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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  June 27, 2018 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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the army is called in to help tackle a huge fire across saddleworth moor. as temperatures soar, it now spreads across four miles — people have been told to leave their homes. conditions can change within five or ten seconds if that wind direction changes. the crews are doing an admirable job and working really hard in extreme temperatures. police have declared the fire a major incident. we'll have the latest fom saddleworth. also tonight... the first comment from the doctor implicated in the scandal at a gosport hospital where over 400 people had their lives cut short. she has always maintained that she was a hard—working, dedicated doctor, doing the best for her patients in a very inadequately resourced part of the health service. commentator: and here's son to wrap it up, all alone... son heung—min! straight into an open goal — a stunning victory for south korea as they knock germany out of the world cup. a heterosexual couple
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celebrate winning the right to have a civil partnership. and how pubs are running out of drinks, thanks to the shortage of carbon dioxide gas. and coming up in sportsday later in the hour live from moscow, we'll have the rest of the world cup news as we look ahead to brazil's match to see if they can reach the last 16. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the army has been called in to help firefighters battling a huge fire on saddleworth moor, which is continuing to spread. more than 50 homes have been evacuated. the blaze near manchester has been raging since sunday night, and now measures nearly four miles across. the police have declared it a major incident. our correspondentjudith moritz
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joins us now from the scene. judith, this is proving incredibly difficult for the army and the firefighters to tackle? yes, because whilst this has been going for three days now, and you can see behind me that although it looks peaceful, the smoke flares up and then it dies down again, there is what has been described to me as a perfect storm. the ground is tinderbox dry. the wind is high and it keeps changing direction. and these moors are made of highly flammable peaked, with heather on the top which burns really quickly. so all of that together means that the fire crews are facing an enormous challenge. this is the fire front line, leaving burned heather and twisted would. the blaze plays cat and mouse with
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the firefighters are willing to put it out. each time the wind changes direction, the fire moves. each time one hotspot goes out, another pops up. the problem with pete is that it burns like tobacco. it smoulders slowly, so that is why you need the water to get in there. it's fine pashmina fire on the surface, but thenit pashmina fire on the surface, but then it burns underneath, so we need then it burns underneath, so we need the water to soak into the ground and completely saturate the area. this is not something that is going to end today, by any stretch of the imagination. this could go on for days, even weeks. last night, it looked like a wildfire in the californian bush or australian outback, but this is six miles from oldham, and as the moon shone over saddleworth, fire raged on the more whilst meters away, homes bought for their tranquil views were suddenly threatened, residents told to spend the night elsewhere. kept looking out of the window and went about our usual business, having something to
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eat etc. then there was a knock at the doorjust eat etc. then there was a knock at the door just after eight eat etc. then there was a knock at the doorjust after eight o'clock from one of the special police officers who said, you're going to have to get out and evacuate. as they were telling you to get out, did you think, my house is at risk? absolutely. the last thing i said to him was, don't let the house burned down! some local schools have closed, unable to keep their classrooms ventilated. closed, unable to keep their classrooms ventilatedlj closed, unable to keep their classrooms ventilated. i have been here 20 years and we have never been ina here 20 years and we have never been in a position where we have had to close the school premises because of fire. and there have certainly not been any evacuations in the past, so this is unprecedented. with smoke hanging heavy in the air, face masks we re hanging heavy in the air, face masks were handed out to residents who we re were handed out to residents who were also told to keep their doors and windows shut. the fire service declared a major incident, crews coming from several areas. and now the army called in too. up here on the army called in too. up here on the top of the more, it's an apocalyptic landscape. all of the heather has been killed off, but the fire continues to burn under the
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surface, pockets of smoke and steam coming up overground. surface, pockets of smoke and steam coming up over ground. and this devastation goes on for miles. it's unforgiving, inaccessible terrain. the hoses can't be everywhere and firefighters had to stamp out some elevated hotspots and then keep coming back to re—extinguish fires. the heat was that intense, it was terming the spray deem, if you like. but it didn't stop it. but as you can see this morning, it's flaming up can see this morning, it's flaming up again. it was just the smoke in your eyes. as the country basques in a heatwave, imagine the temperature is the firefighters are coping with. it's exhausting, and it's frustrating. but they won't stop until the fibres. judith moritz, bbc news, near saddleworth. —— they won't stop until the fire does. a doctor implicated in the scandal at gosport war memorial hospital has said she was "doing her
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best" for patients. more than a50 patients died after being given drugs inappropriately, according to a report published last week — which concluded that there had been a disregard for human life. drjane barton, who was named in the report, appeared outside her gosport home this morning — duncan kennedy reports: these are some of those whose lives were cut short during their stay at the gosport hospital. the result of drugs given without medicaljustification. today, jane barton, the doctor who oversaw the prescription system, appeared for the first time since last week's scathing report. but instead of speaking herself, she left it to her husband. she has always maintained that she was a hard—working, dedicated doctor, doing the best for her patients in a very inadequately resourced part of the health service. we ask that our privacy is respected at this difficult time, and she will be making no further comments. but i did ask one question. jane, do you have any
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message for the families? robert wilson was one of those who died in the gosport war memorial hospital. his daughter tracey said dr barton's statement today was empty. she had an opportunity today to come out and take responsibility for her actions, but she has chosen once again not to do that. she's portrayed herself as a victim, which i find quite distasteful. she's not a victim. that sense of disappointment was shared by the family of elsie devine, another victim identified by the report. there she is getting on with her life, and here we are, fighting all these government bodies, and... i just can't understand, you know, britishjustice. when relatives gathered for the report's publication, few had any idea of the full scale of what had happened. in fact, last week's inquiry found that a total of 656 patients may have been victims of unnecessary drugs here. but we have now learned that three
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more families have come forward to the police since the report was published to say their loved ones too may have met an early death at this hospital. drjane barton wasn't the only one criticised by the inquiry. others are likely to be the subject of interest for any future police investigation. duncan kennedy, bbc news, in gosport. a heterosexual couple have won their legal bid to have a civil partnership instead of a marriage. the supreme court unanimously ruled that the civil partnership act — which only applies to same—sex couples in engalnd and wales — was incompatible with the european convention on human rights. our legal correspondent, clive coleman, has been speaking to them. rebecca steinfeld and charles keidan, a devoted couple since 2010, now with two young children, who don't have a problem with marriage — itjust isn't for them. their fight for a civil partnership has taken them all the way to the highest court in the land.
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we saw ourselves as partners in life and we wanted to be partners in law. we felt a civil partnership best perfected the nature we felt a civil partnership best reflected the nature of our relationship. why wouldn't the government extend civil partnerships to opposite—sex couples when the institution already exists? but civil partnerships are only available to same—sex couples. rebecca and charles claimed that discriminates against heterosexual couples like them. today, the supreme court agreed. it was therefore concluded that the appeal must be allowed, and that a declaration should be made that sections one and three of the civil partnership act, to the extent that they preclude a different sex couple from entering into a civil partnership, are incompatible with article 14 of the european convention on human rights. after four years, victory. today, we are a step closer to opening civil partnerships to all, a measure that would be fair, popular and good for families and children across the country. civil partnerships give couples
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the same legal and financial rights as married couples. today's ruling can't force parliament to change the law, but it does put real pressure on government to open up civil partnerships to those 3 million cohabiting heterosexual couples who may not want to get married, but who may well want stronger legal rights. charles and rebecca aren't getting the invitations to their civil partnership printed just yet, but they are now confident that it will happen for them and to many like them. clive coleman, bbc news. there's been a stunning upset at the world cup as south korea have knocked out one of the favourites, germany. the 2—0 score culminated in south korea firing a shot into germany's open goal as the german goalie could only look on in disbelief from the other end of the pitch. 0ur sports correspondent, natalie pirks, is in kaliningrad, where england are playing tomorrow. this world cup has been one upset after another. it's just been unbelievable so far,
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hasn't it? today was no exception. the press room here looked on in sheer disbelief of the world champions went out at this stage of the world cup for the first time since 1938, sparking scenes ofjoy and of course despair, as our correspondent richard conway now reports. germany came into this game knowing they needed to win for a place in they needed to win for a place in the knockout rounds, but scoring and conceding has been an issue for the defending champions, and theirfirst half performance was listless. south korea nearly took advantage, manuel neuer spilling the free kick before clawing it away. josh reykjavik have a chance to make it 1—0, but on the biggest stage, he only found the diving career goalkeeper. meanwhile in yekaterinburg, the other gaming group of saw face mexico, both with ambitions to progress. and sweden
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beat! swedish nerves were settled from the spot. germany were heading out. the news soon filtered through to worried german fans in kazan. the world champions at that answers, but the heather was off target, a reflection of his team's overall performance. then, deep into injury time, came the killer blow. commentator: germany are out! time, came the killer blow. commentator: germany are ounm time, came the killer blow. commentator: germany are out! it was an offside. an agonising wait ensued before the referee confirmed germany's fate, and there were still time for more pain. 2-0 four south korea! germany haven't been eliminated at the group stage in 80 yea rs, eliminated at the group stage in 80 years, but a giant has fallen and this world cup continues to shock. richard conway, bbc news. so one of the serial winners is out,
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but another serial winner, brazil: place tonight. they could be one of england's quarterfinal opponent if england's quarterfinal opponent if england get that far. the next match for bout against england is an important one with interesting repercussions. with further to travel if they win the group, shouldn't really be a game that england try and win? where east meets west, sandwiched between poland and lithuania, kaliningrad has a complicated history. it was formerly part of germany and heavily bombed during world war ii, until it was seized by stalin. but while once a symbol of russia's long simmering tension with the west, it's now putting its best face forward for putin's world cup. translation: it is the most western pa rt translation: it is the most western part of the russian federation, our little enclave of europe. it is a beautiful city. i'm confident that any visitor will fall in love with
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kaliningrad and certainly visit us once more. england's visit is turning into a hat scratcher, though. it looked like coming second in the group could offer a more favourable draw in terms of travel and opposition. so what will gareth southgate do? we want to breed a mentality that everybody in our squad wants to constantly win. we have not won a knockout game since 2006. why are we starting to plot which would be a better venue for oui’ which would be a better venue for our semifinal? it is beyond me, really. jesse lingard! england's performances so far have certainly got people talking, and notjust france. the world is taking notice too. england have so far surpassed all fans' expectations too. england have so far surpassed all fa ns' expectations of too. england have so far surpassed all fans' expectations of them, and in turn, those fans here are starting to allow themselves to dream about just how starting to allow themselves to dream aboutjust how far england might go. i wouldn't be surprised if we got to maybe even the semifinal, the way the draw is. so i am
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optimistic. it feels really good at the moment. before, when we have the likes of beckham, gerard and lampard, we believed we had great individuals, but now we have good team and team spirit. nobody else looks better than england. sol team and team spirit. nobody else looks better than england. so i try and keep expectations down, but it's getting hard. right now, no one knows the destination, but fans are enjoying the ride. it has been unpredictable so far and tomorrow will follow suit with both teams set to make changes. but by 9pm here tomorrow we will know where and who england will play in the knock outs. the time is... our top story this evening. the army is called in to help tackle a huge fire stretching four miles across saddleworth moor. and still to come... the heatwave continues. it's been the hottestjune day in northern ireland in decades. scientists in cambridge say advances
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in genetics are set to transform the treatment of breast cancer, making it more personalised to each patient. all women in cambridge diagnosed with breast cancer have their entire genetic code mapped. one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. in the 1970s, four in ten women survived beyond ten years. now it's around eight in ten. as part of our look at the nhs at 70, our medical correspondent fergus walsh reports on this new development from cambridge. newsreel: the hospitals and clinics in britain and throughout the world are the headquarters from which the war against cancer is waged. 0ptimism from the early days of the nhs. newsreel: they believe that cancer,
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the world's biggest killer, can be defeated for good and all. that fight continues, but with new weapons. this is a tiny slice of a patient‘s breast tumour, which contains their faulty cancerous dna. and this is a sample of their blood, containing the genes they were born with. addenbrooke's in cambridge is the first nhs hospital to completely sequence both genomes for all breast cancer patients. you know, absolutely amazing. it's like the genome is shattered all over the place. this is a digital read out of one patient‘s tumour dna. it yields a huge amount of information, helping doctors understand which treatments are likely to be effective and which to avoid. we can catalogue all of the mutations in the tumour cells, and we can also understand how the micro environment of normal cells, in particular immune cells, are responding to the cancer. in this knowledge, will allow us to deliver much more
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precision cancer medicine. is there anything you wanted to ask about the current treatment? that makes a tangible difference to elizabeth. her breast cancer has spread to her liver and is incurable. but because doctors have mapped her dna, they know which drugs to try next to keep her condition at bay. this is definitely a long—haul. yes, i mean, there's no easy answers, but the hope with the way cancer treatment‘s going is one thing after another comes along, new targets are discovered. having had the genome sequence, the information is all there. nearly 300 patients havejoined the personalised breast cancer programme in cambridge. after surgery and radiotherapy, they receive tailored drug treatments. we've had lots of cases where we have either opted for the patient to go on to a clinical trial,
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because of the results of the consequencing, or where the patient has been offered an alternative standard of care treatment because that was better than one of the other options. and this is a glimpse of how treatment might change in the future, using what scientists call mouse avatars. all these mice have the same patient‘s breast tumour cells growing under their skin. the mice on the right got a drug which didn't work — the tumour has grown. but the mice on the left got a different drug, which did, and the tumour is gone. scientists say these animal models are essential for speeding up the development of new cancer medicines. this is a remarkable example of how cancer research is becoming ever more personalised. in future, it should mean that promising drugs can be tested first in the lab, and then in mouse avatars, to find which one will work best in a patient. advances in surgery, radiotherapy and diagnostics
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are also helping to extend survival. one in two of us will get cancer, so we will never defeat it completely, but the prospects for patients are better than at any time in the nhs's history. fergus walsh, bbc news, cambridge. thejohn lewis partnership has issued a profit warning. the chain said it expected its profit to be close to zero in the first half of the year — and the annual figure would be substantially lower than last year. the group is to close five waitrose stores. the bank of england says the uk has made positive progress on handling the risk to financial services because of brexit. but it says there has been a lack of similar action from the eu. the boss of nissan has added his voice to those of senior figures from the car industry regarding brexit. 0ur economics editor, kamal ahmed, is here what did he have to say? 0ur economics editor, kamal ahmed, is here, what did he have to say? well, last week of course we had the
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chief executive of the head of the ukfor chief executive of the head of the uk for bmw, this week the chief executive of the japanese car maker nissan, both big car companies looking for clarity on that brexit deal. nissan employs 7,000 people in the uk, the british, the biggest british car plant is in sunderland. they export 80% of the 500,000 cars they make every year, the chief executive of nissan said he was still in the dark about that brexit deal. we are talking about tens of thousands ofjob, we are talking about tens of thousands of job, we we are talking about tens of thousands ofjob, we are talking about hundreds of millions of pounds of investment. that is what i am talking about. nothing really very blurry about it, we are talking about things that matter for people, that ensure the livelihood of people. that is why we take it very seriously and we don't want to take any decision in the dark and we
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don't want to make any decision that we may regret in the future. to be clear he wasn't saying that they were reducing investment in the uk, but they were holding off. very similar tone from bmw, also from airbus, i think we will hear a lot more of this over the next nine months until we reach the point where britain leaves the european union, businesses, who have these big global networks that export a lot to the european union, wanting clarity so they can get on and plan for the future. thank you. the firefighter who led the initial response to the grenfell tower fire has said he felt "helpless" as flames reached the top of the building within minutes. michael dowden said he did not consider evacuating the tower even as residents came out coughing and covered in soot, and that he was "consumed" with what was happening on the outside of the building. the inquiry heard that a more senior officer would usually have overseen a fire of that scale. prince william has spoken of his hopes for lasting peace in the middle east.
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the duke of cambridge made his comments after meeting the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, in the israeli—occupied west bank. later he met refugees at a camp near ramallah. the pub chainjd wetherspoon says a number of pubs have run out of some beers and ciders because of a nationwide shortage of carbon dioxide gas. the company says things should be back to normal in the next couple of days. 0ur correspondent sima kotecha is outside one of their bars in birmingham. it's not what any pub would want in weather like this. well, fiona, this wetherspoons says it is fully stocked but that hasn't been the case with some other bars and been the case with some other bars a nd restau ra nts been the case with some other bars and restaurants round the country. the chain says it has been struggling to supply certain brands of beer and cider and other chains have been struggling too. why is this happening? you may have heard ofa this happening? you may have heard of a shortage of c02 gas, that is used to make beer and cider. put that shortage along with this glorious weatherings the world cup
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and an increase in demand, that is leading to bars like this one struggling to meet demand. how serious is this? the government has said it has watched reports like this one on the problem and it is doing all it can to find a solution. to find a solution. there's no sign of a let up in the heatwave. northern ireland has experienced its hottest day injune in decades. and it's likely to get hotter still across parts of the uk. emma vardy has this report from bangor in northern ireland. you would be forgiven for swanning round on northern ireland's hottest june day for 22 years or to put it another way... boiling. baking. it's piping today. glorious. it is about 15, i6 piping today. glorious. it is about 15, 16 degrees. perfect and a quick break to enjoy it. an hour in the water to enjoy it. then back to work. take the kayak out. it will
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have to make the most of it and enjoy it while it is here. northern ireland has been making the most of its share of the uk's heat wave because weather like this is rarely seen for so long. health warnings have continued to be issued round the uk as the heatwave has intensified. in leeds a 17—year—old swimmer drowned, after getting into difficulties in the river. his body was recovered this morning. scotla nd was recovered this morning. scotland basked in its warmestjune day for two decade, while temperatures were above 30 degrees again in wales, yesterday this was the hottest place in the united kingdom. the seaside reassociates of weston—super—mare welcomed many while in birmingham suncream was handed out to the homeless. the heat brought difficult conditions on farms in staffordshire where it has been a struggle to keep livestock cool been a struggle to keep livestock cool. bigger beasts were given respite at belfast zoo and the pigs w0 re respite at belfast zoo and the pigs wore sunscreen respite at belfast zoo and the pigs wore sunscreen the heat is a nice
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challenge because in northern ireland we get a lot of rain and cold days but when we get weather like this, the keepers have to ensure the animals, their are as co mforta ble ensure the animals, their are as comfortable as possible. for many it is isa comfortable as possible. for many it is is a rare treat to have temperatures this high, and northern ireland savoured the moment. savoured the moment. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. third day in a row, gorgeous sunshine. and another hottest day of the year so far believe it or not. blue skies and sunshine for wales, this picture came from one of our weather watchers. this heat wave continue, but it hasn't been plain sailing for everyone. that was scarborough, though even here it cleared up. i will see you the satellite picture, we started off with cloud but it retreated into the north sea and for all parts we got to see some sunshine. that cloud will make a return to parts of
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eastern scotland, eastern england, as far inland as the midlands, one of the features is that the night—time temperatures haven't been especially high, some relief from the heat. 11 before 13. a fairly fresh start i suspect to tomorrow morning, some early cloud in the east but don't let that bother you. it will burn back to the coast and again we will have a beautiful day, with long spells of strong sunshine and notice the extent of the orange on the temperature chart. we need spread heat, 28, 29 in cardiff. 28 in belfast. 31 in the centre of glasgow tomorrow, and that could be enough to spark off the odd rogue shower in scotland. high pressure still in charge as we head to the end of the week. however, as that high drifts north we tap into cooler air, you can see it way to the north but we will bring that in on a north oi’ but we will bring that in on a north or north—easterly breeze. a bit more cloud into scotland on friday as well. remember that 31 in glasgow that we predict for tomorrow, by
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friday afternoon, it will be more like 26. by no means chilly but fresher still some heat down to the south, for the weekend, any change will not really still lots of dry weather, warm in the south. cooler further north. cooler further north. a reminder of our top story. the army is called in to help tackle a huge fire stretching four miles across saddleworth moor. straight into an open goal — a stunning victory for south korea as they knock germany out of the world cup. that's all from the bbc news at six, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. some sunshine. cooler in the north but plenty of heat further south. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... firefighters request
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the help of the army to tackle a huge fire on moorland in greater manchester. more than 50 homes have been evacuated. i heard crackling and afire been evacuated. i heard crackling and a fire and then all of this ash and a fire and then all of this ash and smoke came tumbling down and we couldn't breathe. the smoke was dense and you could hardly breathe. plus your eyes were burning as well. the doctor at the centre of the gosport war memorial hospital scandal appears in public. speaking through her husband, she said you we re through her husband, she said you were doing the best for the patients. prince william is cheered as he visits a palestinian refugee camp. earlier he met resident in palestinian president mahmoud abbas.
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