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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 29, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11:003m: eu leaders warn that a huge and serious gap remains between them and the uk over brexit as they begin to discuss the issue. on brexit we have made progress but huge divergences remains. david duckenfield — the match commander at hillsborough — will face a trial for the manslaughter of 95 football supporters. five people are shot dead and others after a gunman opens fire in a local newspaper newsroom in the us. also in the next hour, carbon dioxide supplies start to fall flat. crumpets become the latest casualty of the gas shortage amid warnings supermarkets shelves will run out of some fizzy drinks, beer and meat by the weekend. and marine biologists prepare to carry out the first ever survey
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of seal pups in the thames estuary. good morning. it's july 29th. welcome to bbc newsroom live. eu leaders are meeting in brussels today to discuss brexit but without theresa may, who left the summit early this morning. christian fraser is in brussels. it went long into the night as it often does in this building. they did find an agreement on migration. it falls short of an overall
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revising of the asylum rules and the eu but what it does do a strike a balance between the demands of the frontier countries like italy, greece and mulder who have taken the bulk of the migrants and the concerns of the likes of germany who wa nt concerns of the likes of germany who wantan end concerns of the likes of germany who want an end to that secondary migration where an asylum seeker like register in one country and travel across the border of another. but they have, but it is an idea to set up these closed processing centres within europe. most likely within the frontier countries. i will be processing of those migrants will be processing of those migrants will be processing of those migrants will be done at the left open and it is on will be done at the left open and it isona will be done at the left open and it is on a voluntary basis. voluntary appears several times in the conclusions. tacked onto that to satisfy the italians who are threatening to walk away from the conclusions is this idea of looking at this embarkation centres in africa where migrants would come and be processed without having to make that dangerous crossing over the sea. in the also some important
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language for germany saying countries need to improve their legislative and administrative procedures to stop this secondary migration. is that enough for angela merkel when she goes back the bill in this weekend? we will see. we have also talked about secondary migration and we have concluded that we should put this in order because we should put this in order because we have got to stick to the rules. no asylum seeker has the right to choose a country within an asylum application. on the other hand we have to show solidarity with the countries in which they arrive. we had quite a lot of discussion about this. all in all i think it is a good message that we have reached a common text. europe is not an island but we must be able to face up to this challenge while remaining loyal
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to our values and protecting our people. tonight we took an important step. many predicted the impossibility of an agreement, many predicted the triumph of national solutions. tonight we succeeded in finding a european solution under way of working in cooperation. at the end of this european council we have a more united europe. italy is no longer alone. i amjust have a more united europe. italy is no longer alone. i am just going to throw in a few things because you heard the language they and a great colleague told me they have tried the centres before but in the end they had to let people walk in and out. also you have to understand the pressure builds because it isn't straightforward just returning migrants. you have migrants who throw their passports and documents in the sea. you can have a moroccan
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who says he is from somewhere else. you have to bring in a translator. it isa you have to bring in a translator. it is a bureaucratic nightmare that every single one of the migrants. it's not easy closing camps. the other caveat is that none of the north african countries have shown any inclination to set up these this embarkation centres. so there is an offa embarkation centres. so there is an off a lot of questions that comes with this document. let's turn the brexit because that is what they are turning to in their meeting this morning. it took them a minute to sign of the conclusions on brexit because there are only four paragraphs. not much to discuss until teresa may meets with the cabinet on friday. this was michel barnier coming into the building a few minutes ago. on brexit we have made progress but huge divergences remains. after brexit we want and
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you want a youth —— a uk and eu ambitious partnership. but we have to build this partnership on our values and principles, respecting also the uk red lines. the integrity of the single market, autonomy of the decision—making and the protection and respect of the fundamental rights of eu citizens. we are waiting for the uk to reply andl we are waiting for the uk to reply and i hope it contains realistic proposals. but time is very short. we want a deal and we are working for a deal but time is short and i
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invite the uk delegation to come back next monday. time is indeed short. if you take out the summer holidays we have six weeks until the next summit in to the other two sites to get together. and 273 days until britain leaves the eu. let's talk to the brexit correspondent for the daily telegraph. we are always told time is ticking and time is running out and that has been the message from the eu again today. they want to raise a to come forward and say this is what we want from you. that isn't as simple as we would like it to be. the summit has been a story of two divided camps. yesterday we had the divisions over migration and today is the cabinet divisions which are in the spotlight. on top of the frustrations over the
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lack of progress, frustration about what she dangled last night, this idea that they would be less security in europe if they don't find an agreement. that is going to go down pretty badly, especially with the european commission. they had been a lot of talk about their was going to want to jeopardise the safety a nd was going to want to jeopardise the safety and security of its citizens. they pushed back quite hard on that. i have spoken to senior officials who said we are not taking the blame for this. any security gap is not the eu's fault, it's a consequence of brexit. the sooner britain faces up of brexit. the sooner britain faces up to the consequences of brexit the sooner we up to the consequences of brexit the sooner we can work out a deal which at least will fill some of those gaps. in fairness to hear, what she is saying is if you continue to
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treat britain is a third country then the deal will collapse and everything that goes with that including security and defence will also collapse. that is a reasonable and fair point. i was struck by what the irish prime minister said yesterday. he said this is not a discussion between equal partners. the uk has 60 million people and we have 500 million people. they are casting britain as a junior partner and we not used to that. one of the things we can offer the eu is security. we have world—class intelligence service. we have a strong military. that's important for eastern european countries especially when you haven't aggressive russia essentially. the one thing we can do is theresa may
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using security as black male or a bargaining chip. the european commission president said they are not going to lecture theresa may and said you need to get on with it and stop these divisions within your cabinet. it was a great line from jean—claude younger. he has got a good sense of humour. he said time is getting very small. so they have to say something, they have to issue something because frankly they can't do anything out at this stage. they are not freezing the negotiations because the freeze the negotiations time will get even shorter and then we jeopardise the time will get even shorter and then wejeopardise the deal time will get even shorter and then we jeopardise the deal and nobody wa nts a we jeopardise the deal and nobody wants a no deal brexit in london brussels. so tempers a little frayed but maybe they would be because they've only had three of four hours sleep. this afternoon they are going
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on to reform of the eu. it will be interesting to see the reaction from some of the smaller countries because there is some resistance. for now, i will hand you back to the studio. the match commander on the day of the hillsborough disaster david beckham fielders to face trial for by gross negligence of 95 liverpool supporters after a judge lifted a stay on his prosecution. an order preventing him from being tried was imposed 18 years ago but this morning a judge ruled that order could be lifted and a fresh
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prosecution started. about ten relatives of the 96 liverpool fans who died at the fa cup semifinal in 1989 were at preston crown court to hear the ruling while others watched proceedings via a video link in liverpool. they were shouts of thank you as a decision was announced. the match commander at hillsborough, david duckenfield, who is 73, faces 95 charges of gross negligence manslaughter following the crash on the terraces at that fa cup semifinal. under the law at the time they can be no prosecution for the death of the 96th victim as he died more than a year and a day after his injuries were caused. four other defendants charged with matters related to the disaster and its
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aftermath are also to face trial. a second piece of breaking news to bring you and the bbc‘s former china editor carrie gracie has reached an agreement with the bbc to resolve their differences over the matter of her pay. let me bring you the top line of a statement issued by carrie gracie and the director—general of the bbc. " the bbc and carrie gracie have reached an agreement to resolve their differences. the bbc acknowledges that she was told she would be paid in line with the north america editor when she took the role of china editor and she accepted the role on that understanding. the bbc is committed to the principle of equal pay." 0ur media editorjoins us now. this has been a long—running campaign by carrie gracie over equal pay. she
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said she did want to be —— she said it was about the principle of equal pgy- it was about the principle of equal pay. she is donating the backpay to charity. about this time last year the bbc released the pay of on—air broadcasters over £150,000. 0ne issue was gender pay across the whole of the organisation and the separate issue was equal pay with a number of people often women felt they were being paid less than men for doing equivalentjobs. carrie gracie said she went to china on that posting on an understanding that posting on an understanding that she would be paid the same amount as the north america editor. what the bbc and carrie gracie ‘s joint statement says today says there was an understanding and that her pay didn't match that of the north american editor. i think the bbc has moved its position in that
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the bbc now does except she was given a specific understanding and the bbc didn't stick to that. we already knew she was going to get a cashback paid but what's new is the fa ct cashback paid but what's new is the fact that carrie gracie has shared she is going to donate that back page to charities working specifically on the issue of equal pay for women. we are seeing that carrie gracie is going to take six months of unpaid leave to write and speak on china and gender equality. does this set any sort of precedent in terms of the issue of equal pay? it's very hard to tell that that this stage. there are two related questions. 0ne this stage. there are two related questions. one is tactically i know the bbc would like this —— to draw a line under this matter. but carrie gracie has become very much a figure
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around equal pay and the message of this is that she launched a campaign and she has got what she wanted, backdated pay and the bbc accepting a principle. the campaign has been effective and i think it sends a message to people elsewhere that this is a campaign with fighting. five people have been shot dead in the newsroom of a local newspaper in the us state of maryland. two more were injured as the gunman fired with a shotgun through a glass door into the office of the capital gazette, in the city of annapolis. a suspect is being interrogated. police say he is a white man in his late 30s. nada tawfik reports from annapolis. hands raised and rushing to safety — this has become a familiar scene in america. this time, the target was a local community paper. mid—afternoon, just as initial reports of the attack were coming in, staff
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inside detailed the horror. the capital gazette's crime reporter said the gunman shot through the glass door. phil davis hid under his desk during the rampage. he said nothing was more terrifying than hearing multiple people shot, and then the gunman reload. he later compared the scene to a warzone. police apprehended the suspect without exchanging any fire. they described this as a targeted attack. the suspect carefully planned each move, and stormed into the building with a smoke grenade and a shotgun. us media have identified him as 38—year—old jarrod ramos. thursday night, investigators were searching his residence in maryland. the deputy chief of police, bill krampf, said the suspect likely held a vendetta against the paper. threats were sent over social media. we're trying to confirm what account that was, and we're trying to confirm who actually sent them. he also confirmed that all five victims were staff members of the capital gazette.
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in the wake of the attack, security has been stepped up at major media outlets across the country, including in new york. the staff at the capital gazette have continued to cover the story, despite being at the centre of it and, in a sign of strength and determination, they have vowed to put out their friday morning paper. nada tawfik, bbc news, in annapolis, maryland. let's get the very latest from our reporter, angelica alvarez, at the scene of that shooting. yesterday in the immediate aftermath of the friends and fellow reporters of the friends and fellow reporters of those who had been killed said we are going to get this week ‘s paper out. they have done that. that front page of the most difficult one may have ever had to put together. yes. definitely. we've just got a copy of this paper. it has all the pictures
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of the five victims. inside are stories about them. they have already been published online. talking about their contributions to the community and how they will all be missed by their colleagues and the community. the law—enforcement reminded everybody yesterday this is personal to them to because they interact with these reporters on a daily basis. this has hit everyone really ha rd. daily basis. this has hit everyone really hard. what more are police saying about the interrogation of the suspect and the possible motive? they are not saying too much about the specific interrogation. we're hoping to hear an update later today. as far as a motive, they have not spent the late anything on that. there has been some history though between the newspaper and the
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suspect. years ago he got in trouble with the law for harassing a woman and it made it to the court and the paper reported what was going on and he filed a defamation suit against the paper. he lost that suit but since then there has been some ongoing threats between him and the paper. whatever the specific motive turns out to be, there is no doubt that people working in the media in the united states feel they are doing so currently in a pretty hostile environment. correct. just looking on social media this morning iam seeing looking on social media this morning i am seeing a lot of fellow reporters just talking about finding strength in this and talking about how strong newsroom strength in this and talking about how strong newsroom czar strength in this and talking about how strong newsroom czar and saying journalists are everyday people with families and hobbies who just want to come home like everybody else.
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that's the sentiment i've been seeing across social media. thank you very much. the summit continues today with eu leaders discussing brexit without theresa may. she left this morning, after warning that their approach to the negotiations was risking the safety of european citizens. the prime minister said eu officials were seeking to exclude britain from systems for sharing criminal records, dna profiles and real—time alerts for wanted people. as she left early this morning, mrs may denied that her warning about security was a diversionary tactic. we currently enjoy a high level of cooperation with member states of the eu in a number ofareas on security which are important for our citizens. this is what's at stake. well, let's get the thoughts now of our political correspondent, alex forsyth.
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clearly the uk and the eu want good security cooperation but at the same time we are seeing very real threat of some of the current systems not in there after brexit. do you think there is a solution to this on both sides? theresa may has played the security card in these negotiations. she did it very early on and suggested there would be a risk to both their on the uk of they didn't reach some kind of agreement on security. the reason she is doing this now is because that is somewhat ofan this now is because that is somewhat of an impasse in the brexit go see asians. there was never really in recent weeks huge expectation summit would deliver very much because theresa may needs to get her cabinet onside before she can set out what the future relations are. this was her saying to the eu, i will go back and do my bit with cabinet but we
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need you to be more flexible if we are going to get a deal that works for both sides. of course that is a real element to this because the eu has already suggested the uk might not be able to stay part of the european arrest warrant post brexit so european arrest warrant post brexit soi european arrest warrant post brexit so i think theresa may highlighting some of the potential issues but at the root of all of it is that she is saying we need to get a deal. that is the same mrs from the eu. most eu leaders say they do want an agreement with the uk but it's down to theresa may to come up with what she wants life after brexit to look like. as you've heard throughout yesterday and today from eu leaders across the board the messages case, the pace has to be stepped up if they are going to reach some sort of agreement by october. one of the firefighters called to grenfell tower has described trying to put out the flames but finding that he couldn't. as the public inquiry into the tragey continues today, daniel brown told the hearing that water simply bounced
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off the building. 0ur correspondent tom burridge is at the inquiry now. it has been really tough to listen to this testimony from the firefighters all week and they have found the experience incredibly trying as well. some of them but daniel brown was quite clear on what happened this morning and he was interesting to listen to because he was one of the first firefighters inside flat 16. they managed to put the fire out but straightaway daniel brown said he could not feel much heat inside the flat, he said everything is ringing alarm bells that something is not right. he looked up to the left—hand corner near a window and said he could see a tiny flame dancing in the corner. then, after dousing the flames inside the flat and putting it out he and his colleagues noticed there
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we re fla m es he and his colleagues noticed there were flames on the outside of the building. he didn't know it was cladding at the time. this thing to him now describing what happened when they started to put water on to the flames on the cladding. when they started to put water on to the flames on the claddinglj initially lent out. i could see both columns were alight and i needed to attack them both. the one on the left was possibly five foot away from me. iattacked left was possibly five foot away from me. i attacked them left was possibly five foot away from me. iattacked them both left was possibly five foot away from me. i attacked them both but i was having no effect. water was bouncing off and i am thinking we have a problem here. i can't put this out. you literally got water hitting metal and it's as if you
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wrap a load of paper up, put it in the back seat of the car set it alight, and say to me but that out. you are not allowed to break the door or open the window or use a key, all you've got is your kit. all you are doing essentially is washing the carand you are doing essentially is washing the car and that is the situation i faced. daniel brown also said their radios were sometimes not working on the night and he made a more general point about fire safety and said when the law changed in 2005 and the fire service had a responsible is even forcing fire safety and buildings taken away from it, since then he has basically counted more problems in terms of emergency lighting. that has been a theme in other evidence relating to grenfell tower as well. a firefighter tried
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to rescue a young 12—year—old girl who sadly died inside the building. she was separated from the family when they managed to get out. he tried to rescue herbert was not to do so. he has been questioned about his training and there are again big questions about the amount of training firefighters have been given in relation to fighting fires in tall buildings. he was asked a series of questions about things that maybe he was trained about in terms of fighting a fire in a high—rise building. every element of training he had not been trained about. thank you. the food and drink federation says the carbon dioxide shortage will start affecting some supplies to supermarkets this weekend. c02 is used to stun farm animals, put fizz in carbonated drinks and in packaging. the federation says while stocks will not run out there'll be less choice. joining me now is our business correspondent, jonty bloom. it might be worth reminding everyone
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why we have got this shortage in the first days. c02 is a by-product of large chemical plants. c02 is a by—product. that is not much demand for ammonia at the moment so they have shut down more than expect it to their and was a shortage of c02. so this warning of shortages of some supplies starting this weekend, how real is that warning? it's very real. warburton is the bakers have stopped making crumpets in two of their largest bakeries. if you are a crumpets fan you've got problems this weekend. they produce 1.5 million crumpets a week. the reason for that is to keep them fresh they basically fill the packaging with c02 to exclude a so that they can be kept longer. that happens a lot in
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fish and meat wrappings and things like bagels and wraps. a lot of that can be placed by a but it won't last as long on the shelf. are we going to see c02 production being ramped up to see c02 production being ramped up again? there was only one chemical plant going this week and another one is due to come online quickly. but it takes a couple of days for plans to get up to speed and producing significant amounts of c02. we should be able to import more c02 in the nearfuture. now it's time for a look at the weather. if you are working all week in the sunshine you'll be glad to hear that the sunshine is going to continue
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over the weekend. we have a beautiful day at their across the uk. this is norfolk at the moment. in the north and west of scotland on the coast we have quite a bit of cloud and it is a bit cooler here as well. cool down the eastern side of england but maximum temperatures in the mid to high 20s. parts of wales and northern ireland may reach 30 degrees this afternoon. that cloud will continue across coastal areas tonight and moving further inland. saturday morning might start off rather grey and cloudy. these are the temperatures overnight. if you start off with a cloud on saturday it would last very long. most of us then on saturday will see another hot and sunny day. the jazz and a few showers and south—west of england and south—west wales on sunday but for most of us it's dry and sunny. this is bbc news.
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our latest headlines: david duckenfield, the match commander at hillsborough, will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 football supporters. as eu leaders meet in brussels do discuss britain's departure, the chief brexit negotiator michel barnier warns huge and serious differences remain, particularly over the irish border. migrant centres are to be set up in eu states after leaders reach a deal to share responsibility for those rescued from the mediterranean. five people shot dead and two others injured after a gunman opened fire at a local newspaper in the us state of maryland. a warning that fizzy drinks, beer and meat may run out in some supermarkets by the weekend as a carbon dioxide shortage affects supplies. and marine biologists prepare to carry out the first survey of seal pups in the thames estuary. sport now.
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let's cross to the bbc sports centre. hello, good morning. no world cup action today — what will we do with ourselves? so it's time to reflect on yesterday's events, and what that 1—0 loss to belgium means for england. they came second in their group and will face colombia in their first knock—out game. here'sjoe lynskey with more. england into the last 16 of this world cup as the runners—up of their group. we will look at what that means for their potential route through the knockout stage. it was
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last night's defeated belgian that has plotted their cause in the tournament. a ball from the former manchester united player sealed their fate. with a substitute and brought on, every outfield player in the squad has now featured in the world cup. that is something the manager said could be important as the tenant goes on. not a classic man much more that ocean at a classic match. not only go this belgian player not find the net but the chelsea striker also managed to boot the ball into his own face. he tried to own it all from social media. what that result means for england as they will face colombia in the last 16. if they were to beat them, england are now on the side of them, england are now on the side of the draw that means they will avoid the draw that means they will avoid the likes of brazil, france and argentina. they will play either sweden or switzerland in the
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quarterfinals if they may get that far. it also means they have a slightly easier schedule getting around russia. they are now out of their base just north of st petersburg and are interested they will go 400 miles to the east back to mock school —— back to moscow. it is much cooler in the capital than down in the south. should england when the last 16 match, they will go for a quarterfinal in samarra, further east. there they will play either sweden or switzerland. that is on the afternoon of saturday seventh july. if you want to dream even further, perhaps the semifinal, it is back to moscow for england. that is the same ground that will stage the final. that may only be a fortnight away but still a long way to go for the england side. so, it's england—colombia on tuesday. 0ur reporterjohn bennett is in samara, where they beat senegal last night. john, hurrah! colombia!
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the easy option, right? yes, a colombian team that has won six of its last eight matches. this is going to be very tough for england. it depends on what colombia side turns up. we know that last sunday they flashed up all 3—0 and we re sunday they flashed up all 3—0 and were fantastic. yesterday, i watched them against senegal, 1—0 win. they we re them against senegal, 1—0 win. they were not all that convincing in the game. it wasn't a brilliant performance by colombia. we wonder which team will turn up. there's a big worry in the colombia camp that their star player, rodriguez, big worry in the colombia camp that theirstar player, rodriguez, has suffered with a calf injury. there's a danger that he may the england game. iam here a danger that he may the england game. i am here with the colombia fa ns game. i am here with the colombia fans who are nursing her novels after the game yesterday. i've been asking them what they think of the prospect of playing against england. they have loads of stars from the
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premier league but we will go for everything. we have a couple of good stars on our team as well so we will go for it. they have to be scared because colombia is a very good team and we have a very good players that play in europe, and we are very different team from england. england isa different team from england. england is a traditional team that is known around the world, colombia is new in the world cup. i think it is better that we have england in the next round in belgium. i think it is going to defeat england, this is going to defeat england, this is going to defeat england, this is going to be the time. let's round up the rest of the action from the group stages, and tunisia came back from 1—0 down to beat panama 2—1 in england's group, sunderland's wabi khasri with the winner for tunisia. both sides are out of the tournament. japan went through even though they lost 1—0 to poland — southampton's jan bednarek with the goal. japan also adopted some rather bizarre tactics,
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passing the ball between themselves at the end of the second half to avoid any yellow cards because they qualified for the last 16 on their fair play record, which was better than senegal‘s. they'll play belgium on monday. and here's all the last—16 fixtures. england vs colombia as we already know. you'd argue that france vs argentina is the pick of the ties, although the all south american tie between brazil and mexico is also one to keep an eye on. those matches start tomorrow. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. after ten hours of talks in brussels, eu leaders have reached an agreement on migration. italy, which has begun turning away migrant boats, said it was satisfied and that it no longer stood alone.
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under the deal, new migrant centres are to be set up in eu countries on voluntary basis. they would determine who are irregular migrants and who will be returned the relocation and resettlement of certain refugees will take place on a voluntary basis. however, it is unclear which countries would host these centres or receive refugees. the joint communique also talks about restricting the movement of asylum seekers between eu states. aquarius, the migrant rescue ship that's been the focus of international attention in the past few weeks, has now docked in the french port city of marseille after being banned from italian and maltese ports. there is now a question of whether this and other ngo ships can continue to rescue migrants in the mediterranean. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is onboard and has been speaking to the ship's doctor. unfortunately, in the last two weeks
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we've just seen more and more politicisation of this and we've seen games being played by politicians with the people that we rescue at sea being used as pawns. the italian government has refused entry to port for safe disembarkation several times now to ngos. likewise, we see that malta was putting up resistance. and this type of situation is essentially not sustainable. what more for the aquarius? can this ship carry on? can these operations carry on? now we're finding that ngos such as ourselves here on the aquarius are being gradually criminalised and sidelined from being able to do this type of work. if the authorities controlling the search and rescue zone are not willing to let us do thatjob, of course we're going to have to start questioning
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what we are doing out here. but in the meantime, we're going to continue to be present and try to do thatjob. it comes as the maltese authorities have begun to process more than 200 migrants who arrived on the lifeline rescue ship on wednesday evening. the migrants, many from sudan and ertirea, are now at a holding centre in the capital valetta. malta only allowed the lifeline vessel to dock after securing the agreement of a number of other eu states to take in a share of the migrants. let's cross now to james reynolds, who's in valletta for us. i guess for malta and italy the question is whether what has happened in this agreement turns into something concrete and durable.
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they are centrally now want to see a show of hands, the text of that agreement says that those centres will be set up on europe on a volu nta ry will be set up on europe on a voluntary basis, so malta and italy will ask you, whoever volunteers? we might have an indication of that based on the story of what has happened to the lifeline rescue ship. they are now being looked after at a holding centre not far from here in valletta and a number of eu states from western and southern europe have agreed to take on those migrants. it may be that those states, belgium, the netherlands, portugal, might be some of the volunteers europe are looking for a 2—stage those actual figure holding centres that malta and italy say they saw definitely need. thank you very much for that update. ajudge has ruled that the police officer in charge at the time of the hillsborough disaster, david duckenfield, can face trial for the manslaughter
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by gross negligence of 95 football supporters. let's go live now to our correspondent, judith moritz, who has the latest from preston. hello to you. just tell us the detail of that announcement and the reaction there in the court. the detail of that, we learned within the last are from the judge here at preston who has ruled that the former match commander will stand trial. the reason that that was to be decided is that, following a previous prosecution 18 years ago, there was a regal order imposed to prevent there was a regal order imposed to p reve nt a ny there was a regal order imposed to prevent any retrials. that order has been lifted today by the judge here at preston and so consequently, the
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former chief superintendent will stand trial. that date is expected at the moment to be the tenth september here at preston. it is also expected he will stand trial alongside the former company secretary of sheffield wednesday football club. he faces charges of breaking health and safety and safety at sports ground legislation. there are also three other men, a former solicitor, a former police officer who will, at a separate trial, face charges of perverting the course of justice. trial, face charges of perverting the course ofjustice. all of the stiff findings had applied to have their prosecutions stopped and the spawning thejudge here ruled that all of them will go to trial. there's a sixth defendant who may face charges in connection with the aftermath of hillsborough and that is the former chief constable. at the hearing to determine what will
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happen to his case has been adjourned until august, so that has not been decided. but from this morning, the news that five men now will go to trial in connection with hillsborough and its aftermath. and just to explain for you that david dukinfield, who faces 95p of gross negligence, manslaughter, you may remember 96 people died in the disaster but that of the 96th victim died sometime later and so it is 95 people whose names will be reflected in those counts. that is what has been explained to us by the prosecution. that trial is expected to begin in september. thank you very much. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: david duckenfield — the match commander at hillsborough — will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 football supporters.
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eu leaders warn that a huge and serious gap remains between them and the uk over brexit as they begin to discuss the issue. five people are shot dead on two others wounded after a gunman opens fire in the united states. tata steel are close to agreeing terms on a merger that will create europe's second burqas still make. sources have told the bbc that the deal which has been under negotiation for more than a year will be included in the next few days it will see tata steel ‘s plans merger the pan—european venture with annual sales of about £13 billion. the british economy has unexpectedly grown by not point to present in the first three months of 2018 according to the office of national statistics. services output rose by
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an 0.3% in april, as fastest growth since november 20 17th a 1.6% rise from the same period in the previous year. it was initially estimated to be not 20%. bae systems has won a multi—billion pound contract to be sold in the ftse 100 is higher today after those revised economic growth figures from the office of national statistics. in terms of individual companies, bae systems jumped nearly 3% on news of that contract it announced with the australian government. elsewhere, european markets look a bit cheerier after eu leaders hashed out a deal on migration yesterday. the euro is slightly higher today as well. that's all the business news. a second wildfire has broken out on moorlands in northern england. up to 100 firefighters from lancashire are tackling a blaze on winter hill near bolton. meanwhile, a further 100 soldiers from the royal regiment of scotland have joined a team firefighters in greater manchester, to bring a fire on saddleworth moor under control. patients who see the same
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doctor repeatedly are less likely to die early, according to a new study. people with chronic conditions and complex needs are known to benefit from seeing the same gp, so that they can build up a trusted relationship. gp leaders say they recognise the reports' findings, but with current pressures on the workforce it could mean patients waiting longer for an appointment. a hosepipe ban is being introduced this weekend due to the ongoing heatwave. northern ireland water is appealing for people not to use waterfor washing cars, filling pools, and sprinkling gardens. it comes as temperatures are set to hit 29c, which is just a fraction lower than highs of 30.5c yesterday. for decades the anangu people of central australia have requested that tourists not climb uluru or ayers rock, the massive rock formation rising from the desert in australia s centre. from october next year the chain making it possible will be removed. it's a step towards
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reclaiming the sacred rock. while filming this report, the bbc‘s rebecca henschke discovered her family played a role in taking ownership of uluru. uluru, also known as ayers rock, dates back more than 500 million years. for decades, there's been a bitter row over the controversial practice of climbing the rock. there are signs here at the base of the climb clearly saying, please don't climb, it's against traditional law, and translated into six languages. but still, every day we've been here there's been a steady stream of climbers. have you guys heard that the aboriginal people don't want people to climb? yes, i do, and i understand that, but i'm going to do it anyway. indigenous communities have long campaigned for the behaviour which they consider deeply offensive to end but say the threat of losing the tourist dollar
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was enormous pressure, traditional owner sammy wilson saying it was like a gun being pointed at their heads. and talk they did. in a historic vote last year, the board decided to shut the climb down from october next year. when the first white explorers came to the area in 1873, they named the rock ayers rock after senior australian politician at the time henry ayers. while i was working on this story, i realised that henry ayers was my great, great, great, great uncle. i tell western desert elder alison hunt about this family connection, and that i'm
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sorry. ..for my family's role in any horrific or disrespectful treatment of indigenous people. sometimes families feel the need to shout at each other but it's always a relief when you can stop shouting. i'm grateful to the director—general for helping me resolve this. i do feel that he has led from the front today. in acknowledging the value of my work as china editor, the bbc has
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awarded me several years of backdated pay. but for me this was a lwa ys backdated pay. but for me this was always about the principle and not about the money, so i'm giving all of that money away to help women who need it more than i do. after all, today at the bbc, i can't say i am equal. and —— i can say i am equal. i would like women in workplaces up and down the country to be able to say the same. how would you characterise the bbc‘s handling of your case? i know there will be lots of questions about love this, what went way, the amount of money, where it's and what is far, and i will let others answer all of those questions today and i will answer some of them in the future. today, ijust today and i will answer some of them in the future. today, i just want to say this statement has been an enormously long, hard road to get here. it has involved so much work
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by so many people and i am proud of it. i want today to let this statement do the talking. the bbc at a select committee injanuary where you were in front of a select committee, the bbc could have come to the position they came to today back then. but they didn't, they have changed their position. what has changed to make the bbc come further today than they were prepared to in january? it is a win- win and cultural change takes time. it takes time to help people think things through. it is an enormously difficult issue not just things through. it is an enormously difficult issue notjust for the bbc but for employers all over the country and all over the world. i am glad that this is our win for me and the bbc today to start i am proud of all of us. the bbc‘s former china editor making that statement and answering a
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couple of questions in reaction to the news a short while ago that she and the bbc have reached an agreement to resolve their differences over her pay. you will probably well remember that she had said she was told when she took up thejob of china said she was told when she took up the job of china editor that she would be paid in line with the north america editor when she took on that role. she accepted as on that understanding. she later found role. she accepted as on that understanding. she laterfound out she was being paid less than the north america editor. she repeated their what she said in the earlier statement, that this was always about the principle of equal pay and not about the money itself, which she has donated to the endocrine society for women seeking equality at work. she said she can say she is equal. the headlines are coming up on bbc news channel.
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in a moment we'll say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with a look at the weather. the hot weather will continue over the next few days. we have had four consecutive days where temperatures have been breaking the warmest day of the year. today we are not likely to break that again, temperatures not quite reaching 33 celsius we had yesterday, but for many of us it is just hot and sunny. this morning there was some fog around and one of our weather watchers captured this quite rare for both. it is quite remarkable. that fog and mist we have had has cleared away. we have some low cloud across the north sea coast, quite a beautiful satellite image. for most of us it is just a sunny day. many of us have the blue skies like this one and a temperatures really responding without sunshine, are into the high
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20s once again. we could see some of the cloud in the north the move back further inland across parts of lincolnshire and towards norfolk but further west, the sunshine continues. temperatures for many in the mid to high 20s but the few locations such as porthmadog and the west of northern ireland could reach 30 celsius. overnight we have the cloud across eastern areas which will drift further imminent. many will drift further imminent. many will have clear skies. temperatures overnight down to similar values that we have had overnight, 10—14 degrees. 0n the weekend, we'll shift of that went every so slightly and it will bring in more humid air, hot airfrom the it will bring in more humid air, hot air from the south. it will also remove any of the low cloud we have in the north sea. much sunnier on those eastern areas through into saturday. barely a car was in the sky. temperatures again in the
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mid—to high 20s for many. not quite as hot in northern ireland and through parts of northern scotland. through sunday, the pressure will move in and to give us a glancing blow across southern areas but with increased humidity, we will see some showers towards towards southern england, south—west england in particular and south wales. they will still be few and far between for most of us and it will be hot and sunny for most of us and it will be hot and sunny across for most of us and it will be hot and sunny across the southern parts with increased humidity. 31 in the south and elsewhere in the high 20s. in the rest of the week, you can see in northern areas temperatures down to the load to mid—20s but across southern parts, there's always the risk of showers but temperatures staying in the high 20s. you're watching bbc world news. our top stories:
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david dukinfield the match commander at hillsborough will face gross negligence of 95 on brexit we have made progress. huge diverges remains. five people are shot dead and others are injured after a gunman opens fire ina are injured after a gunman opens fire in a local newspaper office in the us. carbon dioxide supplies start to fall flat. crumpets become the latest casualty of the gas
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shortage amid warnings supermarket shelves will roll—out of fizzy drinks, beer and meat shelves will roll—out of fizzy drinks, beerand meat by shelves will roll—out of fizzy drinks, beer and meat by the weekend. and marine biologists prepared to carry at the first survey of seal pups in the thames history. welcome to the police officer in charge of the hillsborough disaster can face trial for the manslaughter by crew gross negligence of 95 football supporters. the former chief superintendent of the south yorkshire force was match commander at the game in 1989 when the liverpool fans were fatally injured
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ina liverpool fans were fatally injured in a crash. thejudge's decision left a previous order imposed a three prosecution 18 years ago. let's go live now to our correspondent who has the latest from reston. that has been taking place today so just remind us of the background leading up to this. there was a legal order david duckenfield will face 95 charges of gross negligence manslaughter. 96 liverpool fans died at hillsborough but the 96 bit dim the eu summit continues
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today with leaders saying they are concerned about some progress of negotiations. theresa may left this morning of the warning their approach to the talks was risking the safety of european arriving at the summit in brussels this morning, the eu's chief negotiatior, michel barnier, said progress in the overall negotiations had been made, but he has warned the uk to be realistic in its demands on brexit we have made progress but huge dive versions remain. after
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brexit we want and ambitious partnership on trade as well as security. but we have two build this partnership on our values and principles. the protection and respect of the fundamental rights of eu citizens. it is key for our copper —— corporation and security. now we are waiting for the uk white paper and i hope it contains realistic proposals. that they would mention once again that time is very short.
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we are working for a deal and we invite the uk delegation to come back next monday. well let's get the thoughts now of our political correspondent, alex forsyth a fairly palpable sense of the tensions between the two sides. first of all on the issue of security. what chances are there that that high level of cooperation that that high level of cooperation that exists now can continue after brexit? on that particular issue both sides want to reach some sort of agreement because they realise what a potentially at stake. theresa may has in the past played this security card suggesting it is very clearly in the interests of both the eu and the uk to reach an agreement. it is worth mentioning although some of suggested she was making some sort of threat that has been firmly
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denied by downing street cause they point out the eu itself as suggested it can't stay part of the european arrest warrant post brexit. there is still a lot to resolve which is why you see the other side is the message coming from eu leaders about the need to step up the pace of talks now. theresa may herself suggesting that things need to move more quickly. she is in no doubt aware of the time pressure but before she can come forward with any proposals about what she wants life after brexit to look like she needs to getan after brexit to look like she needs to get an agreement from her cabinet. and as we know there is disunity around the cabinet table a run fundamental things like future trading relations. they are due to get together next week to thrash out some of the detail to produce that paper that can form the basis of further talks. but the pressure on theresa may note is pretty apparent. if she can't get that unity amongst
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her own cabinet next week what does that mean for the timetable? you heard clearly the message from the eu chief negotiator and that has been echoed by other european leaders and echoed by plenty senior forces in westminster saying there is now very short time frame. they wa nt to is now very short time frame. they want to reach agreement on the terms of the uk's withdrawal from the eu but also broad political declaration about what future relations will look like by october. they have to do that because this needs to go through various parliaments before the uk leads in march next year. the bottom line is theresa may has to bring her cabinet onside in some form. we are hearing suggestions that when they get together to thrash all of this out that could be a very long session to try and resolve some of the key differences that remain. even if she gets her cabinet onside she has to persuade her party and that is before negotiations —— negotiations start
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with the european union. there is a real time pressure on this now but the question really is whether she can deliver. just going back to what the eu chief brexit negotiator was saying about some progress made but big divergences still existing. 0n the european side are we sure they are singing from the same song sheet? there is some hope from the uk side there will be some differences between the member states when it comes to future relations specifically. the sticking point was this issue of the irish border and how that is resolved. at this point that is now budging from the eu on that. they put forward proposals which the uk has said it won't work for them. so on that front there really is so —— no
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resolution. it had been hoped that by this summit further progress would have been made. that will be the first key issue that theresa may has to resolve. number ten still remain confident they can reach an agreement not least because of security issues, the rhetoric being it's in the interest of both sides to get it done. now they have to do it. christian fraser is in brussels. pretty heavy going yesterday and into the early hours of this morning and more heavy going today. possibly. we had three rounds of negotiations last night and the italian prime minister threatened to veto the entire conclusions which you don't do at the european council because it runs along the lines of unanimity. 0ut because it runs along the lines of unanimity. out of it came a deal on migration which i think is a balance
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between the demands and concerns of the frontier countries like italy and malta and greece and the concerns of the interior countries, specifically germany, who are concerned about this secondary migration. asylum seekers registering in one country and moving over borders. we have a commitment to set up these closed processing centres within europe on a voluntary basis. essentially that would be financed by europe and europe the process them so migrants arriving in italy would not be arriving in italy would not be arriving per se in italy but in europe. more solidarity. there is also plans to talk about december —— this about asian centres in north africa but that is in the infancy. though north african countries have shown any inclination to set those camps up. there is also some important language that country's their —— to improve their
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administrative procedures to stop this secondary migration. is there enough for the chancellor she goes back to berlin? we will have to find out. let's talk to the bureau chief for the economist in brussels. lots of questions in this document and very few answers. they usually stay up very few answers. they usually stay up all night to signal their taking it seriously and then issue a very long contradictory statement and they will declare victory which is what happened last night. every one of the things they agreed have more questions than answered attached to them. they will require european union '5 states to work together when they haven't been able to in the past. one of the problems has a lwa ys the past. one of the problems has always been these closed centres because increase of the pressure built up so much people drifted across the border. its processing people quickly enough and getting them back to countries. that's why
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them back to countries. that's why the direction of the travel here is increasingly about. in arriving in the first place, whether that's working with countries of origin or with coastguards, that is increasingly what this is about. so you're going to find an emphasis on diplomacy and working with countries in north africa along un agencies. quick word on brexit. and struck by the parallels between theresa may who has this divided cabinet atonement angela merkel lies are divided cabinet and billing. there are some parallels. they are both in trouble but in different ways. theresa may is in trouble because she can't get unity within her cabinet. that's why nothing is happening when she comes here to
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negotiate. angle merkel situation is different. she has a problem with the coalition partner which is suggesting that they should turn migrants away at germany's borders. whether she has done enough at this summit to ensure that doesn't happen remains to be seen. thank you very much indeed. it took the 27 leaders under a minute to sign of four paragraphs on brexit this morning. not much to discuss because there has not been much progress. michel barnier says he has invited the british team here on monday. they will have a crucial meeting in chequers on friday. hands raised and rushing to safety —
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this has become a familiar scene in america. this time, the target was a local community paper. mid—afternoon, just as initial reports of the attack were coming in, staff inside detailed the horror. the capital gazette's crime reporter said the gunman shot through the glass door. phil davis hid under his desk during the rampage. he said nothing was more terrifying than hearing multiple people shot, and then the gunman reload. he later compared the scene to a warzone. police apprehended the suspect without exchanging any fire. they described this as a targeted attack. the suspect carefully planned each
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move, and stormed into the building with a smoke grenade and a shotgun. us media have identified him as 38—year—old jarrod ramos. thursday night, investigators were searching his residence in maryland. the deputy chief of police, bill krampf, said the suspect likely held a vendetta against the paper. threats were sent over social media. we're trying to confirm what account that was, and we're trying to confirm who actually sent them. he also confirmed that all five victims were staff members of the capital gazette. in the wake of the attack, security has been stepped up at major media outlets across the country, including in new york. the staff at the capital gazette have continued to cover the story, despite being at the centre of it and, in a sign of strength and determination, they have vowed to put out their friday morning paper. nada tawfik, bbc news, in annapolis, maryland. earlier i spoke to angelica alvarez from cbs news — she gave us the latest
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from the scene of the shooting. we have just got a copy of that neighbour. the five shot dead at the capitol and it has pictures of the five victims. inside are stories about them. they have already been published online. talking about some other contributions to the community and how they will be missed by their collea g u es and how they will be missed by their colleagues and by the community. law enforcement reminded everybody yesterday this is personal to them to because they interact with these reporters on a daily basis. what more police saying about the interrogation of the suspect and a possible motive. they are not saying too much about the specific interrogation. we're hoping to hear
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more in an update later today. as far as more in an update later today. as farasa more in an update later today. as far as a motive, they have not spec related anything. there has been sinisterly though between the newspaper and the suspect. years ago he got in trouble with the law for harassing a woman. the paper reported what was going on and he filed a defamation suit against the paper. he lost that but since then they have been on growing threats between him and the paper. whatever the specific motive turns out to be, there is no doubt that people working in the media in the us feel they are doing so currently in a pretty hostile environment. correct. working on social media this morning iam seeing working on social media this morning i am seeing a lot of fellow reporters talking about finding strengthening this and about how strong strengthening this and about how strong newsrooms are and strengthening this and about how strong newsrooms are and being safe
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and they are saying journalists are everyday people, people with families, people who have hobbies, people just want to come home like everybody else. that's the sentiment i have been seeing all across social media from everyone across the nation. the headlines on bbc news... david duckenfield — the match commander at hillsborough — will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 football supporters. eu leaders warn that a huge and serious gap remains between them and the uk over brexit — as they begin to discuss the issue: five people are shot dead and others after a gunman opens fire in a local newspaper newsroom in the us. busy time in sport and love to catch up busy time in sport and love to catch up on. we start with tennis —
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wimbledon gets under way on monday. the draw was just a couple of hours ago and we now know andy murray will play benoit paire in the first round, if he decides he's fit enough to play. the two—time winner has only recently returned to the court after almost a year out following hip sugery. his french opponent is the last player murray beat at wimbledon however he's still yet to confirm if he'll definitely play at the all—england club but has been included in the draw. let's have a look at some other highlights from that draw, and defending champion roger federer will play serbia's dusan lajovic. british number one kyle edmund plays australian qualifier alex bolt, and there's a tasty looking match—up between grigor dimitrov and three time major winner stan wawrinka. in the women's draw johanna konta plays russia's natalia vikhlya ntseva. seven—time winner serena williams plays arantxa rus of the netherlands and the reigning champion garbine mugaruza plays britain's naomi brody.
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back to the world cup in russia as the curtain fell on the group stages of the tournament last night — it ended in defeat for england — but a result that means they'll face colombia in the last 16. it finished 1—0 in kaliningrad after a spectacular strike by adnanjanuzaj ensured belgium finished top of group g and booked them a date with japan next. as for england — they swerve a potential quarterfinal against brazil — but manager gareth southgate insists that wasn't his intention. none of us like the feeling of losing in the dressing room and for the support that was in the stadium especially, but also everybody at home. we wanted to give this a go and i think we kept giving it a go right to the end, but we also wanted to balance those objectives and our objective at the start of this group phase was to be in the next round and we are in the next round. so england will play
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colombia on tuesday... that's after the south americans secured a 1—0 win over senegal thanks to a yerry mina header. defeat for senegal means they go out on the fair play rule. and the former australia cricket captain steve smith played his first competitive match since being banned for ball tampering in march. he scored 61 off 41 balls for the toronto nationals in the first global t20 canada league. smith's12—month ban only applies to matches in australia and he said that playing was part of his rehabilitation. that's all the sport for now. katherine downes will have all the latest after 1.30pm. one of the firefighters called to grenfell tower has described trying to put out the flames but finding that he couldn't. as the public inquiry into the tragey continues today, daniel brown told the hearing that water simply bounced off the building. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent tom burridge
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about this morning's evidence. daniel bryan was confident and clear about what happened. he was one of the first two firefighters inside flat 16. they managed to put the fire out inside the flat but straightaway daniel brown said he could not feel much heat inside the flat and said everything is ringing alarm bells that something is not right. he looked up to the left hand corner near the window and said he could see a tiny flame sitting in the corner dancing. after dousing the corner dancing. after dousing the flames inside the flat and putting it out here and his collea g u es putting it out here and his colleagues noticed there were flames on the outside of the building. he didn't know it was cladding at the time. listen to him now describe what happened when they started to put water on to the flames on the cladding. i initially lent out. i
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could see both columns were alight. i needed to attack both. the one on the left was five foot away from me. the one on the right was closer. i attacked them both but i was having no effect. water wasjust bouncing off and i was thinking we've got a problem here. i can't put this out. you've literally got water hitting metal. i described it in my statement, it's as if you wrap the load of paperup, statement, it's as if you wrap the load of paper up, put it in the back seat of the car and set it alight and shut all the doors and windows and shut all the doors and windows and then say to me put that out. you're not allowed to break the door or the window or user key, all you've got is your kit. all you are
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doing is essentially washing the car and that is the situation they faced. daniel brown also said their radios were sometimes not working on the night and he made a more general point about fire safety and he said when the law changed in 2005 and the fire service had responsibly day of enforcing fire setting buildings taken away from it, since then he has encountered more problems. that is been a theme in the evidence relating to grenfell tower as well. we are now hearing from david the deal inside the public enquiry. he isa deal inside the public enquiry. he is a firefighters tried to rescue a 12—year—old girl who sadly died inside the building. she was separated from her family when they managed to get out. he was not able to rescue her. he has been questioned about his training and
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there are big questions about the amount of training that firefighters have been given in relating to fighting fires in tall buildings. he was asked a series of questions about things that he might have been trained about and four of five questions and every single answer he had not been trained about. the food and drink federation says the carbon dioxide shortage will start affecting some supplies to supermarkets this weekend. c02 is used to stun farm animals, put fizz in carbonated drinks and in packaging. the federation says while stocks will not run out there'll be less choice. joining me now from our studio in salford is the supply chain expert drjonathan 0wens, from the university of salford business school. we have talked a little bit today about how it might affect consumers. let's get your thoughts on how it's affecting businesses. let's get your thoughts on how it's affecting businesseslj
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let's get your thoughts on how it's affecting businesses. i was in a company affecting businesses. i was in a com pa ny yesterday affecting businesses. i was in a company yesterday afternoon, a small microbrewery, and unfortunately they need the seal to in order to create the fizz for their bottling plant. they are faced with the prospect of pouring away 21,000 pints of beer. 0ne pouring away 21,000 pints of beer. one of the largest sporting competitions, the world cup, is going on and it would be a serious blow to their profits. they desperately don't know what to do. that's one of the key problems. particularly the small manufacturers and suppliers, they don't know what's happening. the communication has been erratic. how long could the shortages last for? it's not a straightforward case of getting supplies flowing again is it? no. there are rumours but they are and
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conformed rumours that the european fertilisation plans are starting early injuly fertilisation plans are starting early in july but they fertilisation plans are starting early injuly but they have to start up early injuly but they have to start up and iron out all of their production problems. 0nce up and iron out all of their production problems. once that is all about running we will get the supply chain process and then it's a case of how we got a supply chain in place to actually meet demand? it's going to be as we deliver it will be going to be as we deliver it will be going straight out the door. and who is going to get priority because britain is not alone in this? we have france, germany, all over europe will be screaming out for shortages of c02. it goes way beyond affecting the food chain because...
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how does the industry feel about communication around this issue?m has taken the industry by supplies. —— surprise. c02 is a by—product of fertilisation and fertilisers are used in harvest time and they have gone down for extended maintenance predominantly because the natural gas required to produce the seal to his expensive production process. so this has not been communicated outside of their little domain. who would be responsible though because it's not within the remix of the government is it? no. in their defence it is industry lead. but
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perhaps defra could be taking a lead in this and centralising communication in order to say what's happening. this goes back to the small players and a great deal of them up and down the uk and when will this get back online and when dewi take priority? now time for a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to darren bett. i would advise lots of people to ta ke i would advise lots of people to take lots of water over the next day or two, still water probably. we have temperatures rising sap sharply in the sunshine, perhaps not as high as recently but 30 degrees quite likely. widely in the high 20s in
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the sunshine but cooler around these north sequels where we have found much more low cloud. that has pushed its whale inland overnight towards the midlands and even the west country. after the heat after day it will be a very warm night tonight. some early mist and low cloud tomorrow morning but it will not be long before it breaks and we will see sunny skies developing widely across the uk. those temperatures lifting rapidly in the sunshine. another lovely day on saturday. more hot sunshine to come on sunday as well. temperatures rising in the south—east of the uk. it will be hot for the start of wimbledon. there's the chance of some showers around the chance of some showers around the weekend across the south and to wales. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: david duckenfield, the match commander at hillsborough, will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 football supporters.
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as eu leaders meet in brussels do discuss britain's departure, the chief brexit negotiator michel barnier warns huge and serious differences remain, particularly over the irish border. migrant centres are to be set up in eu states after leaders reach a deal at the summit to share responsibility for those rescued from the mediterranean. five people shot dead and two others injured after a gunman opened fire at a local newspaper in the us state of maryland. the bbc has apologised to news presenter carrie gracie for underpaying her and says it's settled the dispute, whilst she says she'll donat her backdated pay to help other women striving for equality at work. a warning that fizzy drinks, beer and meat may run out in some supermarkets by the weekend as a carbon dioxide shortage affects supplies. and marine biologists prepare to carry out the first survey of seal pups in the thames estuary.
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the bbc has apologised to its former china editor carrie gracie for underpaying her and says it has now put this right by giving her back pay. the corporation said it had reached an agreement to resolve their differences and she is donating the full amount to charity. carrie gracie gave this update a short time ago. i love the bbc, it's been my work family for more than 30 years, and i want it to be the best. sometimes families feel the need to shout at each other but it's always a relief when you can stop shouting. i'm grateful to the director—general for helping me resolve this. i do feel that he has led from the front today. in acknowledging the value of my work as china editor, the bbc has awarded me several years of backdated pay.
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but for me this was always about the principle and not about the money, so i'm giving all of that money away to help women who need it more than i do. after all, today at the bbc i can say i am equal, and i would like women in workplaces up and down this country to be able to say the same. earlier our media editor amol rajan explained how it all began. about this time last year, the bbc released to the pay of on—air broadcasters over £150,000. they we re broadcasters over £150,000. they were two big issues that came out, gender pay across the whole of the organisation and the issue of equal pay were a number of people, often women, felt they were being paid less tha n women, felt they were being paid less than men for doing equivalent
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jobs. 0ne less than men for doing equivalent jobs. one of the most high—profile people to come out of that was carrie gracie, the china editor. she said she went further posting on the understanding she would be paid the same amount as the north america editor. what the bbc and carrie gracie's. statement says is that there was a specific understanding and it was a reasonable understanding she had and that repeated not then much that of the north america editor. after 10 hours of talks in brussels, eu leaders have reached an agreement on migration. italy, which has begun turning away migrant boats, said it was satisfied and that it no longer stood alone. under the deal, member states agreed to share responsibility for migrants rescued from the mediterranean. aquarius, the migrant rescue ship that's been the focus of international attention in the past few weeks, has now docked in the french port city of marseille after being banned from italian and maltese ports. there is now a question of whether this and other ngo ships can continue to rescue migrants in the mediterranean. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is on board and has been speaking to the ship's doctor.
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they started by talking about the mood on the ship. unfortunately, in the last two weeks we've just seen more and more politicisation of this and we've seen games being played by politicians with the people that we rescue at sea being used as pawns. the italian government has refused entry to port for safe disembarkation several times now to ngos. likewise, we see that malta was putting up resistance. and this type of situation is essentially not sustainable. what more for the aquarius? can this ship carry on? can these operations carry on? now we're finding that ngos such as ourselves here on the aquarius are being gradually criminalised and sidelined from being able to do this type of work.
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if the authorities controlling the search and rescue zone are not willing to let us do thatjob, of course we're going to have to start questioning what we are doing out here. but in the meantime, we're going to continue to be present and try to do thatjob. it comes as the maltese authorities have begun to process more than 200 migrants who arrived on the lifeline rescue ship on wednesday evening. the migrants, many from sudan and ertirea, are now at a holding centre in the capital valletta. malta only allowed the lifeline vessel to dock after securing the agreement of a number of other eu states to take in a share of the migrants. james reynolds, who's in valletta, sent us this update. they essentially now want to see a show of hands. the text of that agreement says that those centres will be set up in europe on a voluntary basis,
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so malta and italy will ask, who are the volunteers? we might have an indication of that based on the story of what happened to the lifeline ngo rescue ship and its migrants on board. they are now being looked after at a holding centre not far from here in valletta. a number of eu states from western and southern europe have agreed to take on those migrants. it may be that those states, belgium, the netherlands, portugal, might be some of the volunteers that europe might be looking for to stage those actual bigger holding centres that malta and italy say they so desperately need. patients who see the same doctor repeatedly are less likely to die early, according to a new study. people with chronic conditions and complex needs are known to benefit from seeing the same gp so that they can build up a trusted relationship. gp leaders say they recognise the reports' findings, but with current pressures on the workforce it could mean
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patients waiting longer for an appointment. a second wildfire has broken out on moorlands in northern england. up to 100 firefighters from lancashire are tackling a blaze on winter hill near bolton. meanwhile, a further 100 soldiers from the royal regiment of scotland have joined a team firefighters in greater manchester, to bring a fire on saddleworth moor under control. it's now been six days — and five nights — since a group of teenagers and their football coach, disappeared inside a flooded cave in northern thailand. the huge search for the missing group, thought to have been cut off by rising floodwater, has gripped the country. and thais have turned to social media in an outpouring of support. search and rescue teams have been galvanised here today by the improved weather conditions. it has been raining a lot over the last few
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days but today the weather has held. we have seen a three pronged approach. behind me they have been pumping water out of the cave complex. also, a us navy diving team has been exploring the caverns and caves beneath the ground here, looking for the boys, trying to find them in this murky water that has flooded the caves down there. they are part of a 30 strong us armed forces tea m are part of a 30 strong us armed forces team that are here and some are also in the hills above us exploring, looking for fisheries or shafts or chimneys to try and rappel down, to try and find the boys that way. the type roman history came here today and took it to her around this camp. —— thai prime minister. he spoke to the relatives of the 30 missing boys and coach. he brought a message from the king, that the country will put all its resources behind finding these boys. money can define our relationships and our lives.
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the bbc‘s georgia catt follows three entrepreneurs who started their own companies and then watched them fail. now, they're picking themselves up and starting all over again. here's one of their stories. this is south korea, seoul. home to 10 million people and a young entrepreneur that was to revolutionise the way we make electricity. she has big ideas but has faced a tough time trying to turn them from ideas into real—world success. i wanted to make some product so that people can not only consume energy but also produce energy. flowing water contains may be the most efficient and stable energy resource. her first attempt to make electricity from what i was well away from the energy of seoul. fuelled by a $3 million grant, her
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company designed and built a tidal power plant which they installed off on ireland in the south—west of the country. the generator worked well but long delays in connecting it to the electricity grid meant the company folded, leaving her $300,000 in debt. the project manager and the other people say i knew that you would fail because you are young, you're not an engineer, you are not really a n you're not an engineer, you are not really an expert in this type of power industry. i knew that she would feel it. that's the answer that i always hear from people. would feel it. that's the answer that i always hearfrom people. and i agree with that, because it was true. she decided to start again, finding investors for a new idea on a smaller scale. this was the products she came up with. a portable hydro— powered generator that works in streams or told behind
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bolt. the production line is busy and the generator is selling well, but she has big ambitions. she wants to see if the generators can be linked together to work as a simple water power station. to see if the concept will work, she has arranged a test on the hand river flowing through its seoul. the evidence she collects on how the units performed linked together will determine whether her plans for a water power revolution might succeed. you might install 100 units in here and all the turbines will generate power. its energy from this river. that would be really amazing. to test the generators, they are lowered into the flowing water. there. it works
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very well. now that she has proved the concept works, she is hoping to launch small water power stations in parts of the developing world. powering places that are not connected to the electricity grid. this coming summer, it could be different cities or even in the arm or nepal. that means that the small hyd ro— or nepal. that means that the small hydro— powered generator, we can change the world, even. she will face obstacles and competition, but is hopeful her company can make a big impact. the headlines on bbc news: david duckenfield, the match commander at hillsborough, will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 football supporters. eu leaders warn that a huge and serious gap remains between them and the uk over brexit as they begin to discuss the issue. five people are shot dead and others after a gunman opens fire in a local newspaper newsroom in the us.
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marine biologists will be carrying out the first ever survey of seal pups in the thames estuary this weekend. the project is about protecting grey and harbour seals, as helen briggs has been finding out. heading out of harbour, and it is not long before we find a large colony of seals. have been monitoring seals in the greater thames estuary since 2013. this year, for the first time, they will be counting the pups. 0ur survey will cover the whole estuary, but other particular key breeding locations, how is that distributed throughout the thames, what is the number. it could really tell us the reproductive potential of the population that we're seeing. archive: these norfolk fishermen have left their nets
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and become hunters with guns. seal hunting was banned in britain in the early ‘70s. since then, seals have been gradually returning to our shores, and the thames and surrounding rivers have gone from biologically dead to a haven for wildlife. seals here are thriving, and finding so many seals is a really good sign of the health of the estuary. where you have seals, you have fish and other wildlife. 0ur skipper saw seal pups near here last year, suggesting this could be an important breeding site, it proves the environment is getting cleaner. it is good to see the waterways are nice for them. once upona time, waterways are nice for them. once upon a time, with several industries around, the seal population did die off. that's due to general pollution in the reference. and counting the new arrivals
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will help keep this vital landscape safe for the future. hopefully they will be plenty of them to attend. while many england fans wanted the team to win last night, there's plenty who won't be disappointed that they lost — that's because the matches in the knockout stages look easier after they finished behind belgium. hope you're not tempting fate by saying that! top scorer harry kane was rested, much to the disappointment of the regulars in his local pub. tim muffett watched the match with those who know him well. the dovecote pub in chingford in essex. the big screen is nice and clear, the desired result isn't. do you want england to win or lose? win. i'd rather they lost because it is an easier run forthem. win! we want to come second because it is an easier try. the pub is close to ridgeway rovers, a junior team whose former players include two england captains, david beckham and harry kane. dave bricknell coached
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harry when he was six. bit surreal, to be honest. you look back, you think of what he was like when he was a kid and now you are seeing him and he's the england captain scoring five goals at the world cup and living every young boy's dream. i was shouting at him to run across the ball so it flips up and goes on the goal, we used to train a that lot. and it finally worked. it worked on the world stage. but tonight there is a bit of a bombshell. harry kane is not playing, what do you think? i think it's disgraceful. well, it makes sense — you've got to rest him some time. 0—0, half—time, what do you reckon? harry kane, come on, score two goals. harry kane, harry kane! what did you think of the score? not good at all. we defended too much,
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didn't attack enough. i think it's very disappointing. do you want harry kane? if you want to win the game and score goals, bring on your best goal—scorer. come on, harry kane! but it could be a masterstroke. he will have to live or die by that now, southgate. so it's colombia in the last 16 and the local hero will have to wait until tuesday before returning to the global stage. tim muffett, bbc news, chingford. for decades, the anangu people of central australia have requested that tourists not climb uluru or ayers rock, the massive rock formation rising from the desert in australia's centre. from october next year the chain making it possible will be removed. it's a step towards reclaiming the sacred rock. while filming this report, the bbc‘s rebecca henschke discovered her family played a role in taking ownership of uluru. uluru, also known as ayers
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rock, dates back more than 500 million years. for decades, there's been a bitter row over the controversial practice of climbing the rock. there are signs here at the base of the climb clearly saying, please don't climb, it's against traditional law, and translated into six languages. but still, every day we've been here there's been a steady stream of climbers. have you guys heard that the aboriginal people don't want people to climb? yes, i do, and i understand that, but i'm going to do it anyway. indigenous communities have long campaigned for the behaviour which they consider deeply offensive to end but say the threat of losing the tourist dollar was enormous pressure, traditional owner sammy wilson saying it was like a gun being pointed at their heads. and talk they did.
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in a historic vote last year, the board decided to shut the climb down from october next year. when the first white explorers came to the area in 1873, they named the rock ayers rock after senior australian politician at the time henry ayers. while i was working on this story, i realised that henry ayers was my great, great, great, great uncle. i tell western desert elder alison hunt about this family connection, and that i'm sorry. ..for my family's role in any horrific or disrespectful treatment of indigenous people.
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the sharing of stories like this, she says, is needed now in order to heal, rather than the conquering of the rock. there'll be a new recruit amongst the ranks of the 3rd battalion the royal welsh when it celebrates armed forces day tomorrow, a new goat mascot. over the last few months, we've been following the progress of shenkin iv since his predecessor, shenkin iii, died last year. he's spent the last few months being tamed and trained, as alex humphreys has been finding out. another day, another stroll
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in the welsh capital, with a goat. but no ordinary goat. meet shenkin iv, the new goat mascot of third battalion the royal welsh. since 1884, the role of the goat mascot has been to lead the battalion wherever they go and since shenkin iii died back in september, the race has been on to get a new goat trained. this is not something you see every day in cardiff but today, shenkin and i and his goat major are on a mission. he's getting a lot of attention here. and, mark, this is exactly what you want. it is most certainly is, yes. what we're here to do today is, obviously, he's got to get used to crowds, different road surfaces, sheer volume because it's all the build—up now for national armed forces day when he's going to be marching in front of thousands of people and the bigger picture again is the stadium when we lead wales out, so he's got to be people friendly. so our aim today is to have a walk around the city centre. people can come up to him and say hello to him,
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he can get used to different things as part of his training process. but training a goat is no easy task. initially, when it was just me sat in the pen with him, all day long waiting for him to come to me to earn my trust. which, as you can see, we are doing quite well. shenkin lives in maindy barracks in cardiff and spends so much of his time with mark that it's become a bit of a family affair. it'd be weird having a goat friend. he is a little bit naughty and really funny because he jumps up on the wall and walks across it and he's naughty 'cause when i try smoothing him, he goes like this with his horns next stop, raglan barracks, newport for a band rehearsal. this evening, what we've done is to get shenkin to experience the sheer volume and the loudness of the regimental band and corps of drums and to accept it as it's
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not going to hurt him and march off in peace. and what was he like tonight? tonight, not too bad, not too bad. but it's been a long, warm day so he's a bit agitated towards the end. but, all in all, he's done pretty well. no, not my fault. there's no grapes in my pocket either. he's going to hear this a lot, isn't it? all his life. do you think he's ready? yes, yes. let's just hope there's no kidding around on his big debut in llandudno. enough! in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news, but first it's time for a look at the weather. it's another hot and sunny day for
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most parts of the uk today. in england, some of the highest temperatures are in the north—west and there is a lovely picture view of cumbria. a different story across some eastern areas of scotland, where the weather watcher picture from earlier shows lots of mist and low cloud. that is hugging some other eastern coast of england as well. as you had further inland and west, this is where we see the highest temperatures. not quite the heat of yesterday at 30 degrees possible across western parts of northern ireland and the west of wales. temperatures widely though high 20s but cooler around these wrinkles. the winds are light was coming in from the north—east or easter, hence the drop in temperature. and also this low cloud coming in across scotland, england, towards the midlands and west country. further west to clear temperatures may be no lower than 13-14. the temperatures may be no lower than 13—14. the week and we still give a lot of heat, still dry weather and
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sunshine for the most part, although there's the chance of showers towards the south—west. high pressure generally in charge of our weather. that france may bring a roguish are towards the north—west but more likely to catch shark from the low—pressure over at biscay. the pressure is falling over the weekend and the wind direction is changing slightly. we are drawing in very warm airforthe near slightly. we are drawing in very warm air for the near continent and also increasing humidity. for the start of the weekend, some mist and low cloud which will break up quickly. sunny skies across—the—board on quickly. sunny skies across—the—boa rd on saturday quickly. sunny skies across—the—board on saturday and light winds, too. it will feel very warm. temperatures widely the mid to high 20s. a little cooler on those last sequels. during sunday, the winds probably a bit stronger. a south—easterly blowing away the mist and low cloud was bringing the chance of a shark in the south—west of england, just stealing to the south of northern ireland. elsewhere, it will be dry, sunny and it is getting hotter in the south—east, those temperatures approaching 30 celsius. in the next
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week, there's very little rain around at all. maybe a futuristic was the south—west, perhaps into south wales, otherwise it be dry. more heat and sunshine and high temperatures. the match commander at hillsborough is to stand trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 liverpool football fans. david duckenfield was in charge at the 1989 fa cup semi—final when the fans died after a crush on the terraces. we'll have the latest from the court in preston. the other main stories: huge and serious differences remain, says the eu's chief negotiator, as he calls british negotiators back to brussels for brexit talks. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames on the outside of the building. food and drink production continues to be affected by a shortage of c02.
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manufacturers says it's the worst situation for decades.
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