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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  June 27, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond one hundred days... in from the cold, president trump has agreed to meet with with vladimir putin, at a one on one summit next month. the russian president says he hopes it will be the first step to restoring full—relations between russia and the united states. the meeting is expected to take place in mid—july, when president trump will be in europe for previously scheduled trips to belgium and britain. and...germany — the reigning champions — have crashed out of the world cup, losing 2—0 to south korea. also on the programme..... a major upset in the democratic party — a top congressman is defeated by a 28 year old newcomer running as a socialist. plus, the late night comics go another round with president trump. but who will get the last laugh? get in touch with us using the hashtag... hello and welcome — i'm christian fraser in london..
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jane o'brien is in washington. we live in strange times. two weeks ago president trump was berating the prime minister of canada, threatening his european allies with more tarrifs, while calling for russia to be re—admitted to the gs. and now he has gone a step further. agreeing to a bi—lateral us russia summit before meeting nato leaders in belgium injuly. the us national security adviser john bolton was sent to moscow to agree a place and a time for the meeting. mr putin says he regrets that ties with the west are "not in the best shape". but he blamed what he called the internal political struggle in the united states. and of course, three months after the nerve agent attack in salisbury, the british government will be watching all this with interest. here was mr bolton a short time ago. i think the president is determined that despite the political noise in the united states, that direct communication between him and president putin was in the interests of the united states.
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in the interests of russia, and the interests of peace and security around the world. so there may be a certain element of criticism from some in the united states but i think the president believes he is acting in the best interests of our country despite that and that is why he wants to do this. and joining us now is former us defense secretary william cohen. who exactly benefits from this summit? i think clearly the russians benefit. president putin has been on the outside of the g8, he has been seen as having engaged in poisoning of individuals living in britain. he is seen as having invaded another country, ukraine and annex in crimea. he is seen as harassing aircraft and international airspace and waters and so i think undoubtably a meeting between him
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and president trump will benefit him. which is not to say that should not be a meeting. we need to have better relationships with russia but it should be on our terms and not putin's terms. the notion we should simply welcome back into the family of civilised nations is not we should do lightly. is that a risk? that he will do that? i think he will. we have seen what happened with north korea, the notion that oui’ with north korea, the notion that ourtraining and with north korea, the notion that our training and preparation that we engage in every year annual exercises is provocative, that is the language of north korea. the notion we would talk about withdrawing our troops from south korea is also an indication that we are prepared to leave that country that potential. i think this is another step in the direction of mr putin at and this bromance is an
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excitable but it is a reality is we will see how it turns out. —— it is inexplicable. the envoy sent today was the envoyjohn bolton who wrote last year that we negotiate with russia at our peril so how do you think he is approaching this? russia at our peril so how do you think he is approaching thi57m russia at our peril so how do you think he is approaching this? it is one thing to be a flame—thrower or a hawk on the outside of any administration, to be on fox news and make such hawkish statements and provocative. it is another to work for the president, he is no longer outside the team, he is and say that he takes a direction from the president and if you felt so strongly this was the wrong thing to do then he should have announced his resignation. he is obvious the prepared to work for the president and take direction from him and that is what he is doing. it is a change of tune because it is a change of
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position, he is no longer a commentator on academic, he is inside helping to shape policy. whilst he is in moscow, the defence secretary is engaging and honestly china and united states have common interests and career but they diverged when it comes to charity territorial waters. it was said the meeting has gone well that the president of china said it would not give a one inch on territory. there are two major issues confronting china and the united states on a security basis. number one is taiwan. the chinese are legitimately concerned that the united states may be trying to encourage the taiwanese to establish much more of an independent relationship with the mainland. this would seem to be contrary to a one china policy. i think that is crossing a breadline. second is the so—called artificial
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edifices built by the chinese. you medical the president of china said he would never militarise them but now she has and from the security conference in singapore three weeks ago the standard line coming from the chinese is that we are the ones you are not arising it by sailing warships through territorial that they claim as their own so there has been a big change in terms of our relationship on those issues but the secretary made it very clear in singapore that we will continue to insist upon freedom of navigation throughout the end of pacific region and that is going to be a point of conflict of challenge that we will have to negotiate with the chinese. there are so many challenges in this relationship. at this point does the common ground outweigh the differences? i think it still does. obviously we have a trade difference
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right now. i think president trump was correct to say to the chinese and this is out of balance and it is not sustainable so we need to change it. i do not think you change it by telling the chinese to buy more american goods. you have to go to the structural changes necessary, namely how do the companies, capitalist companies compete against the cheque—book of the chinese government and dealing with state owned enterprises? that has to change, the insistent upon transferring and to little property to the chinese has to change, those have to be done and i think the chinese understand that the something to be negotiated behind closed doors and not by a bad eating one another publicly. the mac by the rating one another. thisjust in: a key member of the us supreme court, justice anthony kennedy, has announced he's stepping down that allows president trump the
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chance to replace a pivotal member ofa chance to replace a pivotal member of a divided court. if connect he was monitored by president reagan's does this mean? here's 81 years old, he is considered a swing justice, one of the more moderate on the supreme court and so donald trump is going to have an opportunity to put and someone going to have an opportunity to put and someone more going to have an opportunity to put and someone more conservative than anthony kennedy. he had a landmark decision that opened up independent expenditure and political campaigns, the so—called citizens united decision. it created the current campaignfinance decision. it created the current campaign finance system we are living under. what this means immediately is that the battle lines are going to be drawn. liberal groups will push to block any
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nominee donald trump comes up with. conservatives will be salivating at the opportunity to push the supreme court even further right and it already is. there have been some narrow decisions recently and the supreme court of the mix the mid—term elections huge because who controls the senate, that is the democrats and have an opportunity to block whoever donald trump nominates. if the republicans hold it there in a simple majority is enough discipline ali to confirm it. this is a blockbuster development. you were a senator during that nomination hearing, what is your reaction to this? it is not surprising. there has been talk of his retirement for some time and i think for what other private reasons
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he may have it is time for him to step down but it gives an opportunity to president trump but i suspect the democrats want to store this as long as possible. just as senator mcconnell did when it came time for president obama to nominate for that position. elections are really matter, they count and because you could take a look at the supreme court can change the direction of a country's judicial process. if you speak to people from donald trump's base, they don't care if he does anything through the next four or eight years, the nomination was enough for them. he has a very qualified individual, very conservative that is exactly the base that the president is appealing to. the question as there will be more retirements and the future, the benchis more retirements and the future, the bench is getting older and soul of the question becomes will be the
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control of the senate to make sure people of a certain persuasion are nominated and confirmed. i think we will see more retirements in the next few years, it'll be important to make sure that the president of whether as president picks people of high quality and less ideology. it is one thing to be conservative but it is another to be so far to the ideological right or left that becomes impossible to have sustained respect for the court. the court stole one of the few is that you our country that has the respect of the people. —— the court is still one of the few. thank you. in the increasingly, polarised world of american politics nothing can ever be taken for granted. but last night democrats witnessed their biggest primary upset in many a year. joe crowley, the 10 time congressman for new york's14th district, the fourth most senior democrat
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in the house, was defeated, by a 28 year old woman from the bronx. alexandria ocasio cortez was a first time candidate. she is mixed race. her mother is puerto rican. and for this campaign she had raised just $600,000. once again, this appears to be a story about the established order taking voters for granted. but it's not only progressive policies that are reshaping the democratic party, it's also people of color. nada tawfik has the story. it was a winner that seem so impossible and it got everyone including the victoria by surprise. 28 gerald alexandria ocasio cortez compared her race to the story of david and goliath. representative joe crowley has held his seat for 20 yea rs joe crowley has held his seat for 20 years and is even regarded as the
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next leader of his party the house of representatives. alexandria ocasio cortez was the first person and over a decade to challenge him. i was not born to a wealthy powerful family. in a campaign video the former organiserfor family. in a campaign video the former organiser for bernie sanders emphasised her roots and her committee will portraying her opponent as an out of touch washington outsider. he cannot possibly represent us. she promised voters to fight for universal health care, a federaljobs guarantee and immigration reform. the morning after her when she exposed how she pulled it off. —— she explained how she pulled it off. we focused on making sure every person could see and have physical contact with our campaign in this community and have a message that was unapologetic in its advocacy for economic social and racial justice for working class
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americans. whilst you think the win means for the future of the democratic party? i hope that ushers ina new democratic party? i hope that ushers in a new time and error of candidates that are a little more independently funded, that are not primarily financed by lobbyists of corporations and that are fighting for a very specific agenda that champions working—class people. after the shocking result representative joe crowley try to out on a highlight with this performance of bruce springsteen's born to run. this will rock the party for some time. and joining us now is ab stoddard — assistant editor at realclearpolitics. nobody thought she would do this including car, it is a tremendous surprise. thejuicy this including car, it is a tremendous surprise. the juicy this coming? including car, it is a tremendous surprise. thejuicy this coming? —— did you see this coming? we have
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seen did you see this coming? we have seen examples of this before when a member is so focused on the leadership aspirations and washington that they do not put enough time at home. it is absolutely pitiful that she won in this by fewer than 16,000 votes. you must —— he amassed fewer than 20,000 votes a nd must —— he amassed fewer than 20,000 votes and a district of 700,000 people. he knows 20,000 people, he could have won this. he spent more time focused on his national ambitions of leadership ambitions, the idea of becoming the top democrat. but as colleagues are doing today is saying we do not really see a trend here because they do not want to say he was a bad member at home. if you send someone to sit in for you at the debate and you are not taking it seriously you deserve the punishment from your own voters. he did not serve his constituents and that is more of an example of the service than an
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actual strain of socialism in the democratic party. how worried you think the leadership should be? the top three democrats on the 70s, is it time for change? the change is coming. if they lose and the do not run the house back double but if you add up the members and the conference opposing nancy pelosi with the candidates who are running, she doesn't have the votes to become the next speaker and i think we facing a wash—out. the next speaker and i think we facing a wash-out. i was watching that campaign video she did which went viral, i thought it was fascinating. you see this image of a working mum standing in the bronx, putting on her high heels, she was
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outspent 10—1 in this campaign and i cannot help but see parallels with what has gone here in the uk with the momentum movement of the opposition labour party. they are highly skilled at using social videos and violent way —— and a viable way and you ignore it at your peril. yes you do. the millennial generation has certainly one not to ignore but in the us we are finding they are politically disengaged. they are disgusted with both parties, they do not like the label of democrat or republican, they do not trust the system. they are very cynical about engaging site is a question of how you shrewdly engaged in with yourcampaign. question of how you shrewdly engaged in with your campaign. still you have to get people who are older than out to vote and i think you can
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see from alexandria cortez pot effo rts see from alexandria cortez pot efforts that she made an effort to everybody. she reached across the spectrum and ways to young people that they would respond to and into older voters that they would respond to. that is why she won with such a decisive margin. thank you. to. that is why she won with such a decisive margin. thank youlj to. that is why she won with such a decisive margin. thank you. i think the thing that upon this will this isa the thing that upon this will this is a new wave of progress of vortex for the democratic party and that is what we are just not seeing. the democratic party having a big debate about identity politics following the defeat in 2016. we saw alexandria ocasio cortez embrace that, she did not shy away from her racial identity of gender or working—class roots. but does that mean that this is going to be a move in that direction more generally across the nation? i was looking at
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the donations tojoe crowley today, facebook, google, they donated thousands. have $600 , 000 facebook, google, they donated thousands. have $600,000 is small beerin thousands. have $600,000 is small beer in american politics. but only did she beat him, she beat the most powerful companies in america, quite extraordinary. words that have never been uttered in a group stage match, germany are out of the world cup, losing 2—0 to south korea. it's the first time they have failed to progress beyond the group stage of the competition. they've won the world cup four times and knocked england out so many times but now it's back to the drawing board for germany who finish bottom of their group. ollie for studies in moscow. what happened? ollie for studies in moscow. what happened ? they ollie for studies in moscow. what happened? they have been poor throughout this world cup. they started off with a defeat to mexico
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and then they scraped a win against sweden. they were in the position today against south korea where a win would have got them through at mexico's expense as the other game unfolded. germany were so poor and cause as sweden unfolded. germany were so poor and cause 3s sweden were unfolded. germany were so poor and cause as sweden were beating mexico 3-0, cause as sweden were beating mexico 3—0, germany newly had to chase the game, they were drawing against south korea. south korea, on the break with two time goals and the first thing they have gone home this only at a world cup. back to 1938 when it was just a straight knockout when it was just a straight knockout when they actually faltered at the first stage and now the postmortem stats, exactly what went wrong. a lot of fingers being pointed at the manager who was perhaps a little bit too loyal to some of the players that saw them win the last world cup but he chopped and changed his teams throughout the matches and theyjust
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have not been playing with any fluidity at all. we saw the big nations have their wobbles but of all of them, brazil playing right now, argentina got things right last night. of all of them you expect the germans to go a long way in the tournament and get things right but the manager and players were in tea rs the manager and players were in tears at the full—time whistle. south korea absolutely jubilant, they are going home with a famous win against the germans and not the reigning champions out. shock waves through this world cup. it has made ita through this world cup. it has made it a lot easier for other teams know germany will not be in that world cup. look at that, humiliate and, they finished bottom of the table. mexico and sweden are going through to the knockout stage which starts on saturday. at the moment in moscow, serbia facing brazil who need one point and that to go
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through. on the other much —— match, the swiss need a point against costa rica but they are really going for it, they have hit the woodwork, shots saved. costa rica the only tea m shots saved. costa rica the only team yet who have not scored a goal so team yet who have not scored a goal so you team yet who have not scored a goal so you can see team yet who have not scored a goal so you can see what they are trying to do. thank you. i wondered who will be the favourite now. it is making a mess of my world cup wall chart and my bet on england going out on penalties is in ruins. i give going out on penalties is in ruins. igive up going out on penalties is in ruins. i give up after saudi arabia was out so i give up after saudi arabia was out so there you go. donald trump is a man to whom ratings matter an awful lot — the same is also aid of america's late night talk show hosts. but now three of them, usually fierce rivals, are putting on a rare united front against the president. it comes afterjimmy fallon faced criticism this week over an interview he did in 2016 in which he messed with donald trump's hair.
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he recently apologised for ‘humanising the president.‘ which quickly drew the presidents angen lets have a listen to what he said at a rally in south carolina on monday. did you seejimmy fallon? jimmy fallon. the guy screws up my hair, back and forth. he was so disappointed to find out it was real. that's one of the great things i got. everybody used to say my hair is phony, it's not my hair. i'm wearing a hair piece. anybody here wearing a hair piece? but they never say that any more because i have been caught in rainstorms, winds that are 60 mph. if it's not your hair, don't run for office, folks. but now mr fallon is fighting back. here's a clip which aired at both the top of steven
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colbert's late show and jimmy fallon's the tonight show on tuesday. conan o'brien also appeared. guys, what's up? we were just talking about what president trump said. president who? trump. donald trump? the real estate guy who sells steaks. he is president? yes. wow. how is he doing? not so good. guys, give him time. and remember, please, be civil. if we're not careful this thing could start to get ugly. hey, i'm about to start shaving my chest. do you guys want to watch? no, thanks. are we still on for lunch? yes, where do you want to eat? red hen. it's fascinating, you have three men who are rivals on—air in the
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late—night slots going up against president trump and president trump reacting. here is a man with all sorts on his plate, north korea, russia, reunited 2000 children with theirfamilies yet russia, reunited 2000 children with their families yet he has taken to go after these guys. he is a sure man, that is about it. he never strays far from his man, that is about it. he never strays farfrom his roots. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news you might be in the midst of a heatwave in the uk but there's a chance you won't be able to cool down with a cold beer. stay with us to find out why. it has been another very hot day for
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some of us particularly across scotland, northern ireland and parts of wales. we record of 32 degrees today, making it the hottest day of the year and the temperatures will be very similar to moral soul hardly a cloud in the sky across the uk through this evening. some coastal areas may turn misty and murky and may end up cloudy any midlands and east anglia by the end of the night with many areas towards the west and north having a clear sky. a lot of the night with many areas towards the night with many areas towards the west and north having a clear sky. relatively dry heat, humidity relatively low so that means temperatures overnight will dip to a co mforta ble temperatures overnight will dip to a comfortable ten or 12 degrees. shooting up quickly in the morning, and we are looking at highs in the high 20s possibly low 30s once again added looks as though it is northern parts of the country getting some of
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the highest temperatures. let's take a closer look, 31 in the lowlands of scotland, possibly 30 in northern ireland but the eastern coasts there will be quite fresher in the low 20s and further south we will see the high 20s. through tomorrow evening, not much change, the same through friday and saturday, high—pressure still with us and the result was been more of a breeze and the south, coming off the north sea so that is why on this occasion we have not had the highest temperatures across the south of the country, it has been further north that that is hardly any wind at all, the remaining stag na nt any wind at all, the remaining stagnant and hot it has been sunniest once again we will see those high temperatures there in the mid—high 20s but looks as though by friday would you be had in 30 degrees across the south is perhaps some of those winds ease. enter the weekend the warm air has reached the arctic circle and parts of scandinavia so the further towards the north and east people are
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experiencing the heat. this tradition of temperatures on saturday, and if it continues into the weekend across the south of the country but a little bit more co mforta ble country but a little bit more comfortable i think for further north. goodbye. this is beyond 100 days, with me in washington. christian fraser's in london. our top stories... presidents putin and trump are to meet in the coming weeks to try to resolve tensions. more details of the summit will be revealed tomorrow. in the past few minutes it's been announced that supreme courtjudge anthony kennedy is stepping down. his resignation gives president trump the opportunity to name anotherjustice. coming up in the next half hour... prince william speaks of his hopes for lasting peace in the middle east, after meeting the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, in the israeli—occupied west bank. as co2 shortages continue to hit food and drink supplies, some british pubs warn they are running out of some brands
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of beer and soft drinks. let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag #beyond100days so often these days the united states and europe are on alternate tracks. while donald trump threatens china with new tariffs, europe sees an opportunity. and this week they sent a delegation to explore new chinese markets. since the start of the year, the us has announced tariffs on chinese solar panels and washing machines, a 25% tariff on steel imports and a 10% tariff on aluminium. and in return, china has announced tariffs on us imports ranging from 15% to 25%, on products like steel pipes and pork. as for europe, well, china is the biggest importer, and on average, the trading relationship is worth $1 billion a day. i have been talking
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to the european commission vice president, jyrki katainen, who has responsibility forjobs and growth. he's just back from leading the eu delegation to beijing. and i asked him if the current trading difficulties are creating space for a new eu—china partnerhsip? we try not to escalate the trade war between the usa and europe. we have reacted and we are united. at the same time, there are other problems which eu, japanese and american companies have faced in china. like state subsidies. those were the issues which i raised when discussing with my chinese counterpart. those are diseases in world trade and they must be addressed. you've made it clear to the chinese armour did you, that things like intellectual theft,
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which trump has talked a lot about, need to stop? i spoke to my chinese counterpart that even though we condemn the us unilateral acts, they are not right at all, still, they are not right at all, still, they are killing that intellectual system and it must be updated. the current rules do not cover well enough forced technology transfer or industrial subsidies. we have to do that and address this because it is the only way to protect this. on friday, the eu reciprocal tariffs on the united states will come into force. you concerned that we are now heading to a trade war? it is quite worrisome and it is bad for the us. notjust for the worrisome and it is bad for the us. not just for the consumers but for the economy of the entire world.“ he was to put a 20% tariff on cars from europe, what would be the
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reaction from the european union? we need to react one way or another, we can't accept unilateral actions which are completely against multilateralism but are also against economic logic. what we have offered president trump is negotiations on some tariffs. we have also proposed modernising and we have said that we are ready to negotiate voluntarily on some other trade measures. but we are not ready to negotiate under any kind of threat. just a quick word on brexit. we spoke to the city of london corporation yesterday, hugely powerful as you will know in the city of london. he said that in the way that britain has put sovereignty over economic stability, so he feels that the european commission has put politics and the integrity of the eu over eu jobs and livelihoodss. you
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are the man that is supposed to be looking at those businesses and livelihoods, are you not concerned that you are sending a dangerous message? we try to have as well organised negotiations with uk organisations as possible. it has been very difficult because we have not heard clearly what the uk is up to. the option that has been circulating this week is a single market on goods. again, the eu has said that is not acceptable. it is cherry picking. nobody can exercise cherry picking. nobody can exercise cherry picking. nobody can exercise cherry picking because being a member of the single market means that you have obligations and rights. so one cannot say that we are ready to trade freely on some issues but not ready to take our own results abilities. mrjyrki katainen there, the vice commissioner from there, the vice commissioner from
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the european union. british and european trade unions have joined forces this week to demand ‘pace and urgency‘ are injected into the talks. the confederation of british industry and the trade union congress have also come together calling on the british government to make ‘measurable progress‘ in the coming weeks. it comes a day after the uk car industry called for a brexit deal that delivers ‘single market benefits‘ and in a week when both bmw and honda have said brexit uncertainty is putting british jobs at risk. a short time ago we were joined by frances o‘grady, general secretary of the british trades union congress. you have called on the government to inject some pace and urgency into the negotiations, why are you concerned that it is going nowhere? time is running out. we need firm decisions and of course in october, there is a lot of business to be sorted out including what is going to happen in terms of the environment and worker‘s rights, environmental standards. let alone
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theissue environmental standards. let alone the issue of the heart border in ireland. yet we haven‘t even got a single, unified voice coming up from the cabinet. at a meeting of business leaders, that the prime minister attended yesterday, 58% of the ceos said they were now planning for a no deal. do you think, as time goes on, that is becoming a more likely scenario? i don't think we can rule out the risk and what worries us is that in the end, if we don‘t get these decisions and agreements, it is working people that will pay the price. really, both business and the unions are calling on the prime minister put to put the issue ofjobs and livelihoods first. we need to know that she understands how important this is and what kind of deal we need to get to protect people. how much influence you think you
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actually have when some members the cabinet are actually dismissing your concerns? i hope that those members of the cabinet who are dismissing the views of business manufacturers, important firms for jobs like the views of business manufacturers, important firms forjobs like bmw and airbus and unions, will recognise that we need to live in the real world. this is about real peoples‘ jobs and the future of this country. we need a good deal and that means that any good deal involves sensible compromise. i think most people understand that and think it is time that cabinet ministers think that‘s true. and think it is time that cabinet ministers think that's true. would you accept that it takes two to tango? we have had guests on this week on the programme who say that every scenario that the british government has put forward, the customs partnership, today they are talking about a customs union on goods, at every turn, we have been told we are cherry picking and the
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european union has not come up with an alternative. do we need an honest negotiating partner across the channel? i think both negotiating partners needs to be honest and negotiate in good faith. i think it is clear that the european union has said that either you play by the rules of the club or what you can haveis rules of the club or what you can have is a free agreement. and this further... they want more than a free—trade agreement. they want our fishing grounds. they want to cherry pick as well. they don‘t want free—trade agreements. pick as well. they don‘t want free—trade agreementslj pick as well. they don‘t want free-trade agreements. i think what we are doing, both businesses and unions, is calling on both parties to put the jobs and livelihoods and people‘s rights first. we will both be poorer if we don‘t get a good deal. and ifear that britain will be poorer still. there‘s only one of us be poorer still. there‘s only one of us 27 of them. we will be in
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brussels tomorrow. plenty more of that coming tomorrow. migration, i think, is going to dumb dominate most of this summit. there will be some terse words from the french and german side. wherever you look in politics at the moment, the insurgents are challenging the established order. and winning. last night, veteran democratjoe crowley lost his new york primary to a 28—year—old from the bronx. crowley is a liberal progressive, a moderate by all definitions, so what do we take from his defeat? with issues like migration and globalisation driving populist movements in both europe and the united state, is there any space left for centrist, cross party politics? orare we moving inexorably to the fringes? joining us from washington is our north america correspondent, anthony zurcher and in london, anne perkins, deputy political editor at the guardian. anthony, i want to start with you.
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we saw the republicans cope with the tea party over a decade ago. are we now see a similar lurch to the left on the democratic side?” now see a similar lurch to the left on the democratic side? i think we are seeing the first rumblings of that. up until now, the democrats have been doing pretty well in keeping their established nominees in office. this was the first time that a big tree fell. there have been a lot of comparisons between the tea party of 2014 when a leader of the republican party was defeated. later that year, republicans swept the midterms that does not necessarily mean that democrats are in trouble. there is a sense of frustration among the democrat rank and file that the democrat rank and file that the democrat leadership does not reflect their views and is not young enough, multicultural enough and over enough to the left. he was upended by a
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young, hispanic woman. i think that isa sign young, hispanic woman. i think that is a sign of things to come. do you see parallels between what is going on in the us and what is going on here in the uk with the momentum movement and indeed in the continent with the reaction to globalisation and migration? i think there are parallels that i think it is very easy to overstate them. i was very struck by the lovely expression that the new york knicks are used. i think there is a feeling that all conventional, political operating devices are no longer working. there is obviously a bigger problem underlying that and that is that the ce ntre underlying that and that is that the centre parties have lost the authority to express the views of a very significant part of the electorate. do you think... where
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does this leave the centre voters? people who are independent and don‘t like this drift to the fringes? desperately anxious and feeling voiceless and unrepresented. i can think of some people on the right and perhaps on the left who think they'd back say now you know how we feel. of course this is how the back of elected in a lot of centre ground projects but i think a lot of people, too many people around who can rememberquite people, too many people around who can remember quite vividly an attempt at a centrist party, a social democratic party was in terms of... the experience of the liberal democrats as junior partners in a coalition has been a grim warning for what a partially successful ce ntre for what a partially successful centre movement can experience. of
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course, anthony, you have not had a centrist movement in the format we have had here in europe. there are two parties, it is a two party system. there was that negotiation across the aisle. if you look today at the immigration bill on which i have seen has been defeated, the moderate immigration bill has gone by the buyer. anthony kennedy was a moderate in the supreme court and now we are expecting a conservative to come in. things are drifting inexorably to the fringes.” to come in. things are drifting inexorably to the fringes. i think pa rt inexorably to the fringes. i think part of that is that us politics has become increasingly polarised, not just between left and right but also regionally. east — west, midwest coastal etc. our congressional districts and constituencies are drawn by politicians to favour incumbent politicians so when you‘re running for re—election you are much more worried about voters to your
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extreme rather than a general election where you could be up against someone from the other party. this democratic incumbent have to worry about someone on his left and not someone on his right. the same thing happened to republicans. the way that some graphics works —— the way that demographics works. you‘re much more worried about people coming up from the grassroots and the base. you need to answer to that you are not worried about the general election as much. went comes to brexit, who will look at the labour party and they are in a rather strange position, they say, "why can‘t there bea position, they say, "why can‘t there be a breakaway centrist position? " in france you have this movement that came out of the collapse of the
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right—wing why has that not happened in this country? it has happened in the past but we don't have an electoral system which allows that kind of insurgency to find a voice the way that emmanuel macron did. the system of run—offs of a two party election absolutely legitimises that kind of insurgency and it would be completely lost. it is very hard to imagine any success for a centrist party beyond the kind of success that you saw, i suppose, with ukip. with the brexiteers. in the sense that they so challenged the sense that they so challenged the right that's the right started to adopt their policies. i think thatis to adopt their policies. i think that is the most that any centrist movement can do here. shall we say this in stereo? thank you to you both? this is beyond one hundred days.
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trouble for publica ns trouble for publicans as a carbon dioxide shortage has caused a shortage of popular beer brands. the army has been called in to help firefighters battling a huge moorland fire near manchester. the blaze which has been raging since sunday night continues to spread and now measures nearly 4 miles across, forcing the evacuation of more than 50 homes. our correspondentjudith moritz has been there today it looks like a wildfire in the californian bush or the australian outback. but this is six miles from oldham. last night, as the moon rose above saddle more... meters away, homes bought from a tranquil views suddenly threatened. residents were
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told to spend last night elsewhere. i kept looking out of the window and thinking about having something to eat and then there was a knock at the door after eight o‘clock. it was one of the special police officers who said we have to get out and evacuate. when they were telling you to get out, did you think that the house was at risk? absolutely. the last thing i said was please don‘t let the house burn down! some local schools have closed, unable to keep their classrooms ventilated.” schools have closed, unable to keep their classrooms ventilated. i have been here 20 years and we have never been here 20 years and we have never beenin been here 20 years and we have never been ina been here 20 years and we have never been in a position where we have had to close the school because of a fire and there have certainly been no evacuations. this is unprecedented. the fire service declared a major incident. 50 firefighters said to be putting a heavy attack on the blaze. it is not an usualfor the heavy attack on the blaze. it is not an usual for the more heavy attack on the blaze. it is not an usualfor the more land heavy attack on the blaze. it is not an usual for the more land to catch fire, particularly in the summer months. residents say that what is unusual is that there houses are so
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close to pockets of flame like this which keep flaring up. as the country basks in heatwave, imagine the temperatures these firefighters are coping with. it is exhausting and it is continuing. with talk of this fire many days to beat. prince william has spoken of his hopes for lasting peace in the middle east. the duke of cambridge made his comments after meeting the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, in the israeli—occupied west bank. later he met refugees at a camp near ramallah. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has been with him. the transition from israel into the palestinian occupied territories, marked by concrete walls and, for william, a switch into a palestinian vehicle and a palestinian security team. in the main palestinian city of ramallah, he was welcomed by the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas.
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and a ceremony akin to a full state welcome. except, this isn‘t a state. it is palestinian territory still occupied by israel. in talks, mr abbas said palestine must become a fully independent nation. william said he hoped there could be a lasting peace. and then to a palestinian refugee camp. not tents but permanent buildings including a small health centre. it was established in 1949 for palestinians who had fled or been expelled from their land when israel was created. nearly 70 years later, the two communities are still trying to coexist in close proximity. and here is that problem in microcosm. i am in the palestinian camp. the houses over there are inhabited by israelis, some of them are flying israeli flags. in the middle distance is an israeli watchtower. and in between is this narrow buffer zone where there are frequent clashes.
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in the centre of ramallah, there was a cultural festival. standard fare for a royal visit. what has not been standard has been the close exposure william has had to the challenges of finding common ground between the israelis and the palestinians. nicholas witchell in the occupied palestinian territories. now this might be hard to believe in the middle of the world cup and a heatwave but it seems that drinkers in the uk may have to face up to a blazing summer without any beer. a shortage of carbon dioxide means some wholesalers are limiting the amount of cases of beer and soft drinks people can buy. the gas is in short supply, due to the closures of fertiliser plants which usually produce it as a by—product. joining me now is the chief executive of the british beer and pub association, brigit simmonds. educate me, how do we run out of
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c02? educate me, how do we run out of co2? food grade co2 is a by-product of fertilisers. fertilisers is not used very much by farmers at this much of the year. one has got planned maintenance and one has got a problem. we need to sort this for the long—term. this happened in 2015 but then we were able to buy europe. this time, europe does not have any either. is is this time, europe does not have any either. isis a brexit this time, europe does not have any either. is is a brexit conspiracy? is it just the either. is is a brexit conspiracy? is itjust the bricks without beer? the germans their sorrows with lots of c02 the germans their sorrows with lots of co2 beer? we are not running out. yes, we have shortages. we had a long winter so there was some stockpiling. everyone is prepared for the world cup but maybe not for the record temperatures this month. what we are saying to people is that please go to the pub and watch the
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world cup, particularly tomorrow evening to cheer on england. if your favourite beer is not available, try something different. don't go out and panic by. there will be lines at the supermarket tonight!” and panic by. there will be lines at the supermarket tonight! i prefer bottles of champagne, christian! i am curious. there has been a big renaissance of beer. is that got something to do with it? there are different types of beer. you need c02 to different types of beer. you need co2 to produce... you need co2 out the pub to bring up the beerfrom the pub to bring up the beerfrom the cellar to be able to pour it out of the tap. you will find that some pubs are using hand—pumps and some of them are actually taking it straight out of the barrel. there are ways of doing it. we are being positive. we are hoping that one of the factories will come back online
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this weekend. in the next two or three weeks we are hoping to be back up. the companies are being cautious saying that they are worried about people stockpiling. we are saying, go to the pub go and buy a beer, celebrating and at the world cup. pubs are under pressure for both tax reasons, beer taxation, high business rates, we need to help them. the last thing we want to do is to discourage people from drinking beer and going to the pub. that sounds rational. it is the way to go! lets recount on our top story. while we have been on air there have been lines coming out from president trump. we think that after the nato summit on the 11th and 12th ofjuly, possibly in helsinki, trump and putin will meet. they met in vietnam at the side of
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an asian summit. this will be a one—on—one summit. the first time in a bilateral capacity. the last time they spoke they spoke with only a translator present. they have got the measure of each other, if that is possible. i‘m sure other nato members will be breathing a sigh of relief that their meeting will come first and last donald trump will not be drawn into an impulsive giveaway or softening opposition which could cause enormous embarrassment when they meet. it says that they will be talking about syria and ukraine. i wonder if they will be talking about the midterms and whether russia might be interfering in those. that is always a sore subject. will there be any discussion about what went on in 2016? we will see. we will talk more about that in the days and weeks to come. coming up next on bbc world news — ros atkins
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is here with outside source and for viewers in the uk — we‘ll have the latest headlines from reeta chakrabarti. for now from me in washington and christian fraser in london — goodbye. it has been another hot day for some of us particularly across scotland, northern ireland and wales too. we managed to record 32 celsius today making it the hottest day of the year. temperatures will be very similar tomorrow. year. temperatures will be very similartomorrow. hardlya year. temperatures will be very similar tomorrow. hardly a cloud in the sky in the uk. tonight, some of these coastal areas may turn misty and murky once again as they did this morning. in fact, and murky once again as they did this morning. infact, it and murky once again as they did this morning. in fact, it may end up pretty cloudy as far west as part of the east midlands and the south—east. many areas towards the west and north will have a clear sky. it is a relatively dry heat.
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the humidity levels are low to. temperatures will drop away to a co mforta ble temperatures will drop away to a comfortable 10—12d. quickly those temperatures shoot up again on thursday. we are looking at highs in the high 20s or possibly the most 30 once again. it does not look as though... northern parts of the country will be getting the highest temperatures. we are talking about 31 in the lowlands of scotland and may be reaching 30 degrees in northern ireland to. further south, we will see the high 20s. through tomorrow evening, not much change. the same happens through friday and saturday. the high pressure is still with us here. there is more of a breeze in the south which is coming off of the north sea. that is why, on this occasion, we have not had the highest temperatures across the south of the country. it has been further north where there is hardly any wind at all. the air has remained stagnant and hot—wired has been sunny. there will be high
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temperatures in the high or mid—20s. it looks as though by friday we could be hitting 30 degrees in the south. that is as those winds tend to ease. the high pressure has reached scandinavia. they will be experiencing the heat in scandinavia. this is the distribution of temperatures on saturday. a bit fresher in belfast and high 20s in south. the heat continues into the weekend across the south of the country. something a bit more comfortable for the south. this is bbc news, and read attack a party. the headline at eight. as temperatures soar it now spreads
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across four miles. people have been told to leave their homes.” across four miles. people have been told to leave their homes. i heard crackling and all this —— and thick black smoke came tumbling down and you could not breathe. the smog was really dense and you could hardly breathe, plus your eyes are burning as well. the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital scandal appears in public — speaking through her husband, she said she had been doing the best for the patients. she has always maintained that she was hard—working, she has always maintained that she was ha rd—working, dedicated she has always maintained that she was hard—working, dedicated doctor. doing the best for patients in a very inadequately resourced part of the health service. supreme courtjustice, anthony kennedy is to retire,
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