visit is seeking to convey. that message, conveyed through meetings with cross—community groups and his visit to the palestinian territories, is that peace can only be found through co—operation. nicholas witchell, bbc news, jerusalem. i want to take you to a beach of tel aviv. our camera has been moved away but it will show you the prince on the beach. in the background at the table. but they are moving the cameras away. while we look at that, we can talk to yolande knell is injerusalem. how is the visit perceived?” how is the visit perceived? i guess you could say there are mixed feelings on the israeli side. we have seen groups of well—wishers greeting the prince at certain
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points. around jerusalem. many israelis have said they think the visit is long overdue and it is the first by a british royal, first official visit, in the 70 year history of israel. on an official level, he has been welcomed by the israeli prime minister. the israeli government invited prince william. he has been met by the israeli president, who asked him to take a message of peace when he goes to meet the palestinian president tomorrow. a lot of ordinary people interested in the british royals because of the royal wedding last month, that raised their public profile. aside from that, in the israeli media there are commentators who are looking at this more sceptically, saying it is more about symbolism over substance, which is often the case when it comes to
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royal visits. they insist on them being nonpolitical. also some say that the schedule of the prince, which lists the visits to the old say to —— hull city later in the week as the palestinian occupied territories is controversial. it later annexed it in a move that was not internationally recognised. it seesit not internationally recognised. it sees it as its eternal undivided capital but the palestinians wanted as the capital of the future state of the sabre terminology —— say that the terminology being used is realistic and true and the british consul general said it is consistent with normal british diplomatic language with un security council resolution language. there has been no departure, he made clear, from
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british foreign policy. an idea on how this can become sensitive. an area so politicised. every detail of the schedule is closely scrutinised. thank you. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines taliban bomb—maker khalid ali is found guilty of plotting a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament mps urge the government to increase defence spending or risk influence with washington and nato allies two men have been killed and 18 other people have been injured after a collision between a bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. in the sport, dele alli is in contention, returning from injury and is available for the england match with belgium on thursday. will denmark or australia qualify alongside france? both those matches under way. and no goals in either
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game. butjust under way. and no goals in either game. but just as under way. and no goals in either game. butjust as i say that, per room have gone 1—0 ahead. britain's health service lags behind that in some other countries when it comes to treating conditions including heart attacks and some cancers. that's according to an independent report produced for the bbc. nhs england says it is ready to address the issues, and that the report highlights many areas of outstanding care. our health correspondent dominic hughes has the details. as the nhs approaches its 70th birthday, four major think tanks have posed the question — just how good is our health service? the answer seems to be "not bad, but could do better". when compared to 18 other industrialised countries, a relatively efficient nhs does well in areas such as protecting people from the financial burden of illness. but when it comes to health
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outcomes, it's less impressive. when treating eight out of the 12 most common causes of death — such as lung cancer or heart attacks — performance is worse than average. the uk has a lower number of doctors, nurses and other medical staff per head of population and the lowest levels of both ct and mri scanners — important for diagnosing illneses. it tells us some good things and it tells us some bad things. the good things are that we are inefficient, we have low cost barriers in terms of people getting access to the service. we're good at looking after some chronic conditions like diabetes and kidney disease. we're not doing so well at looking after some of the more serious illnesses like cancer and heart disease. the record on the treatment of cancer in particular highlights some of the weaknesses of the nhs. the uk has the worst record among comparable countries for pancreatic and colon cancer. gps, often the first port of call for patients with health concerns, believe this shows the pressures that exist in the system. this report has shown some areas
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that the nhs could do better. one of those is in cancer survival — though we are rapidly catching up, we've still got some improvements to be made. and for me as a gp, it's very sad because at the moment gps can't deliver the sort of care that we really want to deliver. we're full, there aren't enough gps, there's not enough time with each patient to do the things that we want to do. the areas where the nhs is doing well, such as treating long—term conditions like diabetes or kidney disease, show the health service can deliver first—class care. a health service that is running on scarce resources in terms of staff and equipment with health outcomes that in some areas are poor. we can speak to amberjabbal, who is the head of policy at nhs providers. it used to be given the nhs was the
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envy of the world that this report suggests otherwise. so, ithink envy of the world that this report suggests otherwise. so, i think what this report does is confirm things we have known for sometime, while there are things we should be incredibly proud of, there are areas such as health outcomes in certain diseases we need to make improvements in and i do not think anyone would dispute that. the difficulty from the report is the nhs does not seem good at treating what are treatable conditions. nhs does not seem good at treating what are treatable conditionslj what are treatable conditions.” think what is clear is trust leaders, i am from an organisation representing trusts and trust leaders are committed to making improvements in order to ensure the nhs is performing at a rate comparable to other countries, whether through research and innovation, which the nhs is known for, or whether it is learning from each other and spreading best
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practice across the nhs.” each other and spreading best practice across the nhs. i wonder how efficient do you believe the nhs is given this sort of evidence. what the report shows is the nhs is efficient, particularly as funding compared to other countries in the report is lower and we have fewer doctors and nurses working in the nhs. the nhs is extremely efficient compared to other public services we have here, and is doing very well in using the scarce resources it has. do you get fed up with reports like this? the thing to remember is we need to be incredibly proud of the nhs and what it achieves every day. as the report says, we are doing very well in providing universal health care, comprehensive services, free at the point of use, no one has
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to worry about accessing care when they need it. we need to be proud of that and celebrate it, particularly front—line staff working harder each year to cope with the rising demand and more people coming through their door every day. thank you. some sport. football. kick—off at a volleyball game. a mixture of something. prince william in tel aviv, continuing a tour of the middle east. and a kick from prince william starting off the volleyball match. he is meeting tourists, as well as dignitaries and officials on this visit to the middle east. this is the more relaxed part of it. earlier he with earlier he shared watermelons with tourists. at one of the beach—side
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cafes. that is the latest. a more relaxed tone for this part of the visit. and he is being presented with... i cannot see it. they will have to show the press so we will hold. tel aviv loves prince william. that is the way to see the prince in action in tel aviv. one more kick coming. is something going on? laughter. that is censorship for you! we will never know. a couple from southwest london have been jailed for life with a mimimum term of 30 years for murdering their french nanny last year.
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sabrina kouider and ouissem medouni beat and starved 21—year old sophie lionnet before burning her body in their back garden in wimbledon. our correspondent richard lister was in court for today's hearing when the judge handed out the sentence for this very distressing case. neither of the couple showed any real reaction as the sentence, the life sentence with a minimum term of 30 years before they can be considered for parole, neither gave any great reaction. they had anticipated something along those lines i think. the judge said it was a case of high seriousness and he made clear the sentence was going to be something of this order. that said, as they were led from the dock, ouissem medouni looked back and for a couple of seconds stared directly at sophie's parents, who have been in the trial throughout, hearing distressing details about how their daughter died. sophie went to work for the couple in 2016 and a year later, they became obsessed with the bizarre fantasy
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that the ex—boyfriend of sabrina kouider, mark walton, had somehow conspired with sophie to sexually abuse and drug the family. there was no truth in this, it was a fantasy from sabrina kouider, who seems to have persuaded medouni to go along with this and it became more intense, beating sophie, interrogating her and ultimately tortured her in a bath and eventually she was killed. it is not sure how that happened. it did and the next morning, they tried to burn her body and it was only when neighbours called 999 that the couple were arrested. in mitigation today, kouider‘s lawyer said he had a letterfrom kouider address to sophie that he wanted to read and he said, from kouider, i wish everyone to know
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how deeply sorry i am for what happened to sophie. it feels like a horrible dream and i only wish i could turn the clock back so it did not happen and you sophie would still be alive today. the judge said to the couple, the suffering and torture you put her through was prolonged and without pity. he said her spirit had been entirely broken by the couple and he said not to mention the broken ribs, cracked sternum and fractured jaw that gave an indication of what she went through before she died. he says sophie was shy, gentle, good—hearted, and he said the attempt to burn her body was the most dreadful desecration of her remains. he said he had no hesitation in adopting a stance whereby they would serve 30 years before being eligible for parole. drivers on parts of the london underground are to strike on the day of president trump's visit to the capital next month. the rail, maritime and transport union has announced.
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the strike is over staffing and working conditions and will affect the picadilly line. union members will walk out from 9pm on 11th july until 14th july. knight fever now. bee gees star sir barry gibb has said he hopes his late brothers are proud as he collected his knighthood at buckingham palace. the 71—year—old's moving tribute to his twin brothers maurice and robin came as he collected his award from the prince of wales. he is the last surviving member of the chart—topping disco pop band. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. if anything, hot weather is becoming increasingly widespread and yesterday brought 30 degrees close to london. today the warmest weather spreading further west. plenty of sunshine this afternoon with a small chance of a shower in northern ireland. tonight, this cloud across the north sea will try to rowley
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inland. some eastern parts will turn cloudy. —— to roll inland. tomorrow, a lot of hot sunshine again, but some eastern areas. cloudy. the cloud burning back out to sea but might linger close to some of the north sea beaches at times. cooler close to the east coast but elsewhere temperatures in the 20s parts of scotland and northern ireland getting close to 30 degrees. the heatwave continues towards the weekend but then there is a risk of thunderstorms spreading from the south. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: a british man has been convicted of planning a knife attack on police and mps outside the houses of parliament. mps have warned that britain will lose its influence with the us and other nato allies unless it increases defence spending by billions of pounds a year. two men have been killed and 18 other people have been injured after a collision between a bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. the duke of cambridge meets the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, after paying his respects at the world holocaust remembrance centre injerusalem. sport now on afternoon live with tim hague and, tim, more good news from the england camp? how the tide has turned in a short time. dele alli is back in full
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training with the england squad. that is the good news, after missing the win over an with a eyestrain. —— with a thigh strain. given the performance on sunday. would it be better for england to lose the match with belgium and come second? how mentality is to win every game we play, and we want to win every game. if we win every game, it builds a mentor to keep going in the tournament. we know belgium or a top opponent, and we need to be now a game to get the win. in our camp, we wa nt to game to get the win. in our camp, we want to win every game we play. we just want to keep winning and winning, and that will put us in good stead. it doesn't matter who we play next. to get to the final, you have to play the top teams. either way, you have to play them. that is how it will be.
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england in a confident mood at the moment. and two games are being played right now? one of denmark or australia will journey through. that one easily saved, of course. at the moment, the danes would be heading through in second as australia are currently losing 1—0 to peru, who cannot go through. the australians have to win to stand a chance of progressing. all the attention will be on argentina this evening, and lionel messi. they take on nigeria in saint petersburg. they also have to win to make through group d. they were outplayed by croatia in their last
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match, 3—0 the score there. lionel messi has been a shadow of his normal self. his team—mates says he has been under pressure for years with the he is carrying the whole country on his back on his own. how is he carrying that pressure? is it different from barcelona ? is he carrying that pressure? is it different from barcelona? i think so. he feels it. more people are expecting more from him than what he is required at barcelona. at barcelona, the quality is higher. they expected to score three goals every game, like he does at barcelona, but football is not that simple. as much as he is the best, it is difficult. tennis and johanna konta is continuing her preparation ahead of wimbledon. the british 11 is taking on the serbian at eastbourne. these are the pictures.
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it is 0-0 eastbourne. these are the pictures. it is 0—0 in the second. 15—15 at the moment. that is life on bbc two or the bbc sport website. anthonyjoshua's plaid heavyweight unification fight could be in doubt. joshua king macro promoter, eddie hearn, was reportedly close to finalising negotiations. the wba have lost patience and demanded he ta ke have lost patience and demanded he take on russia's entry instead or risk being stripped of the title. the scores are still the same in the world cup games. i will be back in the next hour. thank you. var had its most controversial night at the world cup yesterday. on four occasions across two games of football the referee stared at a pitchside camera to decide whether he made the right decision or not — with mixed results.
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two referees made simultaneous decisions in the 92nd minute of two games — spain won group b thanks to an injury—time equaliser against morocco and iran secured a draw against portugal after a late penalty award. so how has var fared so far? joining me now is dermot gallagher, who is a former premier league referee. first of all, that penalty, was it? not for me. this is why we are talking about var. there are a number of things that it has corrected so far in the world cup which would not be corrected. last night, a spanish goal was corrected for offside. what we have to be careful of is with var we embrace how good it has been to get us there. we know it is not perfect,
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not going to be 100%. but don't forget those decisions would have been wrong without their won anyway. the video assisted reverie. for you it was not a penalty last night? you watched the same replays that the referee did. it will make a bit of a mess of it, didn't it? i don't think it was a penalty. there is no doubt in my mind. when it went to var, i thought they were checking something else. i was even thought they were checking something else. 1 was even more thought they were checking something else. i was even more surprised when they were called back to look at it and even more surprised when he gave it. that said, that is what it is. it is his choice. at the moment, with the var in the world cup, it goes back to the referee, they make the choice whether to give a penalty or not. in that game, the var cause the referee more problems than solutions. we do have sent rinaldo off? i wouldn't. when you see it, it
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is not file and, it is petulant and aggressive. it is one of those situations where he runs a great risk. when you look at it, he hasn't punched him. it is not a brutal and malicious act. let's talk about spain. when you were watching that, what did you make of that goal?m is so tight when you see it. you can understand why the assistant flags. it looks like it is offside. that is the beauty of var with offside, it isa the beauty of var with offside, it is a perfect result. as you saw, the defender came up as the forward made his run. it was onlyjust onside. without var, it would have been given as offside. as a referee, is it actually helpful? if it can get
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results right, if it can get that spanish goal corrected correctly... i think that is what you have to look at. those three decisions would have all been wrong without var. it is no good throwing it under the bus on the strength of one decision last night, a penalty for portugal, or for a brand against portugal.m sounds like you would like to see it introduced into the premier league. without doubt, it is going to become. they have got a year to experiment, to get the communication right, because that is not right at the moment. it needs to be speeded up. each time they look at it and practice, they become more adept at what they are doing and will come to the conclusion quicker, there will be less stoppage time on the beach.
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last season, that was the big gripe, nobody knew what was happening, how long it was going to date. great aduu long it was going to date. great adult t. thank you for your time. pleasure. the met office has issued a yellow health warning for what they call heatwave conditions. this is from today until thursday. it is not bad news for everyone. i want to show another picture that has been sent into the weather department. this is a polar bear called vector. he is making a splash at the yorkshire wildlife trust today. 26.8 degrees, they say. just a great picture. showing it because we can! investment in britain's car industry has fallen by half, according to figures from the motoring sector. the society of motor manufacturers & traders says uncertainty due to brexit is preventing major car companies putting money into factories in the uk.
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our business correspondent, theo leggett, reports. not so long ago, the motor industry in britain was booming and posting record sales. but over the past year, it's gone into reverse gear. demand for new cars has fallen, production's declined and several manufacturers have announced job cuts. now investment is falling, too, and the smmt says uncertainty over brexit is to blame. the motor industry is worth £20 billion a year to the uk economy. it accounts for 186,000 manufacturing jobs. in the first six months of last year, new investment in the industry was worth nearly £650 million. in the same period this year, that figure had fallen to just under £350 million. more than a thousand lorries across the channel every day, bringing parts for car and engine factories in britain. manufacturers are now considering what to do if brexit triggers serious delays
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at the borders. the risks are always that countries enact some of those contingency plans. that can be in terms of supply chain sourcing, it can be in terms of future model allocation. it won't be overnight closure, but it could be a death by a thousand cuts. bmw makes minis here at its plant near oxford. the company's already warned it needs more clarity on what happens when we leave the european union. we look to a competitive environment, and that's something that we have to be very, very conscious of because, as a company, as an industry, we actually compete all around the world every single day. the government insists it's confident it can reach a good deal that works for both sides which it says will allow free and frictionless trade with our european neighbours. some car—makers have given the uk a show of confidence. nissan and toyota have both recently promised substantial new investment for their factories here. nevertheless, the smmt has pushed
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the horn button and sounded harsh warning about the future. theo leggett, bbc news. the transport secretary has been speaking at the smmt conference, and addressed concerns over brexit uncertainty. securing a good deal for the automotive industry, with the best possible access to european markets, remains one of our biggest brexit objectives. the prime minister set out her vision in march for the future of our relationship with the european union. we are moving ahead and making progress on withdrawal agreements, the motor industry is incredibly important to both the uk and eu, because we are a big importer of and eu, because we are a big importerof eu and eu, because we are a big importer of eu motor vehicle 's as well. it is in both of our interest to reach a good deal. police injamaica are questioning a man in connection with the murder of a british couple at the weekend. charlie and gayle anderson had retired to the island a year ago from manchester.
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from jamaica, nick davis reports. picturesque and idyllic. moving to their home in an area called mount pleasant, it was a new start for the retirees. but on friday, charlie and gayle anderson were brutally murdered and their home set on fire. gayle's partially burned body was found here at the front of the house. at the bottom of a steep embankment, charlie was discovered close to a fence. police think he was trying to escape and was only feet away from his neighbours' home before he was killed. he, too, was set alight. his neighbour says she looked over her fence and saw a body in the back yard next door. after she called her friend for help, they realised who it was. she also went to school with charlie and remembers how well he was liked in the community. she says everyone cried, and that he didn't deserve what happened, and they all spoke
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highly of charlie. as you walk up this driveway to charlie and gayle anderson's home, you can understand why they decided to retire here. there's the blue mountains in one direction, there's the caribbean sea in the other. it was their perfect home. unfortunately, now it's an active crime scene. there's police tape everywhere. last year, jamaica saw over 1,600 people murdered. there are states of emergency in two areas, but this part of the country is supposed to be one of the safest. well, we have one of the lowest crime rates anywhere for the past 15 or so years. although we are at seven murders this year, we are still the lowest injamaica. the couple had been back in the uk recently, after thousands of pounds was fraudulently taken from their bank account injamaica. police investigating locally have made two arrests,
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but it's not clear if the fraud is linked to their murder. nick davies, bbc news, portland, jamaica. rescuers in thailand have stepped up their search for a group of children believed to have been trapped in a flooded cave in the north of the country since saturday. 12 children aged between 11 and 16, together with their football coach, were exploring inside the cave's narrow tunnels, when a section near the main entrance was flooded. the underground network in chiang rai province is a popular tourist attraction in thailand, attracting thousands of visitors every year. the bbc‘sjonathan head is near the cave complex in chiang rai province. they brought hundreds more people in to join the operation. these guys came from the army. there's probably 50 or 60 people here. what their exact role will be isn't clear. you can see everything here has been churned into an appalling sea of mud by the numbers of people.
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the navy divers who have been trying to get through for the last couple of days have had no success at all up to now and it's only now we start to see people with real caving experience going into the cave entrance which is just around those bushes there. here's another lot going in. it's really quite a narrow area at the cave entrance. we're not sure whether they've got any good news or whether they're going to help with the rescue. we've seen this coming and going of all sorts of units, people from the border patrol police, people from the marine police going in and out all day long. so far they have nothing to show for their efforts. this is where you come into the cave complex. as you can see, these are the bikes that the boys left when they went in on saturday afternoon. they've been down there now for three days. obviously there is real concern about their state of health, although it's reasonably warm, possibly not too cool inside. the assumption is that they got cut off by rising floodwaters and that
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they're still alive. the trouble is this is a complex that goes back ten kilometres. the navy divers simply couldn't get through the narrow passages and they are hoping that some of the volunteers who have got more caving experience may have more success. we've seen a lot of oxygen tanks brought up here, they also have pumps on the other side which we expect them to start using. it's not clear where they'll pump the water from but they are trying to get the water levels down, although with the constant rain it's not clear what success they'll have, but this is very, very worrying for the relatives who have been coming up here and praying — at makeshift shrines they've put up in the forest — for a good result, for some kind of good news. they still haven't had it and they've still got no idea what state those boys are in, or which part of the caves they may be located. the headlines on afternoon live.
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taliban bomb—maker khalid ali is found guilty of plotting a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament. mps urge the government to increase defence spending or risk losing influence with washington and nato allies. two men have been killed and 18 other people have been injured after a collision between a bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. investment in britain's car industry has fallen by half, according to figures from the motoring sector. the trade body the smmt is blaming uncertainty over brexit. scotland's biggest pig processor is about to run out of carbon dioxide today, leaving it in danger of welfare issues. the gas is used to stun farm animals before being slaughtered. quality pork limited may have to send some animals to england to be processed.
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carpetright made a loss of around £70 million last financial year. sales also fell. the company's closing 81 stores as part of a rescue plan. notjust not just losses but big notjust losses but big losses at carpetright. £70 million. the year before, it made a profit of around £14 million, you can see what kind of trouble it is in. it has a turnaround plan, it is in. it has a turnaround plan, it is closing 81 stores and has rate some money from shareholders. the boss of the company says there is a long road ahead. joining us now is tom slide, retail analyst at mintel. what is up with carpetright? what has gone wrong? there are plenty of
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challenges for the bid has been a difficult year for carpetright. they spent a long time dealing with far too many stores. it has been closing stores since about 2011, it opened to many in the 1990s. it has been trying to close those. the reason it has come to a head now is because of growing competition in the sector it is in. that had its sales and made it more difficult to make that process over a long period of time. in 2015, a competitor opened by the former executive at carpetright. it has deliberately gone after carpetright customers. they have struggled to deal with that over the la st struggled to deal with that over the last couple of years. as those most profitable, best stores in the country, have tried to run more promotions and spend more money on
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their in—store environments, it has made it more difficult for the company to put off this dealing with its huge unwieldy store legacy that its huge unwieldy store legacy that it has. that has come to a head this year, and that is what you see with the profits. too many stores in the wrong places. yet the irony seems to be that the people who made those decisions are now behind the company thatis decisions are now behind the company that is giving them such grief. that is one of the big difficulties. a lot of these stores, some of which are really poorly performing, those leases were signed in the 1990s and early 2000. the facts now is that, as you say, the previous owners, a lot of the previous directors of carpetright now run a competitor which is compounding its problems. there is an irony in what is happening to them. is this turnaround plan going to work?”
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think it is difficult. it really needed a cva, it has been struggling to get out of the leases for a long time and now the pressure was on. it isa time and now the pressure was on. it is a legit and use of the cva process to downsize its estate. a lot of the newer stores do look good, it has a good online function and there is a lot of appeal there. there are a lot of challenges in delivering this. it has to spend a lot of time delivering the restructuring programme and closing those stores while trying to compete with its competitor which is rising at the rate it is. carpets are big investment which is something that you put your money down first and hope for a delivery later. if customers hear that carpetright is in trouble or going through a rocky period, they may be more reluctant to put that money down up front for
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a big purchase. you have seen their sales drop a lot in 2018, since the announcement of the cva, that shows what an effect that can have. thank you. a quick look at markets. the ftse recovering from yesterday. carpetright getting punishment from investors, and substantially today. carnival is doing well today, the cruise company coming back from losses. the commodities market is looking stronger, which is why we're seeing anglo—american going back up in price. thank you. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning, because of the high temperatures hitting much of the country. yesterday the thermometer topped 30 celsius in the capital, and similar is expected today. network rail has introduced speed restrictions, because of concerns that the tracks won't be able to cope with the heat, which is expected to last until the weekend. danny savage reports from blackpool. across virtually all of the uk,
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the heatwave continues, and quite understandably, many people like those in this park in london are making the most of the glorious weather. we were looking for a break from the queensland heat by coming here, and it's the same! it was 102 degrees when we left california, so this isn't so bad. but as too often happens there have been tragic accidents as people try and cool off. a search for a missing child at westport lake in stoke—on—trent resumed this morning after emergency services were called last night to reports that three youngsters were in difficulty in the water. two of the children are safe and well. the third is still missing. it is very difficult for us all. we are fathers, we are mothers. this impacts on us and the local area, and we are doing all we can just to work with that family just to reassure them and give them any type of comfort.
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in surrey, the body of a man was recovered from a lake. the message from police is not to swim in open water. further north, a large wildfire has left a pall of smoke hanging over large parts of greater manchester. it has been burning since sunday. people living close to the blaze on saddleworth moor are being told to keep their windows closed as firefighters try and contain it. the heat has slowed trains down, too. network rail says track temperatures could reach as much as 20 celsius above the air temperature, meaning the steel rails can expand and buckle. the reduced speeds are intended to lower the force exerted on the track, reducing the risk of problems. but when it comes to the hottest weather this week, west is best. day—trippers were lapping it up in blackpool this afternoon, with blue skies, blue sea and tranquil conditions. summer is here for a good few days yet. we are hearing from the met office
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that it we are hearing from the met office thatitis we are hearing from the met office that it is the warmest day of the year so far, reaching 30.2 celsius in wales. that is officially the hottest day of the year so far. as we we re hottest day of the year so far. as we were hearing, already predictions that it will go well into the weekend. a yellow health warning for heatwave conditions. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. good afternoon. if anything, the hot weather is becoming increasingly widespread. yesterday brought 30 degrees close to london. today, the warmest of the weather spread further west. just a small chance of a show across northern ireland. during this evening and night, all
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of this cloud you see sitting across the north sea will try to roll in. some eastern parts will turn cloudy and murky. further west, some eastern parts will turn cloudy and murky. furtherwest, clearskies and murky. furtherwest, clearskies and temperatures no leather —— no lower than between 11 and 14 celsius. some places to the east. of cloudy, which will burn the way in the large part. temperatures will happen to the 20s and parts of scotla nd happen to the 20s and parts of scotland and northern ireland getting close to 30 celsius. the heatwave continues as we head towards the weekend, then there is the risk of some thunderstorms breading from the south. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4. taliban bomb—maker khalid ali is found guilty of plotting a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament. if you want to maintain influence with washington and nato you need to spend more money — mps call on the government for a big increase in the uk's defence budget.
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two men are killed, including a bus driver. and seven people seriously injured — after a crash between a double decker bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — tim haig with the latest. in the world cup, france through already, while denmark or australia join them, looking like the danes. and ben with the weather. the warmest day of the year so far and temperatures will stay pretty high, the heat is becoming increasingly widespread, all the details on that and details about one place in europe where it isn't so hot at the moment. that's on the way. also coming up, prince william receives a warm
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welcome in tel aviv as he becomes the first royal to make an official visit to israel and the palestinian territories. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. a british man has been found guilty of planning a terror attack in westminster and making bombs for the taliban. khalid ali was arrested in april last year in parliament street, where he was caught carrying three knives. he had recently returned from afghanistan, where he made and detonated bombs. a jury at the old bailey convicted him of preparing an act of terrorism in the uk, and two counts of possessing an explosive substance with intent. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has the details. go back, go back, go back! leave him, mate. you got him? the moment when armed officers stopped an al-qaeda supporter launching a knife attack on whitehall. do you have everything on you that may hurt, or hurt anyone else?
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it was april last year, barely a month after the traumatic westminster bridge attack. another knife. third knife! khalid ali was carrying three brand—new knives. he had bought them just two hours earlier. he had been born in saudi arabia to a somali father and ethiopian mother, but grew up in north london. he first came to the security service's attention on an aid convoy to gaza in 2010. we are going to do it out here in gaza. taking it to the next level. you feel me? one love. kieren turner was in charge of logistics on the convoy and told me he remembers ali well. at that point i thought, a nice young man, this will be one of the people that's fun to travel with. he had a sense of humour. i remember him because he always smiled. also on the convoy were some die—hard extremists, including thomas evans,
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who was later killed fighting with al—shabab in kenya. within a few months, khalid ali was himself in afghanistan, making bombs for the taliban. his fingerprints later found by the americans on these detonators and remote controls seized in the south—east of the country. in police interviews, he admitted setting off 300 bombs himself. how many times have you pressed the button to cause an explosion? probably more than 300 times. the main target for ali's bombs or ieds were ordinary afghan soldiers like this man. he injured his leg and shoulder and lost an eye when his vehicle was blown up. translation: ieds are more dangerous than anything else, more than face—to—face fighting. most of my friends who got killed or injured, it was by ieds. when khalid ali suddenly returned to heathrow in 2016, suspicious counterterrorism officers took his fingerprints. when these were checked with prints
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kept by the fbi at this huge warehouse of improvised bombs found in afghanistan and iraq, police got a match. by then, ali had resumed his life in north london but, as a suspected bombmaker, he was now kept under surveillance and last march he was seen talking to police at the gates of downing street. in april, he was recorded walking past mi6 on a reconnaissance trip. just after noon on april 27th, he bought three sabatier knives in wilko's in ealing. he took the tube to victoria and then walked to westminster, dropping his phone in the river thames and his oyster card in a rubbish bin. having dumped all the evidence and now carrying just an empty backpack and three knives, khalid ali headed towards whitehall and downing street. he was armed and ready. but, by this point, so were the police. when he headed to whitehall in possession of three knives, that is when we decided to act.
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until that time we managed the risk, using techniques to manage that risk, but he was arrested at the appropriate time using armed police officers. the al-qaeda bombmaker had been stopped just 200 metres from the downing street gates. daniel sandford, bbc news, whitehall. earlier i spoke to our correspondent leila nathoo, who was at the old bailey and asked her what khalid ali's reaction was to the guilty verdict. no, simon, there was no reaction at all from khalid ali when he heard those verdicts. it's been a three—week trial here at the old bailey, the jury took just over two days to convict him. that rather dramatic footage you saw that of khaled ali being arrested in whitehall, back in april last year, remember the context was just after the westminster bridge terror
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attacks, and it was those knives that he was carrying, the three knives, along with the fact that he had carried out surveillance of the area in the previous days and the month before at a demonstration that led the jury to convict him of planning a terror attack. intending to attack a police officer, a member of the military or an mp on that day that he was apprehended by armed police. but as you heard he had also taken himself to afghanistan some six years earlier, disappearing from the family home in north london. telling his family he was taking on plumbing work in birmingham. in fact he made his way to afghanistan where, as you heard from daniel he became a bomb maker. also at his trial, his defence was that he had gone to pakistan as a tourist, had been held under duress, against his will, held captive and forced to make those bomb components parts that his fingerprints were found on, in order to prove that he was not a british spy.
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the jury here at the old bailey rejected that defence from khalid ali. he will be sentenced next month. it's being described as one of the toughest battles facing britain's military — the battle for more funding. today it opened on a new front as the commons defence committee said the uk will have to significantly increase spending if it is to maintain influence with washington and nato allies. they argue the defence budget should rise from 2% of gdp — that's £40 billion — to 3% — that's £60 billion. it's needed, they say to — among other things — counter possible threats from russia. it's a political battle too — reportedly leading to an increasingly acrimonious row between the defence secretary, gavin williamson, and the treasury and the prime minister. richard galpin reports. the first of a new generation of stealth fighter aircraft arriving in britain earlier this month. the raf and navy are due to have 138 of these american—made planes. the price tag for each one — more than £90 million. these, plus the construction of two aircraft carriers and other
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expensive equipment, landing taxpayers with a bill estimated in the tens of billions. sinking the defence budget. and for some, the solution is a big increase in military spending. the first thing in our report is saying — does defence matter, does nato matter, do we need to provide the capability to ensure the defence and security of our country and our people? and if that requires some additional money, then that surely is one of the first priorities of government. will you break the prime minister if she doesn't give you more cash? the defence secretary, gavin williamson, is also pushing very hard for a hike in spending. and there is pressure coming from further afield. these nato exercises are partly designed as a show of unity amongst members of the western alliance, particularly with the increased
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threat from russia. but washington is demanding that member states contribute much more to the costs of the alliance. for britain and its military forces, this is turning into a key moment, according to some analysts. can it afford to remain a major global power? we have slightly deluded the public of late that we have a defence programme which, frankly, we know, the insiders know, those who run the select committees are aware, is unaffordable. so we are to an extent living a lie. and, so far, the government seems to be standing firm in rejecting any significant increase in defence spending. richard galpin, bbc news. two men have died and 18 people have been injured following a crash between a double—decker bus and a lorry in the cambridgeshire fens.
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one of those killed is believed to be the driver of the bus. the crash happened around 7.30 this morning on the a47 in guyhirn near wisbech. angus crawford reports. a straight road, good conditions, then this. the lorry pulling out of its depot. the bus with 20 passengers on board. the driver's cab and front of the upper deck crushed and broken. the first call came early this morning. seven ambulances and other specialist teams were sent. a major incident was initially declared and the air ambulance scrambled. the injured have been taken to hospitals in peterborough and king's lynn. and an investigation has already begun. on dry roads with good visibility, how could this have happened? angus crawford, bbc news. prince william has remembered the six millionjewish people killed in the holocaust — during the first official royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. the duke of cambridge met the israeli prime minister,
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benjamin netanyahu, after paying his respects at yad vashem — the world holocaust remembrance centre. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports from jerusalem — his piece contains some flash photography. there can be few places with a more solemn resonance. william came to yad vashem, israel's memorial to the six million jewish people killed by the nazis in the holocaust of the second world war. it is the first obligation of any official visitor to israel to pay their respects here. in the museum, william spoke to survivors of the holocaust. two men, who, as children, were rescued on the kindertransport trains, but who left their parents behind. i remember thejourney very well, yes. what i can't remember is leaving my parents — well, my father — my mother was dead already. ican't remember the parting.
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singing. then, in the hall of remembrance, as the choir sang an anthem written by a jewish parachutist killed in hungary in 1944, the victims of the holocaust were commemorated. we unite with the blessed memory of six million of our people who died a martyr‘s death at the hands of the german nazis and their collaborators. william laid his wreath and stood for some moments in silence. this first official royal visit to israel has been long in coming, but the fact that finally it is happening is appreciated. this is an historic day. the excitement is felt throughout israel and britain, around thejewish world. and just to see prince william here is something very, very special. from yad vashem, william went
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on to the official residence of israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, and his wife. a formality, but an important one in the context of a visit when william will also meet the palestinian leadership. a visit to yad vashem has historical resonance, a meeting with the prime minister is a diplomatic courtesy. but it will be what william does during the rest of his visit that will define the underlying messages that the visit is seeking to convey. that message, conveyed through meetings with cross—community groups and his visit to the palestinian territories, is that peace can only be found through co—operation. nicholas witchell, bbc news, jerusalem. prince william attended a cultural event in tel aviv. our middle east correspondent yolande knell was in jerusalem. mixed feelings on the israeli side, we have seen groups of well—wishers
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turning out to greet the prince at certain points along the way around jerusalem, many israelis fear that this visit is long overdue. it is the first by a british royal, the first official visit in the 70 year history of israel. on an official level he has been welcomed by the israeli prime minister, of course it is the israeli government who invited prince william here. he has been met by the israeli president ruben rivlin as well who asked him to ta ke ruben rivlin as well who asked him to take a message of peace when he goes to meet palestinian president mahmoud abbas tomorrow. a lot of ordinary people interested in the british royals because of that royal wedding that took place last month, that really raised their public profile. aside from that, in the israeli media there are some commentators who are looking at this more sceptically, saying that this is more about symbolism of a
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substance which of course is often the case when it comes to royal visits, they insist on them being nonpolitical. but also some say that the schedule of the prince which lists is visits to the old city late in the week as being in occupied palestinian territories, that is something controversial for israelis. israel was captured the eastern part ofjerusalem in the 1967 middle east war and later annexed it in a move that was not into recognised. israel says all of jerusalem as its eternal undivided capital but the palestinians want eastjerusalem to capital but the palestinians want east jerusalem to be capital but the palestinians want eastjerusalem to be the capital of their future state. they see the terminology used by buckingham palace officials is real, realistic and true. honours but to the british consul general he said this is very consistent with normal british diplomatic language, with united nations security council resolution language, there has been no
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departure from existing british foreign policy —— one i spoke to the british consul general. just an idea of how sensitive things can become, an area that is so politicised, every small act of the prince, every detail of his schedule is being closely scrutinised. yolande knell injerusalem. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. taliban bomb—maker khalid ali is found guilty of plotting a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament. mps urge the government to increase defence spending or risk losing influence with washington and nato allies. 2 men have been killed and 18 other people have been injured after a collision between a bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. and well denmark or australia qualify alongside fans in group c at the world cup? denmark or drawing with australia nil nil, but one team
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has scored its first world cup goal for 30 years. and dele alli is back for 30 years. and dele alli is back for england after his thigh injury and could play against belgium on thursday. more on all these stories that have passed. —— at half past the hour. britain's health service lags behind that in some other countries when it comes to treating conditions including heart attacks and some cancers. that's according to an independent report produced for the bbc. nhs england says it is ready to address the issues, and that the report highlights many areas of outstanding care. our health correspondent dominic hughes has the details. as the nhs approaches its 70th birthday, four major think tanks have posed the question — just how good is our health service? the answer seems to be "not bad, but could do better". when compared to 18 other industrialised countries, a relatively efficient nhs does well in areas such as protecting people from the financial
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burden of illness. but when it comes to health outcomes, it's less impressive. when treating eight out of the 12 most common causes of death — such as lung cancer or heart attacks — performance is worse than average. the uk has a lower number of doctors, nurses and other medical staff per head of population and the lowest levels of both ct and mri scanners — important for diagnosing illneses. it tells us some good things and it tells us some bad things. the good things are that we are efficient, we have low cost barriers in terms of people getting access to the service. we're good at looking after some chronic conditions like diabetes and kidney disease. we're not doing so well at looking after some of the more serious illnesses like cancer and heart disease. the record on the treatment of cancer in particular highlights some of the weaknesses of the nhs. the uk has the worst record among comparable countries for pancreatic and colon cancer. gps, often the first port of call for patients with health concerns, believe this shows the pressures that exist in the system. this report has shown some areas that the nhs could do better.
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one of those is in cancer survival — though we are rapidly catching up, we've still got some improvements to be made. and for me as a gp, it's very sad because at the moment gps can't deliver the sort of care that we really want to deliver. we're full, there aren't enough gps, there's not enough time with each patient to do the things that we want to do. the areas where the nhs is doing well, such as treating long—term conditions like diabetes or kidney disease, show the health service can deliver first—class care. a health service that is running on scarce resources in terms of staff and equipment with health outcomes that in some areas are poor. dominic hughes, bbc news. at 5:30pm with will look at the first of these reports produced for the bbc. with two experts and what
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you would like to know about nhs performance, send in your questions, saint usa performance, send in your questions, saint us a text or send them by e—mail. a couple from southwest london have been jailed for life with a mimimum term of 30 years for murdering their french nanny last year. sabrina kouider and ouissem medouni beat and starved 21—year—old sophie lionnet before burning her body in their back garden in wimbledon. our correspondent richard lister was in court for today's hearing when the judge handed out the sentence for this very distressing case. neither of the couple showed any reaction when this sentence was handed out of 30 years minimal to be served, 1 think they had been anticipating something along those lines, in thejudges guidelines for sentencing he said it was a case of high seriousness. he made it clear that the sentence would be something
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of this order. that said, as they we re of this order. that said, as they were led from the dock ouissem medouni looked back and for a couple of seconds stared directly at sophie's parents, who have been at the trial throughout comic earrings and distressing details about how their daughter died. essentially sophie went to work for the couple injanuary sophie went to work for the couple in january 2016 and sophie went to work for the couple injanuary 2016 and about one year later they became obsessed with this bizarre fantasy that sabrina kouider‘s ex—boyfriend, mark walton, had conspired with sophie to sexually abuse and drug the family. there was no truth in this whatsoever. it was simply a fantasy from sabrina kouider. she seems to have persuaded ouissem medouni to go along with it, the beta sophie and interrogated her for hours and ultimately tortured her in a bath and eventually she was killed. it is not entirely sure how that happened. the next morning, they tried to burn her body and it was only when neighbours raised the alarm and
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called my 99 that the couple were arrested. in mitigation today, sabrina kouider‘s lawyer said that he had a letterfrom sabrina kouider addressed to sophie that he wanted to read to the court. the letter read, iwish everyone to know how deeply sorry i am for what happened to sophie. adding, it feels like a horrible dream and i only wish! could turn the clock back so that it never happened and you sophie would still be alive with us today. judge nicholas hillyard qc said to the couple, the torture you put her through before her death was prolonged and without pity. he said, the spirit had been entirely broken by the couple and he said, not to mention the broken ribs, the cracked sternum and the fractured jaw which gave some indication of what she went through before she died. he said sophie was a shy, gentle good—hearted girl and he said the attempt to burn her body was the
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most dreadful desecration of her remains. he said he had no hesitation in adopting a stance whereby they would serve 30 years before they are eligible for parole. richard lister at the old bailey. the london fire brigade officer in charge of the initial operation to fight the fire at grenfell tower has said he started to feel outside of his comfort zone as the fire spread up the tower block. for a second day, watch manager michael dowden has been giving evidence to the public inquiry which is currently examining what happened on that night. our correspondent tom burridge is at the inquiry. for the second day he found it too tough? he had more confidence today but i still think he founded harrowing when he talked about what happened. in those moments when he and his colleagues arrived at grenfell tower, he was questioned this afternoon in particular about the moment when the fire showed signs of spreading out of the area around the kitchen
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window of flat 16. in his written submission to the inquiry he had said that he remembered the fire was behaving like burning magnesium. he told the inquiry today that in that moment he had no previous knowledge or experience to fall back on. he said he was out of his comfort zone. in the first half—hour or so of him and other crews being at the scene he upgraded the incident on several occasions. by half an hour he had upgraded it and told the cold room essentially that ten fire engines we re essentially that ten fire engines were needed to fight the blaze at g re nfell tower. were needed to fight the blaze at grenfell tower. and it was highly unusualfor an grenfell tower. and it was highly unusual for an officer of his grenfell tower. and it was highly unusualfor an officer of his rank to still be the incident commander atan to still be the incident commander at an incident on that scale. but by then he was also questioned, at that moment, whether he still felt that the advice being put to residents to stay in their flats inside the advice being put to residents to stay in theirflats inside khalid ali was still appropriate. this is
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the exchange, michael dowden from the exchange, michael dowden from the london fire brigade is who you will hear. for me at that moment in time to facilitate and change the policy to a full evacuation was impossible. i didn't have the resources at that time. we were looking at 20 floors above the fire floor, with just six fire engines and attendance and one central staircase. it's something i've never experienced before. iwas very much out of my comfort zone. i just don't know how that could have been done with the resources we had in attendance at this moment in time. the first time we have heard michael dowden say that he did not think that the state put policy was appropriate, yet has he says he didn't have the resources to implement a massive evacuation. the strategy by the london fire brigade, giving bad advice to residents, was
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still in place roughly two hours after the fire began, the first 999 images equal. earlier michael dowden spoke about his observations when he arrived at the tower, about seeing an orange glow. he was asked if he knew there was flooding on the building. he said he didn't spot that. it wasn't an observation he made. he will continue giving evidence tomorrow as the inquiry goes on. simon. thank you tom. drivers on parts of the london underground are to strike on the day of president trump's visit to the capital next month, the rail, maritime and transport union has announced. the strike is over staffing and working conditions and will affect the piccadilly line. union members will walk out from nine pm on 11th until the 14th of july. a case of knight fever at buckingham
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palace. bee gees star sir barry gibb has said he hopes his late brothers are proud as he collected his knighthood at buckingham palace. the 71—year—old's moving tribute to his twin brothers maurice and robin came as he collected his award from the prince of wales. he is the last surviving member of the chart—topping disco pop band. we are known as the bee gees, very bbc! let's look at the weather with ben ridge. a record breaker? it's a record in terms of this year. we haven't beaten any records from the past. but it is the hottest day this year so far. don't get too excited because you never know, by the end of this week there might be an even today. i want to try to build you up next time. it is nice and most people. mice in liverpool, 30.2 degrees, which is higher than the flintshire where we've had the highest temperatures today, but it makes get a bit higher, you never know. while it is lovely here, it
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isn't like that across europe. what isn't like that across europe. what is it like near the alps? it's almost like he knows what's coming! it's nice here, with high pressure, but in greece this is an area of low pressure, which means rain. the blue stuff. and the green means heavy rain. quite heavy done. not pleasant if you are in greece this week. the alps, you can see the way this wet weather is fringing. that's what we've seen in the last few days. if rain gets to the alps, does it turn to snow maybe? do you know what, sometimes it can, money in the winter although sometimes it can happen in the summer. yes i do have pictures! the snow has been falling in slovenia, even at the end ofjune. this is not that unusual in this part of the world. they do get snow. it's almost
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3000 metres up in this place in the alps when i hadn't heard of before today, the julian alps when i hadn't heard of before today, thejulian alps. looking at these pictures you feel cooler. if you wanted to go there, maybe for tomorrow, you'd be cooler as well. and then i could get to talk to ben again. and of course pay for your ticket! shall i get on? thank you simon. we've been chasing the heat around the country this week. yesterday it was 30 degrees near london, today 30 degrees in north—east wales, not far off that, north devon. if you've been in northern ireland and scotland wondering at high temperatures are, to tomorrow and thursday it could get to 30 degrees. high—pressure still in charge, as that drifts su btly still in charge, as that drifts subtly northwards, it will introduce more of a flow of wind around a high. that is essentially scooping up high. that is essentially scooping up the heat we had in the south—east yesterday, moving it towards north—east wales today, it's going
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to continue to push it northwards over the next couple of days. this isa over the next couple of days. this is a satellite picture, sonny the most, one area of cloud has moved across northern ireland into western scotla nd across northern ireland into western scotland and could bring a spot of rain, extra clout for north—eastern counties but in the sunshine as temperatures should hold up for the rest of the afternoon, in the high 20s or 30s degrees. this evening and tonight a fine end to the day with clear starry skies, then this lump of cloud in the north sea will try to roll in towards eastern england and eastern scotland by the end of the night. temperatures won't drop far, 11—14. tomorrow as you wake up, across eastern scotland and eastern england quite a lot of cloud, some mist and england quite a lot of cloud, some mistand milk england quite a lot of cloud, some mist and milk as well. i'm hoping that will burn its way back towards the coast and back to sea and we will see the sun is to the skies and west. let's take a look at the east coast for tomorrow afternoon, see the yellow colours, that shows things will be cooler, some areas of
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cloud may lap onto the shore at times, mistand mug cloud may lap onto the shore at times, mist and mug and low clouds pushing onto some of the beaches so the forecast for some terms on the east coast for the next few days shows temperatures will be suppressed. some areas of cloud at times although not a complete write—off. elsewhere in scotland, northern ireland and northern england wallop into the high 20s, perhaps up to 30 degrees —— well up. the heat continues, 2930 degrees in cheltenham for example. when does this change? there are signs that of the weekend the area of high pressure will drift away to the north, low pressure trying to push its way up from the south. lots of uncertainty about the timing but it looks like although we will see a sunny weekend things will turn more humid with the risk of thunderstorms particularly on sunday. that's all from me. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: a member of the taliban, who claimed to have detonated more than 300 bombs in afghanistan, has been convicted of plotting
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a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament. mps have warned that britain will lose its influence with the us and other nato allies, unless it increases defence spending by billions of pounds a year. two men have been killed and 12 other people have been injured after a collision between a bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. prince william receives a warm welcome in tel aviv as he becomes the first royal to make an official visit to israel and the palestinian territories. sport now on afternoon live. good afternoon. france are already through from group c, but one of denmark or australia willjoin them. it's currently 0—0 in moscow, france's olivier giroud it's been a couple of days since we
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had a game here in the capital. we are looking forward to this one. the french fans have been fantastic in the streets in the build—up to this match. their players and the danish players not so much. we are 15 minutes away from our first goalless draw at the world cup. olivier giroud had a half chance saved by schmeichel in the first half. that will be good enough for the french, who are through, but the danes only needed a point to join the french who are through, but the danes only needed a point tojoin the french in the last 16. as it stands that is bad news for the australians. peru will take home really a couple of good goals. a cracker set up by theircaptain, good goals. a cracker set up by their captain, who got their second. their first world cup goals since 1982 was a fantastic for them that they managed to get something to ta ke they managed to get something to take home. france will top the
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group, denmark will be second. we wait to see who they play. it could bea wait to see who they play. it could be a nailbiter in group e. all eyes will be on saint petersburg and how argentina get on against nigeria. the argentinians had one point they got ina the argentinians had one point they got in a draw against iceland. they have to beat nigeria, but where will those goals come from? lionel messi has looked like a little boy lost. he has missed penalties and free kicks that were not hitting the spot. hardly got any touches at all. they have to beat nigeria and hope that iceland slip—up against croatia. lionel messi has to step up to the plate. their talisman is under pressure. how does he had that pressure on
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him? is it different than when he's at barcelona? he feels that. more people are expecting more from him than at barcelona. at barcelona, the quality is higher put here, they expect him to score three goals like at barcelona. at football is not that simple. as much as he is the best, it is difficult. make or break for them, but more good news for england. yes, dele alli taking full part in training today. their only full dre before they travel tomorrow for the thursday night match against the belgians. dele alli seems to be over the side strain. a full 23 to choose
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from. then what? who would he choose? what would you choose? finishing first or second. here is what england's goalkeeper thinks about their position. our mentality is to win every game we play. we wa nt to is to win every game we play. we want to win every game and i feel like if we win every game it keeps building momentum to keep going in the tournament. we know belgium are top opponent, and we need to be now a game to get the win. i feel our squad, but —— we want to win every game. peru are still beating australia. they are going home in a matter what. it is goalless. i had forgotten about goalless straws! it has been too good for that so far. plenty of other
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sport on today too, including a win for britain's johanna konta. she's beaten serbia's aleksandra krunic in straight sets 6—1, 6—3 at eastbourne. she'll face caroline wozniacki next. that's it for now — there'll be more in the next hour. well, this time yesterday we were talking about borisjohnson — and his visit to afghanistan while mps were debating heathrow expansion. during exchanges in the commons he was asked about his attitudes to business following concerns raised in some quarters about brexit. our chief political correspondent, vicki young, has more and joins me now from westminster. yes, he is neverfarfrom the headlines. there were concerns about business and jobs in this country. there were reports that boris
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johnson used a four letter expletive to dismiss those concerns of businesses. as you say, today in the house of commons he was asked specifically whether he could justify those comments.” specifically whether he could justify those comments. i don't think anybody pot i may have from time to time experts —— expressed scepticism in the viewpoint of business. theresa may refused to say whether she scolded borisjohnson for this was a she said was important that the government continue to listen to business and they did have a right to speak out. what is the next step in the brexit negotiations? you have businesses starting to speak out about their concerns, and the government response being, we
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have got a transition deal, that is what they wanted, and we believe strongly that we will get a good dealfrom the eu strongly that we will get a good deal from the eu that everyone can get behind. but there are still some unresolved issues, and the way that theresa may is trying to resolve those in her only team is to invite them to an away day at her official country residence, checkers, dubbed a sleepover. we don't know how long they will stay, but we expected to be next friday, and that is all manners of the cabinet getting together and trying to resolve this issue of what kind of customs relationship there will be. the two options are still on the table, despite those in favour of brexit do not like the option of a customs partnership. they will have to thrash that out, and on till they do that, there is not a lot of progress they can make. there is a summit at they can make. there is a summit at the end of the week, but it does not like it will be the big event when it comes to brexit negotiations that we once thought. it is pushing a lot
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of this to october, the autumn. as people keep saying, some of these issues and decisions are being deferred, but there will of course, moment when decisions have to be made. are you asking those flag—wavers to give you a bit of a breeze? idid not give you a bit of a breeze? i did not know they were there. i cannot see them. luckily, they are not shouting. this is true. thanks very much. see you later. more now on the nhs and a report produced for the bbc says britain's health service lags behind other countries when it comes to treating common, life—threatening illnesses. earlier i spoke to amberjabbal, the head of policy at nhs providers. he said that the nhs is aware that improvements do need to made. —— she said. i think that what this report does is actually confirms some of the things we have known for some time. which is, while there's a lot about the nhs that we should be incredibly proud of, there are areas such as
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health outcomes in certain diseases that we definitely need to make improvements in. and i don't think that anyone would dispute that. the difficulty from this report is that the nhs doesn't seem to be particularly good at treating what are eminently treatable conditions. i think what's clear is that trust leaders say — i'm from an organisation that represents trusts — and trust leaders are really committed to making the improvements that need to be made in order to ensure that the nhs is performing at a rate which is comparable to other countries. whether that is through research and innovation, which the nhs is known for around the world, or whether it's learning from each other and actually spreading best practice across the nhs. ijust wonder how efficient do you believe the nhs is, given this sort of evidence? i think actually what the report shows is that the nhs is extremely efficient, particularly as funding,
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compared to some of the other countries in the report, is much lower, and actually they have fewer doctors and nurses working in the nhs. but the nhs is extremely efficient particularly compared to other public services that we have here, and is actually doing very well in using the scarce resources that it has available. do you get fed up with reports like this? i think the thing to remember is that actually, we need to be incredibly proud of the nhs and what it achieves every day. as the report says, we are doing very well in providing universal healthca re, comprehensive services, free at the point of use, no one has to worry about accessing that care when they really, really needed. and actually we need to be proud of that and celebrate that, and particularly when we have front—line staff working harder and harder each year to cope with the rising demand and the more people coming through their door every day. and at 5:30pm, we'll be
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looking at the first of these reports produced for the bbc — how good is the nhs? — with two experts. what do you want to know about the nhs's performance? you can send in your questions using the #bbcaskthis, text 61124, or send them via email — askthis@bbc.co.uk. it says on the label that petroleum jelly can help protect minor cuts, scrapes and burns. but new research suggests using it to cover a fresh wound might not be such a good idea. scientists have studied how the skin creates its own "natural plaster" to help heal injuries. let's speak to professor robert ariens from leeds university, who's behind this research. have i pronounced your name
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correctly, that is my first question. yes, that is correct. some people would say that particularly with burns, petroleum jelly is the first thing they will reach four. that is not good idea? our research shows that it is not a good idea. what we found is that the clot makes it own perfect plaster, it makes a film that covers the entire clot, which is made from a protein which isa which is made from a protein which is a densely packed but allows the clot to breathe. it stops the red cells from leaving the clot and bacteria getting in. petroleum jelly humour b doesn't let any aryan. —— petroleum jelly presumably doesn't let a ny petroleum jelly presumably doesn't letany air petroleum jelly presumably doesn't let any air in. certain surfactants stop the film from falling. we tested that with oil and petroleum jelly. both of those stop the film
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from forming on the clot, so you get a clot without the protect if film. we found that if you stop the film from forming, you get increased infection. what is the best thing to do but you might leave it as it is? in our view, the best thing to do is for 30 minutes let the clot and use its own film. once that is formed, its own film. once that is formed, it should be stable. if you really wa nted it should be stable. if you really wanted to apply petroleum jelly, it could be done after this. what would be best in my opinion is to avoid petroleum jelly or together with these cuts and skin injuries. what about antiseptics, other things? these cuts and skin injuries. what aboutantiseptics, otherthings? is it best to leave, burns and scolds in particular, them? it is best to leave them. if an infection starts, disinfectants are important. in the first 30 minutes, it is best to let
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the clot develop it own plaster. we found that to be highly effective in protecting against infection. what about if there is blood involved? how do you stop the bleeding?m about if there is blood involved? how do you stop the bleeding? in my view, it is better to use bandages or sutures if they are needed to stop the bleeding. but the clot will be very effective in stopping that bleeding if it is only a minor cut. there is no need in that case to apply the petroleum jelly. in our view, it is best to leave the clot to occur by itself. fascinating stuff. thank you forjoining us. thank you. in a moment, the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. taliban bomb—maker khalid ali is found guilty of plotting a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament. mps call for a significant increase in defence spending in order to maintain the uk's influence with washington and nato allies.
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two men have been killed and 12 other people have been injured after a collision between a bus and a lorry in cambridgeshire. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. investment in britain's car industry has fallen by half, according to figures from the motoring sector. the trade body the smmt is blaming uncertainty over brexit. scotland's biggest pig processor is about to run out of carbon dioxide today, leaving it in danger of welfare issues. the gas is used to stun farm animals before being slaughtered. the country is facing a shortage because because of production issues. but it's thought the shortage should start to ease within a couple of days. carpetright made a loss of around £70 million last financial year. sales also fell. the company's closing 81 stores as part of a rescue plan. huge losses at carpetright after
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su ccesses huge losses at carpetright after successes last yea r. profits of about £40 million, can lead to £70 million in losses this year. it is in a real and out of trouble at the moment. one of the big issues is they have too many stores in the wrong places. they are really having to battle back. that is why they have got this plan to close 81 stores as part of a restructuring plan. the boss of the company says there is a long road to travel before things get back to where they should be. more on this now. joining us now is lawrence gosling, editorial director at what investment? magazine. what has gone specifically wrong with this company? pretty much
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everything, which is why in the city people are naming it all sorts of things. too many stores in the wrong places in their economic cycle, because we do not buy carpet every week. and increased competition? yes, more high street players, more online competition in particular, and the like online offering of treble has not been great. i don't think there are many people who are betting on that. there are too many loss—making stores. we are probably heading into a much flatter economic period in the run—up to brexit. let's talk about the car industry.
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investment halved in the last year or so. investment halved in the last year orso. again, investment halved in the last year or so. again, more investment halved in the last year orso. again, more of investment halved in the last year or so. again, more of the brexit uncertainty. if you are an international, new factor, and the uk is one of your big plants, you will not invest any money in it until you have some certainty as to what the post exit landscape is going to be like. less than a year away from that, we have very devil detail, especially for the car industry. if you are sensible boss, you are not invest a lot of money in that type of environment. one last question. resident trump, really angry at harley—davidson threatening to ta ke angry at harley—davidson threatening to take some production away from the us because of eu sanctions. what do you make of that? it is ironic, they are moving their production to thailand to get around the sanctions. mr trump has said it is the beginning of the end for harley—davidson, which would mean it
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was the end for an iconic american business. that is the business. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning, because of the high temperatures hitting much of the country. yesterday, the thermometer topped 30 celsius in the capital, and similar is expected today. network rail has introduced speed restrictions, because of concerns that the tracks won't be able to cope with the heat, which is expected to last until the weekend. danny savage reports from blackpool. across virtually all of the uk, the heatwave continues, and quite understandably, many people like those in this park in london are making the most of the glorious weather. we were looking for a break from the queensland heat by coming here, and it's the same! it was 102 degrees when we left california, so this isn't so bad. but as too often happens there have been tragic accidents
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as people try and cool off. a search for a missing child at westport lake in stoke—on—trent resumed this morning after emergency services were called last night to reports that three youngsters were in difficulty in the water. two of the children are safe and well. the third is still missing. it is very difficult for us all. we are fathers, we are mothers. this impacts on us and the local area, and we are doing all we can just to work with that family just to reassure them and give them any type of comfort. in surrey, the body of a man was recovered from a lake. the message from police is not to swim in open water. further north, a large wildfire has left a pall of smoke hanging over large parts of greater manchester. it has been burning since sunday. people living close to the blaze on saddleworth moor are being told to keep their windows closed as firefighters try and contain it. the heat has slowed trains down, too.
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network rail says track temperatures could reach as much as 20 celsius above the air temperature, meaning the steel rails can expand and buckle. the reduced speeds are intended to lower the force exerted on the track, reducing the risk of problems. but when it comes to the hottest weather this week, west is best. day—trippers were lapping it up in blackpool this afternoon, with blue skies, blue sea and tranquil conditions. summer is here for a good few days yet. a video of a spanish police of a dog peforming cpr has, as you might expect, gone viral. the madrid police department shared the video on social media of a dog performing cpr on a officer. poncho sprang into action when his partner fell to the ground
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and pretended to be unresponsive. the dogs actions mimic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. the dog repeatedly used its front paws to pound up and down on the officer's chest while pausing to place its ear on the officer's neck to detect a pulse. poncho continued until the officer stood up. police wrote poncho "did not hesitate for an instant" to save a life. that's it from your afternoon live team for today. next the bbc news at five. time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. this hot spell of weather is shows no sign of letting up. if anything, weather is shows no sign of letting up. ifanything, it weather is shows no sign of letting up. if anything, it is becoming more widespread. yesterday, temperatures up widespread. yesterday, temperatures up to 30 degrees in the london area. today, it moves further west. as we
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head into the weekend, parts of scotla nd head into the weekend, parts of scotland and ireland will reach up to 30 degrees was of it is rare to see to bridges this high this far north is early in the year. more than easterly breeze, which will give some eastern coast school, but heat from the south is brought more heat from the south is brought northwards into northern ireland and scotland. this is how we finish up this afternoon, lots of sunshine, very small chance of a show across northern ireland, and some cloud close to the north sea coasts. going through this evening and overnight, some of that cloud with some mist and murk will head further inland into eastern areas. elsewhere, starry skies overhead. temperatures between 11 and 14 degrees. wednesday, a relatively warm start,
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eastern areas likely to start off a bit cloudy and murky. i am hopeful that much of that will burn away out to sea. some patches of cloud and folk could linger towards some areas of the east coast. from the yellow colours on the temperature chart, it will be cooler close to the eastern coastal areas will stop further west, deep oranges and temperatures well up into the net to high 20s. some patches of fog and cloud may linger on the east coast was not a com plete linger on the east coast was not a complete write—off. they will be suppressed in next few days. for much of scotland, northern ireland and northern england, a lot of sunshine to enjoy. further south, the heat goes on with some long spells of strong sunshine. wendy things change? the weekend does bring something of a change. high pressure likely to drift northwards, low pressure approaching from the south. there is some uncertainty about the timing, but we could see
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some thunderstorms working in. more humid with - risk of thunderstorms humid with the risk of thunderstorms later. today at 5pm — a taliban bomb—maker has been convicted of planning a terror attack in westminster. khalid ali was arrested on whitehall, where he was caught carrying three knives. we were managing the risk, we were using various different techniques to manage that risk, but he was arrested at the appropriate time. we'll have the latest developments. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm: prince william has remembered the six millionjewish people killed in the holocaust, during the first official royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. mps call on the government for a big increase in britain's defence and other nato allies. england goalkeeperjordan pickford dismisses the idea it might be better for the team to finish second in their world cup group, and insists their mentality
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is to win every game.
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