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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 27, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11am. the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital death scandal breaks her silence, her husband reads a statement on her behalf. she has always maintained she was a hard—working, dedicated she has always maintained she was a ha rd—working, dedicated doctor. doing the best for her patients in a very inadequately resourced part of the health service. firefighters tackling a huge blaze on the moors outside manchester say high winds are making thejob more difficult. it has been tremendously difficult, and firefighters have worked tremendously ha rd hard and we noticed a thick black plume of smoke, and heard crackling. the ash and smoke came trump won tumbling down. it was horrendous.
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a couple who don't want to get married wind their legal battle to have a civil partnership prince william crosses from israel to the west bank — becoming the first royal to officially visit the palestinian territories. can serena williams add to her seven wimbledon trophies to her seven wimbledon trophies in her return to the tournament after giving birth last september? her chances have been boosted by the all—england club's decision to seed her 25th — despite a world ranking of 183. good morning. the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital deaths scandal has broken her silence — with her husband reading
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a statement on her behalf. he said she was a dedicated doctor who did the best for her patients. drjane barton hadn't been seen, or made any comment, since the publication of an inquiry which said the deaths of a50 patients at the gosport war memorial hospital were shortened by a dangerous pratice of overprescribing painkillers. relatives have called for a criminal inquiry into what they called the the unforgivable regime at the hospital which was overseen by dr barton. this morning's statement on behalf of dr barton was read out outside her house in gosport, by her husband, tim. jane would like to thank her family, friends, colleagues, former patients and many others for their continued support and loyalty through protracted enquiry. she has always maintained that she was a hard—working, dedicated maintained that she was a ha rd—working, dedicated doctor. doing the best for her patients in a
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very inadequately resourced part of the health service. we ask that our privacy is respected at this difficult time, and she will be making no further comment. our health correspondent catherine burns is here. she has obviously felt the need to come out and put her side of the story out there. give us the context, what has been said so far? it isa context, what has been said so far? it is a week since the panel came back and it was pretty damning, saying a56 flights were shortened. this panel did not have the power to prescribe any criminal liability but it did say to the government, the nhs and the other authorities that they need to take this seriously. dr jane barton has always been the name at the centre of it for families. she was the prescribing doctor, who gave 9a% of her patients opiates in some form, so this is the first time she has said anything since the first report. interestingly, she
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didn't say anything, as you saw she actually left before her husband had finished speaking, but she's trying to get across the fact that she's thanking people, including patients and colleagues for their support and loyalty, and says hard—working dedicated doctor doing the best for her patients in and it quite —— inadequately resourced part of the health service. she did not answer when reporters asked if she had any m essa 9 es when reporters asked if she had any messages for the families. let's cross now to the bank of england, where the governor mark carney is giving a statement... in this regard it is worth recalling that they capital strength of many uk banks has tripled since 2007, with the aggregate tier one capital ratio of those banks rising to i7% in the first quarter. it is also worth recalling that the contingent liquidity of those banks has risen
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tenfold over the same period, to more than 100% of short—term liabilities potentially subject to run risk. second, the ftc has identified the most important risk from a cliff edge brexit, to the provision of financial services. and we have outlined the necessary steps to assess these risks. as detailed in the fpc‘s updated check list published today, progress has been made but material risks were made. and implementation period was implemented subject to ratification... the european withdrawal act has received royal assent. the uk government has committed to legislate if necessary to put in place a temporary permissions regime to enable eu —based financial companies to continue to provide financial
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services to uk and users. once enacted, this will mitigate action, with minimal disruption to uk company —— customers, including those with insurance contracts. the biggest risk to destruction is where action is needed by both parties, such as the continuity of 6 trillion existing derivative contracts in clear band unclea red existing derivative contracts in clear band uncleared market. based on our clear band uncleared market. based on oui’ experience clear band uncleared market. based on our experience and knowledge of the markets, it will not be possible ahead of march 2019 for private instill -- ahead of march 2019 for private instill —— national private institutions to mitigate billy the risk to destruction of financial services. uk government's temporary provision regime would... the fpc welcomes the
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establishment in april of technical working group chaired by the ecp and bank of england, on risk management in the area of financial services in the period around the 30th of march 2019. the first thing the fpc has done around brexit is make clear that irrespective of the particular form of the uk's future relationship of the eu and consistent with its statutory responsibility, the committee will remain committed to the implementation of robust standards in the united kingdom. this will require maintaining a level of resilience that is at least as great as currently planned, which itself exceeds that required by international baseline standards. the fpc is increasingly focusing on operational risk. we announced today that we will set standards on firms‘
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recovery plans following cyber attacks. these standards would be known as impac tolerances. to be clear, firms have primary responsibility for the ability to resist undercover from cyber attacks. the governor of the bank of england, mark carney. more than 50 homes have been evacuated as a huge moorland fire continues to spread in greater manchester. firefighters have been battling the blaze on saddleworth moor since sunday evening and described it as major incident. fire crews also say it‘s an enormous challenge due to the sheer size of it. residents describe being drowned by the thick black smoke and had difficulty breathing. we have a large area that has been affected by fire. given the size and the scale of that area, what we‘ve had to do is break that into smaller areas to deal with, which we call sectors.
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we‘ve currently got two active sectors where we have 25 firefighters at each area, dealing with that situation. there are pockets of fire all over, so what we have had to do this morning is an assessment of the scene, in which we‘ll be using some air assets to gauge a full assessment, but we are still dealing with the fire situation. it‘s been tremendously difficult and firefighters have worked tremendously hard in heat, smoke and really difficult conditions, which have been really testing for firefighters, but we‘ve continued to battle an and firefighters, they do theirjob. our correspondent dave guest has spent the morning near the blaze in carrbrook in stalybridge. there is still a lot of smoke
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around, and still rising from the landscape, but we have seen the firefighters coming back off the hill, looking like they haven‘t more 01’ hill, looking like they haven‘t more or less under control. we have seen this before, in earlier this morning it looked as if it was just smoking, but the wind changed direction, whipped up the flames, and they had to start again bringing hose pipes up to start again bringing hose pipes up the hillside to try to start it —— bring it under control again. up the hillside to try to start it —— bring it under controlagain. if you have a look, the smoke is now going down towards the village. the fire service as saying that the smoke is not toxic, but it can be irritating to the eyes and throat. it is obviously a major concern for eve ryo ne it is obviously a major concern for everyone with asthma. as you said earlier, and number of homes have been evacuated overnight, people are advised to leave their homes because it looked as though the fire was getting close to them. this is only one part of a massive area affected by the fire. six kilometres of fire have been fought by the fire
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services over the past a8 hours. pockets keep erupting here and there. they are having to break it into sections, deal with the section then move onto the next. as to when they will be able to save it fired is completely out, how long is a piece of string? they really cannot say at this stage. local residents who live in greater manchester, around the areas the blaze has affected , spoke about their experiences it was horrendous, the thick black smoke and the crackling. one of the residents speaking there told us how she‘s been rescuing residents pets that have become lost and confused in the fire. many of their owners were told to evacuate their homes in the early hours of the morning.
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the fire was going on, it was rudely thick black smoke, and ifound the fire was going on, it was rudely thick black smoke, and i found a the fire was going on, it was rudely thick black smoke, and ifound a cat across the road, and he wasjust lying with his tongue hanging out, andi lying with his tongue hanging out, and i cleaned up and he wasn‘t too bad, but then she was in a really bad, but then she was in a really bad mess round the corner. all the stuff in herface now, it was all black, her tongue was hanging out, she couldn‘t breathe. we just couldn‘t believe her, so we got her and then we decided to go and check and then we decided to go and check and make sure there were no other cats leading evacuated. we wanted to check no other animals were left out as well. let us go back to our main news. the doctor at the centre of the gosport health scandal has broken her silence. we can speak to a woman whose grandmother died in 1998 at the hospital. thank you very much forjoining us. what are your thoughts having heard her speaking out this morning? it is very
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shocking. such few words, well, the panel as we know found that there was complete disregard for human life at the hospital, and i think jane barton has the stand at the forefront of that. bearing in mind she talks about heavy workload and her patients being at the centre of her patients being at the centre of her work ethic, she joined that hospital in 1988, and in 1989, the nurses started complaining about the very institutionalised regime that the panel speak about in the report, prescribing and administered eating lethal dozes off the type of drugs thatis lethal dozes off the type of drugs that is peoples lives. and at that point there was no concern from jane barton of workload, it was a very
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small care home with one ward, and that was allowed to continue. so i appreciate that she has broken her silence, but this is not the end in terms of the silencing of the families because we want this in a criminal court. thank you very much. the chancellor‘s deputy, liz truss, has publicly criticised some of her cabinet colleagues over their "macho" demands for more public spending — and telling people how to live their lives. in a speech last night she complained about ministers who told the public to drink less, eat fewer doughnuts, and get rid of their wood burning stoves. let‘s speak now to our assistant political editor, norman smith who joins me now from the houses of parliament. well, how did that go down with the colleagues? i think there was a feed amount of amazement at liz truss‘s comments because it is the latest in what has been emerging willingness of ministers to speak out publicly and criticise each other. we have
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already seen a bust up over ministers, there has been a spat over spending commitments, and no liz truss has criticised policies michael gove has been pursuing, in particular the idea of curbs on disposable cups, plastic straws, and also suggesting his department is full of hot air. let us just have a listen. of course we need regulation in our society and many of the rules we have in place are about guaranteeing safety. but sometimes, i feel, that some of the rules get in the way of consumers making legitimate choices and people being able to live their own lives and have the lifestyle they want. i don't think our government's role should be to tell us what tastes we should be to tell us what tastes we should have. too often we are told we are drinking too much, maybe that isjust me, eating too many doughnuts or enjoying the warm glow of outward burning goves, sorry, i
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mean stoltz. you can see there is a lot of hot air. i am joined by ed vaizey. what do you make of these comments? it has done what she wanted to do, but used an interesting approach to ensure we are now talking about her speech today. if you unpack it and say she has a message to get out, which is about keeping control of taxes and spending, then she clearly used michael gove other spending —— stepping stone to get that coverage. normally those sort of disagreements are conducted in private. why are we seeing ministers publicly criticising each other?” seeing ministers publicly criticising each other? i think it isa fair criticising each other? i think it is a fair point and to a certain extent one is led by example, so, if
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you have a foreign secretary capable of espousing his separate brexit policy from that of the prime ministerand policy from that of the prime minister and the to fly to afghanistan when there is a vote on heathrow, other ministers said, if it is all right for him, it is all right for me. that is part of the problem. so how does mrs may restore order in her cabinet? to a certain extent we are waiting for a brexit, so we extent we are waiting for a brexit, so we have this great chequers summit we are waiting about. if we can come to something the party can unify around, then we have an opportunity perhaps for the prime minister to concentrate more on the domestic agenda, but you are right. ainger question i think is the point the prime minister has to be much more prominent and vocal in what her red lines are on domestic policy. on issues like tax and spending and make it clear where she is prepared to recede ground and perhaps where
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she is not in other areas of spending. perhaps ministers do not fear mrs may, they are not frightened of stepping out of line? ido frightened of stepping out of line? i do not think you get anywhere without setting a clear sense of direction for this bid the conservative government. but you're right, ministers are in a powerful position. i think michael gove plays it well, setting a clear policy without attacking the prime minister, andl without attacking the prime minister, and i think sajid javid has won a victory without overturning the prime minister's decision. regarding the customs agreement regarding brexit, what chances do
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you think there are of having... kicking the can down the road works toa certain kicking the can down the road works to a certain extent, the party is clearly split on what sort of brexit we have, and i have a huge amount of sympathy for the prime minister's position, trying to unify the two wings of the party, and we need to have a clear position, but the crucial point is that it takes to liz truss tangle. on the one hand we cannot as the prime minister to come toa cannot as the prime minister to come to a decision on brexit, but not as senior members of the parliament to say, when we have decided as a collective, this is how we're going to approach it, i will unite behind that and will not use 4000 word speeches to torpedo the policy. this morning the leader of the conservatives in the welsh assembly has resigned. it seems he may have
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been the latest victim of tory infighting over attitudes to business because mr davies only the other day publicly criticised erebus after they expressed warnings over brexit, and it seems that may have been a step too far for some of his conservative colleagues. we have some breaking news that a 17—year—old swimmer has died after getting into difficulty in the river in leeds. officers received a report from the ambulance service at quarter to seven yesterday evening, but the teenager had gone into the water. body was recovered from the water. body was recovered from the water rat 1am on wednesday. west yorkshire police have just put that very sad news out. the supreme court has unanimously ruled in favour of a heterosexual couple fighting for the legal right to enter a civil partnership. the court decided that the ban on different six couples entering into civil partnership under
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the civil partnership act 200a is "incompatible" with human rights laws. the case was brought by rebecca steinfeld and charles keidan, who both oppose marriage as an institution but want to have their relationship officialy recognised. we will try to fix the technical problems and bring you what they have been saying later. the government has scrapped plans forfive new women‘s prisons in england and wales. the same number of residential centres will be built instead. they will provide help with getting a job and treating drug addiction in a bid to reduce the number of women being jailed for low level offences. heavy rains are continuing to hamper efforts to find a group of young football players and their coach who are missing inside a cave in thailand. rescue workers have been fighting a losing battle to pump water
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from the cave network. thai soldiers and volunteers are amongst those trying to find the group as the search enters its fourth day. terminally ill pensioner noel conway, who wants the right to an assisted death, has lost his legal challenge at the court of appeal. mr conway, who has motor neurone disease, wanted to be prescribed a lethal dose of drugs. he says the law preventing assisted suicide breaches his own human right to a peaceful and dignified death. the duke of cambridge will visit the palestinian territories today as he continues his tour of the middle east. later this morning, he‘ll meet with palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas. the trip also marks the first time a member of the british royalfamily has been on an official visit to israel. we can go live to our middle east correspondent, yolande knell, who is in ramallah. we are at the presidential headquarters, and a few moments ago
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we saw prince william making royal history being the first member of the royal family to come to the unoccupied west bank on an official visit. he‘s talking to president abbas, then we‘ll have lunch with him before spending more time in ramallah. british diplomats say they hope people get a feel for the buzz of the city, he is going to meet young people, take part in cultural and sporting events, and he will get the chance to meet some palestinian refugees, these are people who were forced to leave their homes or fled from their homes back in 19a8 when the state of israel was created their descendants to. this was a chance —— this is a chance we are told prince william to learn about the situation, see the palestinian side of the story, palestinians hoping he will get some sense of the daily realities living in the west bank, the difficulties caused them by the long—running conflict with israel. how is that as it being seen
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where you are? well, there is a mixed reception. on the israeli side, the trip is going down very well. i was looking at some israeli newspaper headlines this morning, and they talk about the prince is being prince charming, william the conqueror. he was on the beach in tel aviv, meeting people, he met the eurovision song contest winner in tel aviv as well. on the palestinian side, the british legacy is of course much more complicated, and prince william will know that, he will have been briefed thoroughly. there are many palestinians who blamed the british for their role during the british mandate times prior to the creation of the state of israel allowing jewish immigration to happen. that is something palestinian children are taught about schools. prince william has made it clear he wants to meet young people and hear what they have to say. he is meeting a much greater
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diversity of people than you would see on a ministerial, political visit. thank you very much. now, let us visit. thank you very much. now, let us go for a sports update. for 1‘s lionel messi can ride on someone else‘s shoulders. so much was expected of him on what could have been his last world cup stand. the world cup was watching him from the nigeria defence. in moments of perfection, he can do this. argentina grew victory, and touchy. the over tactile approach cost a penalty. the chelsea playerflipped the game, with argentina on the
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brink of infamy heading out of the competition. but this made them heroes. rocco sent a roar across the world. that might have been pretty much irreleva nt that might have been pretty much irrelevant had iceland one —— had iceland won. in searching for a victory, they left croatia to wind the game and end iceland‘s adventure. another four matches today as well. that is all the sport for no. a solidified lump of fat, oil and grease that‘s been on show at the museum of london could be preserved, after proving popular with visitors. the piece of fatberg comes
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from a so—called "monster berg" that had been blocking sewers in east london. it was going to be removed from display this week but the museum‘s curator says the fatberg caused a "marked increase" in visitors — and they are now thinking of preserving it, when it finishes its public display this week. the headlines are coming up on bbc news channel. in a moment we‘ll say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with a look at the weather. let usjoin simon king. thank you. it is very hot out there. temperatures in porthmadog already up temperatures in porthmadog already up to 30 degrees. temperatures continuing to rise. you can see those blue skies elsewhere to. temperatures continue to climb, particularly northern ireland and scotland. if we can get above 25 celsius it will be the hottest day injune 30 years, and that is likely
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with temperatures predicted for 30. temperatures around 19 to 23 in the south east. we will see low cloud overnight moving in from the north sea. so it might start off a little misty. otherwise, clear skies, sea. so it might start off a little misty. otherwise, clearskies, and temperatures tomorrow about 13. also more sunshine and another hot one tomorrow. bye—bye. he will be given a very positive welcome in ramallah. how difficult is thejob he has welcome in ramallah. how difficult is the job he has to welcome in ramallah. how difficult is thejob he has to do? he has been schooled in not being partisan and the school domain. but he is an environment where obviously he is meeting people with very strong views who will be wanting to impress them. and possibly want to deliver messages. so how difficult will it be for him to navigate this? he is not a messenger boy. if there are
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m essa 9 es not a messenger boy. if there are m essa g es to not a messenger boy. if there are messages to be passed on, that is for ambassadors to do. but he will be hearing very strongly expressed points of views it can be anything but good that he is doing this. the last method she has got is one designed to talk about peace. that is encouraging. but he will be wanting to hear what the palestinians have to say on that point. what does that achieves? and listening? you know, he is the second in line to the throne and he was beginning to really get involved in international affairs and so on. what is happening in israel and the holy land and that part of the world is always of tremendous importance and interest. ithink is always of tremendous importance and interest. i think it is high time and very good that he is going out to pay his first visit to get his own personal feel for what is
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going on. talking to some of the players. this is the first such visit. maybe there will be others. he is covering a lot of ground. i think i can —— it can only help him and his future. you say his first visit, but the first royal visit to israel and the palestinian... why 110w israel and the palestinian... why now do you think? the royal family has gone in various visits over the yea rs. has gone in various visits over the years. it is all to do with the unfinished business of the peace negotiation. if and when there is an agreement on peace, it will hinge around... it will become much easier for everybody. thank you very much. the independent analysis produced
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for the bbc‘s want the public to him —— the government to intervene for help with good health. in a moment, speaking to two experts about the latest of the nhs reports produced for the bbc — "are we expecting too much from the nhs?" but first here‘s our health correspondent dominic hughes. the introduction of compulsory seat belts in cars was one of the most important public health measures introduced by the government. at the time, critics said this was at the action of a nanny state but it led to a drastic reduction in road traffic deaths and injuries. since then, we‘ve seen similar measures, like the smoking ban and a sugar tax, and now a new report says the public supports government action. the majority of the public are in favour of governments taking some of these interventions, such as limiting fast food outlets near schools, limiting advertising of junk food before 9pm on television, and also things like the smoking ban. these are things the government
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does have control over. but the report also says that individuals have a responsibility to look after their own health. at this scheme in leeds, these middle—aged men are doing just that, coming together to hone their carpeting skills, while also tackling the loneliness and isolation many of them have experienced post retirement. you‘ve just got somebody to talk to, you‘re not just sat on your own, being so bored. it is one of the best things i've discovered since retirement. i think the main thing is camaraderie. when you live by yourself, it can be quite lonely. the social, physical and economic environment we live in is the biggest influence on our health. there is public support for government measures that help people to break down those environmental barriers to good health. dominic hughes, bbc news, leeds. with me now is richard murray —
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director policy at the kings fund and jennifer dixon from the health foundation. thank you both for coming in. well, this part is entitled are we expecting too much from the nhs. what do you think? if you ask the public, most of them say they are satisfied with the nhs. it is not that we ask too much of it, it might be that we are not asking enough. the public remain very loyal to the principles of the nhs. that loyalty does not mean that it can‘t tell when the nhs is doing very well, but it does not blame the government for the funding of it. so there is a much more nuanced vision of it.|j think most people think that nhs makes a max of influence to health and it does. it is only around ten
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to 20% of health care. as your film showed, it is a much wider set of issues having to do with where you live, where you live, yourjob, how much exercise you have peered at those things have a much bigger impact. what is interesting about the polling is a lot of people think that they are responsible for their owfi that they are responsible for their own health. over 60% of people say that. they are really open to the government being much more exerting itself and influencing on these wider factors. so for example, the ban on sugar, and smoking. the sugar tax, the smoking ban. food labelling, fat, salt, alcohol pricing. the public are very open to that kind of thing and i think the government can go further. where do you think the government could go further? what areas?|j you think the government could go further? what areas? i think at the
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outset, focusing on childhood obesity. measures to restrict fast food outlets around schools. to help try to reduce the amount of sugar in strength and in the kind of things that children like to eat and pester their parents for. that is probably their parents for. that is probably the first place to start. do you think that would make a difference? this has yet to be tested. we did see that when the government introduced at the sugar tax, they just reformulated their recipe and took the sugar out. the attacks made the companies altered the kind of foods that people were altered —— the sugar tax. i think we can find some sweet spots, a win—win where companies can make some of the changes and make it easier for people to make healthy decisions. why do you think the government is
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so reluctant to do this?” why do you think the government is so reluctant to do this? i think there is an ideology in this. some politicians really don't like the government interfering in people's lives at all and prefer to have very little regulation. and others feel that there is a role. some people are living in areas where they are in so—called food deserts. were the only available food is rubbish food. there is a real opportunity for the government to improve that situation and make it easier for people. lots of people want to make the choices, thatis of people want to make the choices, that is what the poll shows. and they are not making the shows is partly because i think they need support. this is a big issue because one in three children between the ages of two and 15, are overweight or obese. when you think about that, thatis or obese. when you think about that, that is one in three. on the other side of the coin, towards food and
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consumption, that is exercise. that is another big area where there is huge debate as to how to encourage children to be more active. on the stats where people are doing what they know they should be doing, seven in ten adults don‘t meet the recommended guidelines in diet, physical activity and drinking. i hear what you are saying that people are in environments where they cannot achieve what they want to do. where those aren‘t the issues, but the messages are just getting through? i think if you ask people, they know more or less what is healthy and not. in polls that i have seen, they show that people have seen, they show that people have good information. it isjust somehow or other there is something to do with the environment and their will. think about the people who wa nt will. think about the people who want to lose weight, tonnes of
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people. but they cannot or they won't. it is not easy for them to do that. because of transportation... all the reasons that we know. the question is are there some other nudge techniques that can be done by the government that could really help people? there is a huge price here. it‘s a very late notable statistics that 20% is coming from the nhs and the rest are other factors. absolutely. some of our survival rates aren‘t as good as in other countries. we don‘t catch them early enough when people develop diseases, either they smoke or have been overweight for a long. of their lives. not only do they live longer, but they are more well while they do it. there may be more that can still
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be done. making sure that people get the best information. it is not a lwa ys the best information. it is not always easy to tell which is the good food or bad food at supermarkets. especially heavy discounting on things, it puts people in harms way. would you like to see that being banned?” people in harms way. would you like to see that being banned? i think some of the buy one get one free, some of the buy one get one free, some of the heavy discounts. i think the majority of people only a small majority thought the minimum unit price of alcohol was a good idea. we have already seen in scotland it is being discussed also in wales. thank you both very much. thank you. the human rights group amnesty international has published what it calls detailed, new evidence of the extent of the burmese military‘s crimes against the rohingya people in myanmar. around 700,000 fled to bangladesh last autumn when the military launched a brutal security operation in rakhine state following a series of deadly ambushes by rohingya militants on police posts. the army has always
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insisted it was responding to a specific terrorist threat. here‘s our myanmar correspondent nick beake. a village burns in western myanmar. this was last september when burmese army and buddhist mobs were attacking rohingya muslim communities. now amnesty international says it has gathered detailed evidence proving the military‘s offensive had been weeks in the planning. the myanmar army commander—in—chief, min aung hlaing, is one of 13 top officers named in the report. they are accused of orchestrating rape and murder. and driving out more than 1.5 million rohingya people. —— halfa —— half a million. the military, which still holds huge power here, has always claimed it was responding to attacks on the police by rohingya insurgents and rejects accusations
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of ethnic cleansing. but the stories of those who made it across the border to bangladesh and now live in the world‘s biggest refugee camp tell another story. the international criminal court is looking at whether myanmar could be prosecuted for crimes against humanity. so far, myanmar has refused to co—operate and aung san suu kyi‘s government insists a new burmese led investigation is the best to uncover the truth. in a moment we‘ll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital death scandal breaks her silence. her husband reads a statement on her behalf. firefighters tackling a huge blaze on the moors outside manchester say high winds are making thejob more difficult. a couple who don‘t want to get married win their legal battle to have a civil partnership. hello.
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i‘m susannah streeter in the business news. john lewis has issued a profits warning and said it will close five waitrose food stores. the retailer said full year profits would be substantially lower than last year, when it made £290 million, and that profits in the first half of the year would be close to zero. more on this in a moment. shares in african budget airline fastjet have collapsed by two thirds after warning it could go bust without new funding. the airline, backed by easyjet founder sir stelios haji—ioannou, flies in several african countries, including south africa, tanzania and zimbabwe. it is talking to major shareholders regarding potential equity fundraising. investigators looking into allegations of a cover—up of a £1 billion fraud at hbos have been told by mps they must hand over their findings to parliament.
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treasury select committee chair nicky morgan says she found the details disclosed in a leaked report into the alleged cover—up "deeply troubling". the report claims hbos failed to disclose the fraud before being rescued by lloyds during the financial crisis. ms morgan said the committee will seek "maximum transparency". let‘s return to out top business story today and the partnership which ownsjohn lewis department stores and the waitrose supermarket chain, has warned that profits in the first half of the year will be "close to zero". last year, the group made £26.6 million in the first half of the year. it‘s blamed heavy investment in its stores for this year‘s expected fall. the retailer has also said its waitrose chain would close four convenience stores and one supermarket and revealed that the two brands would be renamed waitrose & partners and john lewis & partners from september.
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joining us now is laith khalaf, senior analyst, hargreaves lansdown. hello there. what accounts for this quite hermetic fall in profits? they haveissued quite hermetic fall in profits? they have issued a profits warning. that is right. this is another sign of the high street blues that we have seen from a whole host of retailers. i thinkjohn lewis is obviously quite significant because it is one of the strongest players in the market. and the fact that it is now saying it is having to downgrade its profits shows just how tough things are. white mark it is —— profits shows just how tough things are. white mark it is -- it is a bit ofa are. white mark it is -- it is a bit of a bellwether. until nowjohn lewis has weathered the storm. it is interesting that it is closing waitrose. five stores. it‘s in a
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luxury higher end. but it is trying to... it is caught in the middle do you think? the food industry is obviously very competitive at the moment. we have had the discounters coming in, which has driven prices down. waitrose is operating in a different segment but there is competitive pressure. that has been exasperated by the weaker exchange rate. waitrose‘s profits fell by a third last year. it was a difficult year last year. this year, looking a bit better. john lewis saying that they are expecting some profits. all of us are spending less on the big—ticket items. of us are spending less on the big-ticket items. at the moment it says it is putting a lot of money into investment in stores. are we
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seeing the stores getting a face—lift? seeing the stores getting a face-lift? yes, it looks like that. it is not clear how they are looking to spend the money. there is a lot going into it. there are significant changes coming along for staff. it looks like the pension scheme is going to be reviewed. which means the final salary scheme could be on the final salary scheme could be on the block. staff have seen a a% increase in their salaries which is but retirement could be scaled back. teething part of the investment will be improving even further the online offering? they have performed pretty well on the sector. yes, they have. i think it is going to be two prong. the numbers we have seen today there was some positive performance of the online section of waitrose. john lewis is also investing in service which is important if you are a physical retailer. that is one way
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you can differentiate yourself from online players. if you are a online, you do not offer face—to—face support. people like john you do not offer face—to—face support. people likejohn lewis, mark and spencer can provide that service. thank you very much. onto some other business stories making headlines today business and union leaders from across the uk and europe havejoined together to plead for "pace and urgency" in brexit negotiations. the cbi and the tuc along with their european counterparts are calling on the uk government and the european union to make "measureable progress". uk and eu leaders will attend a european council meeting this week. annual growth in house prices fell to its slowest pace in five years as the lull in the uk housing market dragged into summer, the nationwide said. the building society said demand from buyers was subdued, while the number of properties coming on to the market was "more of a trickle than a torrent". uk house prices rose by 2% in the past year, it said, with prices slightly higher injune than in may.
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and costa has blamed a lack of shoppers on the high street for a fall in like—for—like sales at the start of the year. the nation‘s biggest coffee chain reported a 2% drop in the first three months of the year. however, total uk sales growth were up by 5.2% thanks to new store openings. the downtime in the high street affecting all sectors. let‘s check in with the financial markets. let‘s check in with the financial markets. the ftse 100, the uk‘s top share index has lost a bit of ground as persistentjitters over global trade kept risk appetite subdued, though some more buoyant energy stocks due to the higher oil price has helped stem losses. banking stocks, which tend to be more volatile than other sectors, have so far been the the biggest drag on the ftse. shares in hsbc, barclays and rbs all fell 1% to 1.8%. that‘s all the business news.
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back to you. the latest ideas on how to use satellite technology to improve life on earth, sound like the inventions of top scientists, but in fact they‘ve all been created by young entrepreneurs! 22 inventors have been given the chance to pitch their ideas to industry experts in a bid to make them a reality. john maguire reports. normally when entrepreneurs enter the dragons‘ den, they‘re experienced business owners. but today, 21 young people aged between 13 and 21 are pitching their ideas to five dragons from the space industry, and they‘re a tough crowd. who‘s going to pay for this? you can, sort of, ramble slightly. if we put on our business hats, who do you think would be the end consumer? everyone here is already a winner of the uk space agency‘s satellife competition. they‘ve all come up with innovative ways to use satellite technology to improve our lives.
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so today, it‘s their chance to gain support and advice to take their ideas to the next level. at the age of 13, i took a very intense interest into ai, from which i created my first chatbot. a confident start for 15—year—old kari lawler, whose jacket leaves the dragons in no doubt of her ambitions. if you can start identifying those things you want to pick apart, then i'd really like you to come and talk to me about a job. when you get into discussions with universities and partners, just make sure you read the fine print, get some people on your side looking at, you know, the legal bits and pieces. you didn‘t seem remotely nervous, were you nervous? erm, not really. i do presentations and speaking a lot, so it was all right. goodness, this is such a good event, i did this event last year as well, and the kidsjust really put together some amazing projects. really impressed again this year with the calibre of the projects coming forward. we first met the schoolgirls from cornwall with their surf safe idea two months ago.
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they‘ve come up with an affordable wristband to be worn by surfers and swimmers in the sea, which would help lifeguards on the shore track their exact permission. —— position. aerospace cornwall has already offered the girls £5,000 to develop their idea. today, the european space agency said it would match the money. you can tell it‘s a good idea because you go, surely someone has already thought of this, this must exist! if you‘re able to raise a little bit of money to get this started then we can double that from the european space agency and help you through those feasibility study and testing, kind of, stages. it‘s all very well doing a presentation, isn‘t it? but then they started asking you questions. what was that like? well, nervous, yes, not very good at answering stuff on the spot, got to admit. they're not only thinking about ideas about how to use a satellite imagery or data, they're thinking about how they can solve problems with that data.
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it's really inspiring to see young, creative minds moving and thinking in this kind of space, and it's ground—breaking. i'd like to take you on a journey... so much space technology seems futuristic when, in fact, it‘s being used today. but, when looking for what‘s next and who will create it, the future is already here. 0k ok we are expecting prime minister‘s questions. let‘s check in to see what is going on. it is quite a busy chamber. it will be starting at midday, as always, we will have coverage. certain jobs are best left to experts, and it seems that the restoration of 16th—century art is one of them. an attempted restoration of a wooden sculpture of st. george carried out by an arts and crafts teacher in spain— has been lambasted by art purists. spain‘s art conservation association said that the restoration "shows
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a frightening lack of training". it looks like a completely different picture. hm. there have been plenty of animals predicting world cup results — with varying levels of success... but none quite as cute as this little guy. he clearly found south korea and germany equally tasty — not sure which he went for in the end but he really enjoyed the game. there you go. he does go for both of them. why wouldn‘t you, really? well he knows there is a treat in both of them, might as welljust go for it. anyway, no clues on the prediction. right, hottest day of the year. let‘s catch up what the weather.
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yes, it is the hottest day of the year so far. temperatures up to 38 celsius and it is not even 12 o‘clock yet. i wonder how high it will go. we can probably add another degree on top of that. temperatures being smashed today across many parts. we have lovely scenes, blue skies at the moment. this is in north wales. we also have sunshine as well in suffolk after this morning‘s low cloud. things are improving. temperatures will gradually rise up year as well. a bit of a slow start. the heat will build. across scotland, temperatures are up to about 27 or 28. across northern ireland and scotland, it could be the hottest day in which june for about 23 years. lots of
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sunshine then for the afternoon. the strong june sunshine. high uv levels. tonight, low cloud and misty mist will make its way back here. it is the eastern areas that tomorrow you could once again wake up to misty and murky skies like you have done for the last few days. that will tend to burn away back towards the coast again on thursday. on thursday, for most of us, it is a sunny day. the temperatures may be just a little bit higher in the sunshine. 31 degrees across scotland. temperatures widely up into the high 20s. going into friday, high pressure which is giving us this really settled and warm weather is still with us. we have got an easterly wind which is bringing in the low cloud and the mist from the north sea. you may see some again on friday morning.
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otherwise, not much more to say other than it is going to be another sunny day. those temperatures once again getting up into the high 20s for many. always cooler and fresher along the north eastern coast. we may see a little bit of a change into the weekend. most of this is dry, but we will keep a close eye of the showers and thunderstorms. it mightjust clip the southwestern parts of the uk. they could move their way a bit further north. or misses completely. it will become fresh for some in the weekend. temperatures down just a little bit. pitchers getting up into the high 20s as we go through the weekend with more dry and sunny weather. goodbye. this is bbc news. i‘m joanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at midday. the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital death scandal breaks her silence. her husband reads a statement on her behalf.
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she has always maintained she was a hard—working dedicated she has always maintained she was a ha rd—working dedicated doctor, she has always maintained she was a hard—working dedicated doctor, doing the best for her patients in a very inadequately resourced part of the health service. firefighters tackling a huge blaze on the moors outside manchester say high winds are making thejob more difficult. it has been tremendously difficult and firefighters have worked tremendously hard in heat, smoke, and really difficult conditions. we noticed a new thick black plume of smoke, then i heard the crackling and smell the fire. this thick black smoke came tumbling down and we couldn't breathe, it was horrendous. a heterosexual couple who don‘t want to get married wind their legal battle to have a civil partnership. prince william meets palestinian president mahmoud abbas in ramallah — the first royal to officially visit the palestinian territories. and this is the scene in the house of commons
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where prime minister‘s questions is about to get under way. it is wednesday 27th ofjune. welcome to bbc newsroom. let us go straight to the house of commons, where prime minister‘s questions is about to begin, and our assistant political editor norman smith is watching in the wings. what do you expect here. some days i imagine tea m expect here. some days i imagine team corbyn are scrabbling around, but not today, there are endless stories in the papers about cabinet unity, division, disagreement, whether it is over brexit,
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argy—bargy over spending and various ministers, demanding more cash, and also a bust up over business with the likes of borisjohnson basically telling business to take a hike, others saying no, we have to listen to business. i would be amazed if jeremy corbyn did not see the opening goal in front of him and tried to plant it like harry kane in the top left—hand corner, but maybe he will revert to one of his letters from rita from rochdale or something like that, but i would think it is almost a certainty he will seek to exploit government divisions. that said, mrs may probably knows he is going to do that, so she will be prepared for that line of attack, andi prepared for that line of attack, and i would expect her to come back by flagging up tensions on the labour side, with the split over heathrow at the start of the week, when more labour mps defied mr corbyn and back at heathrow and the ongoing labour turmoil over its
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approach to brexit. but i think that is what we are looking at possibly, if mr corbyn wanted to try to throw misses me off—guard he might return to the subject of the railways and the problems facing northern rail and go via thameslink, at the start of the week chris grayling did not appear that the transport summit along with other council leaders angry at what is happening on the railways, and when he was pressed in interviews about it, always seemed to wave away suggestions he had considered resigning over the issue. so if he wants to take misses me by surprise, he can go to the railways, but my instinct is he will hone in on cabinet divisions, challenging mrs may on who she agrees with, does she agree with liz truss, the chief secretary unhappy at new regulations on wood burners and plastic straws,
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or does she agree with michael gove? so, plenty forjeremy corbyn to go at. it is starting a little bit late, so we will stay with it for now, while we wait for it to get under way. as you say, actually, i am hearing this is the last answer so it should not be much longer. some might describe it as froth, the things being said, the insults being traded, but against the backdrop, obviously... we‘re out of time! we‘re going to listen to theresa may. mr speaker, this is armed forces week and on saturday members from across the house will be attending events to sell about armed forces day. this will provide an opportunity to recognise the source of pride and inspiration that our
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serving men and women are to us. todayis serving men and women are to us. today is also reserves day, and i would like to pay tribute to reservists including members of this house for the integral role they play in maintaining this country‘s security here and overseas, balancing their civilian lives alongside their military careers. this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others in addition to my duties in this house about a half further meetings today. helen goodman. the prime minister is right. we all celebrate the huge contribution our armed forces and reserves make. last year, the prime minister promised that no school would see a cut in its budget, yet half the schools in bishop auckland continue to face real cuts, some of over £1000 per child. doesn‘t she
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understand the damage this does to their life chances? as the honourable lady knows, we are putting extra funding into the schools. we are making extra money available for schools, and our national fairer available for schools, and our nationalfairerfunding available for schools, and our national fairer funding formula is ensuring that of the schools that have previously been among the worst funded in this country are seeing increases in their funding to help to redress that balance. mr laurence robertson. as a former chairman of the northern ireland affairs committee, and given the unresolved issues which remain in northern ireland, does the prime minister have any plans to visit the province in the near future? obviously, there area number of in the near future? obviously, there are a number of issues that we are considering in relation to northern ireland, both in the brexit context, but also with the issue of the devolved administration and our hope
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that that and the assembly will get back up and running. i hope to be visiting northern ireland in the next few weeks. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker, i join next few weeks. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker, ijoin the prime minister in paying tribute to armed forces day and reserves day and i hope... i hope we also recognise we need to do far more for veterans in their housing and health needs. i would also like to pay tribute to the firefighters tackling the blaze on saddleworth moor. i am sure all our thoughts are with the firefighters and their community and families and the memberfor stalybridge and hyde is there to support them. on brexit, the business secretary believes that business is entitled to be listened to with respect. i am sorry to see the foreign secretary is not here today with us. where's boris? he ta kes a today with us. where's boris? he
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takes a very different view, using an anglo—saxon term to make his point. which is the prime minister‘s view? this party and this government has always been a party that will back business and we will continue to back business. and we back business because it is businesses that create millions ofjobs for people in our country, that provide billions of pounds in tax that we can spend on our public services. it is businesses that are the backbone of our prosperity. and can i say to the right honourable gentleman, if he wants to stand up and talk in favourable terms about business, he has a decision to make. he can either back business or he can want to overthrow capitalism, he can‘t do both. derek corbyn. ——jeremy —— jeremy corbyn. -- jeremy corbyn. i take the prime minister‘s response as a thumbs down
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to the foreign secretary. in recent days, there have been unprecedented concerns raised by trade unions, business and even some cabinet ministers. today the cbi director—general said facts ignored today meanjobs director—general said facts ignored today mean jobs lost tomorrow. airbus supports 110,000 jobs in the uk supply chain, many of them very highly skilled, well—paid and unionised jobs. the company says no deal would force airbus to reconsider its footprint in the country, its investment and its dependency in the uk. can the prime minister reassure thousands of workers today and take the phoney threat of no deal off the negotiating table? the right honourable gentleman has raised the question of airbus. if he is so concerned about our aerospace and aviation industry, why did he not back the expansion of heathrow in
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this chamber? order! order. order! mr snell, calm yourself. acquire the quality of an aspiring spokesperson. the question has been asked. the answer from the prime minister must and will be heard. mr speaker, i say to members of this house, i don‘t normally agree with the secretary—general of unite, but on this occasion i do agree with him because he says that backing the third runway at heathrow would ensure our country remains a world
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leader in aviation and aerospace. jeremy corbyn. well, the foreign secretary didn‘t back it either, but in his own way, he was helping the aviation industry by spending 1a hours ina aviation industry by spending 1a hours in a plane for a ten minute meeting in afghanistan. mr speaker, the government is not threatening the government is not threatening the eu with this ridiculous position, it is threatening skilled jobs in this country. but at least there was one government minister that understands this. that is the honourable member for aberconwy. he asks, andi honourable member for aberconwy. he asks, and i think is about the health and foreign secretary, do the tory leadership aspirations of multimillionaires trump the need to listen to the employers and employees of this country? well, a p pa re ntly employees of this country? well, apparently they do. the head of bmw, directly employing over 8000 workers in this country, 8000 jobs in this country, said they need to know the
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government‘s plans for customs, and said if we don‘t get clarity in the next couple of months, we will have to start making contingency plans. order. the prime minister was heard. no concerted attempt from either side of this house to shout a member down will other succeed. however long it takes, the prime minister will be heard and the leader of the opposition will be heard. get the message. jeremy corbyn. the noise of people hiding behind the gallery is interesting, mr speaker. iam people hiding behind the gallery is interesting, mr speaker. i am asking the prime minister how many more firms are telling the prime minister in private what airbus and bmw are now saying very publicly? we have been meeting with business. we are
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listening to business. that is why we are very listening to business. that is why we are very clear on our customs arrangements are we want to ensure not just that we deliver on our commitment in northern ireland, but also as frictionless trade as possible, but also that we can trade around the rest of the world. but if we are talking about plans for government for business, it is this government for business, it is this government that has brought the deficit down. this government has seen employment at record levels. what would labour‘s three—point plan for business be, a 7% rise in corporation tax, nationalisation without compensation and a run on the pound. that is not backing business, it is a plan to break britain. mr speaker, is very interesting that even those brexiteers who have made brexit their life‘s work are concerned about their own financial interests. the honourable member for about their own financial interests. the honourable memberfor north east somerset, for example, is relocating his hedge funds to the eurozone. the honourable member for wokingham is advising his clients to disinvest in
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britain. meanwhile, in the real world, andrew, who works for honda in swindon, wrote to me and said... i wouldn‘t laugh if i were you, these are real people with realjobs and real concerns. he writes "i have seen nothing that gives me confidence that the government is going to deliver a trade agreement allowing the seamless flow of goods through europe‘s borders. myjob, along with many others in manufacturing suppliers and supply chains, hang on this". so will the prime minister ignore her foreign secretary, listen to workers and secure an agreement that safeguards jobs in this country? we are putting jobs in this country? we are putting jobs at the heart of what we do in relation to brexit. we are putting jobs at the heart of what we do as a government through our modern
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industrial strategy and we are ensuring that when we deliver brexit, we will deliver a brexit thatis brexit, we will deliver a brexit that is good for our economy, good forjobs and good for people up and down the country. but the right honourable gentleman, through most of his career, has actually been rather a brexiteer himself. why is it that at every stage, he and the labour party are trying to frustrate brexit in this house? the labour party‘s priority is defending jobs in this country. and, mr speaker, i doubt that andrew from swindon is alone amongst skilled workers when he goes on to say that i will hold the prime minister and her party culpable if myjob and those of my colleagues at honda end up those of my colleagues at honda end up being under threat. the cabinet was split into two, apparently, to look at options for a future customs arrangement with the eu. the prime
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minister‘s preferred option was a customs partnership and we‘ve had no official feedback on that working party, so did the leader of the house speaker the government when she said on monday that i think the customs partnership looks quite bureaucratic and unwieldy? is that option now ruled out as well? as i‘ve made clear on a number of occasions in this house, we are looking at both options in relation to customs because we want to ensure that what we deliver is that frictionless trade with the european union and the ability for us to negotiate trade deals around the rest of the world. that is what we should be looking for, and it‘s what we are doing as a government. and the labour party, he says their interest is in delivering jobs. why is it then that every labour government leaves office with more people out of work than when they went in? coming from a prime minister who
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presides over an economy where1 million people are ron zero—hours contracts, that is very rich. she rules out a customs union, the leader of the house rules out the prime minister‘s preferred option, and reality rules out a maximum facilitation model. that only leaves no deal, which she refuses to rule out. she is putting jobs at risk. sadly, it‘s not those of the warring egosin sadly, it‘s not those of the warring egos in her cabinet, because they‘ve now been rewarded with an invite to a pyjama party at chequers. meanwhile, thousands of skilled manufacturing jobs and the future of whole industries in britain are at sta ke. whole industries in britain are at stake. the prime minister continues to promote the fallacy that no deal is better than a bad deal. no deal is better than a bad deal. no deal
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isa is better than a bad deal. no deal is a bad deal. but isn‘t the truth that realjobs... order, order, and i apologise to the right honourable gentleman, i say again, there is unlimited time as far as i am concerned. order! but questions will be heard and the answers will be heard. and nothing and no one will stop that happening. it is as simple and unmistakable and clear as that. jeremy corbyn. no deal is a bad deal, but is the truth a real risk to thejobs in deal, but is the truth a real risk to the jobs in the country is a prime minister who is having to negotiate round—the—clock with her own cabinet to stop it falling apart rather than negotiating than defending jobs for workers in this country.
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i will tell the right honourable gentleman what i am this government are delivering, a successor to trident, stamp duty slashed for first—time buyers, a modern industrial strategy for jobs and growth, action on childhood obesity, 1.9 million more children in good outstanding schools, fairer school funding, new technical education, improvement or health services, expansion of heathrow, record levels of employment, record levels of employment, falling borrowing, rising real wages and we have trickled article 50 and agreed and implementation period and passed the eu withdrawal bill. britain fit for the future and leaving the european union on the 29th of march 200019. -- 2019. thank you mr speaker. last weekend i attended celebrations of 70 years of production of the great british land rover. will the prime
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minister join british land rover. will the prime ministerjoin me in congratulating the work of solihull and commit to securing post —— post brexit trade deals and recognising that new clean diesel engines have a role to play for yea rs diesel engines have a role to play for years to come? can i first of all congratulate all the workers at british land rover. 70 years of production. and my honourable friend is absolutely right. as we look at leaving the european union it gives us an opportunity to be in a position to conduct our own trade policy, sign our own trade agreements with countries around the world. my honourable friend raises the specific point about clean diesel engines and this can play an important part in reducing co2 emissions from road transport and could reduce co2 emissions further while meeting more stringent air quality standards. this country is leading on this issue of zero emission vehicles and land rover are playing their part. thank you, mr speaker. can i commend
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the armed forces and reservists for the armed forces and reservists for the finejob the armed forces and reservists for the fine job they do for our country? airbus, honda, bmw, the cbi, the tuc, the society of motor manufacturers. this speaker has failed to listen to business and insulted the business community and left companies in the dark. can the prime minister tell the house why 186,000 car manufacturing jobs are disposable to her? we have been consistently listening to business throughout the negotiations so far. business said they wanted us to give priority to eu citizens and their rights here in the uk and we did just that. business said they wanted and in fermentation period so there was not a cliff edge next march and we was “—
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was not a cliff edge next march and we was —— we have negotiated an implementation period. businesses said they want frictionless trade, so we‘d are putting forward proposals to provide that trade with the european union, but alongside that we will be developing a global britain, looking out around the world, signing trade deals around the world and if he thinks trade and business is so important, why didn‘t he support heathrow expansion? not the first time it is a prime minister that failed to answer the question, and investment has been turned off by britain by a government that refuses to listen. more than a year ago the scottish government presented a plan for the uk to remain in the single market and customs union to give certainty to business. just this week, scotland‘s first minister took a trade delegation from scotland to berlin. every step of weight the scottish government has been to protect jobs and
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scottish government has been to protectjobs and economic interest —— step of the way. two years on from the referendum and with the clock ticking down, the prime minister has done nothing but increase uncertainty. has the prime minister completed any economic analysis on the jobs and economy impact were the uk to stay in a customs union, and if not, why not? the right honourable gentleman talks about investment into the uk. last year the uk remains the preferred investor for year the uk remains the preferred investorforforeign year the uk remains the preferred investor for foreign direct investment in europe and is the third country in europe for that direct investment. we saw last year 76,000 jobs being created as a result of foreign investment in the uk and more jobs created through foreign investment than in the previous year and if he wants to talk about further confidence from business, look at the fact that this month we have seen £2.3 billion of investment being announced by the tech industry creating another 1600
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jobs and there are more examples i can give him. if he wants to listen to business, he should listen to scottish business, because there message is clear, stay in the united kingdom. fresh from my success of managing to stagger over the line in the recent london marathon i will be running a ten k road race as part of the black country fun run in hails owen this sunday. this is an event which has raised thousands of pounds from local charities in my community, so would the primer the organisers, in particular —— the prime minister thank the organisers for the administration put into the event and offer her congratulations to those who are participating in this race? can i first of all take this chance to congratulate my honourable friend for completing the london
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marathon earlier this year, and i know, for raising money for a very worthy local cause and i‘m very happy tojoin worthy local cause and i‘m very happy to join him worthy local cause and i‘m very happy tojoin him in worthy local cause and i‘m very happy to join him in wishing worthy local cause and i‘m very happy tojoin him in wishing the halesowen and rally regius rotary clu b halesowen and rally regius rotary club and those taking part in the run the best of luck. they are doing this for a good reason and we congratulate them —— rowley regis. the primaries swallowed up every nuclear submarine the navy has ever had, we still have them, there is little room for the ones coming out of service soon. will the prime minister agreed to meet with me and other members further to our letter to her a fortnight ago to understand how we can extend decommissioning to these nuclear submarine so we can recycle them to create jobs in plymouth, scotland and west cumbria? first of all, we take the issue that he has raised the save story jan disposal of nuclear submarines very
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seriously indeed —— save of disposal. work has started on dismantling the first submarine with over 50 tonnes of radioactive waste removed by the end of may, but i believe the honourable gentleman and other members of the house have written to me on this particular issue and i will respond in further detail in due course. i will ask the releva nt detail in due course. i will ask the relevant minister to meet with him to discuss this issue further. last week i met three students inspires couegein week i met three students inspires college in torquay who have been working on the send my friend to school campaign. could the prime minister confirm the uk well make sure the save schools declaration will help children to access education? can i thank my friend for raising this issue because we know the conflict is a key driver of education exclusion. the education
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and emergencies work supports greater awareness of how to protect children in education, teaching stu d e nts children in education, teaching students and teachers about conflict resolution and a review compliance with international humanitarian law as the primary basis to protect schools and educational facilities, but also to encourage international partners to endorse the declaration. most recently, germany, who signed up most recently, germany, who signed up last month. this is an issue we ta ke very up last month. this is an issue we take very seriously and we are acting on that, supporting the work of the un and i‘m pleased to say that the largest single financial contributor to this secretary general‘s special wrappers and to do for children in armed conflict‘s office. west wales and the valleys remains one of the poorest areas in western europe yet since 2015 we have seen the uk government renege on manifesto promises to electrify the mainline to swansea, the north wales line and the recent development. will the prime minister committed to ensuring that the mid wales growth field does not suffer a
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similarfate? or is it the government assessment that wales is simply not worth the investment? the honourable gentleman raises an important point about the mid wales growth deal. i was happy to sign the swa nsea growth deal. i was happy to sign the swansea city growth deal, the city dealfor the cardiff swansea city growth deal, the city deal for the cardiff region and one for north wales and i understand from the secretary of state for wales that we are in discussion on the mid wales deal and will be involving the honourable gentleman on that. could my right honourable friend set out what the government‘s plans are to improve the educational provision for children with special educational needs, and could she also congratulate grant edwards, head teacher in hitchin for the brilliant and inspirational work he doesin brilliant and inspirational work he does in this regard?” brilliant and inspirational work he does in this regard? i am very happy to congratulate grant edwards on the excellent work he‘s doing as headteacher at priory school. we are
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committed to helping pupils with logical needs —— educational needs to find employment lead and fulfilled we‘re leaving prime minister‘s questions to take you straight to a news conference by greater manchester fire service. they are speaking about the fire at saddleworth moor. the heat is extremely difficult to extinguish, we have got really good water supplies and a really good tactical and strategic plan in place, and cruise a rotating to extinguish the fire as safely as they can. sound problems group met this morning and continues to meet. we're working with partners
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to meet. we're working with partners to resolve this. some work is ongoing at the minute to see if it is possible for them to assist us in any way, and is taking place with my operations commander to see if that can be achieved. anything you want to ask? i am the leader of the council, and this situation is worrying for the authority, particularly the residents that live here and the wider community. but i am really pleased that the work going on by the fire service and the police, and staff in the council, who are doing a tremendousjob in extreme circumstances, and i have been here since early morning, and
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it isa been here since early morning, and it is a changeable situation minute by minute, and we know there are pockets of and of course we have had a lot of wind. a lot of wind is fanning the flames. just so many people working hard. for everyone else involved... obviously you can save the smoke lingering in the air. if you lived here, we will keep you informed. if you can keep indoors. and out of the
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smoke because it is very irritant to the throat. we are here to make sure that it the throat. we are here to make sure thatitis the throat. we are here to make sure that it is within... we will be informing people in local areas if there is any concern or we need them to do anything in particular. there is any concern or we need them to do anything in particulatm there is any concern or we need them to do anything in particular. it is not toxic, but it is an irritant... we have been trying to stay with that as long as we could, but obviously there are technical issues. basically that‘s the story there. fires burning across a six km area where we are having this news conference now is the village in greater manchester where 3a households have been evacuated. it
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isa households have been evacuated. it is a bright sunny day, but you can see there the smoke in the air means you can‘t even see the colour of the sky, really. they are saying that because of the weather, the situation is extremely worrying and getting worse. more pockets of fire keep breaking out. the heat means it is like a tinderbox. and wind is also fanning the flames. you were hearing there that the smoke is getting worse. they are still considering the best way of putting this fire out today. we were hearing earlier that the plan is to put a heavier attack on the fire and if it needs military assistance, that is what is being considered. the military are on standby. it is a major incident —— a major incident has been declared. a plan of action has been declared. a plan of action has been declared. a plan of action has been put into plant to put out the fire which broke out on sunday
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afternoon. ever since it has been getting worse. we will bring you more from that if we get a clearer signalfrom that more from that if we get a clearer signal from that news conference if.... the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital deaths scandal has broken her silence — with her husband reading a statement on her behalf. he said she was a dedicated doctor who did the best for her patients. drjane barton hadn‘t been seen, or made any comment, since the publication of an inquiry which said the deaths of a50 patients at the gosport war memorial hospital were shortened by a dangerous pratice of overprescribing painkillers. relatives have called for a criminal inquiry into the "unforgivable" regime at the hospital which was overseen by dr barton. this morning‘s statement on behalf of dr barton was read out outside her house in gosport, by her husband, tim. yarmulke jane would like to think herfamily, friends, yarmulke jane would like to think her family, friends, colleagues, former patients and the many others
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former patients and the many others for their continued support and loyalty through this protracted inquiry. she has always maintained that she was a hard—working, dedicated doctor. doing the best for her patients in a very inadequately sourced part of the health service. we ask that our privacy is respected at this difficult time. she will be making no further comments. catherine burns explained why the statement from drjane barton is so significant. she gave 90% of her patience opiates in some form. this is the first time that she has said anything since the first report. interestingly, she did not say anything. she actually left before her husband had finished speaking. obviously she was trying
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to get across the fact that she is thinking people for their support and loyalty. and she says, you know, ha rd and loyalty. and she says, you know, hard working dedicated doctor doing the best that she can for her patients. trying to get her side across weird interesting did not a nswer across weird interesting did not answer when she had any messages for the families. let me just bring you some news from that crash on the aa7 that we were reporting on yesterday between a bus and a lorry. we‘re hearing now that the two people that died have been named. one is the driver is michael and he was a5. and a passenger on the bus, brian chatman was 76. kemper sure police have just —— kemper. chatman was 76. kemper sure police
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havejust —— kemper. the chatman was 76. kemper sure police have just —— kemper. the driver was a5 in the passenger was 76. the supreme court has unanimously ruled in favour of a heterosexual couple fighting for the legal right to enter a civil partnership. the court decided that the ban on different six couples entering into civil partnership under the civil partnership act 200a is "incompatible" with human rights laws. the case was brought by rebecca steinfeld and charles keidan, who both oppose marriage as an institution but want to have their relationship officialy recognised. we are feeling elated that the supreme court has unanimously ruled that this difference in treatment continue longer. we brought this court case watchdog years ago, so it has been a long journey to get to this point. we have been to three quarts. finally we have this finally resounding victory. we feel elated, but at the same time, we are also
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feeling a little bit sour following frustrated that the government has wasted taxpayer money and fighting with thejudges wasted taxpayer money and fighting with the judges have called a blatant inequality. we really hope that now that the cover is going to do the right thing at last, and extend this to everyone. the duke of cambridge is in ramallah where he is meeting the palestinian authority president, mahmoud abbas. the trip marks the first time a member of the british royalfamily has been on an official visit to israel. on tuesday, prince william was injerusalem and met prime minister benjamin netanyahu. earlier i spoke to sir andrew burns, the uk‘s former ambassador to israel, who explained the signifiance of the duke‘s visit. i think the visit as a whole is a tremendous step forward. prince william seems to be conducting himself in a very impressive way and he will be given a very courteous and friendly and positive welcome in ramallah. how difficult is the
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jockey has to do? obviously since he was a kid he has been schooled in the importance of not being partisan. especially in the public domain, but he‘s in an environment where he is meeting people with very strong views who want to impress them up on him. and possibly wanting him to deliver messages. how difficult will it be for him? prince william is not a messenger boy. if there are messages to be passed on thatis there are messages to be passed on that is for ambassadors to do. he will be hearing very strongly expressed points of view all along his trip and i think it cannot be anything but good that he is going from israel to the palestinian territories. the last message that he has got is designed to talk about peace. that is encouraging, but he will be wanting to hear what the palestinians have to say on that. what does that achieve, him
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listening? he is the second in line to the throne, who is beginning to get involved in international affairs. what is happening in israel and the holy land and that part of the world is always of tremendous importance and interest. i think it is high time and very good that he is high time and very good that he is going out to pay his first visit to get his own personal feel for what is going on. out there talking to some of the players. this is the first such visit. maybe there will be others. he is covering a lot of ground as it is. i think it can only help him and his future, the evolution to have that direct experience under his belt. the first royal visit to israel and the palestinian territories. why now? the royal family have palestinian territories. why now? the royalfamily have paid in formal visits of various kinds over the
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yea rs. visits of various kinds over the years. it is all to do with the unfinished business of peace negotiations. if and when there is an agreement, it will resolve issues around recognition of jerusalem an agreement, it will resolve issues around recognition ofjerusalem and it will become much easier for everybody. sir andrew burns talking to me earlier. the chancellor‘s deputy, liz truss, has publicly criticised some of her cabinet colleagues over their "macho" demands for more public spending and telling people how to live their lives. in a speech last night, she complained about ministers who told the public to drink less, eat fewer doughnuts, and get rid of their wood burning stoves. of course we need regulations in our society and many of the roles that we have in place are about guaranteeing safety. but sometimes, i feel, that some of the rules get in the way of consumers making legitimate choices, of people being able to live their own lives and have the lifestyle they want. i do
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not think our government‘s world should be to tell us what tastes we should be to tell us what tastes we should have. too often we are told we are drinking too much, or maybe thatis we are drinking too much, or maybe that is just we are drinking too much, or maybe that isjust me. we are drinking too much, or maybe that is just me. eating too many doughnuts or enjoying the warm glow of our word burning doughnuts or enjoying the warm glow of ourword burning —— doughnuts or enjoying the warm glow of our word burning —— wood—burning stoves. you can see there is a lot of hotair stoves. you can see there is a lot of hot air that emerges... laughter. the government has scrapped plans forfive new women‘s prisons in england and wales. the same number of residential centres will be built instead. they will provide help with getting a job and treating drug addiction in a bid to reduce the number of women being jailed for low level offences. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. "prison doesn‘t work for many women." for years, that‘s been the message from reformers. the majority of female offenders are assessed as low or medium risk and commit non—violent or low—level offences, and many keep being sent back to jail for minor crimes. women make up about 5% of the prison population in england and wales. nearly 60% have suffered domestic abuse, and many have
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mental health problems. 70% of those on short sentences will go on to reoffend. now, the ministry ofjustice says rather than women going to prison, there will be a network of residential centres where they can be given help to turn away from crime. women can get the support that they need to turn their lives around, to stop them reoffending. that helps us bring down crime and it helps ensure that we get people on the right track. there are currently nearly a,000 women injails across england and wales. campaigners have welcomed this major shift in position by the government when it comes to dealing with the female prison population. june kelly, bbc news. a terminally ill man, who wants the right to an assisted death, has lost his legal challenge at the court of appeal. noel conway who has motor neurone disease, wanted to be prescribed a lethal dose of drugs. he says the law preventing assisted
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suicide breaches his own human right to a peaceful and dignified death. thousands of homes and businesses are without water in shropshire. severn trent water says the problem is due to high demand during the hot weather which has led to airlocks in the pipes. around 2,000 properties are affected in the telford and much wenlock area. it‘s hoped the supply will be restored later today. heavy rains are continuing to hamper efforts to find a group of young football players and their coach who are missing inside a cave in thailand. rescue workers have been fighting a losing battle to pump water from the cave network. thai soldiers and volunteers are among those trying to find the group as the search enters its fourth day. 17 us states are to sue president trump over what they call the "cruel and unlawful" separation of migrant families as part of his immigration policy. this is the complaint, which was filed in the us district court in seattle. it objects to the policy of refusing entry to asylum seekers at the us—mexico border —
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saying it is motived by a desire to harm. the white house has not yet responded, but it‘s worth noting that mr trump had backtracked on his policy last week, saying that families led by parents who crossed the border into the us illegally with their children would no longer be separated. our north america correspondent, david willlis reports. reaction to the ruling from america‘s highest court was swift. those demonstrating out to his neck outside the supreme court were not the only ones who are affected by the only ones who are affected by the travel ban. we are outraged, we‘re disappointed all backgrounds and faiths. the court's decision
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hands president trump the biggest victories of his presidencies. upholding the travel ban and rejecting the argument that it amounts to unconstitutional discrimination. we have to be tough and we have to be safe and we have to be secured at a minimum, we have to be secured at a minimum, we have to make sure that we vet people coming into the country. coming after a torturous legal ban the mac battle. some have branded the ruling devastating. they failed to stop it andi devastating. they failed to stop it and i think it is going to go down in history as one of the great failures of the supreme court. when confronted with a difficult question. the ruling comes at a time when the president is in broiled in a controversy when the president is in broiled in a co ntrove rsy over when the president is in broiled in a controversy over his policy at the mexican border. president trump says national
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security concerns alone justify a travel ban. his opponents point out that the worst attacks in the united states since september 11 have been committed by either americans or immigrants from countries that are not part of the band. the french president, emmanuel macron, says six eu countries, including france, have agreed to accept a shower of more than 230 migrants stranded on a rescue ship in the mediterranean. malta, said it would allow the migrants to land only if other eu countries took a quota, but has now agreed to let the ship dock. the human rights group amnesty international has published what it calls detailed, new evidence of the extent of the burmese military‘s crimes against the rohingya people in myanmar. around 700,000 fled to bangladesh last autumn when the military launched a brutal security operation in rakhine state following a series of deadly ambushes by rohingya militants on police posts.
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the army has always insisted it was responding to a specific terrorist threat. here‘s our myanmar correspondent nick beake. a village burns in western myanmar. this was last september when burmese army and buddhist mobs were attacking rohingya muslim communities. now amnesty international says it has gathered detailed evidence proving the military‘s offensive had been weeks in the planning. the myanmar army commander—in—chief, min aung hlaing, is one of 13 top officers named in the report. they are accused of orchestrating rape and murder. and driving out more than half a million rohingya people. the military, which still holds huge power here, has always claimed it was responding to attacks on the police by rohingya insurgents and rejects accusations
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of ethnic cleansing. but the stories of those who made it across the border to bangladesh and now live in the world‘s biggest refugee camp tell another story. the international criminal court is looking at whether myanmar could be prosecuted for crimes against humanity. so far, myanmar has refused to co—operate and aung san suu kyi‘s government insists a new burmese led investigation is the best to uncover the truth. a spanish doctor has appeared in court in madrid, accused of stealing a baby from her mother half a century ago. he is the first doctor to stand trial in connection with the theft of thousands of babies during the dictatorship of general franco. campaigners say officials took children from mothers whom the regime deemed to be "unsuitable" — often because of their political views. lebo diseko reports. still from the crib, we want
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adjusted katie justice, still from the crib, we want adjusted katiejustice, they demand outside the courts. many of them are pa rents to outside the courts. many of them are parents to save their babies were snatched by the spanish state decades ago. the woman who embodied their hopes for justice decades ago. the woman who embodied their hopes forjustice arrived to cheers and hugs of support. her case is the first to come to trial, but there have been thousands of similar complaints. in fact, there have been thousands of similar complaints. infact, it there have been thousands of similar complaints. in fact, it is hard to know just how many complaints. in fact, it is hard to knowjust how many children were abducted under the dictatorship because their parents were left—wing, unmarried or poor. translation: this is not my case any more. this has gone further. everyone knows that babies have been stolen all over spain and in the islands. it is very important to ta ke islands. it is very important to take a step further because we have
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expiry dates. people are dying. some of those who lost their children have died. should the man who took her baby years ago is this man. the 85—year—old denies any wrongdoing and says he did not remember the case. indeed, he says he were members virtually nothing about the 20 years he was working at the clinic that has been subject to doesn‘t of baby claims. outside, emotions ran high as the doctor sped away from court. i am 50 years old, i was stolen. no money is enough. they have stolen our lives, said this woman. this case shines a light on some of the country‘s darkest
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yea rs. on some of the country‘s darkest years. but even a conviction cannot do what so many would want most and thatis do what so many would want most and that is undo the years of pain. the latest ideas on how to use satellite technology to improve life on earth, sound like the inventions of top scientists, but in fact they‘ve all been created by young entrepreneurs! 22 inventors have been given the chance to pitch their ideas to industry experts in a bid to make them a reality. john maguire reports. normally when entrepreneurs enter the dragons‘ den, they‘re experienced business owners. but today, 21 young people aged between 13 and 21 are pitching their ideas to five dragons from the space industry, who‘s going to pay for this? you can, sort of, ramble slightly. if we put on our business hats, who do you think would be the end consumer? everyone here is already a winner of the uk space agency‘s satellife competition. they‘ve all come up with innovative ways to use satellite technology to improve our lives.
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so today, it‘s their chance to gain support and advice to take their ideas to the next level. at the age of 13, i took a very intense interest into ai, from which i created my first chatbot. a confident start for 15—year—old kari lawler, whose jacket leaves the dragons in no doubt of her ambitions. if you can start identifying those things you want to pick apart, then i‘d really like you to come and talk to me about a job. when you get into discussions with universities and partners, just make sure you read the fine print, get some people on your side looking at, you know, the legal bits and pieces. you didn‘t seem remotely nervous, were you nervous? erm, not really. i do presentations and speaking a lot, so it was all right. goodness, this is such a good event, i did this event last year as well, and the kidsjust really put together some amazing projects. really impressed again this year with the calibre of the projects coming forward. we first met the schoolgirls
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from cornwall with their surf safe idea two months ago. they‘ve come up with an affordable wristband to be worn by surfers and swimmers in the sea, which would help lifeguards on the shore track their exact permission. —— position. aerospace cornwall has already offered the girls £5,000 to develop their idea. today, the european space agency said it would match the money. you can tell it‘s a good idea because you go, surely someone has already thought of this, this must exist! if you‘re able to raise a little bit of money to get this started then we can double that from the european space agency and help you through those feasibility study and testing, kind of, stages. it‘s all very well doing a presentation, isn‘t it? but then they started asking you questions. what was that like? well, nervous, yes, not very good at answering stuff on the spot, got to admit. they're not only thinking about ideas about how to use a satellite imagery or data,
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they're thinking about how they can solve problems with that data. it's really inspiring to see young, creative minds moving and thinking in this kind of space, and it's ground—breaking. i'd like to take you on a journey... so much space technology seems futuristic when, in fact, it‘s being used today. but, when looking for what‘s next and who will create it, the future is already here. in a moment, it‘s time for the one o‘clock news with jane hill but first it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello, good afternoon, for most of us it is another day of blue skies and sunshine, but it has not been quite that simple. eastern area started off with the mist and murk whereas further west, sunshine all the way as shown by this weather watcher picture. western areas are warming up. further eased it has been a bit of a process. we have
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been a bit of a process. we have been burning away the cloud. and some coastal aerials will keep holding onto it. generally speaking it isa holding onto it. generally speaking it is a hot day would sunshine and high uv it is a hot day would sunshine and high uv levels. where the heat has been confined to southern areas mostly, for the rest of the afternoon, northern ireland and scotla nd afternoon, northern ireland and scotland will be joining afternoon, northern ireland and scotland will bejoining in. now as we go through this evening and tonight, as fine and to the day. certainly in most places are keeping starry skies overnight. again, there will be mist and murk and cloud rolling its way back in from the north sea. a birch is holding up in double digits. some dropping down to 9 degrees. tomorrow, very similar looking day. some cloud, and mist to start. it will burn its way back out to the sea. lots of sunshine. strong uv levels and pollen levels. lots of heat as you can see. temperatures across many places well up into the
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20s and even up to 31 degrees, we suspect in glasgow tomorrow afternoon. into friday, some subtle changes. high—pressure goes a little bit further north and that will allow us to bring in more of a north or northeasterly flow particularly in parts of scotland and northern ireland. today it was very warm indeed, it will be tomorrow. friday will be a little bit cooler. the afternoon temperatures are more like 25 or 26 afternoon temperatures are more like 25 or26 in afternoon temperatures are more like 25 or 26 in glasgow on friday. further south, plenty of heat to be had. not far way from 30 degrees. the weekend, a bit of uncertainty. we have been watching an area of low pressure that has been threatening to bring some showers towards the south. it looks like high—pressure well holed firm. still plenty of fine weather to come through. and plenty of heat as well particularly in the south. the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital deaths
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scandal appears in public for the first time since the damning report. drjane barton appeared outside her home with her husband — whose statement said she‘d done her best for her patients. she has always maintained that she was a hard—working dedicated doctor doing the best for her patients in a very inadequately resourced part of the health service. we‘ll have the latest live from gosport. also on today‘s programme... firefighters say they‘re facing huge challenges tackling a fire on saddleworth moor near manchester — local people are told to stay indoors. we noticed a new thick black plume of smoke and then i heard crackling
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