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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 28, 2018 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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coming back it. its great stuff. coming back from years ago, it spin a long time coming! i've been here 23 years and this is really the first time i've seena this is really the first time i've seen a decent one. this is a very nice change, not having to find their jacket nice change, not having to find theirjacket with a hood. in west lothian firefighters have been dealing with a wildfire, a warning ofan dealing with a wildfire, a warning of an increased risk of wildfires in in place until monday. here in glasgow, most people are concentrating on keeping cool and enjoying this mini heatwave. yesterday we reached 31.3 celsius at aviemore, and it's very likely we will beat that today in glasgow, may be 31 or 32 celsius, which will make it the warmest day injune four 23 yea rs. u nfortu nately we‘ re it the warmest day injune four 23 years. unfortunately we're just falling shy of the all—timejune record of 32.2 celsius which was in perth & kinross back in 1893.m does feel like years since the sun was this hot in the west of scotland. many are determined to enjoy it while it lasts. time for a look at the weather.
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here's darren bett. we could be breaking records today in scotland and northern ireland and here in the north—west of wales, temperatures are already up to 30 degrees once again. beautiful blue skies, strong sunshine for the rest of the day, even further east here in norfolk. the low cloud has burned off here and it is warming up nicely. there is the low cloud that we started with. it got all the way across to the west country and it then burned off. but we've still got that easterly breeze. that's what brought in all the low cloud which is mainly affecting southern parts of england and wales. it means the highest of the temperatures are getting pushed further west and further north. widely those numbers are in the mid— to high 20. but in parts of scotland it could get even higher than 31. a similar story across the western side of northern
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ireland, 32 possible here. already up ireland, 32 possible here. already up to 30 in porthmadog. lots of sunshine for the rest of the day, feeling hot out there as well. however there is that breeze across southern areas and there will be more cloud coming in overnight tonight, off the north sea and pushing its way further middle and across the midlands and into the south—west of england. gradually we will see the low cloud burning back but there will be more in the north sea and a bit more of it threatening to run onto some of the north sea coasts. but away from here it warms up coasts. but away from here it warms up very quickly and it will be another very hot day, not quite as hot, across is to an scotland certainly. but temperatures not far away from 30 celsius in western parts of wales and northern ireland and perhaps to the west of london as well. so, lots of sunshine again on friday. into the weekend, still got the high pressure around. just the threat of a shower in the north—west of scotla nd threat of a shower in the north—west of scotland but it will probably in sunday when this area of low pressure from biscay might bring a
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couple of showers into the south—west. but we are really still drawing ina south—west. but we are really still drawing in a lot of hot air up from the near continent. and most places will again be having a lovely day on saturday. again we will see some mist and low cloud retreating back to coastal areas. sunny skies pretty much cross the board. which is still not quite as high as today across scotland. very pleasant, though. mid—to high high 20s across england and wales. the breeze will freshen up and wales. the breeze will freshen upa bit and wales. the breeze will freshen up a bit on sunday and we have got the chance of a shower in south—west wales and later across northern ireland, justjohns. uncertainty about how many showers there will be and most places will still have a dry day with plenty of sunshine. that's all from the bbc news at one, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are. good afternoon.
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it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news. welcome along to the bbc sport centre, i'm sarah mulkerrins... the countdown is on to england's final group game at the world cup and well for once, it's all rather relaxed. gareth southgate‘s team have already booked their place in the last 16, and will face belgium later in kaliningrad, in a battle to finish top of group g... that game kicks off at seven o clock — and our sports correspondent natalie pirks is there live for us... natalie, i suppose the more qualified already the big question is natalie, i suppose the more qualified already the big question is which natalie, i suppose the more qualified already the big question is which team natalie, i suppose the more qualified already the big question is which team wants natalie, i suppose the more qualified already the big question is which team wants to natalie, i suppose the more qualified already the big question is which team wants to finish natalie, i suppose the more qualified already the big question is which team wants to finish top, if either? that is the big debate, isn't it? that's what dominating the media but it's not something dominating gareth southgate‘s thoughts. essentially, if england top the group, they will play where currently 37 degrees rising to 39 degrees tomorrow and they will get one day less rest with a possible
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quarterfinal against the five times champion brazil if they come second. then they'll get one more days rest and play in moscow with a possible quarterfinal against the likes of sweden or switzerland, so you can understand why people are saying it would be better to come second in the group. even roberto martinez the belgian manager has that winning is not a priority for them and are expected to make wholesale changes but the reality is how do you engineer a result when you're trying to come second in a group and trying to come second in a group and trying to lose? that would be against what england is doing here and what gareth southgate is trying to do. he gave short shrift to that idea at the press conference yesterday. performance and the menton is so important at the tournament, isn't it? any clues as to what gareth southgate might go with team selection? he talked a lot about harmony and keeping harmony in the group and that means potentially getting players in. also trying to keep happy the ones that are playing so keep happy the ones that are playing so well and keeping that the menton
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and positivity as he called it going. kyle walker is on a booking and could be replaced by philjones 01’ and could be replaced by philjones or gary cahill. he had his thigh strapped against panama, so he could be bringing on arnold. danny rose could start ahead of ashley young. hurricane, we are hearing reports jamie vardy could be in line to pick up jamie vardy could be in line to pick up his 24th cap, he scored seven goals for england, but it would be a bit unfair to hurricane who is on fire. he scored in england's last five goals and the last player to do that was tommy lawton in 1938 —— hurricane. gareth southgate will want to keep positivity, momentum and a winning habit going as they go into the last 16. natalie, thank you so much. before england play — group h has to be decided and it will let us know who'll be up next
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in the last 16. three teams still in with a shout. group leaders japan, on four points, take on already elminated poland. senegal, second, also on four points take on colombia, who are third with three points. those games kick off at 3pm, and you can follow them across the bbc. germany are on their way home from russia. their earliest exit in 80 years. as they pressed for a goal that would have sent them through they conceded twice in injury time losing 2—0 to south korea yesterday. with germany losing it means sweden are through as group f winners, after their 3—0 win against mexico, who are also through as runners up. and despite mexico losing that game — this was inside the stadium — both sets of fans joining together to celebrate knocking out the reigning champions. and outside the stadium these mexican fans found a south korean journalist to lift up high. south korea going home,
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but still heroes for many. away from the world cup, andy murray insists there is no risk to his fitness if he does decide to play wimbledon next week the two—time champion was beaten by fellow brit kyle edmund in the second round of eastbourne. he says he will "probably" make a decision on wimbledon before the draw is made on friday. once you start playing, competing again, you want to continue that but also this is a long process. this is not something where you come back and play perfect and feel perfect immediately, you know. that's not how injuries work. tennis is unique in the sense that i have come back from not playing for 11 months and i'm playing against a top 20 players in the world and competing for full matches and a lot of other sports, tea m matches and a lot of other sports, team sports, you play 15 or 20 minutes, and rebuild yourfitness
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team sports, you play 15 or 20 minutes, and rebuild your fitness up that way. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. thank you. 100 soldiers arrive to help firefighters tackle a moorland blaze in greater manchester that's been burning forfour days — and may last for weeks because of the hot weather the troops arrived overnight to help tackle a seven square kilometres of saddleworth moor which had been smouldering with pockets of fire since sunday. a short while ago, fire officer tony hunter said the police has been fought from six locations and the wind change could provide more fuel for the fire. we are fighting from six locations utilising a number of resources including four by four vehicles, specialist wildfire firefighting
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equipment and people on foot beating the fire out. they have had a significant effect since yesterday. we need to be aware the same crews fighting the fire yesterday for 13 hours are the same crew fighting it today. we are very, very pleased to have the army supporting us in that. so they are working on those six locations, supported by, as you can hear, helicopters dropping equipment and water where required. we put a lot of time and effort and front—loaded firefighting yesterday afternoon because if you are not already aware we can't fire fight during the night hours because it is so during the night hours because it is so dangerous underfoot. and the health and safety of our fighter fighters and others is important, so we withdraw our firefighters during the night hours and then we start again as soon as first light comes and that was at 415 this morning for
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us. and that was at 415 this morning for us. so we had a significant effect yesterday and we are building on that advance today. the meeting between president trump and the russian president, vladimir putin, has been confirmed for the 16th ofjuly in helsinki. it'll be the first summit between the two leaders since donald trump came to office , and the second time they have met. the meeting will follow the nato summit, and mr trump's visit to london. it takes about a decade years to train a gp — but the creators of a new artificial intelligence "chatbot" say the algorithm they have created is more effective than a medic‘s expertise when it comes to diagnosing patients. their claims have been dismissed by british doctors who say an app can never replace a human. jen copesta ke reports. the claims were sensational.
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babylon‘s ceo, ali parsa, told an audience at the royal college of physicians that his artificially intelligence software is now able to diagnose medical conditions better than a human gp. do you feel like the room is spinning, or are you feeling faint? the chatbot—based ai was shown as an integration with amazon's alexa platform. babylon‘s existing gp at hand service, available through the nhs, refers users to a human doctor for video call and diagnosis, but this new chatbot can provide its own opinions and offers a percentage—based estimate of eacho one being correct. i think i might know what's causing your symptoms. babylon says its software scored an average of 81% in a clinical knowledge test, similar to those taken by doctors in theirfinal exams. that compares to an average mark for a human doctor, which babylon calculated to be 72%. but the issue of how the chatbot was tested and what questions were used was strongly challenged by the royal college of gps. they also say its services are already siphoning money away from nhs practices that need it. we've had some concerns about gp at hand for some time, and it's not necessarily about the technology.
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it's about the impact that gp at hand has on the health service, which is under enormous pressure, at the moment. the pressure facing the nhs, and health services around the world, was behind ba bylon‘s development of these services. the data feeding babylon‘s artificial intelligence doesn't just come from the uk. they are partnered as well with the government in rwanda, where they have two million registered users. tens of thousands of consultations have been providing data back into babylon‘s uk system since 2016. in rwanda, nurses act as a go—between the aland people who call up the service. the depth of the chatbot‘s knowledge has been a big surprise, here. does the chatbot come up with some questions that you hadn't thought of? yes, sometimes. oh, really? how does that make you feel... it makes me feel more professional. back in the uk, this new diagnostic artificial intelligence may take some time to integrate into the nhs, but it is an area that is actively being explored by all sides.
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the innovators in the nhs are true heroes, who work incredibly hard to advance our model of delivery. we're always delighted to partner with them. jen copestake, bbc news. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. 100 soldiers arrive to help firefighters tackle a moorland blaze in greater manchester that's been burning forfour days — and may last for weeks because of the hot weather eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks — they're expected to warn theresa may that time is running out to reach a deal on brexit. the pressure‘s off — england fans prepare for tonight's world cup match against belgium in russia — knowing that england are already through to the final 16. now the business news.
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transport giant stagecoach has confirmed an £85.6 million hit after being stripped of the east coast main line franchise by the government, and said it had learned "lessons" forfuture bids. the group, which ran the line as a joint venture with virgin, said it was "disappointed" by the costs of the failed franchise. shares in uk beer and pubs group greene king fell 11 % in early trade after it said "unprecedented" cost rises had caused a slump in profits. even so group revenues, that's sales before costs are taken into account, were also down almost 2% to £2.2 billion and chief executive rooney anand said bad weather early in the year, weak consumer confidence and tougher competition were to blame. energy supplier sse has paid £190,000 in compensation to customers over failures following its withdrawal of a white label partnership tariff with ebico, the social enterprise. sse took almost six months to switch customers onto a new tariff, with some losing savings because of the delayed switch.
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a new white label partnership between robin hood energy and ebico also initially set out to switch these customers without their consent. almost three quarters of people over 65 have dug into their pension pots in the four years since the then chancellor george osbourne allowed pensioners the freedom to do what they wanted with the money they had spent their lifetimes saving. so, what have they done with that cash — spent it on speedboats, wild parties and down at the betting shop? or investing it to get a better income than was ever provided by annuities? those are the safe—but—dull investments we used to have to buy with our pensions. the financial conduct authority has now written its final report into this — the retirement outcomes review. let's talk to alistair mcqueen, head of savings and retirement at aviva, the insurance company and pension provider. what have they been doing with their
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money? it's been transformational, this changed the way we approach retirement. there was a fear they would be a —— for cash. everybody would be a —— for cash. everybody would buy sports cars. the great britain public had not been doing that. we've been sensible with what we've been doing. 1.5 million people have taken we've been doing. 1.5 million people have ta ken advantage we've been doing. 1.5 million people have taken advantage of these freedoms but we have not been blowing the money. one quarter of it has been spent but three quarters has been spent but three quarters has either been saved or invested potentially used to pay off debt so people have been behaving relatively sensibly considering this is money for the rest of their life, notjust a payday bonanza, so positive news, but carefully watching how we approach this as we progress through. how do we know it sensible? if you put money into the stock market three years ago when this came into force, it would be pretty ha rd came into force, it would be pretty hard not to make money. the real testis hard not to make money. the real test is going to be when we have some anxious times on the stock market and people of their investments and find they are worth
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a half what they used to be investments and find they are worth a half what they used to he were as had they been safe and cautious they would have been all right. exactly and the financial conduct authority are wise to this risk people face and they've announced today investments pathways. no one would say they are investment experts, but there are recognising many people wa nt there are recognising many people want some kind of support and they are going to these things called investment pathways saying give us an idea the kind of looking for in retirement and your pension provider would give an indication of the investment options you might want to carry you forward, so they are aware of the risks and are putting in place some support to help people make the most of these freedoms that 80% of people want, people saving for retirement wanted. we want to support people through that time in retirement. of course it's a great time for companies like yourself to make money out of it by attracting all of these people and you say and going to look after your money and
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we'll make lots of good income for you in your retirement. how much do you in your retirement. how much do you charge, though? that's always difficult to find out. the fca look at this and recognised charges, while very important, are quite difficult to sometimes understand. traditionally they were represented in percentages and not all of us are co mforta ble in percentages and not all of us are comfortable with percentages. now we are going to do it in pounds and pence, how much we actually going to be paying, and then we are in a much better position tojudge be paying, and then we are in a much better position to judge of it good value for money or not. yes, give them investment support, put the money in pounds and pence and then we can take advantage of these freedoms. thanks very much. bp is buying the country's biggest provider of public charging points for electric cars. it's called chargemaster. it has about 6,500 public charging points and actually builds the charging systems themselves. bp may in most people's minds be just an oil company. this move suggests it might be trying to be something more. i'm joined now by our transpoprt corrspondent victoria fritz victoria, i'm in the bp doing
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something like this not long ago about being into renewables. that came to nothing, didn't it? it was ten yea rs came to nothing, didn't it? it was ten years ago, jamie, they rebounded themselves as beyond petroleum. maybe they were too far ahead of the curve but yes, they are looking at alternative sources of income because of course they are looking at alternative sources of fuel and this is one of many investments they have started to make. as companies got $500 million every single year to plough into renewable energy technology so for a company the size of bp, beyond petroleum, £130 million for this company is really pocket change. what they get from this is really interesting. they actually deliver these packages themselves and also sell the technology into peoples homes, so not only do they get the public charging points, but the proprietary technology for the staff at ends on people's back gardens and their
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front lawns, for example, where people will be installing electrical vehicle charging points, so really interesting technology. they also get a ccess interesting technology. they also get access to a subscriber base of about 40,000 customers and get to learn about data, how people are behaving, how often people charge, how long they are driving their cars for, all that information as we be crucial and very lucrative indeed. are they the only ones in this market? lots of people are looking into this, shell is also looking into this, shell is also looking into this. they have 11 electrical vehicle charging points already. one of the big things is how speedy you can be and shell and bp both realise that people don't want to hang around, so both of them are investing in technology where you get ultrafast turbo—charging of electric vehicles and in a 20 minute it may take charge vehicle, you buy southwark off at the kit kat for example, and they get all the extra source of revenue and half of all income actually comes from non—fuel
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sources of income, coffee ‘s for example, so they are trying to think, what will be doing a future where people aren't coming in to fill up with their petrol, how do we get them still here? spending money? victoria, fascinating stuff. thank you ray much indeed. —— thank you very much indeed. a few other business stories we're keeping across today, the competition and markets authority has warned hotel booking sites about the way they rank and display rooms — it says some make misleading claims about discounts, and availability and "rush" customers into booking decisions. the cma did not name names, but leading sites include expedia and booking.com. diy chain homebase has said it is cutting 303 jobs at its support centre in milton keynes. it was bought by the so—called "restructuring specialists" hilco — they also own hmv for just one pound. damian mcgloughlin, ceo of homebase, said: decisive action is required to start rebuilding homebase s position in the uk market." dr dre and music moguljimmy iovine
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have been ordered to pay £19 million to a former partner in their headphone company, beats. steven lamar claimed credit for the idea of creating a brand of celebrity—endorsed headphones. he took the idea to dre and iovine in 2006 and the first beats headphones were released two years later. the parties later fell out, and lamar sued over unpaid royalties in 2016. a quick look at the markets. the ftse, a small drop. this worries about what's going to happen the eu meeting tomorrow. bp, not a huge amount of change. the pound looking week against the dollar. down from those highs we saw last week. more later. james, thank you. the pangolin is a little—known scaly
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mammalfound in africa and asia — but it's the world's most trafficked animal. now scientists say a new technique could help catch the poachers hunting the creature, as angus crawford reports. if you want to see something extraordinary, follow us. behind this door, some of the rarest animals on the planet. we've got hunting trophies, we've got skulls... killed to order, and smuggled to be sold. but today, we've come to see this — pangolin scales. they don't look like much, but they're worth a fortune. it's all profit, because you're paying that little money to the person who poaches. so, when they resell them to the end user, all of that money goes
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into the kingpins' pocket. it's the most poached animal on earth, the world's only scaly mammal, its meat a delicacy, the scales — in their millions — used in chinese traditional medicines. one animal is killed every five minutes. police do their best, but lack the tools to identify the poachers. but these scales could offer hope. in a world—first, british scientists have lifted human fingerprints off them, and here's how. what i want you to do is to grip this... a firm grip, a strip of sticky gelatin. peel it off... and the print should be there. absolutely, just there. finally, into a scanner, and... straight down there. wow! yeah. so, that's the pangolin scale and, right in the middle of it, a great big thumbprint, with all the ridges and detail. absolutely. this is all unique to me, this couldn't be anyone else's? this will be unique to you. it can show the direct link between scale and poacher. the gelatin strips are cheap and easy—to—use by wildlife rangers in the field. although the technology isn't new, this application is revolutionary.
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it's the first time it's ever been tried anywhere in the world, and scientists here hope that it could help identify the criminals behind this illegal trade. these rangers that are at these wildlife crime scenes need to be in and out of these environments very, very quickly, because they're dangerous. what we've created is a quick and usable method for them to be able to lift a finger mark off a pangolin scale. and, thanks to london zoo, those kits are already being tested on the frontline in africa. the impact for the pangolin will be huge. we're talking about potentially disrupting and deterring wildlife traffickers, organised criminals, who are involved in the trade in pangolin scales. and whilst they are the world's most trafficked mammal, as we know, it's certainly not too late for them. a hi—tech breakthrough, then, but will it be enough to save an animal already on the brink?
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angus crawford, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. thank you, sophie. good afternoon. the heatwave continues today with temperatures up to around 30 degrees in the north—west of wales where we saw the highest temperatures yesterday. but the heat is far and wide and the sunshine too. here in norfolk it's warm sunshine across the county. we started off with mist and low cloud but did not last too long. it burned. wall—to—wall blue skies as well, so the heat is building rapidly as well. we've still got the easterly breeze which brought him a low cloud. affecting southern parts of the uk pushing the highest of the temperatures further west but also further north across oui’ west but also further north across our shores. those are the
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temperatures nationwide. if we focus on the heat in scotland, 30 celsius. we could get 32 may be not far from glasgow. on the western side of northern ireland too. this could be breaking records. a lovely evening in store, plenty of sunshine around. still an easterly breeze across the south and low cloud overnight dragging its way inland, notjust across england but also into northern and eastern scotland, so where we start off cloudy, the temperatures will be slow to rise. we lose the low cloud, though, although some patches will linger on the north sea coasts and there will be more low cloud and we've seen today so right on the coast it will be cooler but away from here, lots of sunshine and temperatures lifting a game very quickly. 30 possible on the western side of northern ireland and west wales with temperatures a bit low in scotland, said typically the mid—to high 20s. another lovely
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day, though, for most of scotland. high pressure in charge for most of us. high pressure in charge for most of us. a shower on saturday in the north—west of scotland but more likely to get showers from that area of low pressure across the bay of biscay into the south west but for the weekend some very warm if not hotair the weekend some very warm if not hot airfrom the the weekend some very warm if not hot air from the near continent and it should be a lovely day on saturday. that could start off grey and misty across eastern areas, back to the coast, but it's wall—to—wall blue skies once again after that. temperatures widely into the high 20s. temperatures widely into the high 205. a temperatures widely into the high 20s. a lovely day on saturday. we'll find the temperatures rising high across the south—east of the uk on sunday. we get the warm air coming in from the near continent. stronger wind on sunday and whilst most places will be dry, hot and sunny, a chance of some showers in the south—west of england, wales and perhaps later on in northern ireland. hello, you're watching afternoon live.
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i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: 100 soldiers join firefighters to tackle a vast blaze on saddleworth moor. it's under control — for now — but the hot weather isn't helping. the reason you can see it burning behind us is because over the course of the fire it goes further and further down into the peat and once it's down there it's very difficult without liquid to get in and under to put that fire out. eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks — they're expected to warn theresa may that time is running out to reach a deal on brexit. # don't take me home! england fans in russia, and at home, prepare to cheer the team on as they face belgium tonight in the world cup. but should they be playing to win or lose? coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with sarah mulkerrins.

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