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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 28, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: 100 soldiers join firefighters to tackle a vast blaze on saddleworth moor. it's under control — for now — but the hot weather isn't helping. the reason you can see it burning behind us is because over the course of the fire it goes further and further down into the peat and once it's down there it's very difficult without liquid to get in and under to put that fire out. eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks — they're expected to warn theresa may that time is running out to reach a deal on brexit. # don't take me home! england fans in russia, and at home, prepare to cheer the team on as they face belgium tonight in the world cup. but should they be playing to win or lose? coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with sarah mulkerrins. no doubt that is one of the questions you will be asking. no doubt that is one of the questions you will be askingm
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no doubt that is one of the questions you will be asking. it is, england already through to the last 16. they take on belgian who have already qualified, so it is a battle to top the group table. do either tea m wa nts to 7 to top the group table. do either team wants to? darren, that's pretty! it's dry, hot and sunny with plenty of blue skies. we could break some temperature records in scotland and northern ireland. also coming up — will it or won't it? thermometer—watchers in scotland prepare could be the hottestjune day on record in scotland — with temperatures not seen since 1893! hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. around 100 soldiers have arrived in greater manchester to help firefighters battle a huge moorland
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blaze that has been burning forfour days. fire chiefs say they fear it could last for weeks because of the continuing hot weather. the troops — from the 11th battalion, royal regiment of scotland — arrived overnight to help tackle the seven square miles of saddleworth moor, which have been smouldering with pockets of fire since sunday. judith moritz is there. boots on the ground. the army arrived this morning to add their efforts to the firefight. big thank you to you and to your officers for coming... they were welcomed by the fire service, who will now battle the blaze for a fourth day, with the military by their side. 100 troops are being sent, arriving in groups of 30. from our own point of view, this is really important, because this shows some of the training that we've done, we rise to the challenge with our partner agencies to support them as and when they require it. this morning, conditions seemed still, but it's a deceptive peace. the moor is still alight, smoke rising across the horizon as peat burns underground.
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conditions still posing a risk. we only need a change in wind direction to then see that fire increasing into where the greater fuel source is, so we could see a dramatic change, and that's why having the resources on scene, immediately ready, and the support of the armed services, is extremely important. another nervous morning for those living in these houses next to the moor. but amongst these hills, there are reservoirs full of water. it's just a matter of getting it to the right place. helicopters are being used to drop gallons onto pockets of fire. it's the terrain which makes it so hard to fight this fire. engines and equipment have to get to remote areas, and when they arrive, the crews are working long hours in the blistering heat. it's notjust the fire service — park rangers are here, too, with mountain rescue teams and ambulance support now
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joined by the soldiers. currently, we've broken our boys down into various locations and we're beating the fire with paddles. we're supporting them by moving equipment, we're putting water on the fires and we're doing everything we can to stop this fire at the moment. the fire service says it most needs a significant downpour of rain, but none has been forecast for at least a week. this is the best chance of keeping the moors wet. and as they continue to smoulder, a pall of pollution and smoke hangs in the air. the effects of this fire go far beyond these moors. 0ur correspondent danny savage is at swineshaw reservoir for us now. while they are looking at what's happening on the ground, they are also looking up to the skies. it's almost idyllic here because it is a
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warm sunny almost idyllic here because it is a warm sunny day that there is a smell of burning heather and peat wafting gci’oss of burning heather and peat wafting across the reservoir. you can see over the other side of the water the rock by a group of firefighters trying to deal with one section of smoking moorland, using their beaters to try to stop that smoke point spreading the fire any further towards the green foliage, and that isa towards the green foliage, and that is a scene that has been repeated 150 times across this moorland, every few moments you hear them beat of helicopter blades in the distance as those firefighting helicopters have been coming in, they have a big bag under the helicopter that dips into the water and they fly away and spread it on to the moorland, so there is a lot of that going on, we have the army here as well, 60 — 80
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soldiers had been brought in from catterick to help the firefighters, each firefighter has three or four soldiers allocated to them so they get looked after well they do their job, and it's a case of beating those flames to stop it from spreading. it's a lot better this afternoon than it was this time yesterday, a lot less smoke and a lot less over manchester. it's not just whether the wind increases but whether it changes direction or not. yes, today we had no breeze at all after quite a strong easterly yesterday which blew the smoke westwards over manchester. the breeze has come up a little weight again in the last half hour and the breeze is that we'll get up more as the day goes on, potentially spreading the fires, because at the moment the fire brigade take all the fires are under control but that
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could change if the wind changes direction or rises. there is no real rain fall for the next 7—10 days and they will be here at least that long and maybe longer because once that pete starts to burn, it burns for ages until it gets a good dousing of rainwater on it. the prime minister is due in brussels shortly to attend the latest eu summit where she will brief leaders over dinner on progress on brexit. they will warn that time is running out to reach a deal and that she has just arrived, she hasjust arrived, let's hear what she has to say. sorry, we are having problems with
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the microphone, we will get this clip to do, she is being asked about those mornings. to be able to name those mornings. to be able to name those who have conducted chemical weapons attacks i think was a good example of what we can achieve when we work together and i will reiterate my commitment to the eu security and prosperity now and when we leave. as regards brexit, i look forward to talking with fellow leaders about the good progress we have made on the withdrawal agreement and securing our strong future partnership which i believe is in the interests of both the eu and uk. both sides are keen to continue that work at a faster pace than we have until now and we welcome that. other european leaders say that is done to you persuading your cabinet to come together. can
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your cabinet to come together. can you really say it's going well when two years on eu leaders say britain needs to get its act together? we have been setting out our position and at every stage, last december and at every stage, last december and in march, we have made agreements on the issues we discussed and agreed we will talk about. now we will bring the cabinet together in the next week, we will then publish our white paper setting out in more detail what a strong partnership the uk wants to see with the eu in future but that is a partnership which i believe is not just about the interests of the uk but the wider interests of the youth and that's why i'm confident we can discuss that at pace and ensure we achieve what we want, which is that continuing partnership with the eu on economic and security matters. we have already been able to encourage
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and get flexibility from the eu on matters. i will set out our position for the future and what i want to do, what i'm sure leaders want to do, what i'm sure leaders want to do, is ensure we can negotiate this for the future because this isn't just about the uk but ensuring we have a partnership that works for us andi have a partnership that works for us and i believe that will work for the eu as well. theresa may talking to laura kuenssberg there and she has been warned that time is running out to secure a brexit deal. she will face the 27th eu leaders at that summit in brussels and they will talk brexit later on this evening prior to a dinner. the eu has other issues to discuss, especially over immigration policy. let's get the view from westminster with our political correspondent, alex forsyth.
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she is under pressure. yes, and you heard theresa may used the word pace, that is needed now because as other eu leaders were arriving today, they all said that the speed of these negotiations has to step up and talks have to intensify, there has to be progress made if there is to bea has to be progress made if there is to be a final agreement and the broad outline of a future relationship by october. the expectations around the summit had been downplayed. at one point this was going to be a crucial staging post in brexit talks where they wa nted post in brexit talks where they wanted to make decent progress on issues like the irish border but that will now not happen. this will be more about mood and tone and the focus will be on getting a more tangible agreement in october. the problem fought theresa may is that
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she needs to get sign off from her cabinet first, so today she will hope to encourage eu leaders that she can do that and come back to them with progress and on the domestic front she will meet with your cabinet domestic front she will meet with yourcabinet in domestic front she will meet with your cabinet in the next week to thrash out the finer details of what she hoped the future relationship will look like, but there is pressure on mrs may now to move things forward. is the assessment in westminster that the prime minister has the authority to get her cabinet to back, to stop what appears to be co nsta nt to back, to stop what appears to be constant sniping the sidelines? we have seen open displays of cabinet this unity in recent weeks, notjust over brexit but things like the departmental spending and many here say theresa may has to stand per authority on the cabinet and come up with decisions they can get a fine,
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not least a former very close adviser, nick timothy, who wrote an article in the daily telegraph saying it was time for a different approach, not theresa may had to be firmer with some around her cabinet table and eu leaders, so there is a school of thought which suggests she has to demonstrate she has the authority to reach a resolution in these negotiations. doing that will be tricky because there are still differences around that table about what brexit should look like and it's how she resolves those and very quickly, in the space of a week, thatis quickly, in the space of a week, that is the real challenge now. now let's go to jean—claude juncker, that is the real challenge now. now let's go tojean—claudejuncker, who was talking in brussels. as was the risk, we have to say
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goodbye. let's go up the road because christian fraser is also monitoring events. it's worth making that point, while we are talking about brexit, the eu has other issues to discuss because this immigration issue is becoming a crisis in the eu. it is, and ironically the numbers coming to the eu are down, 114,000 this year, probably about 80,000 by the end of the year, compared to 2016, two .5 million, but what has shifted in europe in the last humans is that more hardline governments are taking a stand on this issue and it has become a domestic issue for angela merkel. before she set off today she said this is a defining moment and many would agree because her sister party wa nt many would agree because her sister party want to turn around those asylu m party want to turn around those
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asylum seekers who have registered in one country and crossed to germany, but if they do that they have to send them back to italy, and the italian government would be responsible not just for the italian government would be responsible notjust for those arriving on their southern shores and those returning from germany, so there is no agreement on that. we have paddy smith, european editor for the irish times, leo varadkar said he was disappointed that the agenda has been superseded by migration. disappointed many that the british have still not that their cards on the table and explained how they will live up to their commitment to the backstop and what sort of future relationship they want with the eu, so that is they want with the eu, so that is the main concern. jeremy corbyn yesterday was pushing theresa may to roll out the new deal option but i notice in their draft conclusions
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that they have warned eu states they need to prepare for a new deal scenario. the dutch are just tired 1000 new customs officers, much more than the british have. the commission are exploring every possible option in a no deal scenario and every department in ireland is working on what happens if there is no deal. it is complicated in ireland because although we know in relation to the brexit cash, if the british say they will notjoin there brexit cash, if the british say they will not join there will be no money, so will not join there will be no money, so there is a hole in the budget, there will have to be customs officers all over the place. in ireland, we are not sure which of the british commitments are unconditional and which are not, so for example the common travel area
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isa for example the common travel area is a commitment which we understand the british and irish one to adhere to their respective of whether they deal with done. the common travel area is no need to do with people and a long—standing tradition between irish and british people. does it apply to services? no, just people, it's the right of my parents to settle in england without going through residency problems. that is pa rt of through residency problems. that is part of the protocol of the deal in the withdrawal agreement, and so is the withdrawal agreement, and so is the backstop and a frictionless border. the british government says it is committed to preserving all the benefits of the good friday agreement and many people argue these are corollaries of the good friday agreement and not issue solely related to the eu, so would they be preserved in the event of no
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deal, and toad you prepare if you don't know what is conditional and what isn't? and not very long to deal with the issues because if you don't deal with them at the summit you have the summit in october, you have just six weeks, there is already talk of a special summit in november but time is running out. we are 270 days from exit. christian, thank you. young people will be left to pick up the bill for climate change because politicians are avoiding the issue — that's according to a new report. the committee on climate change says the government must act quickly to cut co2 emissions from traffic, homes and farming in order to avoid future generations having to spend more to curb emissions. the government says it will meet its climate obligations. here's our environment analyst roger harrabin. joining me now from our westminster studio is lord deben, chairman of the committee on climate change. some of us remember him asjohn
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gummer as well. at one stage we were doing quite well on this issue. what has stalled things? we have done very well on reducing emissions from power generation but that has masked the fact we now have rising emissions from transport and buildings, as well as from agriculture and we have to face those because the more we put it off, the more expensive it will beat and the next generation will have to face huge bills and climate change will have caught up with us, so we have warned the government clearly. are we putting a tough because we are concentrating on other issues like brexit? i don't think that, we need new regulations to raise standards of the new houses we build so they are properly insulated and so they are properly insulated and so they are properly insulated and so the people who own them don't
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have to pay exorbitant power bills and they are properly ventilated on and they are properly ventilated on a day like this. the way we demand new homes should be put together our way out of date. 0n transport, we are still talking as if we can go until 2040 before we have an all electric car fleet. we have to bring that forward to 2030 or thereabouts if we're going to meet our climate targets, which are now statutorily in the law and have to be met. compared with other countries we still have a good record. in some things, but other countries are now doing more than we are. the chinese and many parts of the us are, many countries in europe. although we have the best institutional structure in the climate change
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committee and the rest of it, we are still not on target and not on course for meeting our fourth and fifth carbon budget, both of which have been passed by parliament, neither of which can be changed without the permission of the climate change committee and both of which demand we do more now. which government department should be taking this by the scruff of the neck? we need more action from the department of housing and local government to raise standards. mrs may says she has a mission to reach zero carbon homes by 2030, we have to do things now to do that. the department for transport has to up its act. it has delayed for months the road to zero document in which it was supposed to be saying how it
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would do it. we had to produce our report because the little says we had to do it be for the end ofjune, before that statement was made. had to do it be for the end ofjune, before that statement was madem i'm watching you in scotland or wales, i'm frustrated because we have said we want wind farms and nobody is building them. that's a disgrace. this is not the cheapest way of producing electricity, onshore wind farms produced cheaper electricity than a new gas—fired power station, so for the government not to allow people, where they want to, both in scotland and wales and parts of england, for the government not to allow that is a disgrace and i want the government either to allow it, or if they don't allow it, to tell the public the cost of this party political decision because it
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is we who are paying for it instead of getting cheaper electricity, we are getting more expensive electricity because the government won't allow onshore wind. what do you drive? i drive a hybrid. i will change to an electric car when it has the range, next year, but i'm also trying hard to get more of charging points and we in ourfamily have a car sharing between four of us have a car sharing between four of us who drive, we sherrock two cars. i'm wondering whether today's announcement is taking over the charge master charging system, whether that signals a move in the right direction. i think it is. we have to make every charging point accessible to everybody. many need a
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special card, you can plug it in, and we need a system where new cars talk to the charging point and tell it, iam talk to the charging point and tell it, i am so one so, and connect it with your billing process. there are a number of technical things we could do rapidly, and we ought to change the law to make it easier to connect some of the motorway stations which need extra electricity and the way leaves take such a long time, the legal arrangements you have to make with landowners, much longer than it ta kes to landowners, much longer than it takes to have weighed leaves for the telephonic communications. thank you for joining telephonic communications. thank you forjoining us and thank you for holding on. one of the first firefighters to enter the burning g re nfell tower firefighters to enter the burning grenfell tower has described fire
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raining down from above as he held a colleague's legs as he leaned out of the window to fight the flames. charles batterbee described the unbelievable scene at the public inquiry today, saying how he tried to stop crew mate daniel brown falling out of the window as he fought the fire with a heavy hose. let's go live now to our correspondent frankie mccamley, who's at the inquiry. very difficult evidence for these officers to give. it has been quite emotional, charles atterbury was one of the first fighters on that scene with his colleague daniel brown, they went up to the fourth floor of g re nfell tower they went up to the fourth floor of grenfell tower work work that fire started. he broke down a little earlier on, the inquiry had to be paused and it has been paused again for him to collect himself because this is very emotional evidence, taking them back to the night of the fire and what he described is
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breaking down the store, going in, seeing that fire, going into that flat and thinking they had put that fire out. they go into the kitchen and from there they see flames on the outside and this is what he told the outside and this is what he told the inquiry earlier on as to what they did next. the amount of the debris and the noise and how rapid, and when i say violent i mean it just rained fire. that, to me, at that time i was thinking it's coming back to shepherd's bush court, it's jumping multiple floors. this isn'tjust one or two windows and frames that have failed and come down, this is lots and it was getting worse. it didn't slow, it just got worse, if anything, so that's why for me at that time, you have to imagine clinging onto danny by the bh, he's got a hose which weighs a lot and he's got that hose
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outside the window. he has leant right outside the window and i'm holding on for dearlife, i'm digging my hips into the counter so we don't both go together and i've got my left hand on my radio, trying to communicate priority messages and whilst he was hitting it, it wasjust getting worse and worse. i interpreted at that time that it was obviously going higher. what else would be burning? describing the actions of he and his colleague as they noticed the fire was burning on the outside of g re nfell tower was burning on the outside of grenfell tower work, and as it got worse he described it as a hell like war zone. we also heard about his training, especially around high—rise flat speakers there are a number of these in kensington and
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chelsea. he said he had no training around burning on the outside of a flat. he had up familiarisation visit to grenfell tower in summer 2016, he said he didn't notice the aluminium cladding going up and never would he have expected this type of cladding on a residential block. it's used for diy superstores 01’ block. it's used for diy superstores orfactories. he will finish block. it's used for diy superstores or factories. he will finish giving evidence this afternoon, then it will be the turn of his colleague daniel brown, who was the other firefighter on the scene at grenfell tower. england are preparing for theirfinal group game in the world cup, as they take on belgium this evening. both sides are already through to the knock—out stage — but tonight's result will decide not only who tops the group and also who could get an easier route through the quarter finals by avoiding the tournament favourites, brazil.
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0ur correspondent, sarah rainsford, is in kaliningrad. we still have several hours to go andi we still have several hours to go and i can see things hotting up. they are, the stadium is not open yet for the game but that crowd has been building all day. the belgian fa ns been building all day. the belgian fans have been the noisiest in town today from 7am, singing in the city square, but you can see england flags there and there is a big crowd of england fans on the other side of the square. it is all very friendly, huge amounts of singing, people building up to the match, plenty of beer being drunk in the sunshine. we have been following the england fans for the last two games and they have come out of their shell for this match, at the beginning they were wa ry match, at the beginning they were wary of russia and worried after the violence at the euros and the political atmosphere, but since they have come here they have found a
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warm welcome and started to wear their shirts and wave their flags and create the scenes we associate more normally with england tournaments, so they are with their flags and getting ready for the match and they are allowed daring to begin to dream in amongst this crowd. lots of england fans saying they hope finally england can go quite far, if not all the way. do they want england to win or lose? good question, the belgians are asking the same, they kind of want to win but also one to lose, for us will it be st petersburg or moscow, it's a tricky one, not a normal maps. the losers would avoid facing brazil, and quickly, your prediction for the score? 2-1 to england, maybe. sigh, that was the toughest
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question you had all day. thank you. much more to come from russia throughout the afternoon. but now, let's look at the weather. it is warm, heart and lovely so i don't know what else you have got to say. there is always something else to say. when you think of high temperatures in the uk you think they are in london and the south east. london is 25 celsius because of the breeze. the heat is being pushed towards the north of the uk and that is where we will see the highest of the temperatures and it could be a record. in manchester, they are
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praying for rain but it is not coming? no, there is a chance we might see potentially some rain at the weekend, but not in manchester. heat may ease off a little bit but i wa nt to heat may ease off a little bit but i want to show you the records we've got across scotland and northern ireland. in scotland we could break the record for the hottestjune day which was set in 1893. but in northern ireland if we get 30.8 or above it could be the highest temperature ever recorded in northern ireland. we are close to 30 degrees now and that was set in 1976 and also 1983. scotland and northern ireland, we could break some records. there is no question at the moment we are facing any water problems? when we were looking at the statistics and we were probably
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talking about them with you, we were looking at the figures until the middle part ofjune. talking to the environment agency, there weren't any concerns about river levels or ground water levels because of the rain we had particularly in the south—east of the uk during the early pa rt south—east of the uk during the early part of the spring. since then, we have not had any rain so things will get worse the longer it stays dry. the fast flowing rivers react more quickly to know rain and then rain. those of the changes you will see when rain does come along but it is dry, hot and sunny for the most part. we shouldn't be moaning, it is good news for those who like this weather. i am complaining, my garden is so dry. i will show you
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what is happening right now. this is zero west wales, beautiful blue skies and these are the highest temperatures, 30 degrees. this is the low cloud we had earlier on, now it has burned. we have seen some fair cloud developing over parts of the south and south east but the low cloud came in this morning thanks to the easterly flow from the north sea. it is still a keen breeze across southern part of the uk and it could play havoc with your hair. a further north winds are lighter and this is where we have the concentration of the highest temperatures. we could get 32 degrees in the glasgow area, just to the north. 30 plus in northern ireland. it leads to a lovely evening, dry, hotand ireland. it leads to a lovely evening, dry, hot and sunny. 0vernight we see some changes
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because more cloud is coming in to the north sea and the onshore breeze will take it inland particularly across england, but into northern and eastern areas. where we started off great, temperatures will be slower to rise but the cloud should be burning. away from here, you don't have to go very far, those temperatures continue to climb. the highest temperatures further west across the uk. not as hot tomorrow in scotland, more like the mid to high 20s. could get 30 again across western parts of northern ireland and to the west of london. high pressure has brought this heat and dry weather but the weather front threatens a shower over the far north—west of scotland. many in the bay of biscay during the second half of the weekend. but on the whole we are drawing the air from the near continent so there will still be a lot of heat and dry weather.
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saturday looks like a lovely day, low cloud and misty weather retreating back to the coast, but for most places it will be dry and sunny. temperatures around the mid 20s further north of the uk. beginning to rise in the south—east. stronger winds on sunday, perhaps the chance of a shower. later on in the chance of a shower. later on in the day, across northern ireland. 100 soldiersjoined 100 soldiers joined firefighters to tackle a blaze on saddleworth moor. it is under control for now but the hot weather is not helping. eu leaders arriving in brussels for talks are expected to tell theresa may time is running out for a deal on brexit. i think both sides are keen to continue the work at a
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faster pace than we have done up until now and we would welcome that. the pressure is off, england fans prepare for tonight's world cup match against belgium and russian knowing england are already through to the final 16. temperatures are forecast to soar at the weekend as the heat wave across the uk continues. let's get the sport now. we are talking world cup, england but we are talking an interesting dilemma as well if they should win or lose? it is so relaxed. it is unusual because england and belgium are already through. this is the battle to finish top of the grid but it is whether either team wants to. the belgian manager has hinted he will make a lot of changes because if you are group winners, arguably you would have a tougher time in the
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quarterfinals, that is if england win and get into the last eight. brazil may be lurking there but if england were to finish second, lots are saying it will be better and they would face the winner of group h will bejapan, they would face the winner of group h will be japan, senegal or colombia with possibly a quarterfinal with sweden or switzerland. but it needs to be about momentum and performance. considering what has happened to germany. we have had matches where we have been dominating the game so much that it can lead to a lapse of concentration and we got caught a bit towards the end of the game with panama. we won't have that opportunity to re cover won't have that opportunity to recover from those things against the very top teams. that is the nature of tournaments. looking to be in that nice position, simon.
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absolutely, and unusual for in that nice position, simon. absolutely, and unusualfor england fans. hinting at the change of the belgian line—up? fans. hinting at the change of the belgian line-up? romelu lukaku will be out. but for england, it will be interesting to see if gareth southgate sticks with the raheem sterling goes with marcus rashford. there are hints jamie vardy will start ahead of harry kane. also eric dier might come in forjordan henderson. it is a seven o'clock kick—off so it won't take us too long to find out the team news but the group h games are about to get under way and john bennett is in samarra for senegal against colombia. john, interest in this group as to how it turns out for england fans? yes, who would england rather not play, japan, colombia or senegal? here in samarra, so many
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yellow shirts. it is a colombian ta ke over yellow shirts. it is a colombian takeover at this stadium. look at the table, how close it is to let you know what the permutations are. japan and senegal need a point in their respective games to take them through. colombia could also go through. colombia could also go through with a points but they could do with a win and they will probably be the team that england would rather avoid. we saw them dismantling poland on sunday. fabulous 3—0 when. rodriguez is in great form, he has scored six, assisted with four goals as well. senegal have the star of liverpool, sadio mane, it will be terrific. colombia against senegal. senegal need a point, colombia need a win. kick—off in about 20 minutes and you can kick—off in about 20 minutes and you ca n follow kick—off in about 20 minutes and you can follow them on the bbc. new zealand women are playing south africa in bristol. england are in
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action later with the number of permutations possible that as well for sunday's final. south africa won the toss and batted first and made 148 from 20 overs. new zealand are 21 without loss in reply. if new zealand win this game, south africa are eliminated and it will be new zealand and england in the final on sunday. if south africa win this first game it does keep the series alive. that is all the sport for now. the duke of cambridge has visited some sacred sites in jerusalem on the final day of his tourin jerusalem on the final day of his tour in the middle east. he spent time at the temple mount as well as the western wall and the church of the western wall and the church of the holy sepulchre. he made a poignant visit to the final resting place of his great—grandmother, princess alice. very symbolic, this
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visit today, how significant is it being seen? jerusalem is at the heart of the israel palestinian conflict, so this was a sensitive visit, lots of security around as prince william went through these religious sites. he was, we were told, the first british royal to visit the al aqsa mosque compound and go inside the golden topped dome and go inside the golden topped dome and be shown around by islamic authorities. he went to the western wall which so many vips do here on private visits. that is where the war black, jewish prayer and put a note into the wall. he was accompanied by the chief british rabbi and the rabbi in charge of the side. then he went to wear many christians believe marks the spot where jesus was christians believe marks the spot wherejesus was crucified and then buried. this was the religious part of his trip. also a time that was
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very personal because he went to the tomb of his great—grandmother, princess alice of greece. she is a name that has come up repeatedly this week because she is recognised in israel as being a holocaust hero because she hid a jewish family in nazi occupied athens during the second world war and she is remembered at the holocaust museum which prince william went to and that was his first official engagement in israel. he has expressed hopes for lasting peace between israelis and palestinians, is that as far as he can go diplomatically on a visit like this? all royal visits are supposed to be nonpolitical but from the outset, people said because he's coming here everything is politicised and it is going to be an unprecedented, diplomatic challenge. i think palace officials will be satisfied with how it went. he did a delicate balancing
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act between the israeli and palestinian sides. he wanted to learn about the conflict so he was talking to politicians, chatting with them, but he didn't make much in the way of official comments. meeting them, he was just expressing his desire for peace here. the prince was meeting a greater diversity of society than you would haveif diversity of society than you would have if he was a politician visiting. he met more young people, people he was told could shape the future, people who take part in cultural events. for the prince it would have been eye opening. in general, the view on both sides is this was a positive royal visit, this was a positive royal visit, this historic first by the royal family in visiting both israel and the occupied palestinian territories. thank you very much. the meeting between president trump and vladimir putin has been confirmed for the 16th ofjuly in helsinki. it will be the first
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summer between the two leaders since donald trump came to office and the second time they have met. the meeting will follow the nato summit and mrtrump's meeting will follow the nato summit and mr trump's visit to the united kingdom. the parliamentary committee that oversees the work of the intelligence and security services has accused the uk of tolerating inexcusable treatment of detainees by the united states. there were 13 incidents after the september the 11th terror attacks where detainees we re 11th terror attacks where detainees were mistreated by the us. the committee found no evidence uk officers carried out physical mistreatment. we will be bringing you the business news in a moment, but first the headlines on afternoon live. 100 soldiers arrived to help firefighters tackle all and blazing greater manchester. it has been burning forfour greater manchester. it has been burning for four days greater manchester. it has been burning forfour days a greater manchester. it has been burning for four days a last weeks because of the weather. eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks despite being told time is running out to strike a deal.
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theresa may is confident of making progress. the pressure is off. england fans prepare for the world cup match against belgian and russia knowing england are already through to the final 16. the business headlines. energy supplier as as he has paid £190,000 in compensation to customers after it pulled out of a partnership with another energy company. ss was meant to offer a new tariff to its customers in 49 days but it took almost six months. it said it had compensated all customers and have a customer support team for those who needed further help. stagecoach has confirmed an £85.5 million hit after being stripped of the east coast main line ‘s franchise by the government. it said it had learned lessons. the group
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which ran the line as a joint venture with virgin says it was disappointed of the gusts of the failed franchise. shares in greene king fell 11% after it said on president it cost rises caused a slump in profits. even so, sales are calculated before those sales are calculated before those sales are calculated before those sales are taken into account. bad weather earlier in the year, weak consumer confidence and tougher competition were to blame. a suspicion that some of these hotel booking sites are being run in a slightly dodgy way? a cavalier way, i'm not sure what your word we should use. it is from the competition watchdog. it has been looking at the way, you know when you go to a site and you look at it and then you will think you will compere it and you see only one room or two rooms left. other sites do
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the same, you'll only have five minutes left. this is something which the way the world works. minutes left. this is something which the way the world worksm doesn't make it right. it depends what you mean? it is misleading. a lot of other people could be looking at it as well, but it is not the way in which you should be selling things. also the way discounts, they put discounts on and you think you have worked out how much it will cost and then you pay the bill at the end of it and you think, that is not quite what i thought it was going to be. the competition market authority has been saying, some of the sites are doing this and they have got to stop. we will talk to the project director at the competition markets authority. 0ne of the things about this, you don't name any names, nobody we can point
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finger at? no, we have spent several months investigating these companies and getting under the skin of what is happening. we have a procedure to follow so legally we cannot name the businesses at this point. if we conclude there is a breach of consumer protection law we expect the companies to change and that point we will name them. you are not clear they have actually breached consumer law. is it a suspicion or do you have hard proof they are misleading us, as simon was saying? we have a lot of evidence about the different practices they are carrying out. they have to be given an opportunity to respond, which we will listen to and then make a decision if there had been a breach of consumer law. give me a description of what they tend to do? we have concerns about the way search results are presented. hotels
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pay commission to decide some very often that commission will play a role in were about the list of hotels they appear. consumers may see hotels they appear. consumers may see hotels not necessarily that of the best for them but the ones who pay more to appear on the list. there are issues around what consumers there are issues around what consumers find as aggressive practice or pressure selling, where they are told there is only one room left, or there are 15 people looking right now. we sometimes see time—limited offers that aren't necessarily as time—limited as they appear. we have concerns consumers are feeling rushed into buying, booking a hotel without taking the time to find the deal best for them. 0ne time to find the deal best for them. one thing you mentioned about them paying commission. if i am a hotel andi paying commission. if i am a hotel and i paid a large commission to one of these booking sites, do i not
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expect to have my hotel right at the top? is there anything wrong with that? one of the things we're looking at is whether or not the sites are clear enough to consumers about how this commission works. consumers, if they are going to buy a product, they need to know what is being recommended to them is recommended because it is the best thing for them, rather than because somebody has paid for it. in other situations you would expect them to be labelled as adverts so consumers know it is not a genuine, independent recommendation, but it is an advertised products. that is where we are focusing, to see whether or not consumers are being misled about the fact they are not being told adequately about the commission being paid. very briefly, where do you go from here? you seem to be three quarters of the way through and what can you do about this? the next steps we will be
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engaging with the businesses we have decided to take enforcement action against, giving them an opportunity to respond to our concerns. if we think there is a breach of consumer law, we will make them make changes to remedy that. if they don't, we can go to court and get an enforcement order to make them comply with consumer law. thank you very much. quick look at the markets? all of them down, looking a bit sad. pound is looking weaker. 0k, we will talk to you later on. the heatwave across much of the uk is continuing with temperatures predicted to rise at the weekend. in scotla nd predicted to rise at the weekend. in scotland people are enjoying some of the hottest weather for decades. king t hunter is at the glasgow
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botanic gardens. how hot is it? king t hunter is at the glasgow botanic gardens. how hot is mm is pretty hot. it is a beautiful day at the botanic ‘s, dozens of people out soaking up the sunshine and then join this unusual warm weather. people sitting in the shade and i have even spotted the umbrella, which is pretty common in glasgow but usually it is for people sheltering from the rain rather than protecting themselves from the sunshine. it is about 30 celsius. there was talk earlier we might break the record for the hottest june day. the mercury will have to reach 32.2 celsius. that happened in 1893 in perth and kinross. forecasters tell me we are unlikely to reach that level today but gloriously warm day nonetheless. well, enjoy it, we'll be back later to see how you are doing but in the meantime, grab an ice cream or something. let's see how it is for
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the rest of us. it is turning into another dry, hot and sunny day with pretty much wall—to—wall blue skies, strong sunshine as well. that was the picture in warwickshire early on. we started with some low cloud and missed in wiltshire in the morning but that has burned off and we have blue skies across most parts of the uk. boosting those temperatures. mid to high 20s but a few spots will get above 30 degrees. in scotland we may break records here forjune temperatures. 32 possible not far away from glasgow and it could be the hottest day ever in northern ireland if we get 32 degrees to the west. 30 degrees in porthmadog, to the west wales. lovely evening and the west wales. lovely evening and the sunshine, overnight will see more clouds filling in across the north sea. perhaps towards the midlands, towards the west country but more low cloud and misty weather
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across the north and east of scotland. that will limit the temperature rise in the morning but through the early hours the cloud will thin and break and a few patches of low cloud lingering along the north sea coast keeping it cooler and pressure with the easterly breeze. away from here, sunny skies, blue skies and strong sunshine. heat as well so 30 degrees possible in west wales. to the west of northern ireland we probably have had the highest temperature in scotland. this weather front threatens a shower on saturday and this cut—off low perhaps brings one or two showers from the south—west on sunday. 0n the whole, we are drawing the air in from the near continent and that will keep the heat going. sunny skies for the most pa rt heat going. sunny skies for the most part on saturday, just a small chance of a shower in the north west of scotla nd chance of a shower in the north west of scotland and one or two not far away from the isles of scilly be
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plenty of sunshine around, easterly breeze and those temperatures into the mid to high 20s away from the north sea coast. the breeze picks up on sunday and we have the chance of a shower, perhaps in the south—west of wales and later on for northern ireland. so uncertain about the showers on the whole but it looks like it will be dry and be hot and sunny weather will continue in most areas. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm: eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks with warnings that time is running out to strike a brexit deal. but theresa may says she's confident of making progress. i think both sides are keen to continue the work at a faster pace than we have done up until now and we would welcome that. 100 soldiers join firefighters to tackle a vast blaze on saddleworth moor. it's under control for now — but the hot weather isn't helping.
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a firefighter has told the grenfell inquiry that the tower inferno was "like a war zone", with burning debris raining down at a speed that could easily kill someone. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. 0nly hours to go. only hours to go. and it is all rather relaxed for england ahead of their final rather relaxed for england ahead of theirfinal group rather relaxed for england ahead of their final group game against belgium. they have already qualified for the last 16th so all the talk now is about whether it is best to qualify top or second. and darren has the weather. temperatures are over 30 degrees in some places. the heatwave continues but for how much longer? we will have the forecast for the weekend, and perhaps some rain. hello, everyone.
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this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. the prime minister has arrived in brussels to attend the latest eu summit where she will brief leaders over dinner on progress on brexit. they will warn that time is running out to reach a deal and that sticking points like the irish border still need resolving, but theresa may has told the bbc‘s political editor that she's confident of making progress. as regards brexit, i look forward to talking with fellow leaders about the good progress we have made on the withdrawal agreement and securing our strong future partnership which i believe is in the interests of both the eu and uk. both sides are keen to continue that work at a faster pace than we have until now and we welcome that. other european leaders say that is down to you persuading your cabinet to come together.
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can you really say it's going well when two years on, eu leaders say britain needs to get its act together? we have been setting out our position and at every stage, last december and in march, we have made agreements with the eu on the issues we discussed and agreed we will talk about. now we will bring the cabinet together in the next week, we will then publish a white paper setting out in more detail what strong partnership the uk wants to see with the eu in future but that is a partnership which i believe is notjust about the interests of the uk but the wider interests of the eu and that's why i'm confident we can discuss that at pace and ensure we achieve what we want, which is that continuing partnership with the eu on economic and security matters. do they have to show more
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flexibility as well? are you annoyed about how rigid they have been? we have already been able to encourage and get flexibility from the eu on matters. i will set out our position for the future and what i want to do, what i'm sure leaders want to do, is ensure we can negotiate this for the future because this isn't just about the uk but ensuring we have a partnership that works for us and i believe that will work for the eu as well. jean claude juncker, the european commission president has told the bbc that preparations are being made for a no—deal on brexit. i don't have to lecture theresa may but i would like to make clear our position, we cannot go on with a
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split cabinet, they have to say what they want and we will respond. split cabinet, they have to say what they want and we will respondm there a risk that there might not be a deal if theresa may doesn't resolve differences? we have prepared for a agreement but in parallel we are working for a new deal scenario. as far as i understand, i was there the other week. i would like us to get the final definite response to the irish problem. i wouldn't like us to be in this situation where the last remaining point would be the irish problem. i don't like that. let's get the view from westminster with our political correspondent, alex forsyth. she's not going to get an easy time
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but she would have expected that.- one point the summit was meant to be a crucial staging point in negotiations, where they hope to reach enough progress on those difficult issues to be able to talk future relations. that will not happen now, this is more about her convincing other eu leaders that she can get her cabinet behind her and come up with a tangible vision of what she wants from brexit so they can what she wants from brexit so they ca n start what she wants from brexit so they can start negotiating in brussels and that will not be easy. you heard jean—claude yunker they're saying they are preparing for the eventuality of no deal. the message from eu leaders is the same as that from eu leaders is the same as that from number 10, they want to reach an agreement, they recognise that it is in the interest of both sides but there are difficult obstacles still to overcome. in terms of the
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infighting at cabinet level, is their pressure on criminal to grab some authority and tell people to stop carping? i think when she addresses eu leaders tonight, this will be a reflection of progress so far but perhaps on the sidelines, she will have to convince the eu she can restore authority to her cabinet and the calls for her to do that are coming from westminster. a former aide, nick, take wrote an article in the daily telegraph today advising theresa may to take a tougher approach to those who have been speaking differently on brexit. she will get them together next week and asked to thrash out an agreement so she can publish this detailed paper about what the uk once and the deadline is short. she needs that agreement by october. imagine how long it has taken to get to this
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point in negotiations and some of the most difficult issues are still on the table. 0ne one of the other issues being discussed today between theresa may and her counterpart is a certain belgian football match. this is what happened at a short while ago, an exchange of signatures and then this, so the belgian prime minister charles michelle and theresa may having a hug and a laugh before kick—off. the two teams meet tonight, some pressure on both teams tonight, some pressure on both teams to win but also to lose, because depending on the score, that will decide who they meet in the next round. both through to the last 16, kick—off at 7pm and theresa may and her belgian counterpart having a lighter moment in what is a pretty
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difficult day for all those involved in those talks in brussels. the meeting between president trump and the russian president, vladimir putin, has been confirmed for the 16th ofjuly in helsinki. it'll be the first summit between the two leaders since donald trump came to office, and the second time they have met. the meeting will follow the nato summit, and mr trump's visit to london. around 100 soldiers have arrived in greater manchester to help firefighters battle a huge moorland blaze that has been burning forfour days. fire chiefs say they fear it could last for weeks because of the continuing hot weather. the troops — from the 11th battalion, royal regiment of scotland — arrived overnight to help tackle the seven square miles of saddleworth moor, which have been smouldering with pockets of fire since sunday. judith moritz reports. boots on the ground. the army arrived this morning to add their efforts to the firefight. big thank you to you and to your officers for coming... they were welcomed by the fire service, who will now battle the blaze for a fourth day, with the military by their side. 100 troops are being sent, arriving in groups of 30.
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from our own point of view, this is really important, because this shows some of the training that we've done, we rise to the challenge with our partner agencies to support them as and when they require it. this morning, conditions seemed still, but it's a deceptive peace. the moor is still alight, smoke rising across the horizon as peat burns underground. conditions still posing a risk. we only need a change in wind direction to then see that fire increasing into where the greater fuel source is, so we could see a dramatic change, and that's why having the resources on scene, immediately ready, and the support of the armed services, is extremely important. another nervous morning for those living in these houses next to the moor. but amongst these hills, there are reservoirs full of water. it's just a matter of getting it to the right place. helicopters are being used to drop gallons onto pockets of fire.
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it's the terrain which makes it so hard to fight this fire. engines and equipment have to get to remote areas, and when they arrive, the crews are working long hours in the blistering heat. it's notjust the fire service — park rangers are here, too, with mountain rescue teams and ambulance support nowjoined by the soldiers. currently, we've broken our boys down into various locations and we're beating the fire with paddles. we're supporting them by moving equipment, we're putting water on the fires and we're doing everything we can to stop this fire at the moment. the fire service says it most needs a significant downpour of rain, but none has been forecast for at least a week. this is the best chance of keeping the moors wet. and as they continue to smoulder, a pall of pollution and smoke hangs in the air. the effects of this fire go far beyond these moors. 0ur correspondent danny savage
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is at swineshaw reservoir. it's almost idyllic here because it is a beautiful warm sunny day but there is a smell of burning heather and peat wafting across the reservoir. you can see over the other side of the water there are a group of firefighters trying to deal with one section of smoking moorland, using their beaters to try to stop that smoke point spreading the fire any further towards the green foliage, and that is a scene that has been repeated 80, 100, 150 times across this moorland. every few moments you hear the beat of helicopter blades in the distance as those special firefighting helicopters have been coming in, occasionally to this one, they have a big bag under the helicopter that dips into the water and they fly away and spread it on to the moor, so there is a lot of that going on,
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we have the army here as well, about 60—80 soldiers have been brought in from catterick to help the firefighters. each firefighter has three or four soldiers allocated so they get looked after well they do theirjob, and it's a case of beating those flames with those beaters to stop it from spreading. it's a lot better this afternoon than it was this time yesterday, a lot less smoke and a lot less smog as a result over manchester. but that impportant weather forecast, because it's notjust whether the wind increases but whether it changes direction or not. yes, today we had no breeze at all after quite a strong easterly yesterday which blew the smoke westwards over manchester. the breeze has come up a little way again in the last half hour and the fear is that breeze will get up more as the day goes on,
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potentially spreading the fires, because at the moment the fire brigade say all the fires are under control but that could change if the wind changes direction or rises. coupled to that, there is no real rain fall for the next 7—10 days and they will be here at least that long and maybe longer because once that peat starts to burn, it burns for ages until it gets a good dousing of rainwater on it. that was danny savage. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks with warnings that time is running out to strike a brexit deal. but theresa may says she's confident of making progress. the fire brigade say there have been significant improvement in the fires raging across moorland east of manchester.
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a firefighter has told the grenfell inquiry that the tower inferno was "like a war zone", with burning debris raining down at a speed that could easily kill someone. and in sport, england are getting set for the final world cup group game against belgium, knowing they are already through, but who will they play in the next round? colombia, who need a win, are taking on senegal, who could make do with a draw. and andy murray says he will probably make a decision on whether to play in wimbledon before the draw is made tomorrow. i will be back with more on those stories at 3:30pm. let's get more now on the eu summit in brussels — theresa may is to brief leaders over dinner on progress on brexit. angela merkel has called on member states to mount a united approach to
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migration or risk eroding the eu's values. that is an issue which is worrying eu leaders. brexit is a conversation for dinner. it is but this will be one of the more difficult summits these leaders have faced in many a year because it is not just brexit but faced in many a year because it is notjust brexit but also migration and that transatlantic relationship with the us because sunlight at midnight those reciprocal eu tariffs will be imposed on the us and who knows what reaction we will get from donald trump. it seems to be a pattern of that relationship going downhill that worries the eu. 0n the sidelines to date somebody told me that when donald trump comes in july, there is still no meeting scheduled with jean—claude juncker, which tells us what he thinks about the eu. let's go back to migration.
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ironic we are crisis point when you look at the figures because 114,000 have arrived this year, compared to 2.5 point when you look at the figures because 114,000 have arrived this year, compared to 2.5 million in 2015 and 2016, but this crisis is there because there is a severe problem within germany italians don't want to be the germans are facing problems with their sister party, the csu, angela merkel has been told unless she finds a solution to migration into their country, the interior minister will close the border. is it as dire as that? could it pull apart the german government? that remains to be seen. at least when these discussions are set in that context, they are trying to find a new solution to address those problems, and one of those is
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setting out this idea about disembarkation platforms, two separate economic migrants from people who were deserving of international protection. i'm confused by this because it seems they are foursquare behind the idea that the north africans who were supposed to host these camps or processing centres, don't want them. nobody has said they are interested in participating in these schemes, on top of that the member states you wa nt on top of that the member states you want the international organisation for migration and the un refugee agency to participate in those platforms but those two organisations are more in tune with having these platforms within the eu and not necessarily on the african coast. one thing viewers might not understand is that within the eu
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there is such a difference in approach to asylum seekers, so if you go to one country you might have a1% you go to one country you might have a 1% chance of success for our 5% chance of success, and that is driving asylum seekers. they have been discussing these issues for some time. the border planned to date was addressed the dublin regulation but that has been postponed and that is part of a broader reform of the eu asylum laws, to address those issues of secondary movement so there would be more harmonisation among member states. thank you very much. some agreement on strengthening border patrols but not much in terms of allocation. written is part of this debate and theresa may speaking to alexis tsipras, the greek prime minister, has promised to send a
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patrol boat to patrol the aegean sea, to help with the process. thank you, christian. joining me now is hilary benn, chair of the exiting the eu committee, and when you hear jean—claude yunker saying they are preparing for a crash out of the eu for the preparing for a crash out of the eu forthe uk, preparing for a crash out of the eu for the uk, how do you react to that? that is pretty alarming and we should all be worried because one thing is clear, falling out of the eu with no deal would be damaging to the british economy, bad for the rest of the eu and that's why we have to make progress on getting the best dealfor britain have to make progress on getting the best deal for britain as we leave and this summit, a few weeks ago, was billed as the one where progress would have to be made on the problem ofan would have to be made on the problem of an open border in northern ireland, it doesn't look like that will happen, i think there will be
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little discussion by heads of government on brexit because they are occupied by other matters, so there is one more european council left in october if we stick to the deadline but the government hasn't even worked out what it wants to ask for when it comes to future trading relationships, which is why the prime minister is taking her cabinet to chequers in a few times to sort this out. no wonder business is losing patience. i wonder if you agree with nick timothy hugh says that time for playing nice is over, it's time we toughened up.|j that time for playing nice is over, it's time we toughened up. i don't really know what he means by that because threatening to damage your own economy by saying we will walk away is not very credible and it wastes time when what the government should be focusing on is sorting out what it wants to ask for. of course
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these will be tough negotiations but if you were still arguing amongst the members of your cabinet over what kind of customs arrangements you want with our biggest and nearest trading partner, that will not help you to get a decent outcome from the talks. but isn't this delayed them to the world of politics, whether within the government or party politics, eve ryo ne government or party politics, everyone sniping at each other and no sense of unity and that is what the eu sees? there is no doubt the conservative party is divided on the subject of europe. but labour, if it was pushed to give any signal of unity, could not do so either. it's a general problem of politics in this country. brexit has divided the country and divided parties and divided parliament, but the
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government is in power and the government is in power and the government has a responsibility not to spend time trying to manage party politics, but to provide leadership in the national interest because there's a huge amount at stake for there's a huge amount at stake for the future of our economy and society and tax revenues and public services and my criticisms is that the government has spent too long arguing amongst itself when it needs to come up with a plan which can then be put to brussels so the negotiations can begin, and as we said in the select committee report published today, time is running out and in the end it will be parliament that decides what happens because it brexit to some people was about taking back control, parliament must have the final decision and it's important that parliament can express its view and advised the government on how to proceed when it
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comes back at the end of negotiations. i suspect you hear voters however they voted, saying for heaven's sake just get on with it and that is the frustration out in the country and in brussels among eu leaders and it is only not dealt within the world of politics, is the sense one gets. we do need to get on with that because the deadline for leaving the eu in march next year is rapidly approaching but you have to decide what kind of relationship you wa nt after we decide what kind of relationship you want after we leave and that's why this debate about customs arrangements misses the point. we should stay in a customs union, it's what british business once and... but isn't this the problem? you say the government needs to come to a conclusion but here you are saying you don't want that. this is the
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problem people say, they switch on the tv, you were saying we just want to know what theresa may once, she has told people what she wants and you are saying you don't want that. i think the government is wrong to say we should leave the customs union and the cbi thinks they are wrong and a lot of businesses think they are wrong because they worry about what it would do, delays at the border, rules of origin, customs declarations, there is a responsibility on the government to pursue the right policy in the interests of the nation and i will not apologise for pointing out when iand not apologise for pointing out when i and the labour party think the government's approach is wrong and if the government was prepared to compromise among its members and seek a sensible consensus within parliament, it would be easier to
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proceed but the prime minister remains in to divisions within her party which is why the cabinet will be meeting, two years after the referendum, because they still can't reach a decision. you were right, people do say to me, why can we get on with it, but this is a complex process because over the last 45 yea rs process because over the last 45 years the legal structure, the way we live as a result of being in the eu, you cannot just we live as a result of being in the eu, you cannotjust pull it apart and replace it with nothing. it has to work in the best interests of britain and all i have argued for, because i accept the outcome of the referendum, i argued for the best dealfor britishjobs referendum, i argued for the best deal for british jobs and investment and families in the future but that requires the government to come up with an approach that can give us that and the clock is ticking. hilary benn, thank you forjoining
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us. the parliamentary committee that oversees the work of the intelligence and security services has accused the uk of tolerating "inexcusable" treatment of detainees by the united states. it says intelligence staff witnessed thirteen incidents after the september 11th terror attacks in 2001 where detainees were mistreated by the us. but the committee found no evidence that uk officers carried out physical mistreatment. conservative mp dominic grieve chairs the committee. we have not found any evidence of uk personnel carrying out physical treatment but we have found evidence of verbal threats and being party to mistreatment by others. 0ur security correspondent, gordon corera is here with me now.
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this suggests there were uk intelligence officers in the room when torture was going on. we knew there had been questions about complicity from the uk and us mistreatment but also other countries and so—called rendition when people are transferred to other countries to be tortured but we got more detail about what that involved, so in a couple of places people were party to mistreatment. that implies they were not necessarily doing whatever nasty thing was being done but they were involved in some way, in 13 cases they witnessed it. in 232 cases they supplied intelligence and questions for interrogation despite knowing or suspecting people were being mistreated, so you get a sense of something quite large and varied but
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ona something quite large and varied but on a scale. it is a damning report but we're talking about a period just after 2001, tempers were afraid and emotions were running high. the context is important because this was a period where you had these attacks which felt like they had come out of nowhere, people felt more acute attacks could come with significant loss of light, so there was a willingness to do things differently to gain intelligence. what is complicated here is that britain seems to have known the us has suddenly started playing by different rules, so caa officials breached senior m15 and m16 officials but the british officials don't seem to have taken what they said seriously. british officers in the field start reporting back
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things are happening, what do we do about it? they didn't have guidance telling them how to respond to this because it was unprecedented and the sense you get from the report, senior leadership figures were slow to understand what was going on and there is a question whether that was wilful slowness, and slow to develop policies to deal with that american behaviour. wondering where this puts it now, it is still quite coded in some ways but in terms of saying the uk knew what was happening and witnessed it and yet is not responsible, is that there conclusion? those whose families we re conclusion? those whose families were victims of some of these alleged torturers are saying this still doesn't tell us much about what happened. in the last month the british government offered an apology in one specific case to do
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with libya and there are other cases where there may be legal action against the uk government and the report says there is one case where the police may need to look at it, but it's partly about the past but also about whether the guidance is there now and the committee is critical of current guidance. some would say you do need guidance, it's clearly against international law. but the problem for intelligence officers on the ground is that their bosses were not giving them any sense of the boundaries and legal guidance. there is now consolidated guidance. there is now consolidated guidance which is meant to give clarity but the committee still has concerns whether there has been sufficient review of that and enough i can't think of the kind of cases coming up, the fact that policy still doesn't deal with rendition, in which britain was clearly more
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involved than we thought, so there are concerns about whether enough has been done to prevent the kind of problems we saw in that period happening again. that would be the main question you would want to assess, could this happen again? that would be a unique time post 9/11. policies could change once again of our closest allies and what they were willing to do maybe different now under president trump than they were under president trump than they were under president 0bama. britain's spies would be put in a compromising position. if you suspect your closest ally is doing something, what do you do, how do you respond, how far do you go, what questions to you as? what are the limits of your cooperation, when do you step away? you can imagine scenarios when they
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can emerge. gordon, thank you very much for that story. now, the weather we are hearing it is record—breaking. record breaking temperatures reached in porthmadog, i think that was an area we were talking about earlier on and more detail about that later on but let's get the rest of the forecast. we have try, hot and sunny weather and we could be setting new records in the west of scotland with temperatures into the height 20s. more low cloud and misty weather coming back in towards the midlands, the west country and low cloud for the west country and low cloud for the north and east of scotland. those are temperatures overnight and the rising temperature will be delayed by the grey start we have in some areas. for the most part it is going to be another dry, hot and sunny day and the heat is further
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towards the west of course and we will see temperatures close to 30 degrees in the western side of northern ireland and the west of london, as well as west wales. but cooler on those north sea coast. more dry weather to come for most areas and hot sunshine but there is the chance of showers in south—west wales and northern ireland. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks — and despite warnings that time is running out to strike a deal, theresa may says she's confident of making progress. the fire brigade says there's been "significant improvement" in the fires raging across moorside east of manchester after after the army began to help. a firefighter has told the grenfell inquiry that the tower inferno was "like a war zone", with burning debris raining down at a speed that could easily kill somone. england expects — the three lions face belgium tonight in theirfinal
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group game of the world cup. which leads us immediately into the sport bulletin, sarah. the countdown is on. england will face belgium at 7pm and both teams are already through to the last 16 so this is a battle as to who will finish top of group g, if either team really wants to. let's cross live to natalie perks. a lot of talk as we mentioned about where you would want to finish in this group, i wonder what the feeling is on that from the england camp? there is two different thoughts. a lot ofjournalists chatting amongst themselves and thinking it wouldn't be a bad thing to come second but when it comes to
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gareth southgate and the team, they are only talking about winning this match. if you come top in the group you are looking at a trip to where it is rising to 39 degrees. we have a colleague who says he don't go out in the day, it is too hot. it is one—day's less rest but if you finish second you had to moscow with 24 finish second you had to moscow with 2a hours more rest. if you got past senegal and columbia u could face brazil in the quarterfinals. the trip to moscow could give you sweden or switzerland in the quarters. the problem is, you are talking about engineering a result which means losing orjust plain for a draw or trying to pick up yellow cards and thatis trying to pick up yellow cards and that is something england are not going to do. they have been building positivity and momentum to this point and there is no way tonight they will try to do anything but win
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they will try to do anything but win the game. do you think we will see many changes or will he stick with the team similar to the pan again? we are expecting to see maybe up to six changes. he was talking about harmony trying to keep people happy you haven't kicked a ball get and keep the momentum going. we expect jamie vardy to start, picked up his 24th for england, he has scored seven goals. that would mean harry came dropping to the bench. he is on fire and he won't like that position when he is chasing the golden boot. eric dier could come into midfield, the likes of kieran trippier, has been playing well but he had strapping on his leg and maybe he could start trent alexander—arnold. kyle walker will not be risked because he is on your low card so we could see jones or cahill come
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because he is on your low card so we could seejones or cahill come in for him. martinez could make some changes so it will be a strange game but it could include the most premier league players in history. the final group games in group h are taking place. senegal is taking on columbia and that is live on bbc 0ne. columbia and that is live on bbc one. a big loss for colombia because rodriguez has gone off injured. then elsewhere on bbc two, if japan, rodriguez has gone off injured. then elsewhere on bbc two, ifjapan, who are elsewhere on bbc two, ifjapan, who u elsewhere on bbc two, ifjapan, who are group leaders take your fancy you can watch them against poland. poland are already out. japan just need a point and that would see them progress to level on points with senegal. and that is all the sport for now. sarah, thank you very much. one of the first firefighters to enter the burning grenfell tower
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has described fire raining down from above as he held a colleague's legs so he could lean out of a window to fight the flames. charles batterbee described the unbelievable scene at the public inquiry today, saying how he tried to stop crew mate daniel brown falling out of the window as he fought the fire with a heavy hose. earlier, i spoke to my colleague frankie mccamley, who was outside the inquiry. it has been emotional for charles batters by, it has been emotional for charles battersby, he was one of the first firefighters on the scene and he and a colleague daniel brown, went to flat 16 on the fourth floor where the fire started. he broke down earlier on and the enquiry had to be paused. it has just been paused again to allow him to collect himself. it is very emotional evidence, taking them back to the night of the fire. what charles batters by night of the fire. what charles battersby described is breaking down this door, going in and seeing the fire for the first time and then
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thinking they had put the fire out. they make their way into the kitchen and then from there, they see flames on the outside and this is what charles battersby told the enquiry earlier on as to what they did next. the amount of the debris and the noise and how rapid, and when i say violent i mean it just rained fire. that, to me, at that time i was thinking it's coming back to shepherd's bush court, it's jumping multiple floors. this isn'tjust one or two windows and frames that have failed and come down, this is lots and it was getting worse. it didn't slow, it just got worse, if anything, so that's why for me at that time, you have to imagine clinging onto danny by the ba strap, he's got a hose which weighs a lot and he's got that hose outside the window.
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lam digging i am digging my hips into the counter so we don't go together. he has leant right outside the window and i'm holding on for dearlife, i'm digging my hips into the counter so we don't both go together and i've got my left hand on my radio, trying to communicate priority messages and whilst he was hitting it, it wasjust getting worse and worse. i interpreted at that time that it was obviously going higher. what else would be burning? describing the actions of he and his colleague as they noticed the fire was burning on the outside of grenfell tower, and as it got worse he described it as hell, like war zone. we also heard about his training, especially around high—rise flats because there are a number of these in kensington and chelsea. he said he had no training around burning on the outside of a flat. he had a familiarisation visit to grenfell tower in summer 2016, he said he didn't notice
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the aluminium cladding going up and never would he have expected this type of cladding on a residential block. it's used for diy superstores or factories. the duke of cambridge has visited some ofjerusalem's most sacred religious sites, on the final day of his tour of the middle east. he spent time at the temple mount, also known as haram al—sharif as well as the western wall and the church of the holy sepulchre. the duke also made a poignant visit to the final resting place of his great—grandmother, princess alice. this report from our royal correspondent nicholas witchell contains some flash photography. it is a city which has a sacred significance for the followers of three different faiths — judaism, islam and christianity. from the mount of 0lives, william looked over to the old city ofjerusalem, fought over in centuries past and still a place of dispute. 0n temple mount, venerated by bothjews and muslims,
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he visited the al—aqsa mosque, the third holiest site in the islamic faith. the imams who showed him around said william's visit had sent a message of hope and support. the church of the holy sepulchre is one of the holiest places in the christian faith. william was shown a spot where it is said christ was crucified. the western wall is a sacred place for people of the jewish faith. it is the only surviving section of a jewish temple built more than 2000 years ago. william followed tradition and placed a note with his own prayer in the wall and then stood in silent contemplation. that he has been moved by what he has seen over the past few days in israel and yesterday in the occupied palestinian territories is not in doubt. this visit has achieved two things in particular.
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for britain, it has shown its evenhanded approach to the israelis and the palestinians. for william, it has shown he is more than able to handle such a sensitive visit. he returns to britain with his experience broadened and knowing that an important visit has been accomplished successfully. nicholas witchell, bbc news, jerusalem. the amount of taxpayers' money spent on the queen in the past year has risen by 13% — partly because of refurbishment works at buckingham palace, taking the queen's total spend
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for the last financial year to more than £47 million pounds. staff and travel costs are also up. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. next year, work starts here, the east wing. 10,000 precious artefacts will have to be moved and although palace officials hope it will be business as usual, there is speculation the balcony, the stage for so many royal celebrations, including trooping the colour, may be out of action. in total the cost of refurbishing buckingham palace has been put at 316 e9 of refurbishing buckingham palace has been put at 316 £9 million and the sovereign grants, the amount of tax payer money given to the monarchy has been increased significantly to cover those costs. also revealed in the royal accounts, other costs including travel. the most expensive by far, the trip made in autumn of last year by prince charles to india and the far east. the prince was also revealed to have
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used the royal train seven times. £21,000, the cost of this one journey from london to durham. anti—monarchy campaigners dispute the palace's claims that value for money is always considered. there is plenty of evidence the main and deciding factor of how prince charles travels, is prince charles. he likes the status and the privacy of his own transport. the royal train needs to be scrapped. the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry are funded by their father using income from his private estate, the duchy of cornwall. those accou nts estate, the duchy of cornwall. those accounts show the young royals have cost [11% more than the previous year. is it increased down to the new duchess of sussex? officials refused to comment. jamie is here — in a moment he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news.
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first a look at the headlines on afternoon live eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks — despite warnings that time is running out to strike a deal, theresa may says she's confident of making progress. the fire brigade says there's been "significant improvement" in the fires raging across moorside east of manchster after the army began to help. a firefighter has told the grenfell inquiry that the tower inferno was "like a war zone", with burning debris raining down at a speed that could easily kill somone. could easily kill someone. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. energy supplier sse has paid £190,000 in compensation to customers after it pulled out of a partnership with another energy company ebico. sse was meant to offer a new tariff to its customers in 49 days. instead it took almost six months. sse said it had now compensated all the customers affected and had a customer support team for those who needed further help. transport giant stagecoach has confirmed an £85.6 million hit
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after being stripped of the east coast main line franchise by the government, and said it had learned "lessons" forfuture bids. the group, which ran the line as a joint venture with virgin, said it was "disappointed" by the costs of the failed franchise. shares in uk beer and pubs group greene king fell 11% in early trade after it said "unprecedented" cost rises had caused a slump in profits. even so group revenues, that's sales before costs are taken into account, were also down almost 2% to £2.2 billion and chief executive rooney anand said bad weather early in the year, weak consumer confidence and tougher competition were to blame. bp is buying charge master, and
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u nless bp is buying charge master, and unless you have an electric car, you won and they are. they provide the public things you plug your car into. so why is an oil company buying an electric charging company? they are saying it is the future. from bp's point of view it is not expensive. they are putting a bit of investment into something that could turn out to be very big. in a year, they want to have all their service stations to have chargemaster points where you can charge up your electric car. it really is a sort of turning point in many ways, possibly. there is a huge amount of infrastructure that has to go with it at the right place and at the right time which has to be coordinated in with it all, but it is definitely a sort of turning point. we saw shell doing a similar thing. the worry would be i suppose,
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if it is an oil company wanting to buy something, they only do something eventually to make money. to guard themselves as well against being caught out. you want to be in the forefront of this, you don't wa nt to the forefront of this, you don't want to be catching up at the last minute. some people would say bp are too far ahead of the curve because just ten years ago it actually started going on with this idea of being beyond petroleum. it dropped that but now it seems to have come back into the fray. this is what victoria fritz said about it. this is one of many investments they have started to make. this company has $500 million every year to plough into renewable energy technology. for a company the size of bp, £130 million for this company is pocket change. what they get from this is interesting, they deliver these
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packages themselves, they also sell the technology into private homes. not only do they get the public charging points, they get the technology that ends up on gardens and from lawns, anywhere people will be installing these charging points. they have access to a subscriber base of 40,000 customers. they get to find out how people are behaving, how often people are charging and how often people are charging and how long people are driving their ca rs how long people are driving their cars for. that information is crucial and lucrative indeed. talking about data, i got a letter from currys this morning saying my data might have been hacked and now ticketmaster saying they have had a problem and this is getting common? this story has a little bit of a way to go but ticketmaster said some of their accounts have been hacked and financial details have been hacked. they said this onjune 23, monzo, a
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challenge bank, said it had warned them that their accounts probably had been hacked back in april. it had been hacked back in april. it had a meeting, it says with ticketmaster on april 12 and said they had talked about it and ticketmaster had gone away and said they would do something about it but they would do something about it but they didn't go public with it until june the 23rd. the general data protection regulations we know all about, you have to announce, you have to declare any data protection breach within 72 hours. as this is not 72 hours, it is a lot longer and the story has a little way to go. this is monzo saying, this is what they did. we will have to see what happens next. music streaming? this is merlin. fascinating company.
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it isa this is merlin. fascinating company. it is a company which has customers and 20,000 music label. it goes out and 20,000 music label. it goes out and sells them to digital providers like apple and spotify. it is owned bya like apple and spotify. it is owned by a foundation which is nonprofit making. it sells the agreements worldwide to use this music. making. it sells the agreements worldwide to use this musicm making. it sells the agreements worldwide to use this music. it is a broker in effect? it is, it distributes the money back to its 20,000 members. the money distributed last year is half a billion and it is going up every year. we can talk to head of research at an
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analysis company. how does merlin make its money? it was established ten years ago to provide an agency service to uk in deep and on labels, they were the first group of people that came on board. uk independent labels, they are small labels, it is not universal music group or sony but companies to small to do their own licensing by themselves, in fact they wouldn't be able to do it at all. merlin aggregates the catalogue on offer and sells the entire catalogue to all you can eat it music streaming services like spotify you mention, but also sound cloud, they have about 25 digital partners right now. the beauty of it
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is each of these single companies wouldn't be able to do it on their own. but the other thing is, wouldn't be able to do it on their own. but the otherthing is, it wouldn't be able to do it on their own. but the other thing is, it has managed to bring a lot of exciting uk music to the far—flung corners of the year world, in particular to asia and latin america. these are agencies have never given back anything to the recorded music agency and now they are being energised by these digital music services like spotify and that is helping merlin to steam up the payments to the labels and the distributors who are its customers. it is going to places like brazil, brazil is a hotbed of piracy, you didn't pay for music, why are people not paying for music in places like that and paying merlin, who is paying the labels and their artists? there is a difference between paying
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for a cd or there is a difference between paying fora cd ora there is a difference between paying for a cd or a music subscription and a service who can give you lots of enjoyment. the all—you—can—eat service is compelling to the higher income, urban sort of type of consumer that is a large and growing group in all of these emerging markets. as you say, brazil in particular, even though it has a fabulous tradition didn't respect artists' writes. so a consequence of merlin being in those markets, licensing the music, including local artists to these music services is that local artists are getting more exposure and it is fantastic for the creative industries. ok, we will leave it there. it was a little bit difficult to say. if you had had your own teeth, you would have been
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fine. let's look at the markets. after that insults, i am not going to say any more. they have been weak over the last fortnight or so, but they have been a bit stronger. that is your analysis. 32.63 is in porthmadog and wales makes it the hottest day of the year so far today. it is turning into a dry, hot and sunny day with wall—to—wall blue skies and strong sunshine. that is the picture in warwickshire earlier on. the cloud over wiltshire this morning has burned off. temperatures
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mid to high 20s but a few spots will get above 30 degrees. in scotland we may break records forjune temperatures, 30 possible not far from glasgow. 30 degrees across porthmadog in the north—west wales and perhaps 29 to the west of london lovely evening in store with the sunshine overnight. more cloud filling in overnight and drifting inland towards the midlands and the west cou ntry inland towards the midlands and the west country but more low cloud and misty weather to the north and east of scotland. that will limit the temperature rise in the morning but we will see the cloud turning and breaking with a few patches of low cloud and it lingering along the north sea coasts keeping it cooler and fresher with more low cloud. away from here, sunny skies and blue skies, strong sunshine and heat. 30 degrees possible in west wales, to the west of northern ireland but
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they have probably had the highest temperature in scotland at this stage. high pressure still in charge on friday, although this feature threatens a shower in the north of scotla nd threatens a shower in the north of scotland on saturday and this low perhaps brings a few showers to the south west on sunday. on the whole we are drawing at the airing from the near continent and that will keep the heat going. small chance of a shower in the north—west of scotland, one or two not far away from the isles of scilly but plenty of sunshine around. easterly breeze and temperatures into the mid to high 20s away from the north sea coasts. the breeze picks up more on sunday and we have the chance of a shower perhaps in the south west wales and later on for northern ireland. very uncertain about the showers, but on the whole it looks like it will be dry and be hot and sunny weather will continue in most areas. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 4.00pm.
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eu leaders arrive in brussels for talks and despite warnings that time is running out to strike a brexit deal, theresa may says she's confident of progress. i think both sides are keen to continue that work at a faster pace than we have done up until now and certainly we welcome that. firefighters say there's been "significant improvement" in the fires raging across moorside east of manchester the army has joined efforts to put out the flames. a parliamentary report finds the uk tolerated the mistreatment of detainees by america after 9/11. a firefighter has told the grenfell inquiry that the tower inferno was "like a war zone", with burning debris raining down at a speed that could easily kill somone coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. sarah has that counts down, a couple of hours to go. it is all about the world cup. england are through but they face belgium in their final group
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england are through but they face belgium in theirfinal group game later. all eyes are on the last game of group h. we will keep you updated. thanks. and darren bett has all the weather. you are as hot as you have ever been this year! 0h, this year! oh, yes, i am! this year! oh, yes, iam! you better believe it. 90 fahrenheit is the highest, could be closed records. how long is the heat going to last? we would ta ke the heat going to last? we would take a look at the focus for the weekend later. thanks, darren. also coming up — england expects, the three lions face belgium tonight in theirfinalgroup game of the world cup. the prime minister has arrived in brussels to attend
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the latest eu summit where she will brief leaders over dinner on progress on brexit. they are expected to warn that time is running out to reach a deal and that sticking points like the irish border still need resolving, but theresa may has told the bbc‘s political editor that she's confident of making progress. as regards our discussions around brexit, i look forward to talking with fellow leaders about the good progress we have made on the withdrawal agreement and securing our strong future partnership, which i believe is in the interests of both the eu and uk. i think both sides are keen to continue that work at a faster pace than we have until now, and we welcome that. but other european leaders say that is down to you persuading your cabinet to come together. can you really say it's going well when two years on, eu leaders say britain needs to get its act together? we have been setting
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out our position and at every stage, last december and in march, we have come to agreements with the eu on the issues we discussed and agreed we will talk about. now we will bring the cabinet together in the next week, we will then publish a white paper setting out in more detail what strong partnership the uk wants to see with the eu in future but that is a partnership which i believe is notjust about the interests of the uk but the wider interests of the eu and that's why i'm confident we can discuss that at pace and ensure we achieve what we want, which is that continuing partnership with the eu on economic and security matters. do they have to show more flexibility as well? are you annoyed about how rigid they have been? we have already been able to encourage and get flexibility from the eu on matters.
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i will set out our position for the future, and what i want to do, what i'm sure leaders want to do, is ensure we can negotiate this for the future because this isn't just about the uk but ensuring we have a partnership that works for us and i believe that will work for the eu as well. jean claude juncker, the european commission president has told the bbc that preparations are being made for a no deal on brexit. i don't have to lecture theresa may but i would like the british to make clear their position. they have to say what they want and we will respond to that. do you think this might not happen? is the red disc we
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might not happen? is the red disc we might not happen? is the red disc we might not have a deal? in parallel we are working on a no deal. we have to do it. shouldn't the irish border be resolved by now? not today. as far as ireland is concerned, i was there the other week, i would like others do have a final response to the irish border. i would not like is to be in a situation where the last remaining points would be the irish problem. i don't like this. joining me now from our brussels studio is pat leahy, political editor of the irish times. impatience is growing and growing fast now. yes, i think that is pretty evident. we have just come from the
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procession of eu leaders going into the afternoon session. while brexit isn't on the formal agenda today, there will be some discussion over dinner later. it isn't on the formal meeting agenda this afternoon but nonetheless it is what an awful lot of the questions to the eu leaders going in word about. it is a topic thatis going in word about. it is a topic that is dominating discussion on the fringes here. this isn't the brexit showdown summit that many people had thought it would be over recent months. it is on the show down, because the eu await proposals on the irish border and future trading relationship. but it is the cloud that hangs over this summit. it will hang over future summit until this question is resolved. in practical terms, be the border, what are the irish preparing some as
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young claude yunker says that, if the uk crashes out of the eu? what happens to that border? we just asked the taoiseach about this. his view is very much that the british have declared they will be no hard border, no return to a hard border. theresa may has repeatedly talked about no return to the borders of the past. the eu has said they will be no return to a hard border. of course, the irish government it is its number one priority, this should not be a return to the hard border. but how is that going to be achieved in the context of the future relationship between britain and be you. that is what eu leaders are waiting with growing impatience for, the proposals from theresa may, who has undertaken to bring these proposals to the negotiations. the
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irish government wanted those proposals by now, it's wanted to see substantial progress on the irish border issued by the time of this summit. that hasn't occurred. there is one more summit. that hasn't occurred. there is one more summer to come summit. that hasn't occurred. there is one more summer to come before the withdrawal agreement is formally agreed between the and the uk. all eu leaders are saying the border issue must be solved before that withdrawal agreement is completed. as of now, no one has an answer over how that could be done. what impact with the uk crashing out of the eu have on our relations with ireland? it is difficult to say at this time. nobody has the road map game plan as to what the uk crashing out without an agreement actually means. everybody says they don't want to
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see it. it is difficult to see how that can be allowed to happen between the two blocks. even if that isn't agreement on a formal withdrawal treaty by october, there is another summit withdrawal treaty by october, there is anothersummit in withdrawal treaty by october, there is another summit in december. some officials begin to whisper that this thing will go right down to the wire in december. the fact is, it is a matter of british law they will leave the european union by march of next year. that will happen with or without an agreement unless there is some sort of bridging arrangement. what you do notice today amongst eu leaders is that they are beginning, for the first time, to talk about the prospect of the eu, or the uk rather, crashing out of the eu without an agreement. that isn't something anybody once. it is difficult to see how those preparations could really be made at british ports, british airports and so british ports, british airports and
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so forth. nonetheless, such as the urgency of the question of solving the irish border question before october, people are now beginning to talk about that. we will hear more about it over the summer. ok, good to talk to you. thanks for your time. ona to talk to you. thanks for your time. on a slightly lighter theme for this is what happened when the belgian prime minister handed over a belgian prime minister handed over a belgian football shirt to theresa may. hours before the two countries face each other in the world cup. so, a gift for theresa may from her belgian counterpart. smiles at a summit where they are in short supply. around 100 soldiers have arrived in greater manchester to help firefighters battle a huge moorland blaze that has been burning for four days.
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fire chiefs say they fear it could last for weeks because of the continuing hot weather. the troops, from the 4th battalion, royal regiment of scotland, arrived overnight to help tackle the seven square miles of saddleworth moor, which have been smouldering with pockets of fire since sunday. judith moritz reports. boots on the ground. the army arrived this morning to add their efforts to the firefight. big thank you to you and to your officers for coming... they were welcomed by the fire service, who will now battle the blaze for a fourth day, with the military by their side. 100 troops are being sent, arriving in groups of 30. from our own point of view, this is really important, because this shows some of the training that we've done, we rise to the challenge with our partner agencies to support them as and when they require it. this morning, conditions seemed still, but it's a deceptive peace. the moor is still alight, smoke rising across the horizon as peat burns underground. conditions still posing a risk. we only need a change in wind
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direction to then see that fire increasing into where the greater fuel source is, so we could see a dramatic change, and that's why having the resources on scene, immediately ready, and the support of the armed services, is extremely important. another nervous morning for those living in these houses next to the moor. but amongst these hills, there are reservoirs full of water. it's just a matter of getting it to the right place. helicopters are being used to drop gallons onto pockets of fire. it's the terrain which makes it so hard to fight this fire. engines and equipment have to get to remote areas, and when they arrive, the crews are working long hours in the blistering heat. it's notjust the fire service — park rangers are here, too, with mountain rescue teams and ambulance support now joined by the soldiers. currently, we've broken our boys down into various locations and we're
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beating the fire with paddles. we're supporting them by moving equipment, we're putting water on the fires and we're doing everything we can to stop this fire at the moment. the fire service says it most needs a significant downpour of rain, but none has been forecast for at least a week. this is the best chance of keeping the moors wet. and as they continue to smoulder, a pall of pollution and smoke hangs in the air. the effects of this fire go far beyond these moors. one of the first firefighters to enter the burning grenfell tower has described fire raining down from above as he held a colleague's legs so he could lean out of a window to fight the flames. charles batterbee described the unbelievable scene at the public inquiry today, saying how he tried to stop crew mate daniel brown falling out of the window as he fought the fire with a heavy hose. earlier, i spoke to my colleague frankie mccamley, who was outside the inquiry.
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it has been quite emotional for charles batterbee. he was one of the first firefighters on the scene. he along with one of his colleagues, daniel brown, went up to the fourth floor into a flat 16 where that fire started. he broke down a little earlier on, the inquiry had to be paused. it has been paused again for him to collect himself because this is very emotional evidence. this is taking them back to the night of the fire. what charles batterbee described is breaking down the store, going in, seeing the fire for the first time, going into the flat and thinking they had put that fire out. they make their way into the kitchen and from there they see fla mes kitchen and from there they see flames on the outside. this is what charles batterbee is told the inquiry earlier. the debris and the noise and how
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rapid, and when i say violent, it just rained fire. that, to make at that time i was thinking it is coming back to shepherd's bush court. it is jumping coming back to shepherd's bush court. it isjumping multiple floors. this is lots. it was getting worse. it didn't slow come it got worse. it didn't slow come it got worse if anything. that is why, for me, at that time, you have to imagine i'm hanging on to daniel by his straps, he has got a hose which weighsa his straps, he has got a hose which weighs a lot and he's got the hose outside the window. he has lent outside the window. he has lent outside the window and i'm holding to him for dear life and bigi my hips into the counter so we don't both go together, i've got my left hand on the radio, trying to communicate messages. whilst looking
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at when he was hitting it, it was getting worse. i interpreted it as it was going higher. what else would be burning? charles batterbee speaking there, describing but the actions of both he and his colleague as they noticed the fire was burning on the outside of g re nfell tower. the fire was burning on the outside of grenfell tower. as the fire got worse, he described it as howl like, a war zone. we heard about his training especially around high—rise flats because in kensington and chelsea then i remembered of these. he said he had no training when it came to burning on the outside of a flat. he also went and had the familiarisation visit of grenfell tower back in the summer of 2016. he said he didn't notice this aluminium cladding going up and he said, never ina cladding going up and he said, never in a million years would i have expected this cladding on the residential block. this cladding he said he's used the diy superstores
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orfactories. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines — theresa may has arrived in brussels for a summit where she is expected to update eu leaders on the latest brexit negotiations. the fire brigade says there's been "significant improvement" in the fires raging across moorside east of manchster after the army began to help. a parliamentary report has found the uk tolerated the mistreatment of detainees by america, after 9/11. and in sports, three hours to go adding that the getting settled their final world adding that the getting settled theirfinal world cup adding that the getting settled their final world cup group adding that the getting settled theirfinal world cup group match against belgium knowing they are through to the knockout stages. two with a play in the next round? colombia need a win, they are taking on senegal. it is goalless in the half. and finally, it has been confirmed that wayne rooney is on his way to major league soccer. he signed a three—year deal with dc united.
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let's get more now on the eu summit in brussels, theresa may is to brief leaders, over dinner, on progress on brexit though the talks are likely to be dominated by migration. germany's chancellor angela merkel has called for member states to mount a united approach to the issue or risk eroding faith in the eu's values. let's go live to brussels where we can get the latest from christian fraser. migration dominates the agenda here today. it is interesting that so often the european union looks to the queen of europe angola merkel for the solutions. today the tables have been turned. —— angela mccormick. i don't think she is there to find the answer is not at this summit anyway. there are tempers which are afraid at the moment especially other side of
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italy who don't want to be any longer a migrant camphor europe. that speak to someone who knows about the german debate at home. her interior minister from her sister party is saying he will close the border on sunday to secondary migration. do you think you will live up to his promise? if he does that she will have to fire him and then the factors in the fire in the sense of the word. then of course the coalition will break up with all the coalition will break up with all the consequences that would have. disaster, another election for germany. people don't want this and they are telling the csu, the bavarian party, don't do it because they've had a dramatic slump in the polls. it might be the case that matters are being put on the trees that people climbed into a few days ago. we hope so. we do hope reason
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will prevail. this is a crisis that doesn't exist because very few people arouse those bavarian borders. 44,000 this year compared to 2.5 million in 2015. it is a crisis driven by italy. in their words, this is a watershed moment, they don't want to be the migrant campfor they don't want to be the migrant camp for europe. they have to figure out a solution because italy, the right to complain, they have been left alone for so many years and summit at the summit the italian prime minister was here in this building saying, please, help us, we need to solve this. nobody moved. everybody thought he is going to go home and carry on. this is crunch time. they have to do something. some sort of redistribution, better border protection to keep people away particularly france italy and the mediterranean country, will have to be found. an important week for
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theresa may. she goes from here to her cabinet meeting on friday it is supposed to be thrashing out a white paper which will spell out the future relationship they want with the european union. what is the debate in germany at the moment is? we hear that is great frustration that they think their can be a deal. the frustration are high and people are putting up wages and saying, if it carries on like this we will see a 50-50 it carries on like this we will see a 50—50 chance things could go bad. that means a crash. it would be the most horrible outcome for both sides. everybody emphasises this is a no—win game. britain will lose greatly and the eu side will lose greatly. nobody wants this. but eu leaders are telling theresa may, they will tower, please, pretty please, put something on the tabor is we can talk about. diouf -- do
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you think, there are six weeks to go until the autumn summit, they could bea summit until the autumn summit, they could be a summit in december, are we likely to see splits when national interests come to the fall? we may see some little cracks but we're not going to see any big split because germany will not budge, france will not budge nobble spain. we have the big three that will say, no, we don't want this. they can't afford to damage the single market. that is their most precious asset. they will have to protect it by all means. they are willing to compromise and somehow do the deal but not at the price that britain wants. single market on goods, that is the new one. it can be done, everybody says, yes, why not? but that means other things, freedom of movement to a certain extent. then that is the
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question, where this movement on that? where can you move the goalposts? that is something that will be thrashed out later. they might be a solution to that. in the customs union, that is a no—go. a solution on the borders, that is not a solution, that is not possible. that is a non—flyer. a solution, that is not possible. that is a non-flyer. just before i let you go, you have to forgive me for gloating but we have suffered so many penalty defeats over the years, is this the horror summer for germany? the migration crisis, out in the qualifying round of the world cup. does it feel like a dark summer? i am ready to talk about migration and the future of angola merkel but don't mention the war! don't mention the football! or the war! we look forward to the football instead, simon. we were left barbara go and do her work. what is the
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school going to be? we have got to lose, haven't we? we have got to win with a lot of bookings. i saw when theresa may was given a belgian football t—shirt. there was a belgian theme to the room this afternoon. christian, thank you. the parliamentary committee that oversees the work of the intelligence and security services has accused the uk of tolerating "inexcusable" treatment of detainees by the united states. it says intelligence staff witnessed thirteen incidents after the september 11th terror attacks in 2001where detainees were mistreated by the us. but the committee found no evidence that uk officers carried out physical mistreatment. conservative mp, dominic grieve, chairs the committee. we have not found any evidence that uk agency offices or defence intelligence personnel directly carried out physical mistreatment of detainees.
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we have found evidence of uk officers making verbal threats in nine cases. we also found two cases in which uk personnel were party to detainee mistreatment administered by others. with me in the studio is sapna malik, she represented abdul hakim belhaj and fatima boudchar in their rendition case against the uk government. i know you haven't spoken about this specifically but you can imagine how they are feeling having seen this report. this report comes on the back of the apology given by the prime minister delivered to them by the attorney general in parliament last month, acknowledging the role of the uk in their rendition in the suffering they went through. yes, in no way this report shows that wasn't
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an individual isolated case, there was a wider pattern of cooperation by the uk. you surprised by the extent to which this sort of thing was going on? in some ways, not. finally now we've got a report that addresses in some detail the numbers of cases, for instance, over 200 cases where the uk was passing intelligence, where they knew there was a risk that the trainees are being mistreated, almost 200 cases where they were getting intelligence back. in that way it is giving us the numbers but in some ways the cases we know about but only by chance. documents found in libya or the detainees saying the uk was involved. we need to put in some perspective here the timing, we are talking after 9/11, the americans very angry. if you have come ina americans very angry. if you have come in a room, a cia operative,
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torturing somebody, watched by a british intelligence officer, what should have happened? what should the british intelligence officer have done? they should have said we cannot be party to this. there is zero tolerance on torture. they should have phrased it back with their heads. the report suggested they did and the answer that came back was not entirely clear. it says they did in a piecemeal basis, sometimes they did, sometimes they didn't, they saw things on an individual basis where the heads at government level would have been seeing things on a systemic basis. there seem to be this deference to the us and they didn't want to cause embarrassment. getting intelligence back to them. rather than saying correctly aligned that should not be crossed. we all need to stay within the rule of law. i amjust crossed. we all need to stay within the rule of law. i am just wondering what abdul hakim belhaj and his wife
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would be feeling, exonerated the word because there has been this full apology. have they forgiven what they went through, do you think? they were very pleased to get the very fulsome apology that they eventually got. it took six years of legal wrangling when the government wa nted legal wrangling when the government wanted to kick the case out of court. having received that, they feel it is time for them to move on with their lives. in that way, they have been willing to move on. they still feel there was a very pressing need for this to be investigated for the truth to come out. is that it's now? ? or do they want more? they are satisfied with what they got. i think that is the questions to a nswer think that is the questions to answer and i think the report, it acknowledges there were limitations,
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it didn't get access to the security personnel it wanted to interview is stopped short of interfering jack straw and getting him to give evidence. it does underline the need for there to be this judicial enquiry, a fulljudicial inquiry which david cameron committed to setting up in 2010. do you think happen? i think that is pressure from a tap. it is therefore the prime minister to deliver on that. thank you very much for your time. a meeting between president trump and the russian president, vladimir putin, has been confirmed for the 16th ofjuly in helsinki. it'll be the first summit between the two leaders since donald trump came to office, and the second time they have met. the meeting will follow the nato summit and mr trump's visit to london. time for a look at the weather. you add a record breaker.
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thank you! that is one way of putting it. you have called me hot and record breaker! iam pleased putting it. you have called me hot and record breaker! i am pleased we are almost finished! let's stop there. these are the latest temperatures. not far behind we have got glasgow airport at 31. contrast that with central london. it has risen by about 2 degrees in the past hour. it may not get a much higher because we are coming to the peak of the temperatures. this is through the record that comes in. in scotland, the highest temperature injune is 32.2 celsius. that was back in 1893. but in northern ireland, if we get
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higher than that to date, it will mean the highest temperature ever recorded in northern ireland. never mind aboutjune orjanuary, ever. let's move on to the forecast. probably best. let's do that! we've got some pictures for you. this is glasgow. this is one of the hottest areas of the uk. contrast that with here in chichester in west sussex where we have got blue skies that temperature is not so high. started off with some cloud, there is fair weather play developing in the south—east, not bringing any rain. we have got an easterly breeze across southern we have got an easterly breeze across southern areas. we have got an easterly breeze across southern areas. there is a nice breeze across the south at the moment. it means the higher temperatures are getting forced further west and further north across the uk. we will get temperatures peaking at around 31,
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32 around glasgow and across the western side of northern ireland, about 30 degrees. already got up to 32 in the north—west of wales, and the highest temperatures are in the north—west. particularly hot around the lake district. a lovely end to the lake district. a lovely end to the day and overnight there is much more cloud coming in. with that breeze, that cloud will go further inland not just across breeze, that cloud will go further inland notjust across england but into northern and eastern areas of scotland. there is more a cloud in the north sea, a greater threat of seeing that played close to the coasts all day. away from the coast, we have got sunny skies and much more warmth. tomorrow not quite as hot as today in scotland, but looking at temperatures hitting 30 or so looking at temperatures hitting 30 orso in looking at temperatures hitting 30 or so in northern ireland western parts, and not far off that to the west of london. a lovely day for most parts of the uk which continues into the weekend. high pressure has brought the heat and the sunshine,
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but we've got a little weather front which threatens a shower on saturday in the north—west. this pressure threatens to bring a show it ought to do the south—west but we are still drawing in from the new continent. that means more heat. temperatures widely into the mid to high 20s on saturday, some low cloud to start the day burning back to those coasts in the north—east. a lovely looking day and decent temperatures. looking at numbers in the mid—to high 20s. we're not getting a 30 or 32 degrees. on sunday, the wind picks up and we've got the chance of a future risen a south—west of wales and later across northern ireland. most places will be dry, it will be dry, very warm if not hot and those temperatures rising in the south—east. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines. theresa may has arrived in brussels for a summit where she is expected to update eu leaders on the latest brexit negotiations. the fire brigade says there's been "significant improvement" in the fires raging across moorside east of manchster after the army began to help. a parliamentary report has found the uk tolerated the mistreatment of detainees by america after 9/11. a firefighter has told the grenfell inquiry that the tower inferno was "like a war zone", with burning debris raining down at a speed that could easily kill somone.
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sport now on afternoon live. good afternoon. the countdown is on to england's final group game. they'll face belgium in kaliningrad in just a couple of hours time. both teams already through to the last 16. so this is a battle to finish top of group g. if either team wants to. let's cross live to kaliningrad and where our sports correspondent natalie pirks is building up to this game. a lot of talk about where both teams would want to finish in this group, natalie, what's the feeling about that from the england camp? i think ithink in i think in terms of the team there is no thought given because they have talked in the past, gareth southgate spoke yesterday, england haven't won a knockout game since 2006. to be plotting a book to the
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semifinal made him laugh, it was madness. we've got some england fans coming in now because the turnstiles have opened, they are starting to pick theirflags have opened, they are starting to pick their flags up. it is very busy down here. you can see the fans coming in and getting in position. they are really keen to find out exactly for england well end up because finishing first in the group means one day's less rest and a journey to a place where it is 39 degrees, and a possible confrontation with brazil in the quarters of the even get that far. coming second means an extra day's rest and a trip to moscow with a potential quarterfinal against sweden or switzerland. you can see why it will all talking about it, but from an england perspective there is no way they will change how they've been playing, attacking and direct, brilliant on set pieces. they want to go on and win. do you think we will see many changes from the team that played last time?
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gareth southgate was talking about harmony, keeping the harmony of the tea m harmony, keeping the harmony of the team and making sure people who haven't played were happy but not wanting to disrupt the positivity in the camp and momentum going forward. we think he could make up to change the leg six changes. we could see jones or a cahill coming in. reports are that jamie vardy jones or a cahill coming in. reports are thatjamie vardy will jones or a cahill coming in. reports are that jamie vardy will start to pick up his 24th cap, he has scored six goals for england. harry keen eye drop to the bench, but he wants to play. he is chasing the golden boot. he scored in england's last james, the last english player to score in six consecutive games for england was in 1938. clearly harry caine wants to get on the pitch but he's got to strike the balance between getting in momentum going for keeping the winning feeling going at making sure players arrested. —— rested not arrested. we
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could see trent alexander—arnold coming in as well. belgium have plenty of experience as well, it could even end up being the most premier league players that have ever featured in one world cup match. we will await those teams sheets with interest. great stuff. right — it's all eyes on group h, to see who england will face next and it's tight to progress. before kick off, japan were top of this group. needing a point against poland, who are already out. jan bednerek has scored for poland in the second half to put them up 1—0. you can follow that on bbc 2. senegal colombia, it was senegal and
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columbia going through, but now because colombia have scored they are going through and japan are back in it. it is all change! matters all the sport for now, plenty more in the sport for now, plenty more in the next hour. donald trump is visiting the us state of wisconsin for the opening of a new factory by the taiwanese electronics company, foxconn. his trip comes as he continues to criticse harley davidson — the state's most famous motorcycling? manufacturer — who earlier this week announced it's moving jobs out of america because of tariffs? introduced as part of the trade battle with the eu. our washington correspondent, chris buckler, has been speaking to harley's workers about what side they're taking in the fight between the?american president, and the all—american brand. harley—davidson has spent decades building an all—american image which is sold all over the world. but
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selling the distinctive roar of these engines has become an expensive rather than an easy ride. the company already has assembly plans in other countries, but wisconsin is seen as the heart of harley. a sprawling site in the state viewed at his home, workers are talking about harris and there isa are talking about harris and there is a nervousness are talking about harris and there is a nervousness that some jobs could head off overseas. i'm a little worried. we've just got to wait and see what's going to happen. the tariffs imposed on harley's exports to europe are the result of the trade battle started by donald trump. his supporters ending the surface here don't seem to have lost faith in the president. surface here don't seem to have lost faith in the presidentlj surface here don't seem to have lost faith in the president. i feel great, i love my company and i love my president. i support them both. i'm happy with harley—davidson and my president. however, everyone in
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wisconsin is where the president's policies could have an impact on harley davidson. that must provide a lot of business for the area and for yourself. yes, it does, a lot of the businesses in this area. but transporters are remaining loyal to the president. here's what he is, bombastic, controversial, but i think a lot of that isjust bombastic, controversial, but i think a lot of that is just a bombastic, controversial, but i think a lot of that isjust a lot of the way he wants to negotiate. think a lot of that isjust a lot of the way he wants to negotiatem was in states like this that donald trump fired was in states like this that donald trumpfired up was in states like this that donald trump fired up his campaign, turning wisconsin republican red was an important part of his presidential victory and it's no surprise he is back on the road campaigning here ahead of congressional elections. but the uncertainty about harley—davidson could hurt him. trump, as faras harley—davidson could hurt him. trump, as far as i'm concerned, i don't consider him a miracle. he is our leader right now but harley—davidson would always be america. that sounds like a real
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warning to donald trump. don't mess with it. there is no doubt harley—davidson is a classic american brand with more than a century of history. but it is the future success of this company which is important not just future success of this company which is important notjust to employees but also president trump. he could find his fortunes are linked to friends like harley. america first was welcomed as a positive message, but able to head has dangers of the president continues to push his protectionist policies. and our washington correspondent, chris buckler, joins me now from milwaukee, with the latest. there's a lot of anger out they are not just a there's a lot of anger out they are notjust a president trump but he is also quite angry, he accused the company of putting up the white flag. it has to be said, simon, that as far as harley—davidson is concerned, donald trump has had a go at the company and suggested he
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won't forget them and indeed people here would forgive them for the decision to move some things overseas. it is all overshadowing donald trump's attempt to bring a positive message. he was due here for a ground—breaking ceremony for an electronics company which is planning to create thousands ofjobs here and there is harley—davidson mess is overshadowing that. it is taking away from his whole idea of america first because this trade war are merging between america and many, are merging between america and any are merging between america and many, many other countries is really starting to have an impact on companies who are getting nervous, this could potentially cause them problems and they're having to think about through the base themselves in order to get tariffs. 15,000 jobs with this new deal, president trump, you're not be surprised to hear, has been tweeting about that. what is the sense when you talk to people there, i had a changing your mind about him, orare there, i had a changing your mind about him, or are theyjust getting
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further entrenched in what they already thought? i have to correct you, rather the president, already thought? i have to correct you, ratherthe president, because although he has treated it as 15,000 jobs, occasionally he is a bit inclined to exaggeration. actually, this is 3000 to 13,000 jobs just depending on how many will be created. 13,000 is the upper limit. some of those will take years to come into place. president trump is just determined to sell and sell. there are people here in wisconsin who are prepared to listen because this is a state that did support barack 0bama and it did turn to trump. that is an indication that message is getting through to workers, they feel he does support them. all those people who said that he had voted trump were continuing to stay with them and someone criticising the company they worked for saying that harley has been making decisions that are based upon other things, that some of this was
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planned, and they think they are overreacting. the one thing i was either donald trump bill is he is not going to get away from harley—davidson. there is the suggestion that in the motorcade taking him to the report this evening, he is going to be alongside officers are driving harley—davidson motorbikes. not a surprise that he cannot get away from harley in wisconsin. his decision will that have been? you can imagine his reaction to that. that's what the right here in wisconsin! you cannot tell a police officer in wisconsin that he cannot write a harley—davidson! i was only quoting his figure. but anyway, there we go. you enjoy the rest of your trip there. thank you very much. a british nurse has been found guilty of trafficking five nigerian women to germany to work as prostitutes —
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after forcing them to undergo humiliating voodoo rituals. josephine iyamu made her victims swear oaths to hand over money during "juju" ceremonies and then arranged for the women to be trafficked across the mediterranean. she is due to be sentenced next wednesday. with me in is our correspondent ben ando. how did she coerce them to do this? she is an interesting character. in the uk she lived in a relatively modest flat in south london. she worked as a nurse. in nigeria she had a large house complete with serva nts had a large house complete with servants quarters and the court heard she would recruit young women primarily from rural nigerian times, they would be brought to europe, after she organise that, they would be forced to undergo bizarre rituals brady would be forced to eat blood containing worms or chicken hearts, they would be cut with razor blades and forced to swear an oath of loyalty a nd and forced to swear an oath of
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loyalty and promised not to escape go to the police. when they arrived in europe, they would have paid around 30,000 euros. to repay the debt, they would be forced to work as prostitutes. it is something of a legal first, there is as prostitutes. it is something of a legalfirst, there is new trafficking legislation which has recently been brought in and it allows british police to prosecute a british national even if none of the traffic victims actually came through the uk. horrific treatment. some were raped, one fell pregnant. full stories. the bbc has interviewed one of the victims and you can see that interview later on today. what the police said was quite important. they said this is a clear message you cannot evade the law if you think somehow because you are in the uk and moving people about other parts of the world that you are beyond the reach ofjustice. after a ten week trial she has been found guilty and will be sentenced next week. what sort of cooperation
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was there between german authorities and the authorities here? this investigation came about because of german police work, contacting the national crime agency in this country, once they realised that the ringleader or the leader of this particular operation appeared to be operating out of the uk. cross—border work led to this conviction. then, thank you very much. the duke of cambridge has visited some ofjerusalem's most sacred religious sites, on the final day of his tour of the middle east. he spent time at the temple mount, also known as haram al sharif, as well as the western wall and the church of the holy sepulchre. the duke also made a poignant visit to the final resting place of his great—grandmother, princess alice. it is a city which has a sacred significance for the followers of three different faiths — judaism, islam and christianity. from the mount of olives, william looked over to the old city ofjerusalem, fought over in centuries past and still a place of dispute. on temple mount, venerated by bothjews and muslims,
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he visited the al—aqsa mosque, the third holiest site in the islamic faith. the imams who showed him around said william's visit had sent a message of hope and support. the church of the holy sepulchre is one of the holiest places in the christian faith. william was shown a spot where it is said christ was crucified. the western wall is a sacred place for people of the jewish faith. it is the only surviving section of a jewish temple built more than 2000 years ago. william followed tradition and placed a note with his own prayer in the wall and then stood in silent contemplation. that he has been moved by what he has seen over the past few days in israel and yesterday in the occupied palestinian territories is not in doubt. this visit has achieved two
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things in particular. for britain, it has shown its evenhanded approach to the israelis and the palestinians. for william, it has shown he is more than able to handle such a sensitive visit. he returns to britain with his experience broadened and knowing that an important visit has been accomplished successfully. nicholas witchell, bbc news, jerusalem. james is here — in a moment he/she will be telling —— he us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. theresa may has arrived in brussels for a summit where she is expected to update eu leaders on the latest brexit negotiations. the fire brigade says there's been "significant improvement" in the fires raging across moorside east of manchster after the army began to help. a parliamentary report has found the uk tolerated the mistreatment of detainees by america after 9/11. here's your business
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headlines on afternoon live. energy supplier sse has paid £190,000 in compensation to customers after it pulled out of a partnership with another energy company ebico. sse was meant to offer a new tariff to its customers in 49 days. instead it took almost six months. sse said it had now compensated all the customers affected and had a customer support team for those who needed further help. transport giant stagecoach has confirmed an £85.6 million hit after being stripped of the east coast main line franchise by the government, and said it had learned "lessons" forfuture bids. the group, which ran the line as a joint venture with virgin, said it was "disappointed" by the costs of the failed franchise. shares in uk beer and pubs group greene king fell 11% in early trade after it said "unprecedented" cost rises had
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caused a slump in profits. even so group revenues, that's sales before costs are taken into account, were also down almost 2% to £2.2 billion and chief executive rooney anand said bad weather early in the year, weak consumer confidence and tougher competition were to blame. i was about to ask why they are doing so badly, but you just summed it up. there is a fall in the wea kness it up. there is a fall in the weakness of the pound which makes a fall ina weakness of the pound which makes a fall in a lot of imported foodstuffs more expensive and also the bad weather at the beginning of the year. the weather has changed, we also have the world cup. in the first few months of the financial year, the seals are looking a lot better. it looks as the summer is
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going to be good, apart from the c02 problems. this is an ongoing story and we will see how it develops. and bp is buying chargemaster. it has not cost them a huge amount of money, something like £130 million. quite a lot of money to me! you on the business desk have a different threshold. well, when you've got as much money as we have. they are getting into the market. what it gives them is an ear onto the market. the canny hear from the data they collect from people, like yourself, who when you are using these machines, how much you are using them, what the trends haka they know when they can invest in more and we are to invest. that's
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what's important. it is very much data collection which will lead them to actually being able to know how and where they can direct their investment. it will require much more investment. they have thousands of charge points but it's where they are going to pick the infrastructure which will make enough electricity to provide what they think, 12 million cars by 2040. and the pound — you said it was strengthening — why? we don't know. it was becoming first thing in the morning. it is not an easy answer. we got brexit negotiations, we've got a whole lot of stuff going on, worries about higher interest rates, treated worse. let us talk to james hughes, he can tell us which one of these things is going to dominate in the coming weeks and months. trade or
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interest rates or brexit? what do you reckon? it is a little bit off all of them. especially with brexit we have seen the headlines of the last couple of days and weeks, with votes in the commons, which doesn't necessarily give us too much to go on. there is not really ever any progress on brexit. there's not much for us to get our teeth into. for sterling, it is going to be interest rates which are the key thing we have to focus on. there is a lot of importance being put on the august meeting, the bank of england meeting. we might see a rate hike at that meeting, that the expectation. there is a probability measured in a market which is at around 67% probability that we will get a rate hike in august. the comments from the bank of england today have came out with some fairly hawkish comments saying he expects to see these interest rates start to move
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on the right direction. it is that divergence, the divergence between the bank of england and the monetary policy and the federal reserve and us. the bank of england want to keep it as close to the us as we possibly can. it's going to be more steadily interest rates which are the big talking point freddie pound going forward. a quick word on bp. talking point freddie pound going forward. a quick word on bf. what you make of that purchase? they are hedging their bets for £130 million, you cannot really go wrong. but for the company like bp, £130 million is just really a snip. this covers a lot of bases. it helps their reputation by looking at going into greener energy. bp have often said they want to be at the forefront of green energy but a lot of big oil energy companies have said that a lot. the key thing is that we know an electronic eyes are going to be really important going forward. you
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don't see too many of them, but with bp being at the front of this practice does very much help the position going forward. we will leave it there. thank you very much. columbia and japan are qualified for the last 16 at the world cup. the heatwave across much of the uk is continuing, with today being the hottest day of the year so far. day two of this intense heat wave in scotla nd day two of this intense heat wave in scotland and in the parks and green spaces, glaswegians are starting to get used to temperatures higher than some of their favourite mediterranean resorts. yesterday, the high was more than 30 degrees. todayit the high was more than 30 degrees. today it could be up to 31 or 32. getting very close to the record. for a city which has a reputation as one of the wettest in britain, there isa one of the wettest in britain, there is a baking hot weather does come as a bit ofa is a baking hot weather does come as a bit of a revelation. butjust because people in glasgow are used
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to hot weather doesn't mean they don't know how to enjoy it. to hot weather doesn't mean they don't know how to enjoy itm to hot weather doesn't mean they don't know how to enjoy it. it is great stuff. it is an old friend coming back from years ago. it's beena coming back from years ago. it's been a long time coming. i've been here 23 years and this is the first timei here 23 years and this is the first time i have seen this one. this is a very nice change, not having to find a jacket with a hoot. in west lothian, firefighters have been dealing with a wildfire. a warning ofan dealing with a wildfire. a warning of an increased risk of wildfires is in place until monday. here in glasgow most people are concentrating on keeping cool and enjoying this mini heatwave. yesterday we reached 31.3 celsius at aviemore and it's very likely we will beat that today in glasgow, maybe 31 or 32 celsius, making it the warmest june day maybe 31 or 32 celsius, making it the warmestjune day for more than 23 years. just falling shy of the all—timejune 23 years. just falling shy of the all—time june record 23 years. just falling shy of the all—timejune record of 32.2 celsius, that was in perth and kinross back in 1893. it does feel
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like years since the sun was this hot in the west of scotland. many are determined to enjoy it while it lasts. today at five — the clock is ticking — eu leaders warn the prime minister time is running out to secure a brexit deal. as leaders arrive in brussels for crucial talks — theresa may reaffirms her commitment to continue brexit talks at a faster pace. i look forward to talking with fellow leaders about the very good progress we have made on the withdrawal agreement and looking forward to securing our strong future partnership which i believe is in the interests of both of the eu and the uk. but for the other 27 countries — the summit is expected to be dominated by the search for a solution to the migrant crisis. we'll have the latest from brussels — and we'll be talking to the irish eu minister. the other main stories on bbc news at five. england expects — gareth southgate's men prepare for their crunch world cup group game against belgium in kaliningrad.
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