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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 28, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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soldiers arrive in greater manchester to help tackle the huge moorland fire — officials say it could last "for weeks" we can see this being delayed for days or weeks. the german chancellor warns that migration could become a defining moment for the european union — ahead a summit of eu leaders this afternoon. on the final day of his tour of the middle east, prince william pays his respects at the tomb in jerusalem of his great—grandmother. room for improvement — hotel booking sites should review the way they rank and display accommodation — the competition watchdog warns. england expects — the three lions face belgium tonight in theirfinal group game of the world cup. with both teams level on points — the result will determine who finishes top of the group — and who england could face later. temperatures reach near—record levels forjune across most of the uk in a heatwave that looks set to continue into july.
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working welcome to bbc newsroom live. the armed forces have been deployed to help firefighters who are battling to contain a vast fire sweeping across moors near saddleworth in greater manchester. around 100 soldiers from the royal regiment of scotland were sent overnight tojoin firefighters. the blaze has been burning since sunday night, and the authorities have declared it a major incident. images released by nasa, and the area affected
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is nearly four miles across. no injuries have been reported but people living locally have been advised to keep their windows and doors closed. earlier this morning, officials told us more about the operation, which could go on for weeks. we can see this being prolonged for days if not weeks, particularly with the fact that the wind has drawn fire is towards the residential but actually away from the centre of the moor. wejust actually away from the centre of the moor. we just need a change actually away from the centre of the moor. wejust need a change in wind direction to see the fire increasing into the greater fuel source is so we could see a dramatic change and that's why having the resources on scene immediately ready and the support of the armed services is extremely important. we are here in support of fire and rescue and there isa support of fire and rescue and there is a finite number of people that we re is a finite number of people that were here yesterday and have been
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here for a were here yesterday and have been here fora numberof were here yesterday and have been here for a number of days so it is actually finding a group of individuals that can provide support. we will make sure soldiers are working alongside the fire and rescue personnel so are working alongside the fire and rescue personnel so they will be pairing up together. we're looking at one firefighter to three or four trips so they can provide extra manpower. i would add that it would go unnoticed that having firefighters on the scene draws those five engines from other stations across greater exeter and we have had other fire and rescue services come into greater manchester to provide fire cover so by having additional staff in terms of soldiers here doing some of the basic firefighters' work means we can keep fire stations with fire engines available to deal with emergency calls. tony hunter there from greater manchester fire and rescue service. our reporter inzamam rashid is at swineshaw reservoir near glossop — where efforts are still under way to put out the fire. we limbs of smoke coming out, —— we
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can see smoke coming out, we expect temperatures of high 20s later on today and we are in the perfect conditions for fires to be spreading right across the next few days. army officials have told us and fire services have told us that we could be here for weeks, notjust days. joining me is the mp for hide and stalybridgejonathan joining me is the mp for hide and stalybridge jonathan reynolds. joining me is the mp for hide and stalybridgejonathan reynolds. a very serious incident in your constituency. it's quite emotional seeing the countryside in this condition. we have had fires on the
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moors in previous years but the scale of this, the army being brought in and people being evacuated, is something that's bigger than anything in living memory. in a lot of schoolteachers have said they have never had to close schools before. what has life been like for residents in this area? the windows were opened and the smoke alarms went off which gives you an idea of how thick it was. people have the ability to share their own pictures and videos to give a sense of how difficult it was in parts of the area. we had to do some evacuations. they were able to go to friends and family and people have been marvellous and they appreciate the amount of work and resources that are going on, particularly from the fire and rescue service and from the armed forces and police and public health england, everyone has been involved local people will watch me to pass
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on how they are. the army arrived this morning and is expected to be there for 48 hours with maybe a plan to extend as well. what does it mean to extend as well. what does it mean to you to have the army hearing your constituency? it's what people asked for. the scale of this is such that they are getting firefighters to really need to be and mortar to read it needs to be —— water has been a massive challenge. they were walking males in equipment —— they were walking for miles. getting water to places is what we need and some parts of this fire has been about getting additional manpower to do that. it's very welcome. let's speak now to stephen rovell, who lives in carrbook village.
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he and his wife and young daughter were evacuated on tuesday but have now returned to their home. please put into context how close your home is to where the fire is. 0n your home is to where the fire is. on tuesday night it was 50 metres from the house which was bad but the smoke was unbelievable. it was horrendous. it really was like a scene from armageddon to be honest. it's something i never want to repeat, put it that way. we met at the house at five o'clock six o'clock, lots of police and fire engines. by eight o'clock, even with the windows shut, the smoke was coming into the house so we made the decision to leave. i stayed for another hour then i got a call off the police telling me to leave. it's a lot better today but tuesday, very bad. 50 metres away is pretty scary,
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as does the situation with the smoke. you decided to leave before the official advice came through? 0ther the official advice came through? other houses have been —— had already been asked to leave, we live on the fringe but we were expecting a call. we thought, let's get out of here. luckily you had somewhere to go. all your neighbours, were they in the same boat? pretty much, all our friends in the same boat? pretty much, all ourfriends and in the same boat? pretty much, all our friends and family on the estate left. a few people stayed behind but not many. how concerned are you that the fire might move back in your direction? presumably you are keeping a very close watch on it all. there seems to be a lot of action at greenfield at the moment, not far from where i live. action at greenfield at the moment, not farfrom where i live. i've action at greenfield at the moment, not far from where i live. i've seen army trucks go up there today. the wind has changed direction towards
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greenfield so i think the focus is on that side rather than car —— ban in ourarea. —— on that side rather than car —— ban in our area. —— thine in our area. evenif even if the fires go out, a close watch will have to be kept on the moors to make sure none of the blazers reignite. it sounds like you would be able to relax for some time. it's like putting the fires out but it's the peat underneath that keeps burning. it's 28 celsius just now, it's bone dry, so they can tackle fire scene and there but suddenly right behind them, it sta rts suddenly right behind them, it starts again —— tackle fires each year and there. it sounds bizarre but we need some rain, i think that
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would help. thank you, stephen. stay safe. we can cross to our correspondent danny savage for the latest. yea rs correspondent danny savage for the latest. years at the reservoir —— he is at the reservoir. tell us about the firefighters and how they have been bolstered by the soldiers. the soldiers have just arrived been bolstered by the soldiers. the soldiers havejust arrived in been bolstered by the soldiers. the soldiers have just arrived in the last 20 minutes or so. the lorry on the hillside, theyjust got off and they will be taken on to the moor above us to continue firefighting. my above us to continue firefighting. my instant assessment in coming up here today after being here all day yesterday is that it doesn't look quite as bad as it was 24 hours ago. the fires may have spread elsewhere but around this area, to local
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communities near stalybridge, there is less of a risk now. i walked up with somebody who had just been to gold, —— command. the hillsides were on fire yesterday and are still giving of smoke butjust smouldering at the moment and there doesn't seem to be the spread of fire that was yesterday. the breeze that we had yesterday. the breeze that we had yesterday may cause changes as the day goes on but the army will be up there soon containing the spread of there soon containing the spread of the fire but first impressions today are that it's not quite as bad as it was yesterday. tellers in more detail about the weather and the conditions, the environment on the ground that are causing concerns about how long this might last for.
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simon king, the forecasterfor bbc radio five live, treated last night there was no significant rain in the forecast for the next seven to ten days so we have more than a week of this continuing weather. it might not be as warm as this but it will be dry and sunny for the foreseeable future and that won't do anything to help put these fires out because the plan of what is going on around here is simply to stop these fires from spreading. there is no plan. the heather burns and sets the peat alight. it is now a matter of what you could pour on the peat from the reservoir to put it out, that will not stop it from smouldering. the only thing that. that is heavy rain and that is not in the forecast so the current weather conditions will not do anything to stop these fires
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burning but if there is no wind it might stop them from spreading and with more personnel being brought in and fire breaks being put in, which is gaps in the heather by fax or artificially made, that might help contain them. the air quality has been very cruel at times downwind of this in manchester. i sense it is not as bad today as over the last couple of days, there's not that much smoke compared to sunday, monday and tuesday, so it is getting better but it is still hazy and smoky in places and that will continue but there's no feeling that the fires are still spreading rapidly, they'rejust the fires are still spreading rapidly, they're just being the fires are still spreading rapidly, they'rejust being more contained and just smouldering at the moment. danny, thank you for that update. news from buckingham palace, the queen has pulled out of a service at
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st paul's cathedral today because she is feeling under the weather. a spokeswoman said the queen is feeling under the weather today and has decided not to attend this morning's service at st paul's cathedral marking the 200th anniversary of the order of michael and st george, her majesty will be represented by the duke of kent instead but we have been told that no doctor has been called, the queen will be travelling to windsor today as planned and that there is no cause for alarm. theresa may travels to brussels today to meet other eu leaders for a summit which had been planned as a significant stage in the brexit negotiations. the irish prime minister leo varadkar has said time is running out to conclude an acceptable agreement on withdrawal before october. but the attention of many other leaders appears to be on the problem of migration. here's our correspondents james reynolds in rome, jenny hill in berling and bethany bell in vienna on the italian, german and austrian positions coming in to the summit. italy's got two main
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aims at the summit. the first is to get the rest of the eu to agree to share out migrants more equally to take the pressure off frontline states like italy. but this idea is likely to meet resistance from states in central and eastern europe. and italy's second main aim is to get support for its plan to stop migration the mediterranean altogether. it plans to do this by helping to build migration holding centres on the external borders of libya. there are a number of questions about this but italy's interior minister, matteo salvini, has told the bbc he doesn't expect any objections from europe. we'll see. my colleaguejenny hill is in berlin. might not think that angela merkel, renowned for her liberal values, has much in common with the new italian government. but right now their
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interests are aligned. she's already indicated support for migrant detention centres, she's always wanted eu migrant quotas and you can expect proposals to strengthen the eu's borders, more guards and stricter proposals and so on. mrs merkel is under significant domestic pressure to toughen her own asylum policy. she needs to come back from this summit with a europewide strategy if she's to see off mag and internal rebellion that could bring down her own government. mrs merkel needs to deliver in three days what she's been trying to achieve for three years. now to vienna and my colleague, bethany bell. austria's government, a coalition of the conservatives and the far right, says the migrant crisis of 2015 mustn't happen again. austria's leader, sebastian kurz of the conservatives, says he is making the fight against illegal migration one of the priorities for austria's
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upcoming eu presidency and he's taking a tough line. he wants to shift the focus from relocating asylum seekers inside the eu to strengthening the eu's outer borders. he wants to set up asylum centres outside the eu and to give the eu's border agency a tougher mandate. during the migrant crisis of 2015 and 16, austria took in about i% of its population. but these days asylum applications have dropped dramatically. 0ur europe correspondent, damian grammaticas is in brussels for us. the summit will be taking place there. theresa may has an opportunity to brief other eu leaders on the work that the uk is doing to brexit. there are big
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differences of opinion on how much progress the uk has actually made. there are. big differences between the eu 27 on one side and the uk on the eu 27 on one side and the uk on the other. the eu are saying the key issues that have to be addressed now are holding things up around the border issue with ireland, what sort of future does the uk really want? the eu says it needs a clear position from the uk put on the table so eu leaders this evening will be waiting to hear from theresa may about the next step, how she's putting those positions together and then they will debate in the morning their own response to the current situation. with me isjennifer rankin from the guardian. 0n the
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brexit issue, we know that this summit was meant to be where major progress was going to be made. it has not been. what message is the eu going to send to the uk from this summit? i think there will be a clear message to speed up work on northern ireland, that they will express disappointment that the uk hasn't done more. there were big expectations this summit was going to resolve the issue and it hasn't and now eu leaders will ask the uk to speed up but to get more realistic about their hopes for the future trading relationship which the eu sees is not grounded in any realistic basis of what they can expect. there's going to be something about a warning and that the eu should do more to dealfor no deal. is that a genuine morning?”
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think that is a serious warning. the eu is stepping up their preparations foran eu is stepping up their preparations for an ordeal brexit. they still see a deal as the most likely outcome but the senses that the no deal possibility has gone up in recent weeks and they are stepping up on their own preparations on that front and asking the uk to get front about setting up plans for the future relationship. at the heart of the problem is the irish border. exactly because the eu have come up with the backstop that northern ireland would stay in the eu customs union with elements of single market rules and theresa may said we cannot accept that because it would create a border dividing great britain from northern ireland but well she has been working out how the tenet of ideas, the eu has become impatient
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—— working ideas, the eu has become impatient — — working out ideas, the eu has become impatient —— working out her own ideas, the eu has become impatient. the eu's attention has been turning to other issues like migration which is actually going to consume the leaders' time here much more. only going to be able to leave this summit...? official going to be able to leave this summit. . . ? official sources will always say it is good to talk and that eu leaders don't have enough opportunity to hear their own different positions and it has an impact, getting 28 leaders together ina room impact, getting 28 leaders together in a room to see the others' point of view but i don't think we will see a big step forward on the fundamental issue of how you share refugees throughout the european union. there might be progress on bilateral deals between countries, greece has indicated his dreaded to help germany —— greece has indicated it is ready to help germany with refugees travelling north, so they the movement along the way —— there
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could be movement along the way. the next question is where does that leave theresa may domestically? apologies for the lack of sound just as damien was finishing. let's get the thoughts of our assistant polticial editor, norman smith who is in westminsterfor us. plenty of people in the rest of europe telling theresa may what she ought to be doing, people doing the same thing at home including her former adviser nick timothy. how is she going to emerge from all of this and accept her leadership? it's clear that within downing street, theresa may will give a briefing on where she thinks the whole process
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has got to over coffee and biscuits this evening but that is not going to be any significant moves, no significant new proposals, no change in language, no new tone or anything like that. that is because basically from a british perspective, everything is now on hold until theresa may manages to hammer out some sort of agreement within her cabinet about exactly what it is that the british government is going to ask for in terms of our future trade relationships and at the moment the whole process is gridlocked by this rest over what sort of deal we want between those brexiteers in the cabinet who think priority must be given to enabling britain to cut free from britain to strike out on trade deals on those who think we should stay as close as possible to the customs union and single market to ensure frictionless trade for british business and that sort of gulf has to be bridged and
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theresa may's hope is to try and do that at a meeting at all her cabinet, but they will have to be something in the air at chequers because the divide between the two sides seems pretty immense at the moment. one of the first firefighters to enter the flat where the grenfell tower fire began has told the public inquiry today that he had not been trained in how to deal with a fire outside a high rise block. charles batterbee said he had not expected that fire could jump between windows. let's go live now to our correspondent frankie mccamley, who's at the inquiry. tell us more about what mr bateau bay has been saying. battery is a firefighter for london fire brigade and hejoined in 2010 but in the last few moments it has been emotionalfor him. they
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but in the last few moments it has been emotional for him. they showed the footage of when the firefighters went in and we are taking a break to let mr batterby compose himself because he got quite upset. this morning, we began by hearing about his training and what he had been trained in regards to and specifically in kensington and chelsea because there are a lot of high—rise blocks. mr batterby said they had specific training when it came to high—rise blocks and he also delivered training himself but when questioned as to whether they had training on an external fire questioned as to whether they had training on an externalfire in a tower block, he said he hadn't had any training. subsequently he hadn't delivered any of that training. he said they did noticed that when it came to fires and tower blocks, if i could jump from one floor to another which had happened in previous cases
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—— afire which had happened in previous cases —— a fire could jump from one floor to another. at grenfell in 2016, he looked at the renovations being carried out, the lists, the sta i rwells, carried out, the lists, the stairwells, access to the building as you notice access to the building was limited. he was then asked about the features being added, for example, the exterior panels and this is what mr batterby had to say about that. the building construction features, as for rapid or abnormal fire spread, nothing beyond my common knowledge and expectation that a firejumps knowledge and expectation that a fire jumps through windows. what about sandwich panels? never in1 million years would we have dreamt that there would be those panels involved in a residential high—rise building. what was taught to me in
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my experience with sandwich panels is they are generally found in places like big shops, diy shops and commercial premises like factories soi commercial premises like factories so i would never have imagined that anything like that would be on a residential building. mr batterby speaking in the inquiry about an hour ago. in the last 20 minutes the inquiry has shifted to that day of the fire, the night of the fire were batterby was one of the fire were batterby was one of the first respondents, one of the first two firefighters to make their way to flat 16 where the fire started on the fourth floor. they tried to access the list and it didn't work and they were unable to ta ke didn't work and they were unable to take control of it and if they had gone up in that, they could have been devastating consequences and could have been deadly for the firefighters because anyone could have taken control of that lift.
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this afternoon, his colleague daniel brown, the other firefighter first on the scene, will be speaking to the inquiry. frankie, thank you very much. we will bring you the latest weather forecast in a moment. the heatwave is set to continue as temperatures are predicted to soar into the weekend. the met office has warned that temperatures were still rising, meaning more records could be broken within the next 24 hours. scotland is set for another day of blazing heat and could reach temperatures last seen in 1893. 0ur correspondent katie hunter is at the glasgow botanic gardens for us now. how is everyone coping? i've got celtic skin and it doesn't go well with all the sunshine! everyone is
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coping remarkably well. it's already a beautiful day here in glasgow. about 26 celsius. here at the botanic gardens, it isn't too busy but there are a few early sun—worshippers out and about. yesterday, scotland had its warmest june day for 33 years, it was 31 celsius in aviemore in the highlands and forecasters think we could have the warmest june day and forecasters think we could have the warmestjune day on record today. the margaret have to hit 32.2 celsius for that to happen, which last happened in 1893. people are just enjoying the unusually warm weather here in glasgow. thank you, katie, it looks very peaceful. now it's time for a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to simon king. northern ireland are also breaking records, 30.8 celsius today. that
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could be the hottest day on record, not just could be the hottest day on record, notjust in could be the hottest day on record, not just in june, but could be the hottest day on record, notjust injune, but the whole year. keep nigh on those temperatures. lots of sunshine out there already. temperatures already 27-28dc at 11am there already. temperatures already 27—28dc at 11am so they will go higher. a bit of cloud towards the south—east of england. 0n the coast, yellow, a bit fresher along the north sea coast, about 22—23. in the west of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, the temperatures in the high 20s, low 30s. through tonight, just like we've seen over the last few nights, lots of cloud moving its way further inland, bringing asa moving its way further inland, bringing as a misty and murky start on friday morning. away from that, sunshine from dawn until dusk. right throughout the day tomorrow. temperatures a game for many getting into the high 20s. bye—bye. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines. soldiers arrive in greater manchester to help tackle the huge moorland fire. officials say it could last for weeks. the german chancellor warns that migration could become a defining moment for the european union ahead a summit of eu leaders this afternoon. 0n the final day of his tour of the middle east, prince william pays his respects at the tomb in jerusalem of his great—grandmother. hotel booking sites should review the way they rank and display accommodation, the competition watchdog warns. sport now. here's sarah mulkerrins. good morning.
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germany are on their way home from russia. this morning, the team and their fans are coming to terms with the fact that the defending champions are out of the world cup. their earliest exit in 80 years after they lost 2—0 to south korea yesterday. remarkably, they conceded twice in injury time, as they pressed for a goal that would have sent them through. kim young gwon scored the first for south korea. the goal eventually confirmed by var. then goal keeper manuel neur in open play was caught up. look where he was. we know what happens. son heung—min tapped in. delight for south korea, even though they were out. with germany losing it means sweden are through as group f winners,
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after their 3—0 win against mexico, who are also through as runners up. and despite mexico losing that game, this was inside the stadium. both sets of fans joining together to celebrate knocking out the reigning champions. and outside the stadium these mexican fans found a south korean journalist to lift up high. south korea going home, but still heroes for many. well for more on this, let's cross to berlin and our correspondentjenny hill. jenny, it must feel rather surreal there today. if we were all in shock at this exit, it must be so much more heightened there. yes, i can't tell you have devastated the german fans are, and humiliated too, to crash out so early in the tournament. you've seen the black, red and gold face paint strea ked the black, red and gold face paint streaked with tears as it finally sank in, but most people here who've been following the tournament from the beginning aren't really
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surprised. germany has not played well. when you have got the manager of the national team admitting, as he has, germany simply didn't deserve to win, let alone last night, you know things have come to a pretty extraordinary pass, and naturally, of course, the postmortems have begun. some are wondering whether germany has been resting on its very victorious laurels for too long. 0ne newspaper headline this morning simply said complacency dominated and that's what has gone wrong. a former player mattias, wrote this morning that the tea m mattias, wrote this morning that the team is not united, didn't have passion and they were complacent. another player who has given interview since the human ageing defeat said he felt what went wrong was the fact the team simply were not having fun when they were having fun so more analysis to go, of course, but the general sense here is germany kind of got what it deserved. jenny hill, in berlin,
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thank you very much forjoining us. is it better for england to lose to belgium later? it's the question so many fans are asking. but what are the managers and players thinking, i wonder? both england and belgium are already through to the last 16, the only thing left to decide is who wins the group later in kaliningrad. lots saying it would be better to go through as group runners up. england would then face the winner of group h eitherjapan, senegal or columbia and a possibly quarter final with sweden or switzerland. but if england beat belgium it could set up a possible quarterfinal with brazil but they would need to get there first. and we've seen what's happened to other big teams in this tournament so far. surely it's about a good performance. and that's certainly the view of the belgium camp. their english born assistant coach graemejones says it's about winning football matches. germany have just gone out so to finish first maybe that side of the draw isn't as strong as it could've
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been. but ijust think in any preparation, any kind of momentum, you've got to win football matches at any level of football, so that's what we will try to do. well, before england kick off we will know who they'll possibly face in the last 16, because the final games in group h kick off at 3pm. japan take on poland and senegal will face colombia. 0ur reporterjohn bennett is samara ahead for that senegal game. this group is tight in terms of permutations, john. yes, this was always going to be the toughest group to call and it proved toughest group to call and it proved to be the case as well. we know poland are out, japan and senegal area point poland are out, japan and senegal are a point away from their games to go through but from an england perspective you would want to avoid colombia because we saw how they dismantled poland on sunday by 3—0. they have rodriguez in amazing form, seven world cup matches, scored six,
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and have four assists. colombia need and have four assists. colombia need a victory to guarantee their place in the last 16. don't write off senegal. main up front. he did well against japan. very hot senegal. main up front. he did well againstjapan. very hot here. this is where england could end up in the quarterfinals if they finish second in the group and win their last 16 game. fans are arriving as we speak, sarah. thank you very much. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. all week we're reflecting on different aspects of the nhs as it approaches its 70th birthday. today we're focusing on how technology could change how the nhs operates. it takes about ten years to train a gp but the creators of a new artificial intelligence chatbot say
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the algorithm they have created is more effective than a medic‘s expertise when it comes to diagnosing patients. their claims have been dismissed by british doctors who say an app can never replace a human. jen copesta ke reports. the claims were sensational. babylon's ceo, ali parsa, told an audience at the royal college of physicians that his artificially intelligence software is now able to diagnose medical conditions better than a human gp. do you feel like the room is spinning, or are you feeling faint? the chatbot—based ai was shown as an integration with amazon's alexa platform. babylon's existing gp at hand service, available through the nhs, refers users to a human doctor for video call and diagnosis, but this new chatbot can provide its own opinions and offers a percentage—based estimate of eacho one being correct. of each one being correct. i think i might know what's causing your symptoms. babylon says its software scored an average of 81% in a clinical knowledge test, similar to those taken by doctors in theirfinal exams.
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that compares to an average mark for a human doctor, which babylon calculated to be 72%. but the issue of how the chatbot was tested and what questions were used was strongly challenged by the royal college of gps. they also say its services are already siphoning money away from nhs practices that need it. we've had some concerns about gp at hand for some time, and it's not necessarily about the technology. it's about the impact that gp at hand has on the health service, which is under enormous pressure, at the moment. the pressure facing the nhs, and health services around the world, was behind ba bylon's development of these services. the data feeding babylon's artificial intelligence doesn't just come from the uk. they are partnered as well with the government in rwanda, where they have two million registered users. tens of thousands of consultations have been providing data back into babylon's uk system since 2016. in rwanda, nurses act as a go—between the ai and people
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who call up the service. the depth of the chatbot‘s knowledge has been a big surprise, here. does the chatbot come up with some questions that you hadn't thought of? yes, sometimes. oh, really? how does that make you feel... it makes me feel more professional. back in the uk, this new diagnostic artificial intelligence may take some time to integrate into the nhs, but it is an area that is actively being explored by all sides. the innovators in the nhs are true heroes, who work incredibly hard to advance our model of delivery. we're always delighted to partner with them. jen copestake, bbc news. with me now is sophie castle—clarke, senior fellow at the nuffield trust. and the lead author of this report produced for the bbc, what will new technology mean for the nhs and its patients? thank you forjoining us
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to a nswer patients? thank you forjoining us to answer some questions from our viewers. let's begin by you giving us an viewers. let's begin by you giving us an overview of what is in this report. so we looked at four key trends we can see now influencing health care and we tried to ask questions about what they might mean for the nhs and the patients, so we looked at position medicine, remote care, technology enabled self—care, and data and artificial intelligence and data and artificial intelligence and what we found was this lots of really, really exciting innovations and things happening at the moment that could really transform how health care is delivered and how patients experience care but actually, in many areas, there are significant barriers to implement a nation and we're not quite there yet and things being mainstream. i think one of the things we have picked up one of the things we have picked up on is that this is not necessarily the short—term saviour that politicians think it will be. ok,
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let's get to those questions. the first one by text message from mark who asks a very good question, i'm not going to call it simple because the implications are huge, but simply put, will robots replace doctors? it's a good question. i think definitely not as the answer, at least in the short to medium term. really, this is about using technology to be able to enhance what doctors can do and for them to be able to make accurate decisions at the point of care, so when you think about the chances big data and ai offers, you can crunch through big data sets to look at treatment outcomes, and various interventions and help doctors make the right decision at the right time, for particular patient‘s. it's not about replacing a doctor with a robot. we've been talking about the story today about the chat bot. of course,
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ba bylon today about the chat bot. of course, ba bylo n has today about the chat bot. of course, babylon has caused quite a lot of interest by saying their algorithm is more effective than a doctor. i think the thing about that is ensuring it is governed appropriately and we don't really know how ai appropriately and we don't really know how a! can be appropriately governed at the moment given that it can adaptand governed at the moment given that it can adapt and evolve that this is really, health care is a people business, so it's absolutely not about replacing doctors with robots. the next question from geraldine on twitter leads on from that. she asks, will a! diagnosis become the norm rather than 111? that's a good question. there's already an algorithm to direct patients to the right care. they are static at the moment, they don't learn and change and they are programmed to act in a certain way. there is potentialfor
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ai certain way. there is potentialfor alto certain way. there is potentialfor al to build on those algorithms and make them more effective, make sure patients are going to the right place at the right time more frequently but, at the moment, the thing with al is making sure it can be governed and regulated appropriately and we're just not quite there yet, so, yes, we could draw on al in the future but we're not quite there yet. we wonder how people would really engage in that sort of consultation potentially. yes, people already use online111 and the telephone. there is evidence to suggest people are less likely to follow that advice practically where it's about self—care, rather than about going to see a doctor. that brings onto the next question and you mentioned earlier about one of the areas looked at in this report are being technology enabled self—care. we've had a question on twitter. i carry out daily checks at
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home, so will not also become the norm? i think it would be great if we could use remote monitoring more effectively in the nhs. it can have affective outcomes for some patients, said people with heart failure for example, making sure that their heart is constantly monitored, allowing professionals to intervene if they go into dangerous ranges. so i think we will start to use it more frequently and i think it's just a use it more frequently and i think it'sjust a question use it more frequently and i think it's just a question of how we can resource that, how we can bring that more effectively into the nhs. sophie, very good to have your expertise. thank you for coming along to answer those questions and thank you for sending them in, as well. the duke of cambridge is concluding his tour of the middle east today with a visit to historical and religious sites in eastjerusalem. yesterday, he met palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, in the first official british royal visit to the occupied west bank. yolande knell is in ramallah.
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i've moved to the old city of jerusalem and you can set behind me and this is where prince william started the last day of his historic visit to the middle east, getting this of the old city, before he went down to go to go to the different regicide is, so he went to the temple mount, inside the golden domed rockjust temple mount, inside the golden domed rock just there temple mount, inside the golden domed rockjust there and we were told it the first time actually a british royal had gone to that holy site and then he went to the western wall which lies adjacent, and he put a prayer note of air into the wall himself, accompanied by britain's chief rabbi and also the chief of the site, and also went to the church of the holy sepulchre where christians believe jesus church of the holy sepulchre where christians believejesus was crucified and then buried. there was
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a personal moment for prince william also hear on the mount of olives, because this is where his own great—grandmother, the mother of princeton, is buried in a tomb in the church of mary magdalene —— prince philip. he was able to lay some flowers there, as well. tell us more on this final day of the trip about how it has been viewed. 0bviously about how it has been viewed. obviously it is one in which the princess had to be incredibly diplomatic, naturally does not get involved in making political state m e nts involved in making political statements that might offend anyone, but how has this visit gone down on both sides in this region? well, i think it has been very welcomed on an official level on the israeli and palestinian side. he came here on the invitation of both governments, but it was also going to be always extremely sensitive for him and he's come at a sensitive time, even
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visiting these holy sites, the old city ofjerusalem is considered to be part of the occupied palestinian territories, that's what was written in his official schedule, that's how the british foreign office officials describe it, but there were israeli politicians who took offence at that because of course israel in 1967 in a middle east war capture the eastern part of the city and later annexed it in a move which is not internationally recognised, and the israelis see all ofjerusalem as being their eternal and undivided capital but the palestinians think it's their future capital, so the prince was tiptoeing around these kinds of issues but i think palace officials will be very pleased with the way it was received and you can see there was lots of coverage too of how the prince is notjust meeting people at the political level but also meeting ordinary israelis and palestinians, young people, getting a different taste of life from what many visiting ministers for example would usually get. thank you very much.
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in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. firefighters who have worked for four days to tackle wildfires on moorland near manchester have beenjoined by a hundred soldiers. the german chancellor warns that migration could become a defining moment for the european union ahead a summit of eu leaders this afternoon. 0n the final day of his tour of the middle east, prince william pays his respects at the tomb in jerusalem of his great—grandmother. hello, i have the latest business news for you this our. last month the transport company stagecoach was stripped of its east coast main line franchise. today it confirmed the cost of the failure — £85.6 million
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and said it was "disappointed" but added, it had "learned lessons". shares in uk beer and pubs group greene king fell 11 % after it said its pubs were facing "unprecedented" cost rises which had resulted in a slump in profits. revenues, the value of all its sales fell 1.8% to £2.2 billion. chief executive rooney anand said bad weather early in the year, weak consumer confidence and tougher competition had made the situation worse. jcb is investing more than £50 million in a new plant which will create more than 200 jobs by 2022. the construction equipment giant is building the new factory adjacent to the a50 in uttoxeter in staffordshire, next to two existing jcb plants. it will build cabs to go on its machines and will be able to produce 100,000 cabs a year, double its current production. the uk is facing an ongoing c02 shortage which is hitting the food
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and drinks industry and all businesses that rely on it. britain's biggest pub group says some outlets are running out of certain beer brands. some wetherspoon pubs are temporarily without draught john smith's and strongbow cider. unfortunate timing considering tonight's football. but britain 5 meat and poultry trade groups are also being badly hit and are calling for their sector to be prioritised when gas production is running back to normal. c02 is used to stun animals before slaughter and in packaging to extend the shelf—life of meat. joining us now is nick allen, chief executive of the british meat processors association. how big a problem is this for the industry? a huge problem for some i don't think anyone realised how dependent we were on c02 until this crisis emerged. as you mentioned,
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there's two things we use them for, stunning of pig and poultry before slaughter and secondly in a modified atmosphere packaging to preserve the sheu atmosphere packaging to preserve the shelf life of meat. what we use it for in the natural process is to extend the shelf life. there's two things we are worried about, oxidation, which causes brown the meat, so we take air out and increase the level of oxygen in there, but to control the microbial activity, we use c02 and that is a food safety issue and so whether it's with george meet, a combination of nitrogen and c02 sebastian vettel fresh meat it's essential to preserve the meat. presumably the hot weather is making the situation worse? not helping at all. not only
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does increase the amount of beer we are drinking but also a barbecue season so the hot weather, we are using the chill is more which uses c02, as well, and preserving the sheu c02, as well, and preserving the shelf life in hot weather is more of a challenge. with regard to the lack of information you are getting, with regard to future supplies, are you thinking weeks or months until things go back to normal? the information we are getting is we admit weeks rather than months here, but it's been frustrating through this crisis that, whilst the first stage suppliers of c02 have been very good, the actual producers of it, the communication and information coming from the production side has been extremely limited and it makes it very difficult to plan if you don't know
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what's going to happen. at the moment, we are being told and assured this problem will be killed in the next couple of weeks but we don't know how quickly that's going to be jawed and knowing where the end point is and what's coming downstrea m end point is and what's coming downstream is absolutely critical to planning what people do to their production systems. if supplies don't pick up soon, what will mean businesses out there? well, if it does not improve over the next couple of weeks, there will be a challenge on the slaughtering side and we have to cut back the amount of animals taken on farms and farmers already are putting in contingency plans in case that happens to avoid welfare issues. but also, it will mean that people will have to shorten the shelf life of meat and just use their rather than modified packaging. that creates a logistical problem because that has
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do get to the retailers quicker and it creates transport problems. logistically and cost wise, it could have huge implications if it does not solve itself in the next couple of weeks. ok, nick, many thanks. the uk's top share index is falling on thursday as shares in banks and commodities—related stocks drop amid lingering concerns over global trade, with more defensive plays in demand ahead of a key eu summit later today. it all means the ftse is on track for a small loss forjune. pharma firm shire is among the biggest ftse gainers, up at a one—month high. among smaller companies, stocks exposed to the uk consumerare on the back foot so shares in greene king and stagecoach both down today. that's all the business news. thanks very much. the latest pictures of coming to us of the raf helicopter which is bolstering the
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effo rts helicopter which is bolstering the efforts by firefighters to put out those fires on saddleworth moor. dipping into the reservoir, scooping up dipping into the reservoir, scooping up water to try to douse the flames and smoke. time now for a look at the weather. the weather not helping the situation there on saddleworth moor but lots of sunshine, dry conditions lasting well into next week as well. lots of sunshine at the moment. we have got the green map, cloudy skies. some mist and murk around southern and eastern areas but that is now clearing away. the rest of this afternoon, this is the scene in terms of blue skies. it mayjust be a little bit cloudy and misty around those eastern coasts once again. but that localised for most of us. the heat will build. and it could well
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bea heat will build. and it could well be a record—breaking day in terms of temperatures because for northern ireland you just have to get above 30.8 celsius for it to be the hottest day ever recorded there, and thatis hottest day ever recorded there, and that is a possibility today. for scotland, temperatures, 31, perhaps 32 celsius. we will keep a close eye on that one. elsewhere, those temperatures into the mid to high 20s. always a bit fresher on the eastern coasts and through tonight, this will move its way back inland so on friday morning along central and eastern areas, like the last few mornings, you will notice the mistiness and cloud first thing but again, like the last few mornings, that will burn away quickly and lots of sunshine developing. the heat building during friday. it will be a bit cooler on the eastern coast. look at the yellows there. further west, the heat builds up. temperatures perhaps not quite as high in western scotland and
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northern ireland compared to today. still, those temperatures in the mid—to high 20s. 0nto the weekend, high pressure keeping things very settled at the moment. it drifts into scandinavia and means we will have a sunny day on saturday. barely a cloud in the sky. it willjust be less hot across scotland and northern ireland for the temperatures coming down the touch. further south, temperatures into the mid—to high 20s. going into the weekend, the outlook is a few showers drifting across south—western areas of the uk but for most of it into the weekend and next week, it stays dry. the low 20s in the north for the mid—to high 20s in the north for the mid—to high 20s in the south. bye—bye. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at midday: firefighters who have worked for four days to tackle wildfires on moorland near manchester have beenjoined by 100 soldiers as flames turn towards residential areas. the german chancellor warns that
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migration could become a defining moment for the european union — ahead a summit of eu leaders this afternoon. england expects — the three lions face belgium tonight in theirfinal group game of the world cup. room for improvement for hotel booking sites. the competition watchdog warns some sites should review the way they rank and display accommodation. scotland continues to sizzle, with forecasters predicting record levels forjune. good afternoon.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. the armed forces have been deployed to help firefighters who are battling to contain a vast fire sweeping across moors near saddleworth in greater manchester. around 100 soldiers from the royal regiment of scotland were sent overnight tojoin firefighters. a news conference is beginning to give the latest update on efforts to put out the fires. if i can bring you up to speed with where we are this morning, as you will be aware, this morning, as you will be aware, this incident has been going on for some three days now. we have over 100 firefighters in operation. we now have 60 army personnel. we are
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fighting the incident from six locations, utilising a number of resources including four by four vehicles, specialists, firefighting equipment and basically people on foot putting the fire out with a beater. they have had a significant effects since yesterday. this includes who were fighting the fire yesterday for 12 hours at the same cruise that are fighting it today —— are the same crews. we're very pleased to have the army supporting us. pleased to have the army supporting us. they're working on those locations supported by helicopters that are dropping equipment and water were required —— where it is required. we put a lot of effort in yesterday afternoon because if you are not aware, we cannot firefighters during the night because it is so dangerous
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underfoot. the health and safety of our firefighters and staff is important so we withdraw to some degree are firefighters during the night then we start again as soon as first light and that was at 4:15am this morning. we had a significant effect yesterday and we are building on that advance today. it doesn't look as bad as yesterday. would you say that is a fair assessment? that isa thin say that is a fair assessment? that is a thin assessment, we have made significant improvement. i would put an error of caution that we had a similar occasion yesterday where we thought we were on top of it and it flared up. the wind is swirling around. we were positive about the wind direction from the east towards manchester and therefore the amount of fuel available was limited. if it does change direction, there is
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potential for it to have access to square miles of additional field. we're very grateful to the for bringing in nigel morgan and his colleagues here. they're making a very significant difference to the issues here which is the capacity and that will help enormously. i'm going up to the top in a minute to see some of the team up there. this isa see some of the team up there. this is a major incident and it could go on for a very significant period of time but trying to get on top of it now is essential to have this capacity. the other issue is the joint working, because as well as capacity it is coordination that makes the difference and we have seen that with the local authority, the fire service including lancashire fire service, now the military and also the voluntary support we are getting from the salvation army, the ambulance service, it is a major logistical coordination exercise but at the moment it is being handled extremely
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well through the command structure andl well through the command structure and i am so impressed with the spirit out there, talking to people, the people working together really well and really up getting on top of. i would appreciate —— well and really up getting on top of. iwould appreciate —— i appreciate your presence here, major morgan, particularly. the army meet every challenge as met and we commit 100% of what we do. right now we have 100 people tasked to do this mission in support of manchester fire and rescue service. we are currently bringing our boys down and beating the fire with paddles and we are supporting them by moving equipment and putting water on the fire and doing everything to stop this fire. it looks at the moment like we will be here for another 48 hours until saturday evening and then we will wait for another
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authority request going through and if that is the case, we will continue until our commander says otherwise. we are truly really happy and excited to be here, the boys are cherishing every moment. the word rain is an understatement, it needs are very, very significant downpour to make a difference. the reason you can see it burning behind us is because over the course of the fire, it goes further and further down into the peat and once it is down there, it is very difficult to get in and underto there, it is very difficult to get in and under to put the fire out, and we obviously can't stick square miles of them are lined up —— square miles of them are lined up —— square miles of the moors up. it provides a safety net for the
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public of greater manchester. well they are stopping the fire from spreading, they are leaving our firefighters were able to respond to other incidents, otherwise we would have fire stations without engines saw a big thank you for that as well. we're not using h and it -- we are not using a chinook at the moment because you don't know how firefighting is going to react and we saw the flared up yesterday, so we saw the flared up yesterday, so we have the chinook on standby ready to move the high—volume pump and this morning, we recognised that we didn't need it there and then. that's not to say there is the potential for it to flared up again. smoke seems to be flaring up every now and then. presumably this means
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that the fire is still spreading. the plumes of smoke you see are actually in the depth of the fire, saw around the middle of the fire, with it is embedded in the peat and is taking time to come up. we have firefighters and other soldiers stopping it from spreading. the main action is to stop it from spreading towards the residents. we have to stop it spreading into the on—board material. is it possible you may still have to close the moors? yes, thatis still have to close the moors? yes, that is possible. we have tactical advisers who are specialists trained wales firefighters —— wild fire fighters. we are led by the experience and judgment and tactics
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and we're going with them at the moment. what are you doing to look after residents? to pick up on the point about the air quality, those of you who were there yesterday will see that it feels a lot lighter. there's a lot less smoke in the air. there's a lot less smoke in the air. the analysis we are doing confirms that the air quality is improving. we will continue to have a really robust programme of monitoring air quality across the region, working with fire and rescue. are you handing out masks still? we are not. we have masks available if required but generally it is not required and the sciences confirming that. you are expected to be rising numbers of people going to their gps over the next few days and weeks as the
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effects work their way in?” next few days and weeks as the effects work their way in? i think thatis effects work their way in? i think that is an important role for us and we are monitoring that. we work with the local health partners and public health in england. at the moment there aren't an increased number of attendances at doctors and a&e but if that happens, we are well briefed into how to support those communities. how widespread is a potential problem? communities. how widespread is a potential problem ? there communities. how widespread is a potential problem? there were reports from manchester city centre yesterday. we're working with a command structure at greater manchester so we're covering all of the manchester area. the footprint we are planning for and reassuring on isa we are planning for and reassuring on is a very large footprint. is it fairto on is a very large footprint. is it fair to say it is contained but not yet under control? i would say it is contained and under control given
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the current situation with the wind direction and the weather, the heat etc. things can develop, especially u nfortu nately etc. things can develop, especially unfortunately giving that window we have every night when we can't fight the fire. under what circumstances would you decide to close the moors? that would be on the guidance of specialist personnel with that knowledge from a fire and rescue point of view as long as the public aren't interviewing and causing, through honest mistakes, further incidents them at this moment there is no reason to close it, especially during this lovely weather at such a lovely location. to define generally entering like this that there are problems when people are having open barbecues and off—road biking and that kind of thing that can cause potential problems and create
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sparks? we have this every year. we have had a substantial amount of warm weather so that increase in risk is there but we work with partners across local authorities and other agencies to raise awareness of that and i believe that is continuing as we speak. will be an investigation to work out how this happened? there will be. in terms of the size of the incident and narrowing it down to it it was ignited is a challenge, as you can imagine. how easy or difficult will it be to establish how it started? are you confident you can do that? i'm not confident in that at all. considering how much has been involved and then people's footfall and vehicles over the ground, there has been mention of things like off—road bikes and barbecues but at the moment we have no evidence to suggest it is any of those. you have
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60 soldiers working alongside the firefighters. will there be a further update today? there will be. thank you very much. we will update you later. studio: that was assistant chief tony hunter of the manchester fire and rescue service amongst others giving an update on the efforts to put out that fire and various pockets of fire on saddleworth mirror in greater manchester —— saddleworth moor. continuing for four days. he said the same crews who worked 13 hours yesterday are working today and he said he was very pleased to have the help of the
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army who have drafted in 100 soldiers to help. we also saw an idf helicopter skipping up water out of the reservoir to try to dallas claims and areas —— try to douse fla mes claims and areas —— try to douse flames —— and r a f raf helicopter. they cannot work through the hours of darkness because it is dangerous underfoot, there may be flames in the peat and the wind direction is also a big factor in fully containing and putting out the pockets of fire. it would require a significant downpour to put it down but nothing like that in the
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forecast so that is the latest in the efforts to deal with the fire on saddleworth moor. the headlines on bbc news: firefighters who have worked for four days to tackle wildfires on moorland near manchester have beenjoined by a hundred soldiers. the german chancellor warns that migration could become a defining moment for the european union ahead a summit of eu leaders this afternoon. england expects — the three lions face belgium tonight in theirfinal group game of the world cup. good afternoon. it's been the biggest shock of the world cup so far. defending champions germany are on their way home from russia after they lost 2—0 to south korea yesterday. and remarkably, they conceded twice in injury time, as they pressed for a goal that would have sent them through but that result
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is their earliest exit in 80 years. and that result means sweden are through as group f winners, after their 3—0 win against mexico, who are also through as runners up. and despite mexico losing their game, these were the scenes inside the stadium. both sets of fans joining together to celebrate knocking out the reigning champions. and outside the stadium some mexican fans found a south korean journalist to celebrate with. south korea going home, but still heroes for many. this evening, england are back in action but is it better for england to lose to belgium later? it's the question so many fans are asking. both england and belgium are already through to the last 16, the only thing left to decide is who wins the group later in kaliningrad. but i wonder what are the managers and players thinking? this is why.
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lots saying it would be better to go through as group runners up. england would then face the winner of group h, eitherjapan, senegal or columbia and a possible quarterfinal with sweden or switzerland. but if england beat belgium it could set up a possible quarterfinal with brazil but they would need to get there first. and we've seen what's happened to other big teams in this tournament so far so surely it's got to be all about a good performance. england probably have as much if not more momentum. the way they have played has been very refreshing. now they just have to played has been very refreshing. now theyjust have to win another game andi theyjust have to win another game and i think it increases the fear factor to whoever they get in the next round. they just factor to whoever they get in the next round. theyjust have two win so just forget about planning. just keep winning your games. before england play,
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group h has to be decided and it will let us know who'll be up next in the last 16. three teams still in with a shout. group leaders japan, on four points, take on already elminated poland. senegal, second, also on four points take on colombia, who are third with three points. those games kick off at 3pm, and you can follow them across the bbc. that's all the sport for now. sarah mulkerrins will have the latest after half past one. theresa may will meet european leaders in brussels today, for a summit which had been planned as a significant stage in the brexit negotiations. but the summit is expected to be dominated by migration. our correspondent damian grammaticas is in brussels for us. you have going fractures in europe with how to deal with migration and
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the other fracture, , the relationship between the uk and the other 27. exactly right, the uk, brexit issue is actually being relegated here to a sort of minor side issue when this summit was originally going to be the time when the uk's exit from the eu was going to be largely decided and agreed. that's not the case because there are major issues still outstanding, issues relating to securing the withdrawal agreement, how to deal with the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, the eu saying at the minute, the uk's proposal is not good enough and are waiting to hear more, and the other issue that needs to go in the withdrawal agreement is an outline of the future relationship that will exist between these two sides. the eu say we haven't had enough from the uk, we
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need to hear more and they will be delivering quite a sharp message today to theresa may and they will be saying that the eu will be stepping up preparations for what to do in case no agreement is reached and no deal, a hard brexit has been called and all the consequences that would follow, so that sort of waving a stick, but meanwhile the eu's attention is diverted to migration and the political divisions within eu over that because those have come into sharp focus at the minute. let's get the thoughts of our assistant political editor, norman smith who is in westminsterfor us. hello, norman. theresa may is going there to be for other eu leaders, who are saying to her that the uk
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hasn't made enough progress, it's not doing what it means to do as bad as they are concerned quickly enough. she's got a lot of convincing to do that the uk is going to be ready within the time frame that has been agreed. in a way, the view in british government circles is that is not going to be any new initiatives or proposals on new language and that is because theresa may is basically waiting until she can get all her cabinet signed up to an agreed strategy on the sort of trade deal that we are looking for so the real action from the british point of view is not going to be today but next friday when cabinet ministers are being summoned to chequers to try and thrash out exactly what sort of deal the british government should be pushing for and there have been all sorts of cabinet tensions and disagreements over the package that british government should seek and i'm joined by sir british government should seek and i'mjoined by sirgraham british government should seek and i'mjoined by sir graham brady, chairman of the london committee of
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backbenchers. we have seen boris johnson suggesting one thing, other ministers are suggesting other things, that surely makes theresa may's task even harder.” things, that surely makes theresa may's task even harder. i think it does, it's not about one side of the debate on the other, it is about cabinet ministers arriving at a collective view, that should be done privately, not publicly. ithink collective view, that should be done privately, not publicly. i think my colleagues in parliament but also most of the british public are really very keen that we move ahead and continue to make progress and that the government presents a united front. that is good to strengthen the government's position in the negotiations and that clearly is in the national interest. if theresa may is unable to forge that cabinet unity, then presumably progress on brexit becomes pretty much impossible. the cabinet will meet next week for those discussions and the expectation is that an
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agreement will be reached. we have got to a really crucial point in this process. we had that great breakthrough last week of the enactment of the eu withdrawal bill. we have now repealed, therefore the european communities act, made a dramatic step forward. it is now essential that the government comes together, speaks with a single voice and has an agreed position behind theresa may to give her the strong negotiating position she needs. how confident are you that that will help, given the profound differences that seem to exist in the cabinet over the sort of trade deal we should seek and given the fact that we have had innumerable attempts to try and forge this consensus with working groups set up on —— and the brexit subcommittee trying to forge a deal? why would we be confident a deal will be reached ? a deal? why would we be confident a deal will be reached? sign —— battery whose party is coming
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together to make sure we made —— la st together to make sure we made —— last week we saw parties coming together to make sure we made progress on the eu withdrawal and now we expect ministers to come together in the same way. it is essential the government speaks with one voice. what happens if there is more delay? as time ran out —— has time ran out? we expect discipline, we expect ministers to recognise the obligation they are under to respect collective responsibility and we expect them to come together to ensure theresa may is in the strongest possible negotiating position to get the best future arrangements for britain and for the european union. at what happens if, come friday, we end up again with some linguistic compromise which by and large keeps everyonejust some linguistic compromise which by and large keeps everyone just about together but fails to give any real
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sense of clarity about what it is that britain is seeking?” sense of clarity about what it is that britain is seeking? i think that britain is seeking? i think that would be a mistake. it is clearly high time that the government's speak with a unified voice on that position and i expect it to happen next week. how seriously do you take the possibility that of clarity is not provided, it increases the prospect of no deal? a lack of clarity is unhelpful, it gives encouragement to those who want to damage the interests of our country. i don't think we should get overly excited about the likelihood of no deal. it is so obvious in the interests of the united kingdom and the eu 27 to have a good functioning free—trade arrangement in place when we leave the european union. we've already been told that canada would have a
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trade deal available with us so we should be serious in accepting that there are future arrangements already available, which would be better than having no deal. what we are working for now is the best possible future arrangements that will provide the smoothest trade, the most frictionless trading goods and that needs to be hammered out, too. thank you. i need her, it seems that the main action settlement from the british perspective is not going to be over dinner tonight but over next friday —— anita. to be over dinner tonight but over next friday -- anita. thank you, norman at westminster. hotel booking sites have been told to review how they rank and display rooms. the competition and market authority says it's concerned that a hotel's ranking may be influenced by the size of commission it pays. it is also examining whether sites are giving a false impression of room availability and "rushing" customers into booking decisions. i am joined in the studio by guy anker who is the deputy editor of moneysavingexpert.com. it has done its own investigation
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but first of all, how does this compare, a couple days ago we had similar story about people looking forflight prices similar story about people looking for flight prices and the prices that were being displayed were not ultimately what they were paying in total costs, so how does this compare? with flights, the additions are optional. here we are talking hotel site is not giving the price you will pay, because sometimes they exclude taxes and charges which will be charged if you take that particular route. we are very concerned about the way some booking sites, not all, display their fees. have some people booked a room somewhere at a particular price and turned up to pay and discover they have to pay much more or they have nowhere to stay? you've got two things going on. that might happen, it might be that you get there and
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there's a charge you don't know about. i experienced this myself at christmas, when an additional cost was asked for at the hotel that didn't know about, but it's also the first page you see on the booking site. it makes it the room is £100, to click through it, it's really 120, 130,, so you will eventually pay the right price but when you are doing comparisons it is not always clear. seven months ago, the composition markets authority urged these sites to be more transparent about what the charges are and clearly the line that not happening with every single site. your website did your own investigation, what else did you find? the main things we found were, we tried 55 different exa m ples of we found were, we tried 55 different examples of hotels around the world and have the time, the sites weren't giving the actual price upfront. i wouldn't say to people, don't use online comparisons because quite often it is the cheapest way, but
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click through to make sure you're getting the best price. how savvy are we as consumers about this now, the fact that what you're seeing might not be the ultimate price you end up paying and ultimately, do you think that some sites are going to have to really take a look at this because people will lose confidence and face in these sites? it's got to change. the cma have to act because we are often seem misleading prices. this is a cross—border issue, not just the uk. in terms of awareness, i'm not sure how or where people are just how different the price might be when you click through to you first see. it doesn't have the awareness of flights so it is good that we're doing this. hopefully that we're doing this. hopefully that awareness is. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. yes, we had some mist
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and low cloud this morning in central and eastern areas which has gone now and it's blue skies, hot, dry and sunny. temperatures 30 degrees in one or two places. we could create some records in northern ireland and scotland. widely the high 20s but cooler on the north sea coast. and easterly breeze increasing low cloud coming down through the north sea and it will spill its way inland overnight. and the midlands and the west country and more low cloud across the north and east of scotland so here where we are cloudy, the temperatures will be slow to rise but we should see a lot of cloud retreating back to coastal areas where it could linger in a few places but away from here, you can see plenty of sunshine. heat in the sunshine and the high temperatures to the west. not quite as warm in scotla nd to the west. not quite as warm in scotland and a noticeable change down east coast in particular. 30 degrees in ireland and wales and
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again, over the weekend, degrees in ireland and wales and again, overthe weekend, most degrees in ireland and wales and again, over the weekend, most places remaining dry, hot and sunny. the wind picks up on sunday and a chance of one or two showers in the south—west of england and wales and later in northern ireland. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. emergency services who have been working for four days to tackle wildfires on moorland near manchester have been joined by a hundred soldiers, as flames turn towards residential areas. the german chancellor angela merkel warns that migration could become a defining moment for the european union ahead a summit of eu leaders this afternoon. england prepare to face belgium tonight in their final group game of the world cup, as champions germany crash out in the group stage. on the final day of his tour of the middle east, prince william pays his respects at the tomb of his great—grandmother, who's buried in jerusalem. the uk's competition watchdog says hotel booking sites must review the way they rank and display rooms to avoid making misleading claims about discounts.
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it takes about a decade years to train a gp but the creators of a new artificial intelligence "chatbot" say the algorithm they have created is more effective than a medic‘s expertise when it comes to diagnosing patients. their claims have been dismissed by british doctors who say an app can never replace a human. jen copesta ke reports. the claims were sensational. babylon's ceo, ali parsa, told an audience at the royal college of physicians that his artificially intelligence software is now able to diagnose medical conditions better than a human gp. do you feel like the room is spinning, or are you feeling faint? the chatbot—based ai was shown as an integration with amazon's alexa platform. babylon's existing gp at hand service, available through the nhs, refers users to a human doctor for video call and diagnosis,
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but this new chatbot can provide its own opinions and offers a percentage—based estimate of eacho one being correct. of each one being correct. i think i might know what's causing your symptoms. babylon says its software scored an average of 81% in a clinical knowledge test, similar to those taken by doctors in theirfinal exams. that compares to an average mark for a human doctor, which babylon calculated to be 72%. but the issue of how the chatbot was tested and what questions were used was strongly challenged by the royal college of gps. they also say its services are already siphoning money away from nhs practices that need it. we've had some concerns about gp at hand for some time, and it's not necessarily about the technology. it's about the impact that gp at hand has on the health service, which is under enormous pressure, at the moment. the pressure facing the nhs, and health services around the world, was behind babylon's development of these services.
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the data feeding babylon's artificial intelligence doesn't just come from the uk. they are partnered as well with the government in rwanda, where they have two million registered users. tens of thousands of consultations have been providing data back into babylon's uk system since 2016. in rwanda, nurses act as a go—between the ai and people who call up the service. the depth of the chatbot‘s knowledge has been a big surprise, here. does the chatbot come up with some questions that you hadn't thought of? yes, sometimes. oh, really? how does that make you feel... it makes me feel more professional. back in the uk, this new diagnostic artificial intelligence may take some time to integrate into the nhs, but it is an area that is actively being explored by all sides. the innovators in the nhs are true heroes, who work incredibly hard to advance our model of delivery. we're always delighted to partner with them. jen copestake, bbc news.
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earlier i spoke to sophie castle—clarke, senior fellow at the nuffield trust, about the ways technology is evolving to meet the changing demands of the health service. so we looked at precision medicine, remote care, technology enabled self—care, and remote care, technology enabled self—ca re, and data remote care, technology enabled self—care, and data and artificial intelligence. what we found was this lots of really really exciting innovations and things happening at the moment that could transform how health care is delivered on how patients experience care, but actually, in many areas, there are significant barriers to implementation and in many cases we are not quite there yet with things being mainstream. ithink are not quite there yet with things being mainstream. i think one of the things we picked up on is that this is not necessarily the short—term
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saviour that politicians think it will be. lets get to those questions. the first one by text message from mark who asks a very good question, i'm not going to call it simple because the implications are huge. but simply put, will robots replace doctors? it's a good question. i think definitely not as the answer at least in the short to medium term. really, this is about using technology to be able to enhance what doctors can do and for them to be able to make accurate decisions at the point of care, so when you think about the chances of the data and what a! offers, you can crunch through big dataset look at treatment outcomes with various different interventions and help doctors make the right decision of the right time for particular patient‘s. it's not about replacing a doctor with a robot and i think health care... we were talking about the chat bot. of course. babylon
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have caused quite a lot of interest by saying that their a! algorithm is more effective than a doctor. i think the thing about that is ensuring it can be governed appropriately and we don't really know how a second can be appropriately governed at the moment given that it can adapt and evolve but this is really, health care is a people business really, so it's absolutely not about replacing doctors with robots. the next question from geraldine on twitter leads on from that. she asks will a! diagnosis become the norm rather than 111? another good question. there's already an online111 which draws on algorithms to direct patients to appropriate care. those algorithms are not ai, so they don't learn and change and they are programmed to act in a certain way. there is potential for al
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programmed to act in a certain way. there is potentialfor al to build on those algorithms and make sure patients are going to the right place at the right time more frequently. at the moment, the thing with al is making sure it can be governed and regulated appropriately and we are not quite there yet, so yes, 111 may draw on al in the future but we're not quite there yet. we don't know how people would engage with that sort of consultation potentially. yes, i mean, people do already use online 111 and obviously telephone 111 and there is some evidence to suggest that people are less likely to follow that advice pitifully where it's about self—care rather than about going to see a doctor. that brings us neatly to the next question. you mentioned earlier about whether the areas you looked at in this report being technology enabled self—care. at in this report being technology enabled self—ca re. we've at in this report being technology enabled self—care. we've had this question on twitter. i carry out
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daily checks at home. will that also become the norm? i think it would be great if we could use remote monitor more effectively because it can have good outcomes for some patients, people with heart failure for example, making sure that their heart is constantly monitored and allowing professionals to intervene if they go into danger rangers. so i think we will start to use it more frequently and i think it's just a question of how we can resource that and bring it more effectively into the nhs. that was sophie clarke on the nhs. that was sophie clarke on the report produced for the bbc on what it means for haitians to have ai. the parliamentary committee that oversees the work of the intelligence and security services has accused the uk of tolerating "inexcusable" treatment of detainees by the united states. it says intelligence staff witnessed 13 incidents after the september 11th terror attacks in 2001 where detainees were mistreated by the us.
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but the committee found no evidence that uk officers carried out physical mistreatment. conservative mp, dominic grieve, chairs the committee. we have not found any evidence that the united kingdom agency officers and the french personnel directly carried out physical mistreatment of the training is. we have found evidence of united kingdom officers making verbal threats in nine cases. we've also found two cases in which uk personnel where party to detailing this treatment administered by others. dominic grieve. the duke of cambridge is concluding his tour of the middle east today with a visit to historical and religious sites in eastjerusalem. yesterday, he met palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, in the first official british royal visit to the occupied west bank. our middle east correspondent yolande knell has been following the tour and is in ramallah. well i've move now to the old city
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ofjerusalem for the pew concede just behind me. this is actually the very spot where prince william started the last day of his historic visit to the middle east, getting this great view of the old city before he went down to go to the different roger sites, so he went to the temple mount as jewish different roger sites, so he went to the temple mount asjewish people call it, he went inside the golden topped dome of the rock and we were told it was the first time actually that a british royal had officially gone to that holy site he then went to the western wall which lies just adjacent and he put a prayer note into the wall himself and was accompanied by britain's chief of iron doors of a chief by the site. the also went to the church of the holy sepulchre where many christians believe thatjesus was crucified and then buried. now there was a
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personal moment for prince william also here on the mount of olives because this is where his own great—grandmother, the mother of prince philip, is buried in a tomb at the church of mary magdalene and he was able to lay some flowers there as well. tell us more on this final day of the trip about how it has been viewed. obviously it is one in which the prince has had to be incredibly diplomatic, naturally, he does not get involved in making political statements that might offend anyone. but how has this visit gone down on both sides in this region? well i think it's been very welcomed on both the israeli and palestinian side. the prince came here on the invitation of both governments but it was always going to be extremely sensitive for him and his camera at a very sensitive time, even visiting these holy
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sites, the old city ofjerusalem is considered to be part of the occupied palestinian territories. that is what was written on his official schedule and that's how britain sees it but israeli politicians took offence to that because of course israel in 1957 and a middle east war captured the eastern part of the city and later annexed it in a move not internationally recognised and israelis see all ofjerusalem as being their eternal and undivided capital but the palestinians want eastjerusalem to capital but the palestinians want east jerusalem to be capital but the palestinians want eastjerusalem to be their future capital so all the time the prince was tiptoeing around these kinds of issues but i think palace officials will be very pleased with the way it has received and you can see there was lots of coverage on how the prince is not just was lots of coverage on how the prince is notjust meeting people at the political level but also meeting ordinary israelis, ordinary palestinians, young people and getting a different taste of life from what many visiting ministers for example work usually getting. young people will be left to pick up the bill for climate
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change because politicians are avoiding the issue, according to a new report. the committee on climate change says the government must act quickly to cut co2 emissions from traffic, homes and farming to avoid future generations spending more in the future. the government says it is committed to being a world leader on the issue. our environment analyst roger harrabin reports. the uk is supposed to be promoting a clean vehicle revolution. more and more drivers are buying electric cars nowadays, but there's a problem. only a small percentage of new cars being sold are low carbon vehicles. the committee says the government has to do very much more to clean up the vehicle fleet. in fact, emissions from vehicles have gone up when they should have been going down. it's power generation that's provided three quarters of the uk's emissions cuts so far. wind and solar power are getting cheaper all the time. dirty coal energy is being phased out. the waste industry has also played a part, with methane emissions down
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since we've been separating rotting food and green waste from general waste. but emissions from farming, muck spreading and fertilisers has barely fallen. climate change is already under way, the committee says. if ministers don't cut emissions soon, the next generation will have to pay more to sort out the mess. roger harrabin, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. firefighters who have worked for four days to tackle wildfires on moorland near manchester have beenjoined by a hundred soldiers as flames turn towards residential areas. the german chancellor warns that migration could become a defining moment for the european union ahead a summit of eu leaders this afternoon. england expects — the three lions face belgium tonight in theirfinal group game of the world cup. in greece, athens and surrounding
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areas have been hit by floods after two days of heavy rain. several roads were closed and several people had to be evacuated from homes and cars. last year dozens of people were killed in floodsjust outside the capital. lebo diseko has more. waterlogged streets and homes. this is what is left after flash flooding caused by summer rain swept through this neighbourhood. people here say they were powerless to stop the waters which came pouring into their homes. the clean—up may have started but the memories are still fresh. we flooded in five minutes. one torrent came from there and the other from over there, from the mountain. where else could it go but inside? we
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broke down a wall by the field and unable also broke his wall and we opened all the sewers so the majority of the water could leave. last, flash budding killed 24 people ina last, flash budding killed 24 people in a nearby town, something that can't be far from peoples minds in a nearby town, something that can't be farfrom peoples minds —— flash flooding. some roads have now reopened as people try and return to some sense of normality. but the damage caused is still clear to see. residents will be hoping that the worst is now over and they have seen the last of such heavy summer rain. universities are being told to "dramatically improve" support for students with mental health issues. the government is announcing it will award a certificate of excellence to institutions which meet new standards of mental health care. it also wants universities to give students an opt—in service which will allow vice—chancellors to contact parents if needed. it is in universities' interest, if you take care of the pastoral
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side and the well—being and mental health of students, they are more likely to complete their course. they are more likely to complete their course and be successful. to not do so would be to risk failing a generation of students. the metropolitan police have dropped an investigation into a jogger who pushed a woman into the path of a bus in south—west london. the incident saw a 33—year—old woman escape with minor injuries thanks to quick thinking from a local bus driver, as she crossed putney bridge in may last year. officers looked at more than 50 people and arrested three, but all were realeased without charge, and police now say they have exhausted all lines of inquiry as we've been hearing, england take on belgium tonight in theirfinal world cup group game in kaliningrad. both teams are already assured of progression to the next round but finishing first or second would have a big say on who plays the big teams further in the draw. our reporter sarah rainsford has been taking the temprature from the batlic coast. kaliningrad is the most unusual
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location for the world cup, a sliver of russian territory that history is left to right here in the heart of europe, sandwiched between poland and lithuania and that geography means it's easier to reach for european fans pitifully important for this game where england take on belgium. and the fans from both sides have been here celebrating early in fact in this square in the heart of the city. the england supporters surrounded by a conga of belgian fans singing and dancing and backing their team. there is a great atmosphere here and in fact england fa ns atmosphere here and in fact england fans who were wary about russia ahead of this world cup, have been hanging out their flags celebrating too in the bars and in the streets. there is a little bit of a sense that neither team actually wants to win this game and finishing second
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in the group might give them an easier passage through this world cup, but the fans from both sides are hoping actually their team will give them something to celebrate here. the pangolin is a little—known scaly mammalfound in africa and asia — but it's the world's most trafficked animal. now scientists say a new technique could help catch the poachers hunting the creature, as angus crawford reports. if you want to see something extraordinary, follow us. behind this door, some of the rarest animals on the planet... we've got hunting trophies, we've got skulls... ..killed to order, and smuggled to be sold. but today, we've come to see this — pangolin scales. they don't look like much, but they're worth a fortune. it's all profit, because you're paying that little money to the person who poaches. so, when they resell them to the end user, all of that money goes into the kingpins' pocket. it is the most poached animal on earth, the world's only scaly
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mammals, its meat a delicacy, the scales, in their millions, used in chinese traditional medicines. one animal is killed every five minutes. police do their best, but lack the tools to identify the poachers. but these scales could offer hope. in a world—first, british scientists have lifted human fingerprints off them, and here's how. what i want you to do is to grip this... a firm grip, a strip of sticky gelatin. peel it off, and the print should be there. absolutely, just there. finally, into a scanner, and... straight down there. wow. so that is the pangolin scale, and right in the middle of it, a great big thumbprint, with all the ridges and detail. absolutely. this is all unique to me, this couldn't be anyone else's? this will be unique to you.
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it can show the direct link between scale and poacher. the gelatin strips are cheap and easy—to—use by wildlife rangers in the field. although the technology isn't new, this application is revolutionary. it is the first time it has ever been tried anywhere in the world, and scientists here hope that it could help identify the criminals behind this illegal trade. these rangers at these wildlife crime scenes need to be in and out of these environments very quickly, because they're dangerous. what we've created is a quick and usable method for them to be able to lift a finger mark off a pangolin scale. and, thanks to london zoo, those kits are already being tested on the front line in africa. the impact for the pangolin will be huge. we're talking about potentially disrupting and deterring
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wildlife traffickers, organised criminals who are involved in the trade in pangolin scales. and while they're the world's most trafficked mammal, as we know, it's certainly not too late for them. a hi—tech breakthrough, then, but will it be enough to save an animal already on the brink? if you're feeling like you may have put on a pound or two, then spare a thought for arbuckle the hedgehog. he's been declared the fattest in the world and has been put on a strict diet and exercise regime to get him back into shape. a rescue centre in aberdeenshire has taken him in, and hopes to get him fit enough to be returned to the wild. weighing in at five pounds, arbuckle is currently four times larger than a normal hedgehog or about the size of a world cup football. just to give you a very current comparison. i do hope it works!
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the heatwave is set to continue as temperatures are predicted to soar into the weekend. the met office has warned that temperatures are still rising meaning more records could be broken within the next 24 hours. scotland is set for another day of blazing heat and could reach temperatures last seen in 1893. a short while ago our correspondent katie hunter gave us update from the glasgow botanic gardens. everyone is coping remarkably well for them it's already a beautiful day here in glasgow as you can see, about 26 celsius. here it isn't too busy yet but there are a few early sun—worshippers at and about. yesterday scotland had its warmest june date for 23 years, 31 celsius in aviemore and the highlands, and forecasters think we could have the warmestjune forecasters think we could have the warmest june day forecasters think we could have the warmestjune day on record to date, the mercury having to hit 32.2 celsius for that to happen. it last happened in 1893, but! celsius for that to happen. it last
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happened in 1893, but i don't think the people around me are worried about breaking any records and they arejust enjoying about breaking any records and they are just enjoying the unusually warm weather here in glasgow. katie holmes reporting. in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news with sophie raworth but first it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett hello there. another dry, hot and sunny day with pretty much wall—to—wall blue skies, strong sunshine as well, as the picture in warwickshire early on shows. mist and low cloud in the midlands towards wiltshire in the morning, but that has burned off and we have got blue skies in most parts of the uk. really boosting those temperatures as well. the mid to high 20s and a few spots above 30 degrees and the game, in scotland, we could break some records forjune temperatures. 32 possible, not far away from glasgow. it could be the hottest day ever in northern ireland. to the west, 30 degrees across porthmadog in the north—west of wales and perhaps 29 to the west
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of wales and perhaps 29 to the west of london. a lovely evening install but the sunshine overnight. more cloud across the north sea drifting its way further inland. but more low cloud and misty weather across the north and east of scotland limiting the temperature rise in the morning, but through the early hours we will start is in the cloud thinning and breaking. a few patches of low cloud lingering, keeping it a touch fresher with easterly breeze. more low cloud and we have seen recently but away from here, sunny skies, strong sunshine, heat, as well, 30 degrees possible in welsh wales. the highest temperatures by this stage in scotland. the mid to high 20s. into the weekend, high pressure in charge although a couple of little features. a shower in the north—west of scotla nd features. a shower in the north—west of scotland on sunday and this cut off load perhaps brings one or two showers up from the south west on sunday but on the whole, we are drawing the air in from the near continent and it's going to keep the
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heat going, so sunny skies for the most pa rt heat going, so sunny skies for the most part on saturday. a small chance of a shower in the north—west of scotland, one or two not far away from the isles of scilly but otherwise, plenty of sunshine around. and easterly breeze and those temperatures into the mid to high 20s widely away from those north sea coasts. the breeze picks up north sea coasts. the breeze picks up on sunday and we have the chance ofa up on sunday and we have the chance of a shower perhaps in the south—west of wales later on for northern ireland too. on the whole, it looks as if it's going to be dry and hot and sunny and it will continue in most areas. around 100 soldiers arrive in greater manchester to help firefighters tackle a vast blaze on saddleworth moor. the fires have been burning for four days and there are warnings the hot weather could mean they will continue burning for weeks. the reason you can see it burning behind us is because over the course of the fire, it goes further down into the pete and once it is down,
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it is difficult to get in and under to get the fire out —— the peat. we'll get the latest live from our correspondent at the scene. also this lunchtime... eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks. they're expected to warn theresa may that time is running out to reach a deal on brexit. the pressure's off — england fans prepare for tonight's world cup match against belgium in russia knowing that england are already through to the final 16.
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