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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 27, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today: homes are evacuated as a huge moorland fire in greater manchester continues to spread. this is the scene live in stalybridge. the fire has been declared a major incident and the army are on standby to help. plans to build five new prisons for women are scrapped. a new strategy will aim to cut reoffending rates. messi shines at last. argentina are still in the world cup after a late, late winner. that was against nigeria. and will this heatwave continue? carol will have all the weather through the programme. it's wednesday the 27th ofjune. our top story: more than 30 homes have been evacuated as a huge moorland fire continues to spread in greater manchester. the blaze on saddleworth moor has been declared a major incident and the army is on standby to help out. mark lobel reports.
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into its third day, an enormous fire in an area of upland, east of manchester, rages on. smoke from the pennine moors has been spreading since sunday. it's causing major disruption and fear. nearby, at least 3a houses have been evacuated. residents here maybe next. the smoke was really, really, sort of, dense, and you could hardly breathe, plus your eyes were burning as well. firefighters, gamekeepers and farmers have all been tirelessly trying to put out the fire but, as yet, it's been impossible to get under control. it's very hot, hot conditions when you're up there trying to fight the fire. the vastness of it, one of the biggest
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ina long vastness of it, one of the biggest in a long time i've seen. the fire is even visible from space. here's the smoke showing up on imagery from nasa. it's been declared a major incident. greater manchester police say they've spoken to the army, who are on standby. amid health and safety fears, two schools in the affected area a re safety fears, two schools in the affected area are closing today and hundreds of residents have been warned to keep their windows and doors shut. unlike many parts of britain looking forward to the predicted temperature rises over the next few days, for those living nearby, it's a far more precarious proposition. mark lobel, bbc news. quite dramatic pictures. for the latest we can go to our correspondent dave guest, who's in stalybridge. people there are trying to put it out at this point? what's going on? well, louise, as you say, they're still trying to put out the fire, showing no signs as yet of being put out. the ground around here has been tinder dry now for several weeks, which has made things worse. i was up
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which has made things worse. i was up on the moors yesterday with the firefighters, the wind constantly whipping up flames from nowhere. you can see it is smoking a lot behind me, they are trying to beat it out, hot, heavy work for the firefighters. before you came to us, more flames erupted on the ridge behind me. this is only a small section of the land affected, a huge area of moorland has been devastated. it's a site of special scientific interest, so the whole thing looks like it will pose an ecological disaster for this area with rare flora and fauna and animals affected by the fire. as you say, more than 30 homes in the area we re say, more than 30 homes in the area were evacuated last night. people went to stay with friends and relatives, a local church opened up if they needed it. but certainly this emergency showing no signs of resolving itself yet. we can see that. dave guest, thank you very much, thank you, we will be back with you later. the government has scrapped plans forfive new women's prisons in england and wales.
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the same number of residential centres will be built instead. they will provide help with getting a job and treating drug addiction in a bid to reduce the number of women being jailed for low level offences. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. american "prison doesn't work for many women." for years, that's been the message from reformers. the majority of female offenders are assessed as low or medium risk and commit nonviolent or low—level offences. and many keep being sent back to jailfor minor crimes. women make up about 5% of the prison population in england and wales. nearly 60% have suffered domestic abuse, and many have mental health problems. 70% of those on short sentences will go on to reoffend. now the ministry ofjustice says rather than women going to prison, there will be a network of residential centres where they can be given help to turn away from crime. women can get the support that they need to turn their lives around, to stop them reoffending. that helps us bring down crime and it helps make sure that we get people on the right track.
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there are currently nearly 4,000 women injails across england and wales. campaigners have welcomed this major shift in position by the government when it comes to dealing with the female prison population. june kelly, bbc news. donald trump has praised a supreme court decision to uphold his travel ban, which prevents people from several muslim—majority countries from entering america. lower courts had deemed the ban unconstitutional, but the top us court reversed the decision. at a white house meeting, mr trump described it as a great victory for the nation. taxes and regulations should be used to encourage people to lead healthier lifestyles according to a new report. the independent analysis, produced for the bbc, suggests the public want the government to intervene and highlights the success of the smoking ban and sugary drinks tax. the experts behind the report say it should be used to justfy policy which could help relieve pressure on the nhs. 0ur health correspondent dominic
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hughes has more. of of compulsory seatbelts in cars was one of the most important public health measures introduced by the government. at the time critics said this was at the action of a nanny state but it led to a drastic reduction in road traffic deaths and injuries. since then, we seems measures, like the smoking ban and a sugar tax, and now a new report says the public supports government action. the majority of the public eye in favour of governments taking some of these interventions, such as limiting fast food outlets near schools, limiting advertising of junk food before 9pm on television, and also things like the smoking ban. these are things the government does have control over. but the report also says that individuals have a responsibility to look after their own health. at this scheme in leeds, these middle—aged men are doing just that, coming together to hone their carpeting
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skills while also tackling the loneliness and isolation many of them have experienced post retirement. you've just got somebody to tuk—tuk, you're not just you've just got somebody to tuk—tuk, you're notjust sat on your own being so bored —— talk to. it is one of the best things i've discovered since retirement. it is one of the best things i've discovered since retirementlj it is one of the best things i've discovered since retirement. i think the main thing is camaraderie. when you live by yourself it can be quite lonely. the social, physical and economic environment we live in is the biggest influence on our health. there is public support for government measures that help people to break down those environmental barriers to good health. dominic hughes, bbc news, leeds. heavy rains are continuing to hamper efforts to find a group of young football players and their coach who are missing inside a cave in thailand. rescue workers have been fighting a losing battle to pump water from the cave network. thai soldiers and volunteers are amongst those trying to find the group as the search enters its fourth day. if they're in the right place, they
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could survive for five, six days. but the water now, the floodwater, is getting higher and higher. so there will be a point in time where this cave here, even the entrance, will close. the duke of cambridge will visit the palestinian territories today as he continues his tour of the middle east. he'll meet the palestinian leader mahmoud abbas. the trip also marks the first time a member of the royalfamily has been on an official visit to israel. 0ur royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports from jerusalem. it's one of the longest—running and most intractable conflicts in the world. the tensions between the israelis and palestinians have lasted for generations, and seem to show little sign of abating. for william, on his first visit to both israel,
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and later today to the palestinian territories, it is proving to be a sharp lesson in how difficult it is to resolve such a deeply rooted rivalry. he spoke about it last night at a speech at the british embassy in tel aviv. this region has a complicated and tragic history. in the past century, the people of the middle east have suffered great sadness and loss. never has hope and reconciliation been more needed. i know i share a desire with all of you, and with your neighbours, for a just and lasting peace. later this morning, in ramallah, william is due to meet the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas. he will spend several hours in the palestinian territories, meeting different groups. he will spend several hours in the palestinian territories meeting different groups. britain is keen to send a message that peace can only come about through cooperation and mutual respect, and that is the message that william's visit is intended to emphasise. nicholas witchell, bbc news, jeruslalem. a solidified lump of fat, oil and grease that has been on show at the museum of london could be preserved after proving popular with visitors.
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the piece of fatberg comes from a so called monster fatberg, which had been blocking sewers in east london. it was going to be removed from display this week but may be kept as an historical artefact. it is back by popular demand! so popular! it! charlie, you need to go and visit and visit it, now you've got time. bash back by popular demand... it's a lesson for us about not pushing things down the drains. sorry to introduce the sport with that story. very careful what we put down the drains! shall we change the subject and talk about diego
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maradona? fatbergs to diego maradona, not sure how that's going to work! was he the star of the show or was it the player ors on the pitch? i think it was both. what a bizarre performance. he had to have medical treatment, he was overcome at one point, he is fine. he was watching argentina and the drama, history or x, he was watching argentina and the drama, history orx, the naughty rude gestures were not going to show this morning, lots of that went on. —— histrionics. argentina were four mintues away from an early exit last night but messi was on form at last and marcos rojo's winner against nigeria took them through to the last 16. sorry to see nigeria's fantastic it to leave the competition. —— fantastic kit. they'll face france, who played out the first goalless draw of this world cup with denmark, who also qualified. we will get the chance to see england train at their repino base this morning, before making the journey to kaliningrad for their group decider
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against belgium. and in the run—up to wimbledon, british number one johanna konta is through to the third round at eastbourne, where andy murray will face kyle edmund today. it's going to be warm. it is isn't it! we'll get the weather with carol in just a moment, but it's fair to say it's a scorcher wherever you are this morning. she might use the scorchio word.|j love it when she does that! let's have a look around the uk. here's the scene in central london. carol will have the weather to tell us carol will have the weather to tell us the temperature but it will be a warm day everywhere. it's looking particularly prettty outside our studios here in salford quays. at 4am this morning it was 18 degrees. which is something, isn't it? it's a lovely morning in glasgow. maybe not quite so lovely actually in glasgow but hot there later.|j heard a rumour, carol, that glasgow was going to have its hottest day of
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the year. is that right? good morning! she's not ready. we will leave that question hanging because she's not quite with us yet. she's ata she's not quite with us yet. she's at a vineyard, i don't know how, she might be able to tell us later, about how the weather will affect the crops. the weather is having a bearing on what's happening at the fires in stalybridge. it is our main story this morning. you can see as our cameras closing on the smoke. we are waiting to hear from the fire services this morning. —— close in. we are waiting to hear the details. we are waiting to hear the details. we know lots of fire emergency services are in place on saddleworth moor. fires have been raging since monday, when they first began, and real problems, houses evacuated. you get a sense of the smoke. it can be
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seen for miles around in and around the manchester area. we will keep you up to date with that. we expect some kind of briefing later in the morning from the fire services. carol shortly as well and whether having an affect that too. let's take a look at today's papers. the front page of the times, swimmers throwing caution to the wind in aberystwyth as temperatures across the country rose to 30 degrees, bringing warnings of wildfires. so tempting to be doing this kind of thing. we will talk about open water swimming and things you should be looking out for later on the programme. this is a worrying story. we could run out of beer. yeah! there's various reasons, because there's not enough c02. the most unprecedented combination of an extended heatwave and back—to—back victories in the world cup lifted our move but we are facing a beer crisis. some cafes and pubs are
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being rationed. the biggest wholesaler rationing... i am panicking myself! they are rationing supplies in response to a critical shortage of carbon dioxide. hub james allen brewers warning that some drinks could run out in days. and considerable demand tomorrow, thursday evening? —— pub owners and brewers. and also a sunny weekend with the barbecues! many other papers using the images of the duke of cambridge at the holocaust memorial injerusalem, of cambridge at the holocaust memorial in jerusalem, yesterday, of cambridge at the holocaust memorial injerusalem, yesterday, as this trip to the middle east continues. word we have those pictures on the other papers. and, sadly, i'm sure you won't mention this in your sports bulletin, this is the wives and girlfriends of some of england's world cup stars for a japanese meal —— sally. not sure what they ate but sally might know that. in st petersburg yesterday. it's not a great tradition but it's a tradition to see what they're
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wearing, what they are up to. a bit more relaxed. on the front of the mirror as well. it's been more relaxed at this time around. mirror as well. it's been more relaxed at this time aroundlj relaxed at this time around.” rememberthe relaxed at this time around.” remember the sad old days in baden—baden, there were photographers everywhere, the wives and girlfriends were having their photographs ta ken walking and girlfriends were having their photographs taken walking about, going for a coffee, out with their kids. it was all over the papers. going for a coffee, out with their kids. it was all overthe papers. i wonder what's different this time. that picture on the papers is something they have posted through social media. i do think it has calmed down a little bit this time around. do you think it is the balancing act between now we have something to talk about with the football we don't have to talk about that so much. and years ago when we had victoria beckham and david beckham, there were cameras following her everywhere. coleen rooney, same thing. and what is
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inside? i have completely lost my place. no, it is fine. gareth southgate is a great coach, there is no doubt about it. but he has been all over the world, basically, and he has stolen bits of coaching from different sports. he has spoken to ellyse christie's coach, she is a speed skater, he has spoken to the cycling coach, he has studied the nba's defensive systems. and what has been the most striking thing about england at the world cup? in terms of their tactics, their set pieces have been brilliant. that boring thing you do on the training pitch over and over again, practising and practising, they have been great. that may be down to the research he has been doing. 0ne been great. that may be down to the research he has been doing. one more quick piece for you. i love this. it isa quick piece for you. i love this. it is a bit naughty, but i will say it anyway. john mcenroe talking about
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working at the berlin. john mcenroe saying i deserve my bbc salary. he says, very honestly. i misquoting him quietly, —— slightly. i bring extra to the broadcast. martina navratilova was earning less, and thatis navratilova was earning less, and that is quite a distance. she is now happy and that has been resolved.” enjoyed both their contributions, and they have their own distinct style. i admire someone saying, do you know what? i am good at this, andi you know what? i am good at this, and i am worth it. we are in the midst of a heatwave, and it is going to continue. carol has the best job of the morning. she is at england's largest vineyard, where the warm weather promises a bumper crop. she can tell us about that and what will happen with the heat. good
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morning. good morning all. you are quite right. i am morning. good morning all. you are quite right. iam in morning. good morning all. you are quite right. i am in the surry hills and you can see vines as far as the eye can see. 265 acres, and here they produced sparkling and fruity wines. we will be talking about this through the course of the morning but let's talk about the temperatures, first of all. yesterday was the warmest day of the year so far. we hit 31 celsius in cheshire. it was dirty .7 celsius to be precise. 0ther cheshire. it was dirty .7 celsius to be precise. other parts of the country also saw some high temperatures —— 30.7 celsius. yesterday we had high as widely in the high 20s. for example, in parts of wales we hit 30.6. in northern ireland we were up there with 27, 28, as we were in parts of scotland. today the highest temperatures are likely to be in northern ireland and scotland, where once again we could
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hit 30 celsius. now, the other thing about today is uv levels are high and the pollen levels are very high as well. if you are just about to head out, bear that in mind. high pressure is still firmly in charge of our weather. nothing much is moving, we have imported a lot of low cloud, mist and fog through the east coast through the night, and as in previous days, most of this will burn back to the coast and a lot of it will lift from the coast. like yesterday, there will be patches that stick. a breezy day across parts of south—east england and the channel islands. move away from here, a lot of dry, sunny and warm or hot weather in the cards. as we head on through the evening and overnight period, we will start off with a lot of sunshine. 0nce overnight period, we will start off with a lot of sunshine. once again, through the evening and overnight, we will import all this low cloud, mist and fog from the north sea. still breezy across the south—east and the channel islands. temperatures not falling as low across parts of the north—west of
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england, cumbria and northern ireland, for example. we start tomorrow on a very similar note. a lot of clear skies and sunshine, but still with all this low cloud and mist and fog from the north sea in eastern counties. like the last few days, it burns back towards the coast, and little pockets of it here and there will stick. but a lot of it will actually left, and tomorrow we could have highs of 30 in scotla nd we could have highs of 30 in scotland and northern ireland in particular. maybe 31 in the central lowlands. elsewhere we are looking widely at the mid to high 20s. so still very warm or hot. by the time we friday, a bit of a change in the horizon, because we have some cooler aircoming infrom horizon, because we have some cooler air coming in from the north—east. so although it will still be pleasa ntly so although it will still be pleasantly warm, if you like it in the 20s, across the north of the country it is not going to be as hot as it has been. further south, once again we will be looking at temperatures of up to about 27 or 28, and still that low cloud has to
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burn back towards the east coast, as on previous days. goodness me, thank you very much. we will be with you throughout the morning. with temperatures soaring, many of us are looking for ways to cool down. but there is a new warning against swimming in open water. yesterday the body of a man was recovered from a lake in surrey, and the search for a boy last seen in a lake in stoke—on—trent is due to resume this morning. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is in walton—on—thames to find out how to stay safe in the heat. good morning. yes, good morning to you. walton—on—thames this morning isa you. walton—on—thames this morning is a beautiful spot, with all of the beautiful weather we have been having. there are renewed warnings about the potential risks of swimming in open water. this is the river thames, we are talking about rivers, lakes, disused quarries, things like that. as you say, they have been some tragedies recently, a body recovered earlier this week in
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another spot in surrey and a boy also missing in staffordshire, as well. so what is the situation with regards to open water swimming? is it ok to do in certain situations, or not? peter is from an organisation called specialist group international, and you provide rest you services for police forces. that's right, we provide diving operations from kent to the thames valley. and you were involved in the incident earlier in the week, as well. should people swim in open waters, or not? organised events are fine, but diving into rivers, there are hidden hazards. there is soft mud, you could get your feet stuck in the mud and you won't come up. there is rusty metal on the bottom, and there is leptospirosis, a waterborne disease from rat you're in. there are people who swim in open water without incident. what do you say to them? one well, some are
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lucky and some are not. the gentleman on monday nightjust went for a gentleman on monday nightjust went fora swim. it gentleman on monday nightjust went for a swim. it is very cold. you jump for a swim. it is very cold. you jump into the water, it shocks the body, constrict the chest and you get tired very quickly. so for those who take part in an organised event or decide to go swimming, what are the key things to bear in mind? they need to bear in mind that there are undercurrents. the water is so cold out there, and you have to be careful. if you have young children, put them in a buoyancy aid or a lifejacket. if you are working on the back of the boat, where a lifejacket. we have a gentleman falling off the back of his boat and drowning, that is the second one in the last two years. we had eight drownings in surrey in 2016 that we had to recover, and it is not good for anybody. do you think this is becoming more of an issue? are more people being tempted to swim? there
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are, there are a lot of people who do things called tombstoning, and the average age is about 15 that we end up recovering. in the water is not warm. it is icecold, it is a sudden shock to the system. if you area sudden shock to the system. if you are a triathlon swimmer you are used to it, but if you are not used to it, and it is less buoyant. saltwater is more buoyant and it is not as buoyant in fresh water. interesting words of advice there. the advice is only do this if you are part of an organised event and you have the correct equipment. it is this spontaneous decision making to go for a quick swim which so often ends in a very bad out come. thank you very much indeed. and he was talking about doing it in a safe environment. we know that there are triathlon clubs which organised open water swimming, if you look it up on the internet there are various
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places where you can go where it is monitored and there is safety therefore you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. hospitals in london say they're spending increasing amounts on equipment specifically designed for obese patients. bbc london has discovered the number of larger mortuary fridges, which can accommodate people weighing more than 30 stone, has risen by a third over four years. obesity is now costing the nhs in the capital up to £1 billion a year. this unit costs us £3500. it can cope with people up to 30— a0 stone. the trays we bought are equipped to handle that weight as well. it is not just the fridges that are getting bigger. 0ur purses are getting bigger. 0ur purses are getting bigger, our limousines are getting bigger, our limousines are getting bigger, our limousines are
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getting bigger, everything is getting bigger, everything is getting bigger, everything is getting bigger, and we are equipped to ta ke getting bigger, and we are equipped to take bigger people —— hearses. the mayor, sadiq khan, will call for a joint approach to tackling knife crime today, when he addresses police, politicians and community groups from across the capital. it comes on the first anniversary of his knife crime strategy. almost 50 people have been fatally stabbed in london this year, most recently a 15—year—old boy in romford at the weekend. kensington and chelsea council is asking residents if they want the number of buskers in the borough reduced or even banned. the council receives 12,100 complaints of noise pollution and anti—social busking every year. people are being asked whether busking should be restricted to certain times with loud instruments like drums banned. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the london 0verground between surrey quays and crystal palace and west croydon, that's due to a signalling problem. in walthamstow, the a10a lea bridge road is closed in both directions between markhouse road and the junction with argall way, due to a burst watermain. and in lower holloway the a503 camden road is closed southbound between hillmarton road and dalmeny avenue due
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to a serious accident. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. there is a little bit of cloud at their first thing, at least. that cloud will burn away quickly leading to a dry, hot and very sunny day. that cloud retreats back towards this clear blue sky. a gentle easterly breeze, and temperatures today very similar to yesterday. high uv and very high pollen count. the temperature reaching between 26 and 28 celsius. a lovely evening, warm sunshine before it sets, and an overnight tonight a repeat performance of last night, really. the cloud rolls back in againfrom night, really. the cloud rolls back in again from the east. potentially be the best mixed in as well. the minimum temperatures between 11 and 13 celsius. 0nce minimum temperatures between 11 and 13 celsius. once again, tomorrow morning that cloud will burn away very quickly, leading to a very dry, hot and sunny day. very similar conditions if not the same for friday. a touch cooler for saturday,
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but still very warm in the sunshine. there is a risk, however, of one or two showers for sunday, especially as we had overnight into monday. but all in all there is not a lot of rain in the forecast. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello, you're watching breakfast with charlie stayt breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: temperatures could reach 30 degrees today as the uk heatwave continues. we're out and about looking at how the sunshine influences what we buy and brings a welcome boost for retailers. using satellites to improve life on earth, we'll speak to a group of young inventors who've won the chance to pitch their space tech ideas to a panel of top industry experts. we can all remember
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the first cd we ever bought, but what about the last? as new research suggests music fans are shunning them in favour of digital streaming and vinyls, we'll explore what the future holds for the compact disc. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. more than 30 homes have been evacuated as a huge moorland fire continues to spread in greater manchester. the blaze on saddleworth moor has been declared a major incident and the army is on standby to help out. mark lobel reports. into its third day, an enormous fire in an area of upland east of manchester rages on. smoke from the pennine moors has been spreading since sunday. it's causing major disruption and fear. nearby, at least 3a houses
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have been evacuated. residents here may be next. the smoke was really, really, sort of, dense, and you could hardly breathe, plus your eyes were burning as well. firefighters, gamekeepers and farmers have all been tirelessly trying to put out the fire but, as yet, it's been impossible to get under control. it's very hot, hot conditions when you're up there trying to fight the fire. the sheer vastness of it, one of the biggest i've been on in a long time. the fire is even visible from space. here's the smoke showing up on imagery from nasa. it's been declared a major incident. greater manchester police say they've spoken to the army, who are on standby. amid health and safety fears, two schools in the affected area are closing today and hundreds of residents have been warned to keep their windows and doors shut. unlike many parts of britain looking forward to the predicted temperature rises over the next few days, for those living nearby, it's a far more precarious proposition. mark lobel, bbc news.
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that's what's been happening overnight. i think we can see it. no, we were going to go to live pictures. we will go back to that story later with our cameras and keep you up to date. the government has scrapped plans forfive new women's prisons in england and wales. the same number of residential centres will be built instead. they will provide help with getting a job and treating drug addiction in a bid to reduce the number of women being jailed for low level offences. the french president, emmanuel macron, says six eu countries, including france, have agreed to accept a share of more than 230 migrants stranded on a rescue ship in the mediterranean. malta, said it would allow the migrants to land only if other eu countries took a quota, but has now agreed to let the ship dock. taxes and regulations should be used to encourage people to lead healthier lifestyles, according to a new report. the independent analysis, produced for the bbc,
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suggests the public want the government to intervene and highlights the success of the smoking ban and sugary drinks tax. the experts behind the report say it should be used to justfy policy which could help relieve pressure on the nhs. if the government is serious about wanting to improve health, it needs to use the levers it has a available to use the levers it has a available to do something about that. that means, you know, using regulation, using tax. for example, previous effo rts using tax. for example, previous efforts and initiatives that the government has used, such as the smoking ban, has had a huge impact on people's health. so we know that legislation can really make a difference. heavy rains are continuing to hamper efforts to find a group of young football players and their coach who are missing inside a cave in thailand. rescue workers have been fighting a losing battle to pump water from the cave network. thai soldiers and volunteers are amongst those trying to find the group as the search enters its fourth day. this is a picture of them before
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they went into the cave. if they're in the right place, they could survive for five, six days. but the water now, the floodwater, is getting higher and higher. so there will be a point in time where this cave here, even the entrance, will close. the duke of cambridge will visit the palestinian territories today as he continues his tour of the middle east. later this morning, he'll meet with palestinian leader, mahmoud abbas. the trip also marks the first time a member of the british royalfamily has been on an official visit to israel. certain jobs are best left to experts, and it seems that the restoration of 16th century art is one of them. an attempted restoration of a wooden sculpture of st george, carried out by an arts and crafts teacher in spain, has been lambasted by art purists. that has made sally laughed. me too!
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—— laugh. shall we look again? to compare the two, theyjust don't look the same! spain's art conservation association said that the restoration shows a frightening lack of training. imean... is i mean... is one imposed upon the other? it's more of an interpretation. over the top of it. he looks a lot more surprised in the second one. " what's happened to me?" probably thousands of euros worth of damage. where do you go from there? did a betterjob than i could have done, i couldn't have even started! last night did you see one diego maradona watching argentina and,
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perhaps, at times, worry for his health? in fairness to him, i will say this, in fairness to him there was a lot of drama on the pitch and argentina, thejeopardy was a lot of drama on the pitch and argentina, the jeopardy was was a lot of drama on the pitch and argentina, thejeopardy was massive. it was made more massive by everyone at home going, is he all right? he did have a bit of medical treatment but he is fine, he flew back to moscow last night and his people say he's absolutely fine. there's nothing wrong with him, it was the stress of the game. i'm really sad nigeria have gone out because best kit, best travelling outfits, best tracksuits, i have loved watching them in this competition! yes, argentina are through to the knockout stages but only by the skin of their teeth. patrick gearey reports. for once, lionel messi can ride on someone else's shoulders and. in marcos rojo, he had a fellow heroes. so much was expected from messi in what could have been his last world cup standard. the world was watching him, apartfrom
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cup standard. the world was watching him, apart from a second from the nigeria defence. the few moments of perfection, messi can do this to a nation, to an icon. that's what it means but argentina grew tetchy, touchy. javier mascherano's of a tactile approach cost a penalty. what pressure now on nigeria's victor moses? not that he seemed to realise. the chelsea playerflipped the game. argentina were on the brink of intimate, heading out of the competition, but at this stage and instant can make scapegoats into heroes. rojo's centre roared across continents from st petersburg back to buenos aires, the defender the saviour and the heartbrea ker. to buenos aires, the defender the saviour and the heartbreaker. that might have been pretty much irreleva nt might have been pretty much irrelevant if iceland had won. a penalty from guilty sigurdsson got them level against croatia, one more would send the competition's smallest nation through but in searching for it they left space for croatia's perisic to win the game
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and end iceland's adventure. but still a performance to be applauded with a fitting, passing clap. so argentina will play france in the last 16. they played out the first goalless draw of this world cup, against denmark, but that point was enough to take the danes through to a meeting with croatia. now to england. they train this morning before heading to kaliningrad for the game against belgium, which will decide who finishes top of the group. thoughts are turning now to gareth southgate's team selection, but we were talking yesterday about suggestions england could play for second place in the group, and possibly an easier route through later on. the answer to that is apparently a firm no. it's about what we're going to do and how we're going to approach each game. i don't think there's been any focus whatsoever on the teams we could face in the knockout stages. we feel confident we can beat anyone, and we get will be repairing
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for that. —— preparing for. belgium seem relaxed ahead of the match too. they resumed training yesterday and pulled off a successful attempt at the head tennis challenge. england will be hoping those celebrations remain confined to the training ground. 0n the actual tennis courts, johanna konta is through to the third round at eastbourne, her home town. she said she was happy with her straight sets win over serbia's aleksandra krunic, and she feels she's continuing to raise her level in the run—up to wimbledon. she faces caroline wozniacki next. i'm looking forward to that.” haven't played her in quite some time and she's obviously a grand slam champion this year so she's playing some great tennis. i'll really look forward to that battle. this time last year, the smart money would've been on andy murray to win a match against kyle edmund. but now edmund is british number one and murray is still rediscovering his best form after that long injury lay—off. they meet at easbourne this afternoon. he's obviously played unbelievably
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well. he is now up in the top 20 in the world and, you know, is only going to improve. you know, i think he's going to keep going higher. he has a really good team of people working with him. you know, he's got weapons and, yeah, he's done extremely well and it will be a very tough match for me. and finally, there have been plenty of animals predicting world cup results, with varying levels of success, but none quite as cute as this little guy. he clearly found south korea and germany equally tasty, not sure which he went for in the end but he really enjoyed the game.
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i don't know whether that is a draw... 0r whether that is whatever was in the box was better. there we 90, was in the box was better. there we go, really quite yummy! how many more animals do you think we could have predicting results of football matches? none of them for me have compared with the octopus. yazidi, i went to the aquarium to find the octopus. did you? i was involved in the whole octopus thing, it was very odd —— you see. involved in the whole octopus thing, it was very odd -- you see. can you remember his name?” it was very odd -- you see. can you remember his name? i met the octopus but after i did there was debate about whether it was the right one or not, there might have been more than one. things concerning me this morning, there's the chance we could run out of beer because of the hot weather and a lack of c02. doesn't that mean fizzy drinks of any kind? it might mean that as well, we will cover it on bbc breakfast. a reminder of the england game tomorrow? they are
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playing belgium. you have to say, the games england have played so far, the opposition hasn't been too much of a challenge. into tomorrow, the game against belgium is their first real challenge to see how they are first real challenge to see how they a re really first real challenge to see how they are really playing, to see how they measure up. having said that, neither side really needs to win. you could say both teams might want to lose it to finish second in the group! it is a tea kick off, slightly earlier than some of the evening games, 6pm? around that time, so get home early from work, by your peers on the way home, open the doors and windows and put the big tv on. thanks very much! today ben is talking about the hot weather and the impact on sales in a good way. we're talking about open water swimming, how to keep safe and the dangers and carol will have the weather from a vineyard. the latest ideas on how to use
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satellite technology to improve life on earth and sound like the inventions of top scientists but they are invented by young entrepreneurs. 22 have been given the chance to bid to show their ideas to make them real. good morning. we are at the satellite applications catapult in 0xfordshire are in very good company here with tim peake. what we're looking at on this giant screen is a grab from some flood monitoring that's done here for the malaysian government. this is a grab from the wet season earlier in the year. visa rivers. it's a traffic light system, it will be blue, orange and red and if it is read it means flooding above three metres —— visa rivers. they had a 250,000 people displaced in 201a -- if it they had a 250,000 people displaced in 201a —— if it is colour red ——
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visa rivers. teams from the national and local government is need to devise a plan to deal with the situation. this is a police station out of the flood evacuation zone. this real—time technology is invaluable. this is what is happening now but we aren't talking about what happens next. normally when entrepreneurs enter the dragons' den, they are experienced business owners, but today 21 young people aged between 13 and 21 are pitching their ideas to five dragons from the space industry and they're a tough crowd. who's going to pay for this? you can ramble slightly. if we put on our business hat, who would be the end consumer? already everyone here is a winnerfor consumer? already everyone here is a winner for the consumer? already everyone here is a winnerfor the uk consumer? already everyone here is a winner for the uk space agency competition. they've all come up
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with innovative ways to use satellite technology to improve our lives. so today it's their chance to gain support and advice to take their ideas to the next level. at their ideas to the next level. at the age of 13 i took a very intense interest into ai, from which i created my first chat bot. a confident start for 15—year—old karuah, whose jacket leaves the dragons in no doubt of her ambitions. you can start identifying those things you want to pick apart. then i'd really like you to come and talk to me about a job. when you get into discussions with universities and partners, just make sure you read the fine print, get some people on your side looking at the legal bits and pieces. you didn't seem overly nervous, were you nervous? not really. i rodrigo duterte presentations and speaking a lot so it was all right. goodness, this is such a good event, i did this event la st such a good event, i did this event last year as well and the kids really put together some amazing projects. really impressed this year
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with the calibre of the projects coming forward. we first met the schoolgirls from cornwall with their serve safe idea two months ago. they've come up with an affordable wristband to be worn by surfers in the swimmers in the sea, which would help lifesavers on the short track their exact permission. aerospace cornwall has already offered the girls £5,000 to develop their idea. today the european space agency said it would match the money. you can tell it's a good idea because you 90, tell it's a good idea because you go, surely someone has already thought of this, this must exist! if you're able to raise a little bit of money to get this started then we can double that from the european space agency and help you through those feasibility study and testing kind of stages. it's all very well doing a presentation, isn't it, but then they started asking you questions. what was that like? well, nervous, yes, not very good at answering stuff on the spot, got to admit. they're not only thinking
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about ideas about how to use a satellite imagery and data, they're thinking about solving problems with that data. it's inspiring to see young, creative minds moving and thinking in this kind of space and its groundbreaking. so much space technology seems futuristic when, in fa ct, technology seems futuristic when, in fact, it's being used today. but, when looking for what's next and who will create it, he is already here. —— the future is. very clever young people in that room, just across the corridor. we will introduce you to the winners throughout the morning. what was your idea? throughout the morning. what was your idea ? solving throughout the morning. what was your idea? solving a modern conundrum, really. my idea was basically to use satellite images to prevent traffic congestion. to ensure our commutes are less stressful. and lots of ideas about autonomous vehicles, innovative stuff. i like to bring all these
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ideas together because traffic congestion is a big problem. so i try out these solutions, pace cars, for example, can break up traffic jams, a slowdown in areas of road networks, and make traffic work smoother. and what are the next steps for you? yesterday went really well, our presentation went as well as we could have hoped for. one of the panellists was from a company which specialise in high—resolution satellite images. she gave me some advice to take this forward. and you we re advice to take this forward. and you were one of the judges, one of the dragons yesterday. a very high standard. what happens next, realistically? will these ideas come to fruition? it was an astonishingly high standard. it was the second time we have done this and it has moved on since the great ideas of last year. tek, for example, realised that this company based in guildford are launching new
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satellites which can do video from space. they are leading the world in that kind of technology right now. he immediately saw the role that can play in traffic management and supporting autonomous vehicles and he has an offer to go and work with them and help develop their ideas and help them exploit their satellites. there were similar conversations with all the bidders yesterday. we will look for ways to ta ke yesterday. we will look for ways to take that forward. i want a quick word with emily. we are seeing these images from saddleworth moor today from space. well, they can give us more information about what is going on in the copernicus emergency management service can tell us where the fires will be, and we can use satellite images to help people get to areas of safety. just like we are seeing from international partnership programme. thank you very much indeed, very impressive stuff. i learnt a lot not only about what is happening now, but what is out there in people like tek‘s rains
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and what we can look forward to. —— brains. and carol is in rather beautiful surroundings. good morning to you. absolutely right. i am at a winery in surrey, 265 acres. take a look at these beautiful fines almost as far as the eye can see. this used to bea as far as the eye can see. this used to be a pig farm, can you believe. now it is a beautiful vineyards, and iam now it is a beautiful vineyards, and i am told the weather has had a good impact on the grapes. it is a bumper yearfor impact on the grapes. it is a bumper year for the impact on the grapes. it is a bumper yearfor the grapes, impact on the grapes. it is a bumper year for the grapes, but some of the younger vines will be looking forward to a drink of water and they mightjust see forward to a drink of water and they might just see that forward to a drink of water and they mightjust see that on sunday. we we re mightjust see that on sunday. we were talking temperatures, and yesterday the highest temperature in the land was once again the warmest day of the year so far, in cheshire, where we reached 31 celsius, or 30.7 to be precise. it was a hot day wherever you are. look at the chart
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and you will see what i am talking about. parts of wales hit 30.6 celsius, another really hot day. for northern ireland in scotland we were 27 or 28 celsius. today, the highest temperatures are likely to be in scotla nd temperatures are likely to be in scotland and northern ireland, where some should hit 30 celsius. it is a mild start to the day, actually, especially in the north—west. temperatures currently are between 14 temperatures currently are between 1a and 17. here in surrey we are looking at 1a with a light breeze. today, as in previous days, high pressure is firmly in charge of our weather. things are not moving particularly quickly anywhere and once again we have imported a lot of low cloud, mist and fog from the north sea. through the day that will burn back to the coast, some of it will linger but we will have some onshore seabreeze is developing. it will always be cooler on the coast. move away from there and we are back in the sunshine. very warm or hot sunshine. through the day, a little
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bit more high cloud will develop across parts of southern england, that makes the sunshine turned that bit hazy. temperatures today, widely in the mid—to high 20s, but locally we are looking at 30 once again. breezy in the south and the channel islands, and that will continue as we go through the evening and overnight. a lot of evening sunshine and again we will see more low cloud, some mist and flog lapping in from the north sea along eastern counties of scotland and england. it will not be a cold night, in fact quite a warm one. particularly the north—west of england, northern ireland and south—west scotland. tomorrow we start off with a lot of blue skies from the word go, especially in the west. in the east we have that low cloud and the mist and fog which will burn back once again towards the east coast. we will see some pockets of that stick, and on the coast once again seabreeze is well developed. tomorrow we could hit 31 celsius, for example somewhere in the central belt of scotland. but widely it will belt of scotland. but widely it will bea belt of scotland. but widely it will
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be a very warm or hot day. as we head into friday, a bit of a change in that cooler air comes in from the north—east. so in the north, temperatures will be lower than they have been. it will not be told, it just won't be as hot. again we are looking at another dry, sunny and warm or very warm day. still quite hot in the south, at 28. we have all at sea fog to push back towards the east coast. it is sunday, but it looks like we may see some very showers coming into the south and moving north. there is still a big question mark over that at the moment. i know that the gardens will be very grateful for it. we will see you a little bit later. it doesn't look like england, really. it looks like tuscany or something. you have to be up early to beat ben to the deckchair. we have nipped outside and i have
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the best job this we have nipped outside and i have the bestjob this morning, because like carol i get to go out in the sun. retailers are seeing a massive boost of late of all of these sorts of things. 0ther boost of late of all of these sorts of things. other key food, barbecues themselves, beer, we have been talking about a potential shortage of that, but plasters, allergy relief, sunscreen and bug spray. retailers doing very well, but the question is how long can that last? fraser, good morning. a really big time to retailers right now, isn't it? the crucial thing is they have to get it right. they need to keep an eye on the forecast well in advance. the key thing is to stop the right things, ice cream, soft drinks, beerand wine. the right things, ice cream, soft drinks, beer and wine. it the right things, ice cream, soft drinks, beerand wine. it is the right things, ice cream, soft drinks, beer and wine. it is a logistical challenge for retailers
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and we don't normally notice how ha rd and we don't normally notice how hard they worked to get that right. when you have your barbecue going on, and we put that on the retailers, we get very disappointed. and you organise big beer events and you do very well when the weather is good. you must keep a close eye on the forecast to make sure you will get people to your events. yes, when the weather is like this it creates a buzz. manchester transforms completely when the sun is out. it gets people out after work in the city centre, it makes a festive atmosphere and that is great for us. it means we can take risks with events outside and push people towards venues. it makes a huge difference. we will chat more a little later. and we have our own ice cream van on the piazza this morning. paul is knocking up some ice cream for us this morning. we will talk to him later about how to get it right. the retailers have to make sure they get the right stuff in the right shops at the right time. if they don't, it becomes a
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big problem. we will talk more about that after seven a.m.. for that, the news, travel and weather where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. hospitals in london say they are spending increasing amounts on equipment specifically designed for obese patients. bbc london has discovered the number of larger mortuary fridges, which can accommodate people weighing more than 30 stone, has risen by a third over four years. obesity is now costing the nhs in the capital up to £1 billion a year. this unit costs us £3,500. it can cope with people who are up to 30—a0 stone. the trays we bought are equipped to handle that weight, as well. it's not just the fridges that are getting bigger. 0ur hearses are getting bigger, our limousines are getting bigger, everything is getting bigger, and we're equipped to take bigger people. the mayor, sadiq khan, will call for a joint approach to tackling knife crime today when he addresses police, politicians and community groups from across the capital.
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it comes on the first anniversary of his knife crime strategy. almost 50 people have been fatally stabbed in london this year, most recently a 15—year—old boy in romford at the weekend. kensington and chelsea council is asking residents if they want the number of buskers in the borough reduced, or even banned. the council receives 1,200 complaints of noise pollution and antisocial busking every year. people are being asked whether busking should be restricted to certain times, with loud instruments like drums banned. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the london 0verground between surrey quays and crystal palace and west croydon. that is due to a signalling problem. it is a good service on all other lines. turning to the roads, in walthamstow, the lea bridge road is part closed in both directions due to a burst water main. in lower holloway, camden road is part—closed southbound due to a serious accident. a burst water main is still causing
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problems in hempstead. and in kingston upon thames, a part closure southbound for roadworks. that takes us to the weather. good morning. there is a little bit of cloud out there, first thing this morning, at least. that will burn away quickly, leading to a dry, hot and very sunny day. that cloud retreats back towards this clear blue sky. a gentle easterly breeze, and temperatures today very similar to yesterday. and temperatures today very high uv, and very high pollen count, the temperature reaching between 26 and 28 celsius. a lovely evening, warm sunshine before it sets, and then overnight tonight a repeat performance of last night, really. the cloud rolls back in again from the east, potentially a bit of mist mixed in there, too. the minimum temperatures between 11 and 13 celsius. once again, tomorrow morning that
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cloud will burn away very quickly, leading to a very dry, hot and sunny day. very similar conditions, if not the same, for friday. a touch cooler for saturday, but still very warm in the sunshine. there's a risk, however, of one or two showers for sunday, particularly as we head overnight into monday. but, all in all, there's not a lot of rain in the forecast. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website, facebook page, and over on bbc radio london. bye for now. good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: homes are evacuated as a huge moorland fire
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in greater manchester continues to spread. this is the scene live in stalybridge. the fire has been declared a major incident and the army are on standby to help. plans to build five new prisons for women are scrapped. a new strategy will aim to cut reoffending rates. messi shines at last. argentina are still in the world cup after a late, late winner. a sunshine boost for the high street. sales of food, drink and sunscreen and beer are all up, but will it last as long as the good weather? yesterday we hit 31 celsius in cheshire, making it the warmest day of the year so far. today it's going to be another warm or hot day more or less across—the—board, with a lot of sunshine away from the east. more in15 of sunshine away from the east. more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday 27th june.
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our top story: more than 30 homes have been evacuated as a huge moorland fire continues to spread in greater manchester. the blaze on saddleworth moor has been declared a major incident and the army is on standby to help out. mark lobel reports. into its third day, an enormous fire in an area of upland east of manchester rages on. smoke from the pennine moors has been spreading since sunday. it's causing major disruption and fear. nearby, at least 3a houses have been evacuated. residents here may be next. the smoke was really, really, sort of, dense, and you could hardly breathe, plus your eyes were burning as well. firefighters, gamekeepers and farmers have all been tirelessly trying to put out the fire but, as yet, it's been impossible to get under control. it's very hot, hot conditions when you're up there trying to fight the fire. the sheer vastness of it, one of the biggest i've been on in a long time.
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the fire is even visible from space. here's the smoke showing up on imagery from nasa. it's been declared a major incident. greater manchester police say they've spoken to the army, who are on standby. amid health and safety fears, two schools in the affected area are closing today and hundreds of residents have been warned to keep their windows and doors shut. unlike many parts of britain looking forward to the predicted temperature rises over the next few days, for those living nearby, it's a far more precarious proposition. mark lobel, bbc news. we will have more on that a bit later in the programme. the government has scrapped plans forfive new women's prisons in england and wales, the same number of residential centres will be built instead. they will provide help with getting a job and treating drug addiction in a bid to reduce the number of women being jailed
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for low level offences. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. "prison doesn't work for many women." for years, that's been the message from reformers. the majority of female offenders are assessed as low or medium risk and commit non—violent or low—level offences, and many keep being sent back to jailfor minor crimes. women make up about 5% of the prison population in england and wales. nearly 60% have suffered domestic abuse, and many have mental health problems. 70% of those on short sentences will go on to reoffend. now the ministry ofjustice says rather than women going to prison, there will be a network of residential centres where they can be given help to turn away from crime. women can get the support that they need to turn their lives around, to stop them reoffending. that helps us bring down crime and it helps ensure that we get people on the right track. there are currently nearly a,000 women injails
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across england and wales. campaigners have welcomed this major shift in position by the government when it comes to dealing with the female prison population. june kelly, bbc news. heavy rains are continuing to hamper efforts to find a group of young football players and their coach who are missing inside a cave in thailand. rescue workers have been fighting a losing battle to pump water from the cave network. thai soldiers and volunteers are amongst those trying to find the group as the search enters its fourth day. if they're in the right place, they could survive for five, six days. but the water now, the floodwater, is getting higher and higher. so there will be a point in time where this cave here, even the entrance, will close. donald trump has praised a supreme court decision to uphold his travel ban, which prevents people from several muslim—majority countries from entering america. lower courts had deemed the ban unconstitutional, but the top us court reversed the decision. at a white house meeting mr trump
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described it as a great victory for the nation. the duke of cambridge will visit the palestinian territories today as he continues his tour of the middle east. he'll meet the palestinian leader mahmoud abbas. the trip also marks the first time a member of the royalfamily has been on an official visit to israel. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports from jerusalem. it's one of the longest—running and most intractable conflicts in the world. the tensions between the israelis and palestinians have lasted for generations, and seem to show little sign of abating. for william, on his first visit to both israel, and later today to the palestinian territories, it is proving to be a sharp lesson in how difficult it is to resolve such a deeply rooted rivalry. he spoke about it last night at a speech at the british embassy in tel aviv. this region has a complicated and tragic history.
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in the past century, the people of the middle east have suffered great sadness and loss. never has hope and reconciliation been more needed. i know i share a desire with all of you, and with your neighbours, for a just and lasting peace. later this morning, in ramallah, william is due to meet the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas. he will spend several hours in the palestinian territories meeting different groups. britain is keen to send a message that peace can only come about through cooperation and mutual respect, and that is the message that william's visit is intended to emphasise. nicholas witchell, bbc news, jerusalem. 0ne one other story, almost a look away now ina one other story, almost a look away now in a way story. a solidified lump of fat, oil and grease that has been on show at the museum of london could be preserved after proving
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popular with visitors. the piece of fatberg comes from a so called monster fatberg, which had been blocking sewers in east london. it was going to be removed from display this week but may be kept as an historical artefact. it shows the stuff that we pour down our brains. hopefully maybe that's not happening any more —— drains. you are strangely fascinated by it. it is still on show! in theory, we all know the benefits of a good diet and regular exercise but in practice, we are struggling to make the changes needed to lead a healthier lifestyle. four leading think—tanks suggest the government should be prepared to intervene with tax rises and greater regulation, as a way to force us into action. we're joined now by tim elwell—sutton from the health foundation, who worked on the report, and the gp and author
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dr ra njan chatterjee. good morning. good morning. good morning. the idea of taxing is for healthcare, not the first time this has been discussed, what's different? what we're interested in is not so much tax rises for healthcare, but how we can use tax and regulation to change the way that we live. give us an example? we all know a healthy diet is absolutely essential for good health, but actually it costs three times as much to get the calories we need from healthy food as it does for unhealthy food. if you're on a really low income, that just pushes you towards making unhealthy choices. we know rates of obesity are much higher in more deprived areas. children in the most deprived areas. children in the most deprived areas. children in the most deprived areas are twice as likely to be of these as in the least deprived areas. there's things we
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can do about that. the government last year introduced a levy on sugary drinks. there's a consultation going on about whether that kind of approach can be extended. for me, it's about creating an environment where it's easy to make those healthy choices rather than once we get sick, relying on the healthcare system to put us back on our feet. let's talk about your experiences as a gp, you've made some serious lifestyle changes yourself, what is your role and what's the role of the nhs? the role of the nhs is changing. we're all excited, it's the nhs's 70th birthday at the moment, and that's brilliant, but we have to understand the health landscape of the uk has changed since the creation of the nhs. what we're seeing now is a bulk of chronic conditions that are driven in a huge pa rt by conditions that are driven in a huge part by lifestyle choices. in your intro you mentioned diet and exercise, i find the debate always gets polarised on to diet and
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exercise, we neglect sleep, stress. these are equally as important as diet and exercise and. looking at the data, the world health organization say stress is the health epidemic of the 21st—century. this fits in with what you're saying about deprived communities. i've worked in a lot of these deprived communities and it's hard for them to make these healthy choices. changing the environment is key. of course parental responsibility plays a role here as well. there's no question about that. once people have the easier health environment to make choices in, they're going to make these healthy choices. but for the nhs, as a gp, i'm finding that 75 and 80% of what i see is driven by life style, 75 and 80% of what i see is driven by lifestyle, right? so as a doctor, we've spoken about this before, charlie, we don't get education on life style charlie, we don't get education on lifestyle driven illness, which there's a new cause —— which is why there's a new cause —— which is why there's a new course for gps to do that. this is the point, the health
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landscape is changing. if the nhs is still going to be there in 70 years we need to focus on lifestyle and these four key pillars, the food movement, exercise but sleep and relaxation as well. we always talk about the fact there's not enough money for everything. is this the only way to save the wonderful things about the nhs that we all need to make substantive and substantial changes?” need to make substantive and substantial changes? i think that's right. where we agree is the answer to the pressures on the nhs don't lie within the nhs. if we keep living unhealthy lifestyles, keep getting sick in the same way, the pressures on the nhs are going to mount and mount and mount and eventually it will become completely unsustainable. it's about what else can we do. lifestyle changes are easier in an environment where those things are... can you give us an example of a successful government intervention in health, if you like,
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that's had a tangible change in how we are as a nation with our health? i'll give you one example from gateshead, where the local authority's taken a really strong stand on fast food takeaway is near schools. we know that if you have a lot of fast food takeaway is, it has an impact on obesity —— fast food ta keaway an impact on obesity —— fast food takeaway is. for children, the density of them around schools makes a big difference. there's a measurable change in obesity in a small area because of that? it's ha rd to small area because of that? it's hard to make those direct connections. the theory works but it's whether you see any results in practice. obesity is probably the most complex public health problem we have. it's never going to be the way a clinical intervention is, x achieves why, we need to make all these changes and when we sufficiently change the environment it makes a difference ——. sufficiently change the environment it makes a difference --. we need to
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change the problem, this is a national emergency. i don't think we will have a national health service in 70 years time in the way many think about it now and less we take this seriously as a nation. it's not about blame, otherwise we can keep talking about this in the media every month, but what is going to change? we need action to make the environment easier for those people to make the choices. it's not about people being lazy. people are stressed... looking at these populations around the world, the blue zones, where people are living longer without chronic disease, not only do they eat well but they are physically active every day, they are well slept, they have low levels of stress. we don't have any of those things in the west and that's what needs to change. so much to talk about. thank you much. a department of social care and health spokesman said there is a clear role for the state and individual to tackle lifestyle conditions. thanks to bold action and increasing public awareness, smoking rates are at
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record lows and they are helping pa rents record lows and they are helping parents make healthier choices for their children. we can now go back to our main story. a majorfire incident on saddleworth moor. they are quite extraordinary pictures. for the latest, moor. they are quite extraordinary pictures. forthe latest, our correspondent. tell us what they are trying to do, because it is a huge effort, isn't it? that's right. in fa ct, effort, isn't it? that's right. in fact, when you join me —— joined me just after 6am, the flames had died down. within the past ten minutes the flames have shot up again. this is what the firefighters are having to deal with. they never know where the flames are going to spring up next and they are at the mercy of
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the wind. the changes in wind direction can help them by keeping the flames down, or can whip them down the hillside. although it may seem like i am standing close to the flames, we are keeping a safe distance. this card track acts as a natural firebreak and we will move if it gets any more dangerous than that. you can see the orange of the firefighters on the hillside. they have been trying to put out the flames, although they say that is very difficult because there is very thick undergrowth. the ground is tinder dry, so although they can get it out on the surface it can burn underneath. a lot of the land is pete underneath. they have been running hosers up the hillside and escalating the number of people they are putting into the area. this is becoming quite a problem, and just a small section of the moorland has been affected by this fire. and there is an impact on people who live close, and the smoke can be seen from many miles. it can, yes. i
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was here all day yesterday on the other side of the hill, and the smoke billowed into the sky. it was a beautiful sunny day over greater manchester, a blue sky for most people, but on this part of greater manchester you couldn't see any blue sky. you can see it rising above the hillside and more than 30 homes in the immediate vicinity of the hillside were evacuated last night. people went to stay with relatives, a local vicar opened his church for anybody who wanted to stay there. some people stayed with their homes, one lady wanted to stay with her pets and didn't want to abandon them. so she stayed at in her home. we have —— she stayed in her home. we have —— she stayed in her home. we have —— she stayed in her home. we have crews trying to bring it under control but as you can see, pockets of flame keep erupting and causing problems for them. it is a real, if you'll pardon the uphill battle. it will be a real battle to get it all under control. thank you
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for the moment. carol has the best job of the morning. we are in surrey, and we are surrounded by vines in this vignette. you can see some of the young grapes here. dependent on the weather, they will be harvested sometime in september or maybe even early october. the weather has played a vital role in the production of the grapes. it has been a bumper year for the grapes this year, but some of the young vines will be looking for some water. and they may well see some of that this sunday, because in the forecast it looks like we could see some thundery showers coming into the south and moving north. that might change, so it is something we are keeping a close eye on. this is england's largest vineyards and the vines are grown on the soil they grow the vines on in the champagne
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region of france. what we have this morning as a person start to the day. it is not too hot, the sun is out. however, yesterday we had a high temperature of 31 celsius in cheshire, making it the warmest day of the year so far. the actual temperature was 30.7. today we are likely to see highs of 30 in both scotla nd likely to see highs of 30 in both scotland and northern ireland. if we see 29 plus, that will be the warmest day since 1995, injune, for both scotland and northern ireland. worth mentioning also that we have high pressure firmly in charge of the weather, as we have done for much of the week. and we will hang onto it for a wee bit longer. that means we are also looking at high uv pollen levels. this morning we have a lot of low cloud and also some patchy mist and fog which has come in from the north sea overnight. that will burn back towards the east coast, and a lot of it will burn away. we will be stuck with some
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patches here and there and on the coast we will also have sea breezes. there is some patchy mist elsewhere but that will also tend to burn away, and for many away from the east where we cling on to the patchy low cloud and mist we are looking at some sunshine. temperatures today getting up to the mid to high 20s, but as i mentioned, in scotland and northern ireland we could hit 30 celsius. moving on through the evening and overnight we hang on to the breeze across southern areas and also the channel islands. once again, more low cloud and mist and fog will lappin from the north sea, and we are looking at clear skies in the west. —— lap in. it will not be a cold night, the lowest temperatures where we have the low cloud, mist and fog. as we start tomorrow, with that low cloud, mist and fog, it will also burn back towards the north sea clothesline. we are looking at a lot of sunshine around —— north sea coastline. temperatures reaching 31 celsius in the central lowlands, but widely we are looking at the need to high 20s.
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as we head into friday, a lot of dry weather around. again we are seeing a bit ofa weather around. again we are seeing a bit of a change in the north, because the cooler air will start to come in from the north. it doesn't mean it will be cold, just not as hot as it has been, and temperatures are looking still at 28 as we pushed down towards the south. so, as we head into the weekend, it looks like sunday when we start to see those thundery showers potentially coming up thundery showers potentially coming up from the south. it looks really lovely there this morning. we will see you a little bit later. extraordinary to see the whole map in red. as we have just been hearing, temperatures will continue to soar, but there is a new warning about the dangers of attempting to cool off by swimming in open water. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at walton—on—thames for us to find out how to stay safe in the heat. good morning from an absolutely
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beautiful spot on a beautiful day. with this lovely weather comes renewed warnings about the potential risks of open water swimming. on monday, a man lost his life in surrey, having got into the water and having got into difficulty, at the 13—year—old boy is also missing, having got into difficulty while swimming in stoke—on—trent. what is the advice? should people get into the advice? should people get into the water at all or should it be com pletely the water at all or should it be completely avoided ? let's the water at all or should it be completely avoided? let's have a chat to play, you manage waterways across england and wales, don't you? what should people be doing? well, the canal and river epico trust looks over 2000 miles of walkways in —— waterways in england and wales. we know that being the water makes you happier. we are asking people to ta ke you happier. we are asking people to take care when they are by the water. only get into the water if you are with a supervised group who will help you with open water swimming. there are risks that you
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can't see, the water is incredibly cold, even on a blisteringly hot day, and reads can catch around your limbs, bugs in the water can make you unwell —— reeds. we advise you not to get into the water unless you are with a supervised open water swimming group. it is a conundrum between enjoying yourself and yet not putting yourself at risk. clare mentioned the organised open water swimming groups. behind you we can see christine. it is ok, because she has a wetsuit on, she has a swimsuit, cap and goggles which enables her to see where she is going on what she is doing. so what are the key pieces of advice people need to bear in mind? be educated. don't just need to bear in mind? be educated. don'tjustjump need to bear in mind? be educated. don't just jump into a need to bear in mind? be educated. don'tjustjump into a body of water when you don't how deep it is, you don't know the temperature, and potentially you don't know any other hazards that might be lurking. it is wonderful to swim in the open water, we have beautiful lakes in this
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country, but you just need to be educated and prepared.” country, but you just need to be educated and prepared. i don't know if christine can hear us, but we we re if christine can hear us, but we were talking about what, if something is going wrong in the water, what is the official advice as to what you should do? how should you demonstrate that you are in difficulty? if you are in difficulty in open water, what you want to do is stop kicking, turn onto your back, as christine will show us, and relax. the most important thing to do is to relax, to try and slow your breathing down, that's it. that is the position we would recommend. if you are doing a triathlon, that is the position you want to take. relax, control your breathing, and get yourself refocused. you are doing a very good job for us this morning. it is so important, isn't it, to be suitably equipped. this is not just any old it, to be suitably equipped. this is notjust any old surfing wetsuit. yes, the buoyancy is very important in open water, so you have that
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confidence. it is not like a swimming pool where you have two use your legs, you can trust the wetsuit to keep you safe and open water. and people will be tempted to jump in on a hot day. your advice is what? don't do it. it is tempting, but you need to be safe. and there are many of us here, and she is not on her own, and that is one of the key pieces of advice. really think very carefully. only do it as part of an organised group, if you know what you are doing and have the right equipment. thank you very much indeed. and i have been watching enviously. there are lots of other wetsuit is available which are equally good, i have won quite a few of them. be very careful, wherever you are, in hot weather. coming up on breakfast: using satellites to improve life on earth. john is at the harwell space cluster for us this morning to meet the next generation of inventors. john. yes, good morning. this is the kind of thing happening at the moment with satellite technology, monitoring the globe and monitoring
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fishing boats to check whether or not there are any illegal fishing incidents taking place around the world. three of the winners of the competition run by the uk space agency with an amazing idea. essentially we to use drones to fly medicines from capitals to remote locations around the world, and at the same time bring back sample is for diagnosis, and gathering data, something which has never been done before. it sounds like a fantastic idea. what sort of feedback did you get yesterday? threw yesterday was a fantastic experience. we had great conversations with the judges, and they put us in touch with a whole range of people and we need to follow u p range of people and we need to follow up with those contacts and see where that brings us. this is all about the future of satellite technology. exactly, ithink there isa technology. exactly, ithink there is a huge possibility in this area, and after the encouragement yesterday, we will essentially apply
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for funding yesterday, we will essentially apply forfunding and yesterday, we will essentially apply for funding and start building the prototype, and we can actually test that idea and the proof of concept can be used down the line to allow the company to progress. fantastic. iam sure the company to progress. fantastic. i am sure it is not the last we have seen a view. more after the news, travel and weather where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. hospitals in london say they are spending increasing amounts on equipment specifically designed for obese patients. bbc london has discovered the number of larger mortuary fridges, which can accommodate people weighing more than 30 stone, has risen by a third overfour years. obesity is now costing the nhs in the capital up to £1 billion a year. this unit costs us £3,500. it can cope with people who are up to 30—a0 stone. the trays we bought are equipped to handle that weight, as well. it's not just the fridges that are getting bigger.
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our hearses are getting bigger, our limousines are getting bigger, everything is getting bigger, and we're equipped to take bigger people. the mayor, sadiq khan, will call for a joint approach to tackling knife crime today when he addresses police, politicians and community groups from across the capital. it comes on the first anniversary of the mayor's knife crime strategy. almost 50 people have been fatally stabbed in london this year, most recently a 15—year—old boy in romford at the weekend. kensington and chelsea council is asking residents if they want the number of buskers in the borough reduced, or even banned. the council receives 1,200 complaints of noise pollution and antisocial busking every year. people are being asked whether busking should be restricted to certain times with loud instruments like drums banned. let's have a look at the travel situation now. it is a good service on all lines. delays on south—western lines. in
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barking, be a 13 has a lane closed for gas main works —— the a13. turning to the roads, in walthamstow, the lea bridge road is part closed in both directions due to a burst water main. a burst water main is still causing problems in hempstead. that takes us to the weather. good morning. there is a little bit of cloud out there, first thing this morning, at least. but that cloud isn't going to last for long. it'll burn away quickly, leading to a dry, hot and very sunny day. that cloud retreats back towards this clear blue sky. a gentle easterly breeze, and temperatures today very similar to yesterday. high uv, and very high pollen count, the temperature reaching between 26 and 29 celsius. a lovely evening, warm sunshine before it sets, and then overnight tonight a repeat performance
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of last night, really. the cloud rolls back in again from the east, potentially a bit of mist mixed in there, too. the minimum temperatures between 11 and 13 celsius. once again, tomorrow morning that cloud will burn away very quickly, leading to a dry, hot and sunny day. very similar conditions, if not the same, for friday. a touch cooler for saturday, but still very warm in the sunshine. there's a risk, however, of one or two showers for sunday, particularly as we head overnight into monday. but, all in all, there's not a lot of rain in the forecast. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website, facebook page, and over on bbc radio london. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. more than 30 homes have been evacuated as a huge moorland fire continues to spread in greater manchester. the blaze on saddleworth moor has been declared a major incident and the army is on standby to help out. greater manchester fire and rescue have advised residents to keep their windows
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shut to keep out smoke, which can be seen for miles around. let's have a look at the scene on moorland near stalybridge this morning. it really gives you a sense of what's going on. we've also had a news co nfe re nce what's going on. we've also had a news conference in the last hour or so, a little bit more information coming out. they're saying the fire is particularly large, there used to dealing with more fires, but this particular incident is difficult, it is vast in terms of access. the conditions for firefighters... are they there in the bottom right of they there in the bottom right of the screen, charlie? the conditions for firefighters are tough, the wind is encouraging the fire to spread and they're is encouraging the fire to spread and they‘ re dealing is encouraging the fire to spread and they're dealing with what they're calling and they're dealing with what they‘ re calling an and they're dealing with what they're calling an escalating incident. you can see here, this is taken a fairway away, you can see some in
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the foreground, but those trying to deal with the blaze this morning, some are running the hoses up the hillside, which is obviously very difficult. the images you saw earlier on are the individuals using the beaters to try to beat down the flames. the scale of the fire... you can see the individuals trying to deal with the fires as it erupts, it's popping up in different places along a long line of the hillside and it's causing real problems. the fire service, as louise was saying, is what they're calling an escalating incident. weather conditions, there is some wind, which is causing problems, and obviously the problem for those trying to deal with the situation is the risk of the smoke that the fire is causing. we'll keep you up to date on the story throughout the morning. with regard to the weather, they're saying the weather means other fires are occurring and they have advice for people out and about, make sure
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any cigarettes are distinguished, properly disposed of, glass as well, because it can act as a magnifier in the sun. we will follow that story throughout brea kfast we will follow that story throughout breakfast this morning —— breakfast. the government has scrapped plans forfive new women's prisons in england and wales. the same number of residential centres will be built instead. they will provide help with getting a job and treating drug addiction in a bid to reduce the number of women being jailed for low level offences. the french president, emmanuel macron, says six eu countries, including france, have agreed to accept a share of more than 230 migrants stranded on a rescue ship in the mediterranean. malta said it would allow the migrants to land only if other eu countries took a quota, but has now agreed to let the ship dock. taxes and regulations should be used to encourage people to lead healthier lifestyles, according to a new report. the independent analysis, produced for the bbc, suggests the public want the government to intervene and highlights the success of the smoking ban and sugary drinks tax. a spokesperson for the department of health and social care said there was a role for both individuals and the state and that the new nhs plan would include a focus on prevention.
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the duke of cambridge will visit the palestinian territories today as he continues his tour of the middle east. later this morning, he'll meet with palestinian leader, mahmoud abbas. the trip also marks the first time a member of the british royalfamily has been on an official visit to israel. those are the main stories this morning. one picture story for you. how do you make something better in theory, certainjobs? how do you make something better in theory, certain jobs? not how do you make something better in theory, certainjobs? not like this. perhaps! the restoration of 16th century art is one of them. an attempted restoration of a wooden sculpture of st george, carried out by an arts and crafts teacher in spain, has been lambasted by art purists. spain's art conservation association said that the restoration shows a frightening lack of training. and, you no, i don't know how much
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damage has been done and whether or not it can be re—restored. whatsapp and there? it is his eyebrows -- what's happened. i suppose you don't know until you've done it! hopefully you get some training before you do it. rub it out and start again! that's what i'm wondering. they can surely take it all off! this world cup is delivering drama, var, amazing goals, drama off the pitch. are you talking about maradona last night? we're going to some pictures. were we watching the football or him? lots of the time on social media people were talking about his
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health as maradona watched argentina play, a very stressful time for him. he had a medical check at the end but he is now find. importantly argentina are through, which is the big story —— fine. argentina are through, which is the big story -- fine. that has been a side in disarray. lionel messi looked different last night. in the other two matches he looked a bit like he wasn't focused, he wasn't there. he looked almost shy at times. it was really awful to watch. last night he turned up. plenty to talk about this morning. let's get the mood from russia now, with our sports correspondent, david ornstein. david, we'll talk about england in a moment but that was some escape for argentina, wasn't it? can they challenge now? sally, what a night for argentina. around a5 minutes from here in repino is the st petersburg arena and we could almost hear the celebrations across the ocean last
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night. it really was fantastic. the 1986 champions, two—time winners, giving themselves a lifeline really. layer now messy, such a shadow of his normal self in that first game, last night he opened the scoring with a sublime effort —— and now messy. it really was messi at his best —— lionel messi. a touch on his knee and his blood and then into the back of the net to send the argentine fans into wild celebration —— and his foot. victor moses equalised for nigeria and then an unlikely scorer of the winner for argentina as the full—time approached, marcos rojo against manchester united, repeating four yea rs manchester united, repeating four years ago when he scored the winner against the same opposition in the group stage and so what a night for argentina. england against belgium tomorrow night, might we see a few changes? i think we definitely will see some
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changes from gareth southgate. here at the england training base on the gulf of finland we will see england training ina gulf of finland we will see england training in a short time. they train behind closed doors yesterday, that would have allowed them to work on their tactics, formation, the set plays, which have proved such a feature so far. 15 minutes of the session will be open, dele alli, we will see if he will be there, he was there yesterday, so we will see if gareth southgate has the full squad to choose from. will the rest the likes of harry kane with the match of the last 16 on tuesday? six england players haven't played at all, two are the goalkeepers, four outfield players. i begin will mix it up but he wants to finish top of the group despite some saying that england getting second may mean a kinder route through the knockout rounds. that kick off is 7pm against belgium on thursday evening. england fly to kaliningrad later today and on monday or tuesday they will play
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in either rostov or moscow against eitherjapan, panama or columbia. getting very serious for england now and very exciting. it is, isn't it? that is quite a long flight they're about to take, it's almost like they're coming halfway home. they are indeed. it's not quite as brutal weather conditions when they get there as their previous two matches. england... the weather conditions here in repino are going to be replicated, it sounds like, in kaliningrad. the match doesn't matter in terms of their qualification, it willjust be to decide who finishes first or second. it should be a brilliant game and england doing so nicely in this competition, they will hope to keep up competition, they will hope to keep up that momentum. david, lovely to talk to you, speak to you soon. here's what's coming up today: the defending champions germany have work to do if they're to make it through to the knock—out stage, it's quite a complicated
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picture in that group, which is led by mexico. both those matches are on bbc tv. and later, brazil's group will be decided, commentary on radio 5live. plenty to look forward to for the rest of the day, and, of course, england travelling today, almost halfway home, for the match tomorrow night. we will miss it when it's over. and when it gets down to fewer matches, what are we going to do? as long as england are in it's ok, isn't it? but i'm enjoying all of them! he'sjust isn't it? but i'm enjoying all of them! he's just watching isn't it? but i'm enjoying all of them! he'sjust watching england? charlie is watching an awful lot! he is. terrific game, the argentina game, terrific for all sorts of reasons. argentina are a great story, if they could pull it back together it would be a miracle at this point! for many young people, social media has increasingly become a way of life and keeping our children safe online can be a constant struggle. today, the information commissioner is asking for ideas to include in a code of conduct which social media companies would have to abide by.
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we asked some parents in manchester for their thoughts. with my children i always find that ijust with my children i always find that i just need to with my children i always find that ijust need to keep an eye on what's going on in the world, because you never know what's happening. year6, never know what's happening. year 6, they start using, like, the phone and the ipad all the time because we get rid of the old phones and the old ipad. i have a daughter and she's already into you youtube. so she can switch the youtube on herself and start picking stuff herself and she knows very well where to go actually. i don't really like them talking online, i'm always keeping an eye on them and watching them. shut down at 8pm and it won't work until, like, the next day, so he can't use it. it's good because sometimes he will sneak out and try to use it but he can't because it's just locked. you don't want to sound like you're
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authoritative but at the same time you want to know what their up against. some very interesting ideas and missions. steve wood, the deputy information commissioner in charge of policy, joins us now on the sofa. how would you call what is going on with children in social media, would you say this is an emergency, how do you say this is an emergency, how do you see it? we're certainly moving into an era where children can learn to master and ipad before they can learn to write. at 2.5 we just heard. there is an important piece of work to be done to find the balance between giving the children freedom to explore the internet, which is a really important stage of their development, but our concern at the information commissioner's office is making sure children's data is protected and that's why we're making this call for evidence today where we're inviting experts in child develop and, academics and the online technology companies to engage with us about creating a new
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set of guidance about a code of practice that will set out rules and guidance about how services need to be designed with protecting children's personal data at the centre —— development. children's personal data at the centre -- development. isn't it too late? there is an important chance to get this right and set out the clear guidance. at number of things need to happen. this guidance is an important part of the jigsaw —— a number. there's a range of things that need to be done around the role of schools and education is an important area, at the information commissioner's office we've developed teaching materials to be used in schools as well, we're planning to update those as part of our wider project. it's important we seize the opportunity now to start to get this guidance in place. you're very much targeting the social media companies. it's one thing for parents to have responsibilities, but your target is the companies. the fact you're targeting them, is that meaning that you think, thus far, they have been
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irresponsible? i wouldn't say it's just this social media companies, all sorts of online services can be used, from a range of apps they download and use, so it's all online services. they've can do better. they can do more to design the services with children in mind. . what we want is default settings feedback. when should location data tracking be switched on in an app when the app is designed for children to be used? should it be switched to off when a child is using it? what data is being collected about children? some organisations need to think more deeply about this at the start of when they're designing their services. is there any evidence they are doing that? it is in their interest that children are seeing things, they are advertising things to them, pushing things out to them, how are you going to make them do this? the important thing about this code
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is it's a set of guidance that we will take into account when we enforce the new data protection law, the gdpr, which came into force may just gone and we can take that into account when considering whether these companies have complied with these companies have complied with the law, and the new law says they must take into account the needs of children when designing the services about protecting their data. ultimately this code is a set of guidance that will take into account when we're taking action if needed. ultimately we have large sanctions, we can find up to £17 million for the most serious cases where personal data have been —— data laws have been contravened —— fine. personal data have been —— data laws have been contravened -- fine. give usa have been contravened -- fine. give us a sense, what's the biggest fine that's been handed out, you said you could find up to £17 million, what's the biggest that's been handed out so far —— fine. the biggest that's been handed out so far -- fine. we've only had the new law since may, 2018, so early days. the previous law only allowed
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us to fine £500,000, we've done fines of £300,000. this new law will give us the chance to tackle those serious abuses when we find them. lots of people watching will have lots of things they would like you to have in the guidelines, are you consulting widely, you talking to pa rents, consulting widely, you talking to parents, how can people tell you what they want? it's important we get a wide range of views and the call for evidence today is aimed at experts, child charities, academics and experts in child development is. we wa nt and experts in child development is. we want the views of the companies themselves and we will do a specialist consultation for representative use from parents and children so it's important the child isn't left out of this —— presented in views. in your clip earlier we heard about children going from —— representative views. children with ipads to ages of 16. there's different needs we need to take account of. maybe you can come back
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and report back when you have the findings. thank you for your time. carroll has probably the best location of the morning. we were thinking how it looks like you are somewhere in italy or france, but you are in surrey, right? that's absolutely right, charlie. —— carol. iam in dorking, in surrey. these young grapes look so delicate, i dare not touch them. depending on the whether they will be harvested sometime in september or maybe early october. on the vines are grown in soil similar to the champagne region of france. this is actually england's largest vineya rd. this is actually england's largest vineyard. it is nice and warm here. there is a breeze, and in that you
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will notice it cools down. it is quite comfortable and currently the highest average in the uk, as we speak, is in porthmadog, where it is 20 celsius. that tells you it will bea 20 celsius. that tells you it will be a warm day. yesterday's top temperature was in cheshire. we hit 31 celsius. but it wasn'tjust cheshire. other parts around north—west england, wales, for example, had temperatures in the 30s as well. not as high as the 30.7 we saw in cheshire. today it is likely to be scotland and northern ireland which hit 30 and have the highest temperatures. if we get 29 plus, that will be the warmestjune day for both scotland and northern ireland since june 19 95. for both scotland and northern ireland sincejune 19 95. high pressure is still firmly in charge of our weather so not much is moving. what we have this morning is quite a bit of cloud, around eastern parts of scotland, the east coast, but if you drew a line from yorkshire down towards hampshire, all points east have some cloud at the moment. through the day that
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will tend to burn back towards the coastline. you will find, like yesterday, pockets of it will stick in the coastline and here there will be sea breezes so it will be cooler here. moving away from that, we are backin here. moving away from that, we are back in the very warm or hot sunshine with widely getting the mid—to high 20s, but locally up to about 30. we will also see some high cloud developed through the course of the day across southern counties, turning the sunshine hazy. the breeze across southern england and the channel islands will be with us through the night as well. the other thing you will find is more low cloud, mist and fog lapping in from the sea. not a cold night further west, although cooler where we have the low cloud. we start with that tomorrow and like today it will burn back towards the east coast, some of it sticking. sea breezes along the coast. away from that a bit of sunshine and somewhere across the central lowlands could hit 31
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celsius. but for most of us it will bea warm, celsius. but for most of us it will be a warm, very warm or hot day. by friday what we have is cooler air coming in from the north—east. so temperatures will still be in the 20s, temperatures will still be in the 205, it temperatures will still be in the 20s, it is just not going to be as high as it has been, and has become further south we are looking at a top temperature of about 28 in london. the other thing i should mention, with all this still weather, is that the uv levels will be high on the pollen levels will be very high. so if you are stepping out, bear that in mind. and very high. so if you are stepping out, bearthat in mind. and i am not complaining, but i am being dazzled by the sunshine here. dazzled by the sunshine, and it is only 7:50 a.m.. thank you for all the warnings, as well. we will let you get out the.” issue another warning, which is a business in this shorts.” issue another warning, which is a business in this shorts. i don't think we need a warning. the shorts on. we are here to talk
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about how great this weather is. not only for us but for retailers as well. we have talked a lot about how retailers have had a tough time of late, but weather like this is great for them. inaudible. one or two problems, as you can see. it is funny old world, because ben is about 100m away from us, and sometimes these things go wrong. standby, ben. we will try and go back to you. where were you? try again. i will start again, back to you. where were you? try again. iwill start again, because we are about 20 metres from you. good sales to retailers. all of this is seeing a really big increase in sales. beer and barbecue food up and brits are getting the message. sales of sunscreen are up more than 120%
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on this time last year. let's not mention rings like allergy and bug spray. i am joined mention rings like allergy and bug spray. iamjoined by mention rings like allergy and bug spray. i am joined by a representative from a market research company. good morning to you. retailers really have to get it right. if they get things in the shops they will sell it and if they don't we will be complaining. shops they will sell it and if they don't we will be complainingm shops they will sell it and if they don't we will be complaining. it is a huge chance for an uptick in sales when the sun comes out. everyone flocks to buy the same things at the same time. if you have a barbecue you buy more and eat more, and that is all sales that retailers would not have made otherwise. it is not displacing other things. it is ice cream, soft drinks, beer, cider, they are all huge at this time of year. how far in advance are they looking at the forecast? they are keeping a really close eye on the forecast, and the problem is that a lot of these things need to be chilled, and that causes great logistical problems. there is nothing which makes us more cross
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than an empty shelf. they will move other things off the shelves to get what we want to buy for the hot weather onto shelves. it is next week the sun will be gone and that moment for retailers will have passed, and those sales will never come back. as i try and get out of the deckchair, come with me. we have our bbc breakfast ice cream van this morning. paul is standing by with an ice cream. this is a good time for you right now, isn't it? you can make a lot of money. and you can't make a lot of money. and you can't make much in winter, so this is make or break for you. we have to make it when it is like this, the skies and sunshine, and sales are buoyant now. things are going very well. how do you decide where you are going to go? you have this van and you get to a lot of events and fares, that sort of thing. you must keep a pretty close eye on the forecast —— fairs. we have a lot of customers in heol,
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old trafford, manchester. we do corporate work and schools... you have to cash in when the weather is good. you have to do get the work done and work really bloody hard. 14 hours a day i do in this weather, and you have to do it because it won't last forever, and, you know, while it is here you have to do it, you have to work hard. and i will tell you what won't last forever, thatice tell you what won't last forever, that ice cream. is that for me? tell you what won't last forever, that ice cream. is that for me7m is for you. i will try not to drop that. so i have my ice cream, and there is plenty more right here. i don't know what you want to order, but i will bring it back to you. what do you fancy, novel gum, strawberry, chocolate? altogether too early, but thank you for the offer. he has shorts on, he is out in the deckchair... offer. he has shorts on, he is out in the deckchair. .. and we go from wonderful blue sky indoors now. technology. the latest ideas on how to use
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satellite technology to improve life on earth sound like the inventions of top scientists, but in fact, they have all been created by young entrepreneurs. 22 inventors have been given the chance to pitch their ideas to industry experts, in a bid to make them a reality. john maguire is at the harwell space cluster for us this morning. good morning. good morning, you are absolutely right. there is a link to what ben was talking aboutjust now. satellites have been doing the weather predictions, helping weather forecasters get the weather right, they have been tracking vehicles and parcels, so satellites are very much pa rt parcels, so satellites are very much part of our daily lives. this is a screen grab of northern malaysia in the wet season, and what they are able to do here is monitor river levels. if it is read, it is three metres above flood level, so as you can see, real problems. it is a way of informing local authorities and the government of what is happening, to predict any flood risks. and this
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is an evacuation centre, so it gives the authority is an idea of exactly what that is. it is a police station and they know it is on high ground. that is some of the ways satellites are used at the moment. what about the future? introducing you to our competition winners run by the uk space agency, you had this dragon ‘s den session yesterday. tek, firstly, what was your idea? using satellites to prevent traffic congestion. there is so much data we can get from satellite images, we can use machine learning algorithms to get a model of how traffic is working in the uk. we use that to predict what will happen next and introduce some kind of control measures to ease the congestion. clever stuff. you have come up with something called med drone, tell us about that. so using drones to transport medicine from hospital too difficult to access
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locations around the world, at the same time using data to predict whether a disease is going to break out before it happens. and what sort of help did you get? we got really great feedback, got put in touch with a number of people and we have been asked to pitch at other companies as well, so hopefully things go well for us. do you think this could come to fruition, come to reality? definitely, we will start building a prototype and essentially just carry our proof of concept forward into the future. good stuff. incredible stuff yesterday. we will introduce you to some competition winners later on. the future is safe in their hands. back to you in the studio. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. hospitals in london say they are spending increasing amounts on equipment specifically designed for obese patients. bbc london has discovered the number of larger mortuary fridges, which can accommodate people
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weighing more than 30 stone, has risen by a third over four years. obesity is now costing the nhs in the capital up to £1 billion a year. this unit costs us £3,500. it can cope with people who are up to 30—a0 stone. the trays we bought are equipped to handle that weight, as well. it's not just the fridges that are getting bigger. our hearses are getting bigger, our limousines are getting bigger, everything is getting bigger, and we're equipped to take bigger people. the mayor, sadiq khan, will call for a joint approach to tackling knife crime today when he addresses police, politicians and community groups from across the capital. it comes on the first anniversary of the mayor's knife crime strategy. almost 50 people have been fatally stabbed in london this year, most recently a 15—year—old boy in romford at the weekend. kensington and chelsea council is asking residents if they want the number of buskers in the borough reduced,
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or even banned. the council receives 1,200 complaints of noise pollution and so—called antisocial busking every year. people are being asked whether busking should be restricted to certain times, with loud instruments like drums banned. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there severe delays on the bakerloo line between queen's park and harrow and wealdstone, due to a signal failure. a good service on other lines. on the railway, there could be delays on south western railway services between london waterloo and new malden, due to speed restrictions for predicted high track temperatures. on the roads, if we look at the camera, it's the usual queues building on woolwich road flyover northbound towards the blackwall tunnel. in walthamstow, lea bridge road is part—closed in both directions due to a burst watermain. a burst watermain is still causing problems in hampstead, on rosslyn hill. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. there is a little bit of cloud out there, first thing this morning, at least.
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but that cloud isn't going to last for long. it'll burn away quickly, leading to a dry, hot and very sunny day. that cloud retreats back towards this clear blue sky. a gentle easterly breeze, and temperatures today very similar to yesterday. high uv, and very high pollen count, the temperature reaching between 26 and 29 celsius. a lovely evening, warm sunshine before it sets, and then overnight tonight a repeat performance of last night, really. the cloud rolls back in again from the east, potentially a bit of mist mixed in there, too. the minimum temperatures between 11 and 13 celsius. once again, tomorrow morning that cloud will burn away very quickly, leading to a dry, hot and sunny day. very similar conditions, if not the same, for friday. a touch cooler for saturday, but still very warm in the sunshine. there's a risk, however, of one or two showers for sunday, particularly as we head overnight into monday. but, all in all, there's not a lot of rain in the forecast. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour.
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plenty more over on bbc radio london. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast — with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today: a fire on saddleworth moor has been declared a "major incident". more than 30 homes have been evacuated. this is the scene live in stalybridge — the fire has been declared a major incident and the army are on standby to help. plans to build five new prisons for women are scrapped — a new strategy will aim to cut reoffending rates. messi shines at last — argentina are still in the world cup after a late, late winner. good morning. sun cream or ice cream? good morning. sun cream or ice cream ? this good morning. sun cream or ice cream? this hot weather is great news for business, but how do shops
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make sure they have the right staff in the right place at the right time? iam in the right place at the right time? i am finding out! good morning from dorking in surrey, where the sun is beating down. the minibus today, very warm or hot at the east coast prone to a bit more cloud. a bit more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday 27th june. good morning. our top story, more than 30 homes have been evacuated as a huge moorland fire continues to spread in greater manchester. the blaze on saddleworth moor has been declared a major incident and the army is on standby to help out. greater manchester fire and rescue have advised residents to keep their windows shut to keep out smoke, which can be seen for miles around. given the scale of the area, we have brought the fire under control but the heat, the conditions, the deep—seated fire situation, other fires have occurred and we don't know why they have occurred at this
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moment in time, whether they are connected to the same fire, the embers that have blown and landed somewhere or because of other issues such as discarded cigarettes, broken bottles, glass, but that will be picked up as part of the assessment. these are the live images this morning. as we have been watching, we have seen the fire and rescue services trying to cope with the conditions, really difficult conditions. they are running hosepipes up some of their hillside but is very difficult, and literally just trying to pat down the flames as they wrapped. more smoke at the moment. we saw quite a lot of flames earlier on and as you heard in the fire and rescue press conference, they are calling it an escalating incident. we heard a little earlier on, weather conditions mean other fires are occurring from time to time. you can see some of the individuals up on the hillside,
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trying to deal with what they are calling a particularly large fire. vast, they say, in terms of access. conditions for the firefighters as you can see in the images, very tough. the wind encouraging the fire tough. the wind encouraging the fire to spread from location to location. here ina to spread from location to location. here in a few minutes we will speak to one of the residents who had to rescue pets last night from the streets that are close by. we will speak to her shortly here on bbc brea kfast. speak to her shortly here on bbc breakfast. more on that coming up in a few minutes. the government has scrapped plans for five new women's prisons in england and wales. the same number of residential centres will be built instead. they will provide help with getting a job and treating drug addiction in a bid to reduce the number of women being jailed for low level offences. the french president, emmanuel macron, says six eu countries, including france, have agreed to accept a share of more than 230 migrants stranded on a rescue ship in the mediterranean. malta, said it would allow the migrants to land only if other eu countries took a quota, but has now agreed
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to let the ship dock. taxes and regulations should be used to encourage people to lead healthier lifestyles, according to a new report. the independent analysis, produced for the bbc, suggests the public want the government to intervene to support good health following the success of the smoking ban and the sugar tax. a spokesperson for the department of health and social care said the new nhs plan would include a focus on prevention. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. the introduction of compulsory seat belts in cars was one of the most important public health measures introduced by the government. at the time critics said this was at the action of a nanny state but it led to a drastic reduction in road traffic deaths and injuries. since then, we seems measures, like the smoking ban and a sugar tax, and now a new report says the public supports government action. the majority of the public are in favour of governments taking some of these interventions, such as limiting fast food
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outlets near schools, limiting advertising of junk food before 9pm on television, and also things like the smoking ban. these are things the government does have control over. but the report also says that individuals have a responsibility to look after their own health. at this scheme in leeds, these middle—aged men are doing just that, coming together to hone their carpeting skills, while also tackling the loneliness and isolation many of them have experienced post retirement. you've just got somebody to talk to, you're notjust sat on your own being so bored. it is one of the best things i've discovered since retirement. i think the main thing is camaraderie. when you live by yourself, it can be quite lonely. the social, physical and economic environment we live in is the biggest influence on our health. there is public support for government measures that help
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people to break down those environmental barriers to good health. dominic hughes, bbc news, leeds. heavy rains are continuing to hamper efforts to find a group of young football players and their coach who are missing inside a cave in thailand. rescue workers have been fighting a losing battle to pump water from the cave network. thai soldiers and volunteers are amongst those trying to find the group as the search enters its fourth day. if they're in the right place, they could survive for five, six days. but the water now, the floodwater, is getting higher and higher. so there will be a point in time where this cave here, even the entrance, will close. donald trump has praised a supreme court decision to uphold his travel ban, which prevents people from several muslim—majority countries from entering america. lower courts had deemed the ban unconstitutional, but the top us court reversed the decision. at a white house meeting mr trump described it as a "great victory" for the nation.
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the duke of cambridge will visit the palestinian territories today as he continues his tour of the middle east. he'll meet the palestinian leader mahmoud abbas. the trip also marks the first time a member of the royalfamily has been on an official visit to israel. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports from jerusalem. it's one of the longest—running and most intractable conflicts in the world. the tensions between the israelis and palestinians have lasted for generations, and seem to show little sign of abating. for william, on his first visit to both israel, and later today to the palestinian territories, it is proving to be a sharp lesson in how difficult it is to resolve such a deeply rooted rivalry. he spoke about it last night at a speech at the british embassy in tel aviv. this region has a complicated and tragic history. in the past century, the people of the middle east have suffered great sadness and loss.
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never has hope and reconciliation been more needed. i know i share a desire with all of you, and with your neighbours, for a just and lasting peace. later this morning, in ramallah, william is due to meet the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas. he will spend several hours in the palestinian territories meeting different groups. britain is keen to send a message that peace can only come about through cooperation and mutual respect, and that is the message that william's visit is intended to emphasise. nicholas witchell, bbc news, jerusalem. a solidified lump of fat, oil and grease that has been on show at the museum of london could be preserved after proving popular with visitors. here it is. the piece of fatberg comes from a so called "monster fatberg" which had been blocking sewers in east london.
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it was going to be removed from display this week but may be kept as an historical artefact. it is gross but sort of fascinating at the same time. it's 8:09am. we will keep you updated with the situation with the fire and the moor. very dramatic pictures from there this morning, you get a sense of what is going on. in 2016, more than half of women sentenced to less than 12 months in prison went on to reoffend within a year, according to ministry ofjustice. five pilot residential centres for women will be set up in england and wales. they will be used as an alternative tojailtime and aim to cut reoffending rates. joining us now from birmingham is marie claire, who spent over a year in prison after being convicted of reckless driving and in the studio, joy doal, ceo of anawim women's centre.
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good morning both, thank you for joining us. joy, why do you think, is it that prison isn't working as far as you see, why would this be a better alternative? prison doesn't work. we only have to look at the reoffending rates to see that. the problem really is the short prison sentences women receive, they received just a few weeks or a few months and that is not long enough to do anything meaningful, by way of rehabilitation or anything that is going to help that woman. we really welcome the strategy that has come out today and it really does highlight the difficulties that women have an trauma, mental health issues, substance abuse and the other issues women have to deal with. marie claire, tell us about your experience. you spend some time in jail, your experience. you spend some time injail, tell us a bit more about that. yes, you know, prison is a
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time for reflection and working on yourself on the best thing i found about prison was the therapy and the things that helped me to rehabilitate myself, the supportive elements. drug rehabilitation and things like that are imperative. as we just heard, short sentences don't give us the time to reinvest in the bubble away is needed. we really welcome the strategy as well. these women residential centres sounds like they will be just the ticket in offering women the support they need to make different choices. how does this kind of centre work? some people might say, is this getting soft in some way? not at all. we used to offer alternatives to custody at women's centre, prior to transforming rehabilitation, whether private companies have now taken on a lot of those issues. they worked really well and reoffending rates we re very really well and reoffending rates were very low, as low as 3%. where
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as short prison sentences, it's about 68% reoffending. the thing is, about 68% reoffending. the thing is, a lot of the women would say this is actually tougher than doing six weeks in prison and just sitting in a cell and not doing anything. we have therapeutic programmes, psychologists led group work, where the women actually addressed the trauma and address the reasons that their offending and a lot of women would actually say this is tougher, harder to deal with, because actually they have to face their issues and demons but by keeping the women in the community where they live, children don't have to go into care, you can keep the women near to home, where they have their support structures. it's a much better option. marie claire, you know first—hand the other path can lead to women facing more problems because of the way the prison service is run, you witnessed that first—hand ? service is run, you witnessed that
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first-hand? absolutely, women are going into prison, and men, it's not gender specific, men and women going into prison and coming out with drug addictions, post—traumatic stress disorder, because they are witnessing people dying in prison and committing suicide. self harm has gone through the roof. we're talking about sending damaged people away and then coming out more damaged, often. having said that, there is a place for prison and punishment and looking at yourself and reflecting, being accountable for your actions is imperative. but asjoy said, surely for your actions is imperative. but as joy said, surely that involves kind of looking and reflecting on the past and working through the trauma that has led you to offending. without that, it isjust a vicious cycle of reoffending. very interesting speaking to you both, marie claire and joy, thank you for your time this morning. the weather is very warm and it is not changing. how right eye on that?
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good morning. —— how right am not changing. how right eye on that? good morning. —— how rightam i? good morning. —— how right am it would change later on into to become potentially but this morning we are at denbigh's wine estate in dorking, surrey, england's largest vineya rd. dorking, surrey, england's largest vineyard. it covers 265 acres and used to be a pig farm. mr white bought it many years ago. his son chris now runs we will be speaking to chris in half an hour or so. he has made it into this magnificent success that it is today, he and his family. last year, they produced half a million bottles from here. in the next eight years, they are hoping double that. the soil is similarto hoping double that. the soil is similar to that that you would find in their champagne growing region of france. temperatures are picking up, and notice or breeze here, as there isa and notice or breeze here, as there is a cross southern counties of england and the channel islands today. yesterday's top temperature hit 31 celsius. that was in cheshire. today, it is scotland and
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northern ireland that are likely to see 30 celsius. if that happens, it will be the warmestjune day for scotla nd will be the warmestjune day for scotland and northern ireland since june 19 95. worth mentioning as well, pollen levels are very high, uv well, pollen levels are very high, uv high well, pollen levels are very high, uv high levels, so bear it in mind if you are stepping up. high pressure has been in charge for a little while and will remain so today the next few days. what we have this morning is quite a lot of cloud across eastern coastlines of scotla nd cloud across eastern coastlines of scotland and england, but some of that cloud has come inland across england in particular. some of it has been producing some drizzle around the midlands this morning. we do expect it to burn back towards the coast, where like yesterday, pockets will linger. we are looking at sea breezes here so it will be cooler. move away from there and we're looking at a lot of sunshine. through the dates, and it or high cloud developing across southern counties, turning sunshine hazy but not spoiling it if you like it's funny. temperature wise, up to 30 in
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scotla nd funny. temperature wise, up to 30 in scotland and northern ireland, widely be mid—20s to the high 20s but cooler along because, looking at 16-19. as but cooler along because, looking at 16—19. as we had through the evening and overnight, hanging on the breeze across southern counties on the channel islands and like previous night, more low cloud, patchy mist and fog coming in from the north sea. away from that cloud, clear skies and it will be quite a mild night. warm for some of us, particularly so across north—west england, northern ireland and south—west scotland. tomorrow we start off yet again with the cloud, again across eastern counties. through the day it will burn back to the coast, pockets of it will linger through the day and we will see further sea breezes develop. move away from there and we're back into the sunshine. temperatures tomorrow somewhere in the central lowlands could hit 31 celsius. again, widely looking at temperatures mid—to high 20s. by the time we get to friday, things are changing. we have cooler conditions coming in from the
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north—east. your temperatures will slide. it's not going to be cold but instead of being towards the 30s, we will be closer to mid—20s. as we slip down south, top temperature about 28. as i mentioned at the top, the risk of some boundary showers developing in the south moving north on sunday, but still that might change. studio: thank you, carol, we will be back with you in the rather lovely surroundings but we will let you get out of the heat for the moment. thank you. some of those warm temperatures and the wind is having a bearing on this story about the fire this morning, 30 homes evacuated as a huge moorland fire continues to spread in greater manchester. the blaze on saddleworth moor has been declared a major incident. for the latest we can go to our correspondent dave guest who's in stalybridge. just slightly below where we can see
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some of the workers, explained the situation this morning. the situation this morning. the situation as you can probably see is they have brought the flames under control on the section of the hillside, basically covering it with water as you can see. they have been here before and thought they had it under control. when i joined here before and thought they had it under control. when ijoined your last nine i think you saw the flames had started shooting up again so it's a very unpredictable, they at the mercy of the winds, and this is tinder dry ground, there is lots of peat, brush and it's a very difficult fire. there was a news conference shot on ago saying they had firefighters in total dealing with this, fire service from greater manchester, derbyshire, lancashire dealing with this significant incident. a number of firefighters have said they have dealt with moorland fires in the past but they said this is one of the biggest. you may be able to see the smoke rising into the sky, it is a blue sky over there and overhear it looks overcast
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because we are covered with this pall of smoke and the smoke can be seen for miles around. this fire is very much not under control, this is a tiny fraction of the six kilometres stretch of fire. we can see the hoses behind you. presumably access is one of the big problems. it is, yes. it is quite steep, point the camera down there. there is quite a steep kart track, the fire engines and distance away. they have run the hoses up here and a lot of the work has been manual using beaters to beat the flames out but the difficulty is the undergrowth is so thick they can think they have it under control on the top layer and suddenly it springs up again from underneath. there is lots of peat land around here that can smoulder for some time and a gust of wind and it is off again. this is a site of scientific interest so there is lots of concern about the ecological do.
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that is something they will only be to assess at some point in the future. right now the priority is getting this fire completely under control and that could be some time off yet. david, thank you. the time is 8:20am. as we've just been hearing temperatures will continue to soar, but there's a new warning about the dangers of attempting to cool off by swimming in open water. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at walton—on—thames for us to find out how to stay safe in the heat. morning. good morning. such a lovely spot and a lovely day but with this beautiful weather comes those renewed warnings about the potential danger of swimming in open water. on monday a man lost his life in surrey having got into difficulty in a lake, a 13—year—old boy in the staffordshire area is missing under some circumstances. what is the advice on this? should people get into water or not? plays from the canal & river trust, you oversee the canals and rivers across england and wales. should people get in the water? not
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unless they are with a supervised group. as you say, canal & river trust is a charity that runs 2000 miles of glorious waterways in england and wales and in hot weather it is no wonder people want to come along to the watercolour it's such a lovely place to be and we know it makes people happy but we ask people not to get into the water unless they are with a supervised open water swimming they are with a supervised open waterswimming group. they are with a supervised open water swimming group. there are risks under the surface of the water that cannot be seen, whether it be reads, the temperatures are very cold even on a hot day which can ta ke cold even on a hot day which can take your breath away and sap your energy. plus there are obstacles that you can't see and that can be difficult in open water. —— reeds. please don't get into the water unless you are with an open water swimming group. you mentioned open water swimming groups and you are an open water swimming coach. martha is swimming in the water behind us. why is she 0k to do this? swimming in the water behind us. why is she ok to do this? she has had a lot of open water swim coaching, which is important before getting
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into open water and i think having respect for the water is incredibly important, as well as christine has a swimming specific wet suit on to keep her buoyant on the water, she is visible, she has goggles, she can see underwater, very important. so, the temperature of water is often very deceiving, it can be a blistering hot day and you get in and it takes your breath away. very much so and people don't expect that soap is knowing what you are getting into, the temperature of the water and trying to relax is very important. it's very different from swimming in the sea because salt water tends to be more buoyant but that's not the case in freshwater. exactly and when you get a new find when you don't have saltwater are not ina when you don't have saltwater are not in a wet suit is it's a different story. the important thing is to be prepared. if something goes wrong what is the best way to alert people to the fact that things are not as they should be? one of the positions we tell our swimmers to get into is on their back and relax. this way the wet suit holds you up
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on the surface, arm up in the air, people can come over and give you a hand if you need it. i guess it is trying to avoid panic because that can be so dangerous. it is very easily done but if you canjust keep telling yourself to relax and calm down, stop kicking things will be better. thank you forjoining us. christine, we can have a chat with you, thank you for your swimming demonstration. it's so important to respect the water. you've got to trust the water and trust people around you, trust the water and trust people around you , never trust the water and trust people around you, never swim on your own and have faith in the equipment you have, your visibility, wet suit and goggles keep you safe. do you find more people want to give it a go but need to contact a proper group? definitely. you should never be on your own. it is not safe and it is more fun with a group, you enjoy it and learn things as well. how different is it to swimming at sea? i love the water, you have more currents to worry about but you have to be wary of the thames and other
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places. in the stagnant or still water you can't see the depth, you don't know what is underneath, in the thames you have the flow to the river so we have to be conscious of your environment. thank you for joining us. do you find more people are wanting to give this a go, marsha? very much so, over the last ten years open water was just a bolt on for triathlon and it's become its own sport and it is increasing every day. thank you ever so much indeed. really important messages, respect the water, realise it will be far colder than you realise and if you are going to go in and make sure you have the right equipment and a part ofan have the right equipment and a part of an organised group. don't think about doing it on your own. go with others and take care ultimately. studio: very clear messages, tim, thank you. it seems counterintuitive if you are panicking to relax but is genuinely a life—saver. more messages on twitter and facebook because we did a bit about it a couple of months ago, particularly about cold water
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shock and what to do. we always like meeting people who invent things, particularly young people who invent things and john is at the harwell space cluster as it is known. is that right? the space cluster? absolutely right, charlie gkolomeev got it in one, all sorts of amazing innovation here, satellites so much pa rt innovation here, satellites so much part of our lives from mobile phones to be incredible pictures of saddleworth moor, the fire we have been seeing on the programme this morning. just take a look at this, it's obviously a map of the world, an interactive map, showing you fishing fleets from right around the world's oceans and coasts, the different colours tell you they are different colours tell you they are different types of vessels doing different types of vessels doing different things, enabling the authorities to keep an eye on illegal fishing authorities to keep an eye on illegalfishing practices, authorities to keep an eye on illegal fishing practices, just one of the ways in which satellite technology at the moment is very much involved in daily life. good morning to emily graves from the uk space agency. you have been running this competition for the second year now getting young people to come up with ideas for using satellites into
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the future. we heard from some of yesterday, incredible ideas. what happens next? the satellite competition is all about getting ideas and some of those people will ta ke ideas and some of those people will take the ideas through to reality, some of them were offered through mentoring yesterday, three of the competition winners last year are doing it with their own ideas. we hope to see the same from this crop this year because we have seen fantastic ideas. a wristband to keep you safe when swimming in the ocean, plans for traffic management, everyday problems being solved by ingenuity. absolutely, most of them taking technology that is already available and repurposed sing it in available and repurposed sing it in a new way, so available and repurposed sing it in a new way, so the safe band was already a thing, people said why didn't they introduce it to help their children at the beach this year? we will meet another competition winner late in the problem after the news, travel and weather you are watching breakfast this morning. yesterday was the hottest day of the
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year. today the hottest temperatures across northern ireland and scotland, where we could see the hottestjune scotland, where we could see the hottest june day scotland, where we could see the hottestjune day here for 23 years. temperatures up to about 30, perhaps 31 celsius. widely across the uk, temperatures getting into the high 20s, except the far eastern coast of scotland, eastern scotland, with some low cloud and miss teen is, keeping temperatures down at 18—20 or 21 celsius. elsewhere, keeping temperatures down at 18—20 or21 celsius. elsewhere, clear keeping temperatures down at 18—20 or 21 celsius. elsewhere, clear blue skies. as we go through this evening and tonight, mist and low cloud plaguing those eastern coast, which may move a bit further inland into the early hours of thursday morning. temperatures overnight down to 10-1a. like temperatures overnight down to 10—1a. like today, any low cloud and misty nuts will burn quickly back
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towards the coast. elsewhere, there's temperatures once again in there's temperatures once again in the mid—to high 20s. it could be even hotter on thursday across scotla nd even hotter on thursday across scotland and northern ireland to stop again, could exceed 30 celsius to stop as we go into the end of the week, high pressure still firmly in charge of our weather but we have this easterly wind, which will give usa this easterly wind, which will give us a bit more of a breeze across the channel islands and the south coast on friday. again, that easterly wind bringing a bit of low cloud and miss teen is across eastern parts. once again, another hot day. temperatures into the high 20s. cooler and fresher and those north sea coasts. into the weekend, we will keep a close eye on some activity towards the bay of biscay and france. these heavy impact thundery showers could perhaps edged their way into southern and south—western parts of england in particular later on sunday but more detail on that over
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the next few days. this is business live from bbc news with samantha simmonds and susannah streeter. uk businesses tell the government to stop passing the buck on brexit and tell them what a deal will look like. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 27th ofjune. business leaders from across the uk and europe are calling for "pace and urgency" in brexit negotiations in a joint statement. also in the programme — $270 million worth of items have been seized at properties belonging to former malaysian prime minister najib razak. we'll have the latest. and the
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