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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 27, 2018 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, and read attack a party. the headline at eight. as temperatures soar it now spreads gci’oss as temperatures soar it now spreads across four miles. people have been told to leave their homes.” across four miles. people have been told to leave their homes. i heard crackling and all this —— and thick black smoke came tumbling down and you could not breathe. the smog was really dense and you could hardly breathe, plus your eyes are burning as well. the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital scandal appears in public — speaking through her husband, she said she had been doing the best for the patients. she has always maintained that she was hard—working, she has always maintained that she was ha rd—working, dedicated she has always maintained that she was hard—working, dedicated doctor. doing the best for patients in a very inadequately resourced part of the health service. supreme courtjustice, anthony kennedy is to retire, giving president trump the chance to cement a conservative majority in america's top court. the rescue ship with over 200
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migrants on board has docked in malta after five days stranded at sea. also this hour — prince william speaks of his hopes for lasting peace in the middle east. the duke of cambridge made the comments after meeting the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas in ramallah. and here is sean, all alone. and boulders germany are out of the world cup, the first time they've been elevated in the first stage of the competition since 1938 —— holders, germany. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the army has been called in to
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help firefighters battling a huge fire on saddle worth more which is continuing to spread. more than 100 homes have been evacuated, the blaze near manchester has been raging since sunday night and now measures nearly four miles across. the bullies have the cleared at a major incident. —— the police have called ita incident. —— the police have called it a major incident. this is the fire from mine, the furthest point where the flames have claimed the land leaving burned heather and twisted wood in their wake. the blaze plays cat and mouse with the firefighters to willing to put it out, each time the wind changes direction the fire moves, each time one hotspot goes out another pops up. the problem with this if it burns like tobacco so it smolders slowly so that is why we need the water to get in there. it is fine knocking fire on the surface, but then like i say it burns underneath so we need the water to soak into the ground com pletely water to soak into the ground completely saturate the area. this is not something that will end today
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by any sort of stretch of the imagination. this could go on for days, even weeks. last night it looked like a wildfire in the californian blush or australian outback, but this is six miles from oldham in as the moon shone over saddle worth fires raged on the more whilst metres away homes bought for their tranquil views were suddenly threatened, residents told to spend the night elsewhere. threatened, residents told to spend the night elsewherelj threatened, residents told to spend the night elsewhere. i kept looking out the window and went around the usual business having something to eat and there was a knock at the door after eight o'clock and one of the special police officers said you'll have to get out, you'll have to evacuate. do you think my house is at risk? absolutely. the last thing i said to him was to let my house burned down. so morkel -- some local schools have closed, unable to keep their classrooms mentholated. i've been here about 20 years and we've never been in a position where we've never been in a position where we had to close the school premises because of fire and they're
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certainly not been any evacuations in the past, so this is unprecedented without a doubt. with smoke hanging heavy in the air, face masks were handed out to residents who were also told to keep their doors and windows shut. the fire service declared a major incident, crews coming from several areas and 110w crews coming from several areas and now the army called in also. of the year on the top of the more it is an apocalyptic landscape, all of the heather has been killed off, but the fire continues to burn under the surface, pockets of smoke and steam coming up overground, surface, pockets of smoke and steam coming up over ground, and this devastation goes on for miles. it is unforgiving, inaccessible terrain the hoses cannot be everywhere and firefighters have to stamp out some elevated hotspots and then keep coming back to reacting with spires. the heat was intense, it was turning the spread of steam, but it did stop
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on the peak as you this morning it is wayne up again. it was just the smoke, the stinging smoke in your eyes. as the country basks in a heat wave, imagine the temperatures the firefighters are coping with. it is exhausting and it's frustrating, but they won't stop until the fire does. let's speak now to clive patrick, a local councillor for carrbrook where homes were evacuated last night. thank you very much indeed for joining us here on bbc news. some quite amazing scenes there. have you ever seen anything like this? no, not at all. i have lived here about 14 not at all. i have lived here about 1a years now and nothing like this. the fires here are quite common, but never that big or this big and so close to our house. my house now is safe, but i reckon about 50 metres as the crow flies or the flame
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jumps, about 50 metres away. but we are safe. i was going to say, you are safe. i was going to say, you are speaking to us from your house now? yes. and you are safe? we are safe, yes. last night when i was out asa safe, yes. last night when i was out as a counsellor helping evacuate people, the nearest house at that time, i reckon about 50 metres away from where we finally, the firemen finally got that bit of the fire out, so 50 metres from the nearest house. very frightening experience. had he been told when the residents who have been evacuated will be allowed back into their homes? yes, the news from the counsel is that they're being allowed this evening, but to keep their windows and doors closed. it is the smoke. the smoke
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last night was her this, and i was given a mask. —— the smoke will surrender. we are bringing resident out, getting in their cars and taking their pets and belongings, and they obviously didn't have proper masks provided by the services, so it was bad for me. when it was like for those poor residents that were being evacuated i don't know. frightening experience.” that were being evacuated i don't know. frightening experience. iam sure it was. he said a moment ago that fires are not actually uncommon on the moore's. no. unfortunately, thatis on the moore's. no. unfortunately, that is so. a straight match or cigarette and orjust the heat of the fire, the heat of the sun on a bit of glass, just like the australian outback or california or something. the same reasons that can
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cause a fire here. and it is such a large area, so dry because of the weather and then the winds presumably just fan the flames. weather and then the winds presumablyjust fan the flames. yes, exactly presumablyjust fan the flames. yes, exa ctly a nd presumablyjust fan the flames. yes, exactly and the wind was blowing astoundingly last night. i suppose mainly by the heat. it is chicken and egg, if the heat of the fire was causing the wind as well. is chicken and egg. 0k. clive patrick, you are looking slightly shocked at what has happened. we hope things get back to normal soon. thank you for talking to us. thank you. a doctored or implicated other scandal has that she was doing her best for patients. as a doctor implicated. more than a50 died after giving —— being given drugs inappropriate according to a report published last week that concluded there had been a disregard for human life. the doctor who was named in
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the report appeared outside her home this morning. these are some of those whose lives were cut short during their stay at the gosport hospital, the result of drugs given without medicaljustification. todayjane barton, the doctor who oversaw the prescription system, appeared for the first time since last week's scathing report. but instead of speaking herself, she left it to her husband. she has always maintained that she was a hard—working, dedicated doctor, doing the best for her patients in a very inadequately resourced part of the health service. we ask that our privacy is respected at this difficult time, and she will be making no further comments. but i did ask one question. jane, do you have any message for the families? robert wilson was one of those who died in the gosport war memorial hospital. his daughter tracey said dr barton's statement today was empty. she had an opportunity today
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to come out and take responsibility for her actions, but she has chosen once again not to do that. she's portrayed herself as a victim, which i find quite distasteful. she's not a victim. that sense of disappointment was shared by the family of elsie devine, another victim identified by the report. there she is getting on with her life, and here we are, fighting all these government bodies, and... i just can't understand, you know, britishjustice. when relatives gathered for the report's publication, few had any idea of the full scale of what had happened. in fact, last week's inquiry found that a total of 656 patients may have been victims of unnecessary drugs here. but we have now learned that three more families have come forward to the police since the report was published to say their loved ones too may have met an early death at this hospital. drjane barton wasn't the only one
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criticised by the inquiry. others are likely to be the subject of interest for any future police investigation. duncan kennedy, bbc news, in gosport. prince william has spoken of his hopes for lasting peace in the middle east. the duke of cambridge made his comments after meeting the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, in the israeli—occupied west bank. later he met refugees at a camp near ramallah. he's the first member of the british royal family to make an official visit to the palestinian occupied territories. the duke has been injerusalem this evening and in a speech he said the palestinians " have not been forgotten". my my message tonight is that you have not been forgotten. it has been a very powerful experience to meet you and other palestinians living in the
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west bank. and to hear your stories. i hope that through my being here and understanding the challenges you face, the links of friendship and mutual respect between the palestinian and british people will grow stronger. the united kingdom stands with you as we work together for a peaceful and prosperous future. well, joining us now from exeter is dr nadia naser—najjab who is a research fellow in palestine studies at the university of exeter. thank you very much forjoining us this evening. how significant do you think prince william's visit is to the west bank? of course it is lovely to see prince william engaging and connecting with palestinian youths. he is a young prince and he met with young palestinians playing football with them, visiting a school. however, i am not sure i see anything good to
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come out of this visit because i don't think that the conflict or the issue is related to mutual friendship and respect. what about the political implication? i understand that the visit was announced as nonpolitical, however looking at his store in the west bank, there is nothing without a political implication —— looking at his door. for example, visiting a school in ramallah is great, however what is the implication of education? prince william assured the president that britain is going to support education, palestinian education. but some children wake up in the morning and find their schools demolished. there are palestinian children who are arrested by the israeli occupation. education is negatively impacted by
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the israeli policies. i understand that it the israeli policies. i understand thatitis the israeli policies. i understand that it is nonpolitical, but what is the significance of this visit is political implication is not discussed or at least considered? visiting the refugee camp for example, i don't know if prince william, and i'm sure he knows, that this camp has been established because palestinians were forced to leave in 1948. this is because his ancestors promised a homeland for the jewish people at the expense of the jewish people at the expense of the palestinians. this is the balfour declaration. i suppose it is as you say and a political visit and it isa as you say and a political visit and it is a vivid probably most people would see as more symbolic value than of political value, but it does seem to have prompted gentle words from each side from the israelis and from each side from the israelis and from the palestinians, and anything that can promote something that
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approaches dialogue or friendly dialogue is to be welcomed, isn't it? well, first of all, i think the visit to israel and palestine is for consideration and balance, and balance has always been against palestinians to tell you the truth. the israeli president sent a message of peace to president abbas and within a propaganda framework and media, it looked as if israel is concerned about peace and the problem is that palestinians or abbas. the nice words i understand, this is a diplomatic visit, of course it has to be diplomatic. however, think it. last year it was 100 years of the balfour declaration, about the old or threaten to sue britain over british —— e—ballot or threaten to sue the british. i think dialogue is great, and my research, i worked on
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dialogue, however without addressing the colonial structure, the occupational structure, dialogue will not work. we cannot ignore the political implication and the expansionist policies of israel and talk about dialogue. the peace process has been on hold for years now, and during that israel is continuing to expand settlements, calling jerusalem as the capital of israel. why is recognised internationally as an occupied city. we will have to leave it there. thank you very much forjoining us. thank you very much forjoining us. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... firefighters request the help of the army to tackle a huge fire on moorland in greater manchester. more than 50 homes have been evacuated. the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital scandal appears in public — speaking through her husband, she said she was doing the best for the patients.
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in america's top court. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh woozencroft. hello, good evening. defending champion germany are out of the world cup after suffering their second defeat in russia. their manager insist their future is bright, but they have failed to make it into the knockout pages for the first time after a 2—0 defeat against south korea in what would a dramatic match watched by patrick gary. thisjust did not look like germany, not as the world knows it. this was a strangely edgy country unsure of things that used to be certain. like their place in the next round. like the security there
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will forced into an unexpected rescue mission and germany have been relying on those. south korea sensed their nerves and unlikely victory might yet see them through. germany had most of the ball but none of the idea. anything less than a two—goal win would leave the vulnerable to the result and the other game —— leave them vulnerable. their belated urgency was met with supreme agility. somehow stop being the header. now, news from the east, word of a swedish goal. german fans don't usually have to check the arithmetic, but they knew they needed to score. no problem, this is germany. they always do. surely. goodness me, how did they miss. he cannot believe it, and nor could anyone else. south korea was still going, now unable to qualify there we re going, now unable to qualify there were desperate to leave a mark. it would be indelible. but wait, he is behind you. the offside would now be var's biggest decision revealing the ball came off the german player.
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goal, pandemonium. germany who they we re goal, pandemonium. germany who they were leaving it late even for them. now needing to even the goalkeeper attacked, when that goes wrong there is only one result. 2-0 to south korea. south korea have played their pa rt korea. south korea have played their part in history. germany, the world champions are out in the group stage for the first time, but then they never looked like germany. that result would not have necessarily put germany out, had sweden failed to beat mexico in the other group game. in the end it was rather co mforta ble game. in the end it was rather comfortable for the swedes. firing them into a first—half lead before any nerves were put well at rest by the caption asked by the captain who stepped up to sleep home a penalty to make it 2—0 and that was before i second—half on goal. that meant it
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was mexico who are left sweating at the final whistle. matt duffy for germany meant they lived to fight on. here is confirmation of group f —— that defeat for germany. look at that, germany are finishing bottom of the table. brazil could be another big—name casualty at the world cup. in the group stages, but they are currently in control of their own destiny. they need to avoid defeat against serbia in moscow. so far things have gone to plan, lovely pass from coutinho helping the former spurs midfielder. prodding the five—time winners into the lead is still 1—0 into the second half. switzerland also hoping to make it through. they know a win over costa rica will put them into the last 16, swire and that's firing this was that before costa rica scored their first goal in russia with kendall watson equalising. as
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things stand switzerland don't even need a win to qualify. andy murray lost the battle of the britons in the second round at eastbourne today as he continues to gauge his progress ahead of a potential grand slam return at this year's wimbledon. he was taking on the british number one kyle edmund but he showed that he may well be bringing's best hope at wimbledon this year by taking the first set 6-a, the this year by taking the first set 6—a, the second set following a similar pattern, edmund's power was too much for the three—time grand slam winner and kyle edmund moves on based kukushkin the quarterfinals. johanna konta is out as well beaten in three sets by the world number two caroline wozniacki. the british number one took the first set 6—a, wozniacki responding with the next two, 6—2, 6— forsetting wozniacki responding with the next two, 6—2, 6— for setting up a meeting with ashley barty next. that is all the sport for now. we will be back with more ends wednesday at half past ten. thank you very much. a key member of the us supreme court,
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justice anthony kennedy, has announced he's stepping down. though a conservative, he has been a pivotal vote on crucial decisions including the 5—a rulings that decided same—sex marriage and upheld roe v wade. in his letter to mr trump, justice kennedy expressed "profound gratitude" for having served in the highest court. the 82—year—old will retire at the end of next month. well, let's speak to our correspondent in washington, anthony zurcher who's following developments in the story. as opposed president trump will be looking to change the balance on the supreme court. absolutely. we've already said he will pick a replacement for anthony kennedy from the list of about two dozen potential candidates that he compiled when he was a candidate, and the same list neil gorsuch from who's approving to be unreliable and conservative vote on the supreme court over the past term. i think there is no question that whoever
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replaces anthony kennedy will move the centre of power in the supreme court decidedly towards the conservatives. and as you mention that can call into question whether they are the votes to change abortion law, change the way gay rights is considered by our legal system. it's a major development and a difficult to overstate exactly how significant this will be going forward. morden up -- more developments in washington with president trump announcing he will meet the russian president next month. we will find an exact date and location tomorrow. they'll probably it but donald trump's national security adviser was in moscow today meeting with vladimir putin. they said they'd agreed on a time and date, it sounds like it will be in mid—july either before or after the nato summit which was interesting. it says a lot about donald trump's priorities that he could go from a nato summit immediately to meet with vladimir putin. obviously there is significant tension in the us russia
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relations, but donald trump has expressed a willingness to work with winer put in. it'll be interesting to see when they sit down face to face what happens. 0k. it will indeed. many thanks. our correspondent there. there's no sign of a let up in the heatwave. northern ireland has experienced its hottest day injune in decades. and it's likely to get hotter still across parts of the uk. emma vardy has this report from bangor in northern ireland. you would be forgiven for swanning around on northern ireland's hottest june day for 22 years, or to put it another way... boiling! baking. it's piping today. glorious. it's about 15, 16 degrees. perfect. and a quick breakfrom the dayjob to enjoy it. i'll get an hour in the water now, a bit of a shiver after getting out, even today, and then back to work. i'll take the kayak out. it's not often it comes like this, so i'll have to make the most of it and enjoy it while it's here. northern ireland has been making the most of
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its share of the uk's heatwave, because weather like this here is rarely seen for so long. meanwhile, health warnings have continued to be issued around the uk as the heatwave has intensified. in leeds, a 17—year—old swimmer drowned after getting into difficulties in the river aire. his body was recovered this morning. scotland basked in its warmestjune day for two decades, while temperatures were above 30 degrees again in wales. yesterday, this was the hottest place in the uk. the seaside resorts of weston—super—mare welcomed many visitors, while in birmingham, suncream was handed out to the homeless. the heat brought difficult conditions on farms in staffordshire, where it has been a struggle to keep livestock cool bigger beasts were given some respite at belfast zoo, and even the pigs wore sunscreen. the heat is a nice challenge for us because obviously in northern ireland, we get a lot of rain and cold days but when we get weather like we've had the past few weeks, the keepers have
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to ensure the animals are as comfortable as possible. for many, it is is a rare treat to have temperatures this high, and northern ireland savoured the moment. emma vardy bbc news, bangor. in the studio with me now is our weather presenter, tomasz schafernaker. a heat wave is unusual enough in itself, isn't it? but this one is out of the ordinary in a particular sort of way. this heat wave is quite prolonged, that certainly is one thing. it will last for a little bit longer, quite possibly across southern parts of the uk into next week. probably will but is —— what is more unusual is getting some of the higher temperatures across parts of the uk that are not normally so hot. temperatures soaring about 30 -- 30 hot. temperatures soaring about 30 __ 30 __ hot. temperatures soaring about 30 -- 30 -- 30 in hot. temperatures soaring about 30 —— 30 —— 30 in scotland, northern ireland, parts of wales as well and it looks like we could be hitting 30 degrees. from that aspect it is quite unusual. why has this happened with my wife in the north more than the south? sometimes the weather
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overall, why we are getting a heat wave right now the weather sometimes get stuck in a rut. that is found at a bit ofa get stuck in a rut. that is found at a bit of a negative thing and a lot of people like the good weather, but it does get stuck and we get persistent warm winds coming off the continent. that is what is happening right now. in fact in the winter we had a similar sort of weather pattern and winds were coming off the continent, but they were very cold and we have the snow. this time we are getting a lot of dry heat and actually the heat we have had has not been a particularly humid so the night has been pretty cool, but why have scotland and northern ireland had the highest temperatures? it is all to do with the typography in the uk. actually the mountains play a very important role —— typography. it was the hills in wales that helped to distribute this hot air. how much longer is this heat going to go on and for god knows when will they get some rain? that is a question i've been asked all the time. at the moment there is a small
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risk that perhaps the end of the week and into next week would did see some showers across southern parts of the uk, but they are only showers. there are very hit and miss so at the moment no real indication of any widespread rain across the uk and if anything does, way it's probably going to be scotland and northern ireland later next week, but for now the hot weather will continue. before we go, we have had so many pictures from weather watchers i thought maybe we could have a look at some. the first is from scarborough. not everywhere is it hot. look at that, pretty misty and murky there and temperatures on the north sea coast have only been the north sea coast have only been the high teens, so that is one. the second image i is from cornwall, beautiful. everybody wants to go to st ives. standing there and it looks like the caribbean. we have bedford. the dog days of summer, i guess in bedford. and we have wales in the next one. that is like... that is
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stunning. it is like from the caribbean. it is beautiful stop delete them. northern ireland where temperatures got up to 30, beautiful. look at that. look at the seat. scotland i think is next. i think the cow got the message that it is not going to rain as it is standing. i don't know about the other two. they're sitting down. a couple more pictures, one from jersey i think, beautiful image. holiday—makers there. jersey i think, beautiful image. holiday-makers there. it is quite empty as well. had this been the weekend. one more from dorset. that is slightly busier. what a lovely summer it is and we must remember if it all goes to the pot in august we had this. thank you very much. the john lewis partnership has issued a profit warning. the chain said it expected its profit to be close to zero in the first half of the year — and the annual figure would be substantially lower than last year. the group is to close five waitrose stores. when faced with the level
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of uncertainty and whether the significant risks that they can see, and with the apparent misunderstanding, or a lack of appreciation of the scale of those risks, i would say that it seems to be irresponsible for people who know that some of those things could happen not to flag those. now it is time for a look at the weather forecast and a repeat performance with thomas. today was a little bit hotter than yesterday. temperatures got up to 32 celsius, and that is 90 fahrenheit in northern wales pretty unusualfor this time of year and the start of the country. —— this part of the country. it's been very sunny, so we've got clear skies on the way tonight. again, some of these eastern coasts, just like last night will turn a little on the cloudy side, and some of that cloud will drift inland, and the overnight lows around 12 degrees in most major towns and cities, a little bit
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cooler outside of town. tomorrow we do it all over again, so the heat wave continues. more strong sunshine on the way and once again temperatures will exceed 30 degrees in one or two spots. the highest temperatures are expected across scotland, northern ireland and some southwestern parts of the country, easily getting into the high 20s and possibly into the low 30s as well. in the coming days it looks as though things will eventually cool off across the north of the uk. we keep the heat in the south. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... firefighters request the help of the army to tackle a huge fire on moorland in greater manchester. more than 50 homes have been evacuated. i heard crackling and heard the fire. all this ash and black smoke
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came tumbling down and we could not breathe. the smoke was really dense and you could hardly bleed dunn breathe close your eyes were burning as well. the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital scandal appears in public. speaking through her husband, she said she was doing the best for the patients. supreme courtjustice, anthony kennedy is to retire, giving president trump the chance to cement a conservative majority in america's top court. prince william is cheered as he visits a palestinian refugee camp, earlier he met president mahmoud abbas in ramallah. let's get more now on our main story, the military has been called in to help firefighters tackle a huge fire on saddleworth moor. more than 100 homes have been evacuated near the fire, which stretches nearly four miles of moorland above stalybridge in greater manchester. in our salford studio is clive hopkinson, a firefighter for greater manchester fire and rescue service, who has been
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helping to co—ordinate today's operation in stalybridge. thank you very much indeed for joining us here on bbc news this evening. it has been very difficult work for your members, hasn't it? yes, the situation they find themselves in is very dynamic intangible. and i need to stress that the commitment of the firefighters has been immense up there and going the extra yard for there and going the extra yard for the community. but we have separate pockets of fire in separate seeds of fire in seven different areas and the intensity of the fire started at the intensity of the fire started at the peat underneath so it is very difficult to extinguish. we saw some of this with fire is being extinguished in popping up again because of the heat of the terrain. yeah, what happens when the peat sta rts yeah, what happens when the peat starts bringing he comes very
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challenging and difficult but the fire a lot dunn fighters and the commitment level, i know some have been up there with dunn for 17 hours with not a lot of refreshments but it got better today. and i understand firefighters had to carry their equipment, hoses and pumps for quite a long distance in this heat? it is up toa quite a long distance in this heat? it is up to a mile they are carrying the gear. they are small ponds and small bits of equipment but we are talking about 25 kilos on the back and it is very challenging in this weather. i can't imagine. i hear and it is very challenging in this weather. ican't imagine. i hear the army is coming in and i present that is good news? it is good news that we can call on the army but the problem we have is we are a brigade at the end of the day and second only to london so i feel it is a
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little defeatist to call the army m, little defeatist to call the army in, sorry the armed services. we have help from other surrounding counties and we are making use of their facilities counties and we are making use of theirfacilities in counties and we are making use of their facilities in terms of resources and pumps. but i think it isa sign resources and pumps. but i think it is a sign of the times that we have to rely on the army. but in terms of the fire itself have you had to deal with anything like this in your professional career?” with anything like this in your professional career? i come from a moral and firefighting station and we go up moral and firefighting station and we go up on moral and firefighting station and we go up on whole come more quite regularly but the intensity of this fire is amazing. it is so dynamic and changing all the time. we are com pletely and changing all the time. we are completely at the test of the environment really and we could do with a little bit of rain which seems to be a usual thing to hope for in manchester. we have to leave it there but thank you for your time. we have some sad news to bring you
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from staffordshire police. the body of 13—year—old ryan evans has been recovered from westport lake. staffordshire police said the body was found in the stoke—on—trent water on wednesday evening following an extensive search by emergency services and underwater teams. a spokesman for the force said: "ryan's family have been informed and our thoughts and condolences are with them at this very difficult time. his family and friends, who were at the lake with him on monday, are being supported by police family liaison officers." ryan disappeared after getting into difficulties in the lake on monday afternoon. two other youngsters, aged 12 and 13, managed to get out by themselves. that's sad news just coming in from staffordshi re that's sad news just coming in from staffordshire police, that the body of 13—year—old brian evans has been recovered. let's go on. 12 teenage boys and their football coach who disappeared into a cave network in thailand four days ago
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are still missing. rising water levels caused by heavy rainfall are frustrating rescue workers, who are using powerful industrial pumps to drain water from inside the cave. jonathan head has this report. the weather is making this difficult operation whole lot harder. there are dozens of teams here now, all trying to find a route into a cave system that is many miles long and now partly flooded. the 12 boys went in with their football coach last saturday, posting this photo just before. their bicycles are still there, a reminder to rescuers of what is at stake. the thai army is also here in large numbers. theirjob? coordinate operation and send soldiers across the mountains in search of other possible ways into the caves. we have been walking for about half an hour and out into the forest
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in these very steep hills. what the soldiers are trying to do is find some evidence of a chimney or in a hole that might drop down through the limestone rocks into the caves below. a party of climbers coming down had just explored to such chimneys but no joy. translation: the leader said the chimneys were blocked several metres down. one british man has spent years exploring this cave system. he says the boys could survive if they managed to stay above the water. more caving and diving experts are on their way from other countries. there is still hope here and while there is hope, no one wants to stop. scientists in cambridge say advances in genetics are set to transform the treatment of breast cancer,
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making it more personalised to each patient. all women in cambridge, diagnosed with breast cancer, have their entire genetic code mapped. 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. in the 1970s, four in ten women survived beyond 10 years: ?now it's around eight in 10. as part of our look at the nhs at 70, our medical correspondent fergus walsh reportson this new development from cambridge. newsreel: the hospitals and clinics in britain and throughout the world are the headquarters from which the war against cancer is waged. optimism from the early days of the nhs. newsreel: they believe that cancer, the world's biggest killer, can be defeated for good and all. that fight continues, but with new weapons. this is a tiny slice of a patient‘s breast tumour, which contains their faulty cancerous dna. and this is a sample of their blood, containing the genes they were born with.
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addenbrooke's in cambridge is the first nhs hospital to completely sequence both genomes for all breast cancer patients. you know, absolutely amazing. it's like the genome is shattered all over the place. this is a digital readout of one patient‘s tumour dna. it yields a huge amount of information, helping doctors understand which treatments are likely to be effective and which to avoid. we can catalogue all of the mutations in the tumour cells, and we can also understand how the micro environment of normal cells, in particular immune cells, are responding to the cancer. and this knowledge will allow us to deliver much more precision cancer medicine. is there anything you wanted to ask about the current treatment? that makes a tangible difference to elizabeth. her breast cancer has spread to her liver and is incurable. but because doctors have mapped her dna, they know which drugs to try next
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to keep her condition at bay. this is definitely a long haul. yes, i mean, there's no easy answers, but the hope with the way cancer treatment‘s going is that one thing after another comes along, new targets are discovered. having had the genome sequence, the information is all there. nearly 300 patients havejoined the personalised breast cancer programme in cambridge. after surgery and radiotherapy, they receive tailored drug treatments. we've had lots of cases where we have either opted for the patient to go on to a clinical trial because of the results of the sequencing, or where the patient has been offered an alternative standard of care treatment because that was better than one of the other options. and this is a glimpse of how treatment might change in the future, using what scientists call mouse avatars. all these mice have the same patient‘s breast tumour cells
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growing under their skin. the mice on the right got a drug which didn't work — the tumour has grown. but the mice on the left got a different drug, which did, and the tumour is gone. scientists say these animal models are essential for speeding up the development of new cancer medicines. this is a remarkable example of how cancer research is becoming ever more personalised. in future, it should mean that promising drugs can be tested first in the lab and then in mouse avatars, to find which one will work best in a patient. advances in surgery, radiotherapy and diagnostics are also helping to extend survival. one in two of us will get cancer, so we will never defeat it completely, but the prospects for patients are better than at any time in the nhs's history. fergus walsh, bbc news, cambridge.
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the firefighter who led the initial response to the grenfell tower fire has said he felt ‘helpless‘ as flames reached the top of the building within minutes. michael dowden said he did not consider evacuating the tower even as residents came out coughing and covered in soot. the inquiry heard that a more senior officer would usually have overseen a fire of that scale. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds reports from the inquiry. a daunting prospect. michael dowden was grilled for hours about the night he was incident commander in the first hour of a major disaster. what did he see, do, order others to do, what did he consider doing?“ you had decided to adopt a strategy of full—scale evacuation, could you give me some kind of idea of what you would need in terms of
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firefighters and equipment at that moment? there were regular long pause as i has he attempted to formulate his answers.” pause as i has he attempted to formulate his answers. i cannot comment on that because that is something i have not had experience of. it is a hypothetical question andl of. it is a hypothetical question and i really want to talk about my reactions that night. normally he would come off two fire engines and their crews but on the night he was in charge of up to 15 fire engines, dealing with the biggest residential fire since the war. he was asked about policy and training were absurd. he was asked about high—level strategic issues which are far above his level of responsibility in the london fire per —— brigade. he was asked about a
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strategic document that he would not be aware of and was not aware of until a few weeks ago. growing solid solidarity and some describing it as an attack on a brave firefighter. this was the response from the inquiry. we as the team thank you very much mr chairman. we are grateful that you have come to give your evidence and you have given your evidence and you have given your evidence and you have given your evidence with tandoor and without shying away from difficult questions of which i am afraid there have been many. and for other firefighters there will be more questions. the inquiry is intent on established link what happened that night including what the london fire per —— fire brigade did and did not do. the headlines on bbc news... firefighters request the help of the army to tackle a huge fire on moorland in greater manchester. more than 50 homes have been evacuated.
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the doctor at the centre of the gosport hospital scandal appears in public, speaking through her husband, she said she was doing the best for the patients. supreme courtjustice, anthony kennedy is to retire, giving president trump the chance to cement a conservative majority in america's top court. an update on the market numbers for you, here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. a charity—run ship, carrying 200 migrants, has docked in malta after previously being blocked from italian ports. malta's prime minister, has said that the migrants will be distributed between malta and five other european countries, and that the ship itself, will be impounded. the lifeline picked up migrants off the libyan coast last thursday. a heterosexual couple have won their legal bid to have a civil partnership instead of a marriage.
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the supreme court unanimously ruled that the civil partnership act, which only applies to same—sex couples in engalnd and wales, was incompatible with the european convention on human rights. our legal correspondent, clive coleman, has been speaking to them. rebecca and charles, a devoted couple since 2010 and now with two young children do not have a problem with marriage but it is not for them. theirfight with marriage but it is not for them. their fight for a civil ownership has brought them all the way to the highest court in the land. we saw ourselves as partners in lightand land. we saw ourselves as partners in light and we felt civil partnership reflected better the nature of her relationship. they would... civil partnerships are only available to same—sex couples and rebecca and charles claimed that discriminates against heterosexual couples like them. today the supreme
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court agreed. the appeal must be allowed and that a decoration should be made in sections one and three of the civil partnership act to the extent that they preclude a... after four years, victory. today we are a step closer to opening civil partnerships to all, a measure that would be fair, popular and good for families and children across the country. it gives couples the same legal and financial rights as married couples. those cannot force parliament to change the law but it puts pressure on government to open up puts pressure on government to open up civil partnerships to those 3 million cohabitating heterosexual couples who may not want to get married but may well want stronger
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legal rights. charles and rebecca are not getting the invitations to the civil partnership printed just yet but they are confident it will now happen for them and many like them. the pub chainjd wetherspoon says a number of pubs have run out of some beers and ciders because of a nationwide shortage of carbon dioxide gas. the company says things should be back to normal in the next couple of days. our midlands correspondent sima kotecha has been outside a pub in birmingham. this one says it is fully stocked but that is not the case with other bars and but that is not the case with other bars a nd restau ra nts but that is not the case with other bars and restaurants across the country. it says it is struggling to supply certain brands of beer and cider and also chains have been struggling as well. why is this happening? you may have heard of a shortage of co2 gas which is used to make beer and cider and that shortage along with the glorious weather, an increase in demand and
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thatis weather, an increase in demand and that is leading to bars and restau ra nts that is leading to bars and restaurants like this one struggling to meet demand. has serious is this? the government said tonight that it has watched reports like this one tonight on the problem and it is doing all it can to find a solution. someone one who knows his carbination is john raquet, chairman and ceo of trade publication gas world, and hejoins me now. thank you very much forjoining us. why have we got this co2 shortage? it is down to a problem that there are five manufacturing plants in the uk, if we arejust are five manufacturing plants in the uk, if we are just talking about the uk, if we are just talking about the uk, of which two are operating and three were downed. they were down ten days ago or longer, they have been down for at least, going back to the beginning ofjune. at the same time, there has been obviously this demand, because it is peak summertime. added to that, you have
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the problem that this is notjust a uk problem but this is a north european problem. we do import liquid carbon dioxide but there has not been much to import as well. a double crunch. there has not been much to report because there has been problems in europe as well? mainly associated with fertiliser pla nts mainly associated with fertiliser plants that have carbon dioxide as a by—product and a number of those ammonia plants are normally routinely go down for routine maintenance and about march or april time but they have actually been slow to come back up and many of them were not operating in may and in part injune. that has added to the problem. we are talking this evening about beer partly because of the world cup but it has affected all the world cup but it has affected a ll starts the world cup but it has affected all starts of industries, hasn't it? yes, first of all you have coverage
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of the abattoir up in scotland and you have the beverage and main brands that are closing down some production lines. and has been affecting a variety of companies, not just the pubs. affecting a variety of companies, notjust the pubs. when is it likely to be resolved, do you think? to be honest it is going to be a challenging rest of the week, make no bones about it but there are two pla nts no bones about it but there are two plants at teesside that are about to start up. one is apparently starting up start up. one is apparently starting up tomorrow and the other one at the weekend. it takes about 2a—a8 hours to get the liquid co2 so as we entered next week, i think most people are hoping that the supplies will then start to kick in and alleviate the immediate problems.
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0k, alleviate the immediate problems. ok, we will have to leave it there. thank you for your time. the latest ideas on how to use satellite technology to improve life on earth, sound like the inventions of top scientists, but in fact they've all been created by young entrepreneurs! 22 inventors have been given the chance to pitch their ideas to industry experts in a bid to make them a reality. john maguire reports. normally when entrepreneurs enter the dragons' den, they're experienced business owners. but today, 21 young people aged between 13 and 21 are pitching their ideas to five dragons from the space industry, and they're a tough crowd. who's going to pay for this? you can, sort of, ramble slightly. if we put on our business hats. who do you think would be the end consumer? everyone here is already a winner of the uk space agency's satellife competition. they've all come up with innovative ways to use satellite technology to improve our lives. so today, it's their chance to gain support and advice to take their ideas to the next level.
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at the age of 13, i took a very intense interest into ai, from which i created my first chatbot. a confident start for 15—year—old kari lawler, whose jacket leaves the dragons in no doubt of her ambitions. if you can start identifying those things you want to pick apart, then i'd really like you to come and talk to me about a job. when you get into discussions with universities and partners, just make sure you read the fine print, get some people on your side looking at, you know, the legal bits and pieces. you didn't seem remotely nervous, were you nervous? erm, not really. i do presentations and speaking a lot, so it was all right. goodness, this is such a good event. i did this event last year as well, and the kidsjust really put together some amazing projects. so really impressed again this year with the calibre of the projects coming forward. we first met the schoolgirls from cornwall with their surf safe idea two months ago. they've come up with an affordable
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wristband to be worn by surfers and swimmers in the sea, which would help lifeguards on the shore track their exact position. aerospace cornwall has already offered the girls £5,000 to develop their idea. today, the european space agency said it would match the money. you can tell it's a good idea because you go, surely someone has already thought of this, this must exist! if you're able to raise a little bit of money to get this started then we can double that from the european space agency and help you through those feasibility study and testing stages. it's all very well doing a presentation, isn't it? but then they started asking you questions. what was that like? well, nervous, yes. not very good at answering stuff on the spot, got to admit. they're not only thinking about ideas of how to use a satellite imagery or data, they're thinking about how they can solve problems with that data.
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it's really inspiring to see such young, creative minds moving and thinking in this kind of space, and it's ground—breaking. i'd like to take you on a journey. so much space technology seems futuristic when, in fact, it's being used today. but, when looking for what's next and who will create it, the future is already here. now it's time for a look at the weather. here is thomas. and this time i am at the seaside, hopefully we will be for the next couple of days because it is looking absolutely beautiful. the weather today was a little hotter than it was yesterday. today we got up to 32 degrees, actually 31.9to be we got up to 32 degrees, actually 31.9 to be absolutely precise. many parts of the country were in the high 20s in coastal areas were a low bit more cloudy and at times also misty and murky and this is a
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picture from earlier on from scarborough. you can see how cloudy and murky and misty it was of course there. and what do we have tonight? we have a lot happening on the weather front. a bit we have a lot happening on the weatherfront. a bit more we have a lot happening on the weather front. a bit more clout again lapping onto the coastline and maybe drifting inland during the night. fairly fresh but those temperatures are going to be shooting up with those deep orange colours. they will be shooting up in the temperatures and once again we could see the temperatures in the excess of 31 degrees, into the high 20s for most of us. again the north sea coastal strip will be a little colder, through aberdeen and further south still. we will see temperatures mostly into the low 20s elsewhere. obviously hot sunshine. and that is how we will end thursday ona and that is how we will end thursday on a beautiful son means night. some of us not liking that hot weather. —— beautiful sunny night. it looks
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like the weather is going to cool offa like the weather is going to cool off a little bit maybe not on friday but certainly through the weekend across northern part of the country. prydie still a warm day if not hot day. notice that the temperatures on friday in glasgow and certainly belfast will be dipping a little bit, we're talking about 26 or so and not 31 any more, or like the 20s. through the weekend this is a plume of warmth which is stretching almost all the way into the arctic circle, into norway as well. the heat wave their across spain and further south into france in spain. sunshine all around for many of us on saturday interpreters into the height 20s and in the north high teens across the north sea coast there. you can see how it cools off and there is good news for you, belfast down to 21 in london is hovering around the high 20s. next time, when will it rain? we think
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may be just a slight chance early on monday. hello, this is outside source. shock at the world cup — the title holders germany are knocked out of the tournament — beaten by south korea ajudge steps down in the united states — we'll explain why that could have a major impact there for years to come. another big summit on the cards for president trump a long—awaited meeting with russia's president vladimir putin has now been decided on. the rescue boat lifeline finds a pot —— find safe harbour in malta but that has not stopped the row in europe about what to do about migrants coming from africa. and remember if you want to get in touch — the hashtag is #bbcos.
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