Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 29, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at two: the match commander at hillsborough will face trial for manslaughter of 95 people. huge and serious difference remain, says the eu's chief negotiator, as he calls representatives back to brussels for talks. on brexit we have made progress, but huge and serious problems remain, particularly on ireland and northern ireland. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the inquiry how he lent out of a window to try to put out flames. firefighters are tackling a fire on the 12th floor of a block of flats in london. and coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with catherine. wimbledon draw has taken place? yes and andy murray will be there. unless he changes hiss mind
2:01 pm
over the weekend. he has been drawn against a frenchman. more in half an hour. catherine is powered by a lovely ke ba b hour. catherine is powered by a lovely kebab she had for lunch. and darren has the weather. sunshine continues. you don't want to know what i had. most of my colleagues are in the pub at the moment. that is another story. we have some lovely sunshine and some warmth. that will continue into the weekend. but we talked about high temperatures by day, i will show you staggering night—time temperature later in the programme. thank you. also coming up — the crow that has worked out how to use a vending machine. hello this is afternoon live. the
2:02 pm
police commander during the hillsborough disaster is to go on trial for the manslaughter of 95 liverpool fans. david duckenfield and four others will face charged linked to the tragedy which happened over 30 years ago. it follows a ruling by a judge. the relatives of those who died were here at preston and ata those who died were here at preston and at a video link in liverpool to watch as it was ruled that the former match commander, david duckenfield will be prosecuted for 95 charges of gross negligence, manslaughter. not 96, although 96 people died. 0ne died some years
2:03 pm
after the disaster and can't be included in the prosecution. but the 95 fa ns included in the prosecution. but the 95 fans who died, their names will appear on the legal papers — one charge for each of the fans from ten—year—old john paul gilhooley, up to the pensioner gerard barren. the charge sheet shows that david duckenfield is accused of breaching his duty of care to those fans during the disaster and it is alleged that that duty of care amounted to gross negligence. there was an order put into place after a previous prosecution 18 years ago that prevented david duckenfield from being prosecuted again. today, thejudge has ruled that from being prosecuted again. today, the judge has ruled that that order should be lifted. that is why this trial can go ahead. it is expected to start in september. and there are four other men whose trials will also go ahead, although they had
2:04 pm
applied to have proceedings stopped. the former company secretary at sheffield wednesday, a former solicitor and former officers. they all face charges connected to hillsborough or its aftermath. there isa hillsborough or its aftermath. there is a sixth defendant, sir norman bettison, whose case has been adjourned until august. he too is applying to have the prosecution against him stop. but the match commander, david duckenfield will go on trial and that trial expected to begin in september. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower on the night of the blaze has been describing how water had no effect on the flames. daniel brown said that water was bouncing off the side of the building as he tried to extinguish the flames. the thermal camera used by
2:05 pm
firefighter daniel brown, and that the dog and smoke of flat 16. there is a raging curtain aflame, what is happening? everything is ringing alarm bells something's not right. he and his colleague had put out the fire in the kitchen, but they quickly realised two columns outside were burning. i attacked them both: no effect. water is bouncing off. 0k, we have a problem here, i cannot put this out. you have literally got water hitting metal, i cannot put this out. no matter what i try and did, i tried sorry we lead to leave that report. we have got to go to the eu summit in brussels where donald tusk and the chief negotiator for the eu
2:06 pm
michel barnier are giving a press conference. as for the text of our compromise, the leaders accepted three proposals i put forward. that is the disembarkation platformout side europe. as boosting eu support for the libyan coastguard. 0n side europe. as boosting eu support for the libyan coastguard. on top of that, we have sent a clear message to all vessels, including those of ngos to all vessels, including those of ngos operating in the mediterranean that they must respect the law and must not obstruct the operation of the libyan coastguard. this demonstrates clear and support for
2:07 pm
the actions of the maltese authorities. another part of the compromise is the proposal of controlled centres on eu territory in countries that are willing to build them. all the measures in the context of these centres including location and resettlement will be taken ona location and resettlement will be taken on a voluntary basis. last but not least, we agreed to launch the next tranche of financing for turkey and to transfer 500 million euros of development money to the eu trust fund for africa. moving on to... this morning's proceedings, the euro summit agreed to progress on the completion of the banking union,
2:08 pm
including by providing the backstop to the single fund. this reform of the eu will strengthen the euro and asa the eu will strengthen the euro and as a result also our union. in turbulent times, this is welcome news for all europeans. 0n brexit, the eu 27 have taken note of what has been achieved so far. however, there is a great deal of work ahead. and the most difficult tasks are unresolved. if you want to still unresolved. if you want to reach a deal in october, we need quick progress. this is the last call to lay the cards on the table. before concluding, let me thank my good friend, the prime minister, for the outstanding and effective bulgarian presidency. you and your team have done a remarkable job, including in the sophia summit,
2:09 pm
which was a historic moment. thank you very much. now the president of the the european commission. jean—claude juncker. the the european commission. jean-claude juncker. let me start by saying is how grateful the commission is for the efficient work of the first bulgarian team. i know they are highly efficient, sometimes too efficient! he has a great performance behind him, because this was the first bulgarian presidency in difficult circumstances. and he did it very well. with efficiency. with his special kind of humour. and with his way to bring people together. a greatjob. thank you for
2:10 pm
that. we had the long night. so donald is tired. and... he did it well, because this was a particularly difficult european council. we were discussing trade. speaks own language. continues speaking in german. translation: if you take everything together, if you calculate everything together, trade in goods,
2:11 pm
the american multilaterals, they made profits in europe and the situation looks quite different from the services point of view. we are on the losing side, not our american friends. we will ensure those points are put across clearly to our colleague this is washington. as regards to the banking union, progress has been made and i'm pleased that the creation of a backstop, which is to be effective for the single resolution fund, has been established and i'm delighted to note that the european council decided that in due course the european stability mechanism will be made into a crisis mechanism that will be enshrined within the legal framework of the eu. we didn't spend
2:12 pm
a lot of time discussing the franco german proposalfor a a lot of time discussing the franco german proposal for a budget for the euro—area. as for the form the budget could or should take, specific lines of consolidated budget, on that score there was agreement to the main features of this budgetary approach. since we need to put in place a mechanism which can withstanding any shocks. shocks can occur at any time. cast your mind back, you will remember that spain, that is admired for its economic performance, portugal, admired for his economic performance and ireland, a celtic country admired for his performance, were all hard hit by the financial crisis. and it can hit you over night. what we need is an instrument
2:13 pm
which is dedicated to fighting and defending us against such shocks. on migration the president of the european council has said almost everything on that and i'm pleased to note that the commission's proposal to refinancing the trust fund for africa was taken on board by the council to a tune of 500 million euros. and i'm happy to note that the discussion ran on for too long on the facility for turkey, but a final decision has been take on that for a second tranche to be paid to the organisations dealing with refugees in turkey. our proposal to increase the number of our european officers on the ground by 2020 met
2:14 pm
with broad support. the proposal to raise it to 10,000. thank you, now turning to the bulgarian euro presidency and the bulgarian prime minister. translation: iwould presidency and the bulgarian prime minister. translation: i would like to thank you and your teams for the enormous support to us before and during our presidency. i'd like to also thank all bulgarians who contributed to the presidency. ministers, assistant, experts. of course, i would like to thank everybody back in sophia, who were all patient and helped in the
2:15 pm
numerous meetings, including the summit of the 28 leaders on the western balkans, plus the leadership of the european union. all this would be placed in doubt had we not achieved the results of today's council. that is to give a perspective to macedonia and albania. had we not had all the patience and perseverance to achieve results, with the contract between bulgaria and the former yugoslav republic macedonia. our friendses
2:16 pm
bulgaria and the former yugoslav republic macedonia. ourfriendses in greece and macedonia did the same, which resulted in a change of macedonia's name, which gives prospects to the country for the eu and for nato and makes the western balkans a more successful region. the topic of connectivity in the western balkan now has over 11 projects for connectivity for erasmus and so on. and just over half an hour ago, with my colleague, we signed the contract between bulgaria and greece for an interconnector for liquid gas, bulgaria and greece for an interconnectorfor liquid gas, with the support of the commission, both for this project and for the balkan hub. we tried to be pragmatic. we
2:17 pm
had objectives that were feasible and on most of them, we either have progress or completed them. we had a strong start on the 2020 budget. we worked on strengthening democracy in the eu and the whole of the legislation for the ep elections in 2019 was complete. we had a lot of debates on the banking union. and we achieved a success. and this is very important in view of the trans—atlantic important in view of the tra ns—atla ntic challenges and important in view of the trans—atlantic challenges and the situations with russia. as well as the eurozone countries, there are countries outside the eurozone. that was the prime minister of bulgaria
2:18 pm
speaking after we had heard from jean—claude juncker and donald tusk who were summing up some of the achievements of this summit and what still is left to be discussed. there is quite a lot. my colleague is in brussels. saying a lot to still resolve ? brussels. saying a lot to still resolve? i was struck by the tone of don adds tusk. we have heard some optimistic words from the leaders last night. but he was warning there is still a lot to do. he is right, if you look at the things on paper. let's start with the closed camps in europe. well no country has volunteered to host those camps. the problem has been when you close camps, the pressure builds up, because they can't process the irregular migrants quickly enough to send them back to their own countries. who will finance they will? -- countries. who will finance they will? —— finance them? there is a
2:19 pm
plan to set up an agency to do that. but it is a slow process. you talk of disembarkation programmes, no country of disembarkation programmes, no cou ntry wa nts to of disembarkation programmes, no country wants to host the camps. although there are inducements on offer. can they persuade the likes offer. can they persuade the likes of morocco to host the camps, with tens of thousands within their borders? the other thing was the ships, the charity ships, run by ngos, which italy accuses of acting like a taxi service. i have some experience of that, i have been on one of the ship and seen it first hand. the problem with the libyan coastguard is they only operate within 11 miles of coast and these dinghies are pushed off the coast in
2:20 pm
the night. what happens if they go beyond 11 miles? under international law, the ships are supposed to help boats in distress. what we might get, because the libyan coastguard won't be able to bring them all back, would be mass drownings. that would build up the pressure. you will hear strong words from the ngos. we have to mention brexit an appeal to britain to lay their cards on the table, time's rung out? yes we are getting more clarity on what is going to happen from this point on. there was talk about time is running out, which need more urgency and an end to the cabinet splits in the uk. we know that. what they have said today is that they are prepared to work 24/7 through the summer holidays here in brussels to get a dealfor the october holidays here in brussels to get a deal for the october summit, which is the next summit in the time
2:21 pm
table. so they are prepared to work, so long as the british side come up with concrete proposals. the interesting thing, apa rents with concrete proposals. the interesting thing, aparents think british side have —— apparently the british side have —— apparently the british side have said there is no points in meeting until we have had this discussion with the cabinet. but we have michel barnier saying we are open to business on monday morning. there are strange games that are played between the two sides. he must have known the british side were not going to play ball next week. because they can't until they have had that discussion. thank you. very much. around 100 people have a migrant boat are reported to have drowned near italy. as we were hearing, few charity run ships are operating to rescue people. aquarius is one of them. but the ship's crew is
2:22 pm
questioning whether it can continue. our correspondent explains why. the end of a 4,000—mile sea odyssey for the aquarius. the crew finally allowed to dock in france, after being at the centre of a political storm. the problems started when they rescued more than 600 migrants from unseaworthy rubber boats off the libyan coast, but were suddenly banned from using italian and maltese ports, which forced them to take migrants to spain. the italian deputy prime minister, matteo salvini, has since stopped all foreign—flagged, charity—run ships from entering italian waters, accusing them of encouraging people smuggling. over the past ten days, the bbc has been on board and witnessed the crew travel back to the search zone and carry out practice rescue drills, while the italian authorities excluded them from helping. they instead instructed the eu—trained libyan coastguard to intercept all migrant boats in distress. as the team returns to land for a crew change and refuelling,
2:23 pm
they are exhausted and frustrated at the political efforts to keep them from working off the libyan coast, and they say the lack of access to nearby ports has effectively rendered their operations futile, and they're calling on eu leaders to consider the consequences. this is where migrants are taken — detention centres in tripoli, condemned by the un as inhumane. eu leaders say they're working on a longer—term solution, but that might not involve ngo ships. the aquarius crew is considering whether it can continue. if the authorities controlling the search and rescue zone are not willing to let others do thatjob, of course we will have 2"still what we are doing out here. in the meantime, we will continue to be present and try to do thatjob. today, around 100 people are thought to have drowned off libya's coast. the future of these ngo ships rests on whether europe's leaders see them as a taxi service for illegal
2:24 pm
migrants, or allow their presence as humane life—savers. gavin lee, bbc news, marseille. let's look at the weather forecast now. darren is here. our attention first to oman, where you would have had trouble sleeping last night? trouble breathing perhaps! on monday this was the minimum temperature in this was the minimum temperature in this part of oman. i won't attempt to pronounce it. 42.6 was the minimum temperature. that is well over 100 fahrenheit. we talk about high attempts by day time. but the night—time temperatures are as important, because that is the time where you cool off after the heat. if you don't have that opportunity, the buildings where you're living,
2:25 pm
you're, you can't cool off. this is where you get this severe heat stress and it is very serious. the reason this is so high is because this is a fishing village next to the gulf of oman and the water are about 30 degrees celsius. so you know that is warmer than a bath probably. so what you have got with that heat from the water you have got a lot of humidity and then it is dangerous. it is that humidity, the high sea surface temperatures, that led to those temperatures. high sea surface temperatures, that led to those temperaturesm high sea surface temperatures, that led to those temperatures. it has been hot, nothing on that scale of course, but some overnight temperatures here were remarkable. yeah. last night, look at some extremes from last night. mumbles in south wales was the warmst place in the country. 17 degrees. that was after a ll the country. 17 degrees. that was after all the heat. over 30 degrees yesterday. by contrast in north
2:26 pm
yorkshire, temperatures down to five celsius. probably because of the easterly breeze having an impact and the low cloud coming in. nothing to do with altitude? and maybe altitude as well. thank you. do you know ravens worth. i know it is cooler and mumbles is on the coast. ravens worth. i know it is cooler and mumbles is on the coastlj ravens worth. i know it is cooler and mumbles is on the coast. i don't know how high it is. maybe somebody will tell us on twitter. maybe i will tell us on twitter. maybe i will look it up and i can help you out next time. simon mccoy doesn't do this. i don't know what simon does. let me not base my career on him. or maybe i should. i don't know. what is the forecast this afternoon? this is great, are you backin afternoon? this is great, are you back in on wednesday. i'm on fire today. probably not? forecast. forecast is coming. this is what we
2:27 pm
have had today, beautiful day in cumbria, seeing some of the highest temperatures in england. different story around aberdeenshire, where temperatures are lower. that is because we have got this low cloud and mist. around the moray firth beginning to break up. but that low cloud is sliding down the coast to east anglia. inland and further west we have the highest faechlts. s —— temperatures. it is 32 in the north—west of wales and 30 across northern ireland and 30 in london. widely into the high 20s. not as hot as it has been in scotland. we are getting that cloud, because we have this easterly breeze. that means we have the highest temperatures in the west. that will draw the cloud in foent. inland across scotland and
2:28 pm
towards the midlands and the west country. further west clearer skies and another very warm night. into the weekend, lots of sunshine, more hooes. maybe some showers in the south—west. more likely to get a shower from this cut off low that is towards biscay. temperatures dropping during the second half of the weekend, but we are still drawing airfrom the the weekend, but we are still drawing air from the near continent and more humidity in the south on sunday. this is saturday. still dry air. so we see some lore temperatures overnight. clear skies, lots of sunshine after some early mist and low cloud and more heat and light winds. easterlies again. so cooler on the north sea coast. the wind picks up on sunday. it is south—easterly. most places still dry. plenty of sunshine around. but
2:29 pm
we have the chance of catching one or two showers towards the south—west of england and wales. not far away from northern ireland. the risk of the odd thunder storm. the temperatures rising in the south—east, it is going to be hotter than the last couple of days. looking to next week, a lot of people wanting rain for the gardens. i do. there won't be much of that. a few showers in the south—west. perhaps in south wales. but for london and wimbledon looks like it is going to be dry. according to my research, ravens worth is situated ona research, ravens worth is situated on a slight knoll. 119 metres above sea—level. on a slight knoll. 119 metres above sea-level. so not that high. it is
2:30 pm
more than the mumbles. what did you say? i hope that helps! not really. thank you any way. see you later. this is bbc british representatives are called back to brussels or brexit talks
2:31 pm
after the eu's chief negotiator said huge devices remain over the british withdrawal, but theresa may is told to put her cards on the table —— huge differences. a man has said how he lent out of the window to try and put flames out of the side of g re nfell tower. put flames out of the side of grenfell tower. 44 residents have been evacuated from a tower in east london. a warning that things may run out in some supermarkets by the weekend as a carbon dioxide shortage affects supplies. coming up, the crow that has worked out how to use a vending machine. now we have the sport. the wimbledon draw has taken place. we know that andy murray is in the draw, there was a lot of uncertainty over whether he would
2:32 pm
play. making his comeback from the hip injury. would his body hold up going into a grand slam where he could end up playing five sets? he is in the draw and he will face benoit paire of france. he has been speaking to reporters and he said he's not planning on pulling out over the weekend. he intends to play the first—round match. we can hear what our tennis correspondent makes of it. it is a coincidence to see andy murray and benoit paire paired together once again because he was the last man andy murray beaded a grand slam in the fourth round on ce ntre grand slam in the fourth round on centre court last year —— beat in. murray says he will play as long as he feels competitive. benoit paire is very competitive and powerful but also hugely unpredictable. the new british number one is kyle edmund and he might play novak djokovic in
2:33 pm
the third round but he has got to get past an australian qualifier first of all. serena williams, she is the 25th seed, so she can't play another seeded player before the third round but it could be the fifth seed for the champion. many british women have tough first—round draws for the miami brody will open the centre core programme on tuesday afternoon against the defending champion —— miami brody. england are into the knockout stages of the world cup. they face colombia next week? there was a lot of talk about being on the easier side of the draw and colombia may not be the easiest opponents but it is the projected pathway to a potential quarterfinal, semifinal, maybe even final, that england were potentially
2:34 pm
trying to avoid by not putting out their strongest team. changes in the line—up meant every member of the squad has played a part in the world cup. one goal decided the result, great effort from januzaj. england now play colombia on tuesday and thatis now play colombia on tuesday and that is after the south americans secured a 1—0 victory over senegal thanks to this header from yerry mina. chris waddle says colombia will be very difficult. colombia will be very difficult. colombia will not be a walkover, they are talented, as we have seen on their day, they can be a very good side and they can beat anybody. colombia will not lie down and say, we have got this far, we have done well, because they will want to win. they will be thinking this is a winnable game. they will be thinking, we can beat england, they have a lot of experience and technical players, and they have a big following of fans, so it will be a cracking
2:35 pm
atmosphere, but england have a very good chance. marrow in fellaini has signed a new two—year contract with manchester united —— moraine fellaini. he's with belgium at the moment. he has been at old trafford now for five seasons and he has now decided to stay with the club after letting his contract run down. that is all the sport for now. thanks for joining us. crumpets have become the latest casualty of the carbon dioxide shortage which is affecting production in the uk's food and drink industry. the shortage has been caused by a longer than usual break in production of ammonia, one of the key sources of food grade c02 in europe which is used to carbonate drinks and preserve some packed fresh foods. some pub chains also report they've temporarily run out of or were short of several beers reliant on carbon dioxide. could we soon see gaps
2:36 pm
on supermarket shelves? that is the concern of the food and drink federation as the c02 crisis deepens. food producers say that an extreme shortage of carbon dioxide means there might be fewer chicken and pork products on the shelves this weekend. we will see fewer chicken dishes, fewer pork and bacon dishes. we will see probably less carbonated drinks and certainly bakery and other things that benefit from what is called modified atmosphere packaging. and it is notjust packaged food which relies on c02 to keep it fresh. 10 million pints of beer is made using c02 every day in britain and even smaller craft breweries will not benefit from bigger companies being in trouble. the role that co2 plays in the brewery, we use it all the time, we use it to move beer in between tanks, we use it to purge tanks. most breweries use c02, so even if you are a cask brewery only doing cask, you probably have a much easier time than the keg producers but it is definitely still going to be a struggle.
2:37 pm
carbon dioxide is a vital ingredient in the food and drinks sector. it is used to make carbonated drinks and vacuum packed food to keep it fresh. c02 is used to stun animals as well before they are slaughtered. the shortage is causing problems for farmers but planned shutdowns and unplanned technical problems means that only two of the uk's five c02 making factories are working. so far consumers have not faced too many problems buying beer or packaged food but there might soon be an issue with another popular staple. crumpets. warburtons, the biggest bakers in britain, said that co2 prices means it has stopped producing crumpets in half of its factories. c02 is used to keep it fresher for longer. the good news is that co2 factories will be coming back on stream soon. most of them should be producing again by next week but it'll take a few days before supplies will reach food and drinks producers who need them most. in the meantime, the advice
2:38 pm
is to keep calm and enjoy your favourite products as usual, if you can. joe lynam, bbc news. joining me now from harrogate is markjones, partner at gordons law firm and an expert in the food and drink supply chain. what kind disruption are you seeing with your clients? i suppose the disruption has not been as widespread as you may have been led to believe, and there are businesses in the market who have experienced shortages and are doing all they can to continue supplies, but i don't think the problem is as acute as it could be. before we see any dramatic reduction in products on supermarket shelves, we will see supplies
2:39 pm
reinstated and suppliers back up and running, but there will be a modest backlog over the next few weeks. it is more about managing the supply at the moment rather than turning the switches off. at the moment for certain types of food and drink there is a rush on? yes, and also we have the perfect storm situation, we have the perfect storm situation, we have the perfect storm situation, we have the warm weather and the world cup and greater demand on certain products. we have spoken about beer. there is a high demand and a shortage of supply so the problem is more acute in certain areas, packaged food, we have not seen too many instances of that. it is more meat and beer which have a challenging problems but equally we will see it coming back on stream
2:40 pm
and the suppliers will be able to manage the situation carefully. what impact might this have on the prices? i don't think they will be a dramatic increase in prices, many suppliers agreements are agreed over a substantial period. you may see a slight increase in >> studio: as a consequence of the -- you may see a slight increase as a consequence of the higher demand, but the suppliers and businesses agree deals over a long term, and so there is my kid to be any impact on the consumers in the short term. —— there is unlikely to be. thanks forjoining us. secure centres for migrants may be set up in eu states
2:41 pm
to process asylum claims under a deal reached after marathon talks at a summit in brussels. the controlled centres would be set up by eu states on a voluntary basis and migrants whose claims were rejected would be "returned". refugees could be resettled in eu states which agreed to take them. joining me now is ann singleton, an expert in asylum and international migration policy at the university of bristol and who has previously advised the european commission and the european parliament on migration data. the problem is the european union has come up with a solution that is compounding the original problem, it has created over the last few years, and over a longer period. there is no intention from the member states to ta ke no intention from the member states to take responsibility for what they need to do to do their duties under the geneva convention and it is
2:42 pm
worrying that the solution is being sought to introduce a system of camps across europe in the same way in which the camps in northern africa have failed to solve this crisis. in fact they are part of the problem. what are the problem is that you have seen when you have visited caps? yes, i went to a camp in lesbos. there are probably nearly 8000 people held in an area which was designed for 1500 of the most. it has become a place in which people live in limbo, not knowing if their asylum claim will be processed. there are thousands of children trapped in this situation and the obligations of member states towards those children's under the un convention on the rights of the child have also not been acquitted, this is causing human harm, which
2:43 pm
will last over generations. there have been arguments made that when ships were being deployed to rescue people, to bring them to mainland europe, that was serving to encourage people to make those perilous crossings, what effect will these migrant camps have on that flow? there's a misunderstanding at eu level that the causes of people migrating are being caused by those who wish to save lives. in a way people involved in search and rescue have been criminalised and demonised as being the cause of the movements and contributing towards the deaths in the mediterranean. this is a misunderstanding of what is causing this crisis. people are fleeing from very difficult situations in many countries where there is a lack of
2:44 pm
human rights and they are also suffering from situations of poverty and the externalisation of the border controls by the eu is contributing to this situation, making it worse, rather than being pa rt making it worse, rather than being part of a solution. what is the data is saying about the number of people trying to europe and which attempts by member states do best in deterring them? what we can see is that numbers of people who have been arriving in eu the european union through the ever diminishing legal route to get to the territory of the eu, these numbers have been falling in the last years, since 2015. we can see the figures that numbers of arrivals have fallen, and we also know that numbers of people who are dying are increasing, we don't know how many people are dying on land
2:45 pm
before they reach the mediterranean before they reach the mediterranean before they reach the mediterranean before they are able to reach the mediterranean and how many people are dying in these camps in north africa and what has happened with the situation in algeria where they have left thousands of people out in the desert to walk or die, and people have died as a result of what has happened in elsewhere in north africa like morocco and lebanon. thanks forjoining us. as we've heard the eu has again warned the uk that time is running out for a brexit deal to resolve issues on the irish border. but the problem does not face the uk
2:46 pm
alone ? new figures out today help explain just how much is at stake for the republic of ireland. reality check correspondent chris morris gives more detail. the thought of no deal is making people nervous and the republic of ireland issued you dependent on trade with the uk for its economic well—being —— is hugely dependent. there has been a lot of talk about north—south trade across the border with northern ireland and the need to avoid the reap position of any —— reimposition of any border checks, but east west trade across the irish sea between ireland and great britain is far more important. we have had a look at freight traffic leaving the republic of ireland and the majority of it goes dublin with the majority of it goes dublin with the busiest routes to ports like holyhead and liverpool, so how much trade are we talking about? we can look at the data on a roll on roll off freight containers and many of these containing food and everyday items, and ireland's central statistics have said in 27 see more
2:47 pm
than 550,000 loaded freight can train as on trucks and trailers were shipped from island to the rest of the world —— 2017. only a tiny number of those went outside of the eu and 85% of trade goes to british ports and this is more than 475,000 containers exported to the uk. we can break that number down further, the irish freight transport association estimates the final destination of roughly 65% of those freight containers is britain itself and 40% are destined for elsewhere in the eu, transiting across britain via ports like dover or the channel tunnel, this means any breakdown posed by the failure to reach a brexit agreement will have a huge impact on ireland's trade with the uk and also on their trade with the rest of the eu and don't forget we
2:48 pm
are looking at irish exports only, but ireland is equally dependent on the uk for their imports, so could ireland cut out the british land bridge and trade directly with the eu? one shipping company has introduced a couple of new huge roll on roll off varies on a route from dublin to rotterdam and they can carry 650 trucks each, extra freight capacity is being planned on another route to france. to give you an idea of the scale of the problem, the port of dublin has said last year it sent nearly 32,000 loaded roll on roll off containers to belgium and holland but nearly 190,002 holyhead alone. while there are contingency plans being made, it is not nearly enough to replace the trade that carrie goes to and through britain —— currently. that is a reminder that ireland needs a good brexit
2:49 pm
deal almost as much as the uk. jamie is here. ina in a moment we will have the business news. what are we doing? it is slightly lively backstage. these are the business headlines. from sunday, the fee paid each time a cash machine is used — by banks to the machine operator — will be cut. then it'll be cut each year until 2021. link, which oversees cash machines, says it's vital for the sustainability of the network. consumer group which? claims it causing 300 atms to close a month,
2:50 pm
but that number is disputed by link. tata steel and tissenkrupp are close to agreeing a merger that will create europe's second—biggest steel—maker, after arcelor mittal. sources have told the bbc that the deal — which has been under negotiation for more than a year — could be concluded in the next few days. it will see tata steel's uk plants like port talbot merged into a pan—european venture with annual sales of about £13bn. the british economy grew 0.2% in the first three months of the year — not 0.1% as the office for national statistics originally estimated. the reason it's revised its numbers is because services output rose had its fastest spurt of growth in aprilfor six months. the beauty of this job is that we get to talk about all sorts. not least c02. it is in simony things. refrigeration, making beer, plastic
2:51 pm
trays, stunning animals before they are killed. -- so many things. you did not know how it is made? no, i must have missed that this on the won “— must have missed that this on the won —— that lesson. must have missed that this on the won -- that lesson. the big angle is that we would have enough beer for the world cup. we spoke to one beer maker at a water school brewery and she explained the problems she has —— and stowe brewery. it affected us mostly on the bottling side and this week i had 2000 litres of beer which was meant to be sent off bottling and then i had a phone call saying they can't ta ke had a phone call saying they can't take it because they have no c02, so thatis take it because they have no c02, so that is approximately 4000 pints and i've got those stuck in my tax that was meant to be going for bottling
2:52 pm
which can't happen now —— tanks. 4000 pints. we could go and help. we could make a dent in that. goings-on ata could make a dent in that. goings-on at a chinese telecoms company? zte is the second biggest telecoms company in china and it had illegally shipped us goods to iran. it failed to take action against the executives responsible and the us put a ban on any american company supplying it with anything — the shares fell 60%. the us will stop the sanctions if they make reforms. let's talk to paul blake in the us. they have elected a new board and
2:53 pm
thatis they have elected a new board and that is part of the deal with the trump administration to get this back on its feet, they have elected eight new board members and a new chairman. the old board which had to go as part of the deal with the trump administration has resigned. this goes back to us allegations that the company had violated trade agreements by selling technology to the likes of iran and north korea, so the likes of iran and north korea, so trying to get back on its feet with these moves. are we going to see the sanctions lifted? as you said, the sanctions were imposed in april and they brought it to its knees, it stopped major operations. this is the number two telecommunications company in china, so telecommunications company in china, soa telecommunications company in china, so a not insignificant fall from grace, but there is opposition to the trump administration's deal in congress and notably from republicans. so he is against many
2:54 pm
members of his own party in congress who are passing bills that will in various ways, it will put various limits on the deal, and they will have two synchronise those bills. it is trundling its way through congress, but worth watching to see if the trump administration deals with it. zte hopes to get back on its feet. paul, thanks forjoining us. markets? the ftse is looking fairly strong. this is largely because of the gdp figures, they have been revised upwards. it is a bit stronger and if interest rates go up, that will make the pound a bit stronger. a bit more optimistic
2:55 pm
about the markets. jamie, thanks for joining us. now, an experiment using a vending machine specifically designed for crows has revealed something about how intelligence evolves. new caledonian crows make and use tools including a kind of fishing hook and can solve complex problems, including capturing grubs by repeatedly poking them with a stick until they are so agitated, they bite. now scientists have discovered the birds can also manipulate items in their enivronment to make intricate tools from memory or previous experiences, rather than just copying the behaviour of other crows completing the same tasks. and now the weather forecast.
2:56 pm
another hot and sunny day and some of the highest wants are in the in england. it has been a lovely day in cumbria —— highest temperatures. this picture shows missed and low cloud and that is having some coasts of england —— hugging. further west we have the highest temperatures, not quite the heat of yesterday but 30 degrees possible in western parts of northern ireland and to the west of northern ireland and to the west of wales, temperatures in the high 20s and cooler around the eastern coasts, the wind is quite light. we have this slow cloud coming back inland across scotland and across england towards the midlands and towards the west country as well. further west, where skies, and temperatures might be no lower than 13 -- temperatures might be no lower than 13 —— clear skies for the plenty of dry weather for the most part, although the chancellor sharyn the south west —— although the chance of
2:57 pm
a shower in the shower west. more likely to catch a shower over biscay, but the treasure is falling in the second half of the weekend and the wind direction is falling —— the pressure. we have increasing humidity. for the start of the weekend we have some low cloud but that will break up, sunny skies across the board on saturday. it will feel very warm. temperatures in the high 20s, although a bit cooler on the north sea coasts and on sunday it will be a stronger wind, but bringing the chancellor sharyn the south of england and wales, steering to the south of england —— bringing the chance of a shower. if we look ahead into next week, very little rain around, maybe a few
2:58 pm
showers towards the south—west into south wales, otherwise it is likely to be more dry, more heat and sunshine and higher temperatures for wimbledon. hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3. huge and serious differences remain, say the eu's chief negotiators, as they suggest the uk's proposals for brexit need to be more " realistic and workable". there's a great deal of work ahead and the most difficult tasks are still unresolved. if you want to reach a deal in october, we need quick progress. the match commander at hillsborough — david duckenfield — will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 football supporters. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames on the outside of the building coming up on afternoon live all the sport. tell us about the wimbledon draw.
2:59 pm
andy murray is the headline. he said he intends to play. as long as his body still feels good. he plays benoit on thursday. a full update in half an hour. darren has the weather. lots of dry, hot and sunny weather. lots of dry, hot and sunny weather again today. perhaps continuing into the weekend. wimbledon of course is starting next week and we will have a look at the weather for there later on. also coming up — marine biologists prepare to carry out the first survey of seal pups in the thames estuary. now live to brussels and join my
3:00 pm
colleague. the press conferences that have been taking place around the buildings. some reaction coming in already to this migrant deal that was agreed through night. it went on until 4.30 was agreed through night. it went on until4.30 in was agreed through night. it went on until 4.30 in the morning and at one point the italian prime minister said he wasn't going to agree to any of the conclusions until he got what he wanted on migration. in the last few minutes, he said that, yes, he did bully his colleagues at his first summit in brussels. whether they will take kindly to that we will discuss soon. but first the reaction of donald tusk, who said it was good on paper how how will they put into practice. we have sent a clear message to all vessels in the
3:01 pm
mediterranean that they must respect the law and must not obstruct the operation of the libyan coastguard. this demonstrates our clear and... support for the actions of the maltese authorities. there is a plan to set up closed migrant centres within europe, probably within the frontier countries. already france and austria said we're not the country of first arrival. so it must be the frontier countries. that tells you about the inclination of the the countries to help italy and greece. in north africa there is no sign that any north african country wa nts to sign that any north african country wants to host the centres. what was interesting about the tusk comments was that he singled out the ships, the ngo ships, that are cruising up and down in the mediterranean and
3:02 pm
bringing the migrants back to europe. the italians say they serve like a taxi service and they're the pull factor. but they say if we have not there, these people will drown and we can't trust the libyan coastguard to do the work. gavin lee has been on one of the vessels and he sent us this report. the end of a 4,000—mile sea odyssey for the aquarius. the crew finally allowed to dock in france, after being at the centre of a political storm. the problems started when they rescued more than 600 migrants from unseaworthy rubber boats off the libyan coast, but were suddenly banned from using italian and maltese ports, which forced them to take migrants to spain. the italian deputy prime minister, matteo salvini, has since stopped all foreign—flagged, charity—run ships from entering italian waters, accusing them of encouraging people smuggling. over the past ten days, the bbc has been on board and witnessed the crew travel back to the search zone and carry out
3:03 pm
practice rescue drills, while the italian authorities excluded them from helping. they instead instructed the eu—trained libyan coastguard to intercept all migrant boats in distress. as the team returns to land for a crew change and refuelling, they are exhausted and frustrated at the political efforts to keep them from working off the libyan coast, and they say the lack of access to nearby ports has effectively rendered their operations futile, and they're calling on eu leaders to consider the consequences. this is where migrants are taken — detention centres in tripoli, condemned by the un as inhumane. eu leaders say they're working on a longer—term solution, but that might not involve ngo ships. the aquarius crew is considering whether it can continue. if the authorities controlling the search and rescue zone are not willing to let others do thatjob, of course we will have 2"still what we are doing out here. in the meantime,
3:04 pm
we will continue to be present and try to do thatjob. today, around 100 people are thought to have drowned off libya's coast. the future of these ngo ships rests on whether europe's leaders see them as a taxi service for illegal migrants, or allow their presence as humane life—savers. gavin lee, bbc news, marseille. we have been here before. that is one to be watched. let's talk to alex barker from the ft here one to be watched. let's talk to alex barkerfrom the ft here in brussels. did they get everything they wanted out of this summit? i see more questions than answers. migration is the most poisonous issue in brussels at the moment. it has been festering for two or three years on a political level. there is
3:05 pm
a practical issue, as you were saying the tragic stories on the sea, but it is nothing like the crisis they faced in 2015, but the politics, that is where the urgency comes from. angela merkel was under pressure at home to bring home a european level deal. the italian prime minister needs to show his authority, his ability to deliver for a populist government in italy. those came together last night with a deal that really patched over the politics more than it achieved. a deal that really patched over the politics more than it achievedlj hate politics more than it achieved.” hate to be cynical. but don't they already have migrant centres in italy and greece and they tried to close, but they had to open again. have been here years and they have been called hotspots, don't call them camps. it has been difficult to
3:06 pm
make them work. they don't want to trap people there. the governments don't want to register everyone and whuns once they sort out people, they haven't decided who should be housing all the refugees. and that core problem is still with with us and it was still with us last night and it was still with us last night and it was still with us last night and it had another burst of... word on the italian prime minister, does the tactics of threatening to veto the entire programme, does that make him liked by his colleagues. italian prime ministers when they come first summit, it is a performance art often. you do have a bit of leeway in your first summit, especially if you need to deliver something. the other leaders will help you and cut you some space. if
3:07 pm
you're difficult and start overturning all the procedures they have and start keeping people in a room until the early hours, it becomes more difficult. he probably wasted a bit of his capital already. he did it again this afternoon. but in the room, people there told me he was more calm more level—headed. so let's see. i think his bigger problem is probably back in rome in terms of whether he has delivered for his political bosses in the coalition. i want to talk about brexit. there is frustration that things haven't happened quickly enough. butjean—claude juncker and donald tusk was asked about what they want from the british side. we are looking to the summit in october. this was donald tusk‘s response. on brexit, the eu 27 have taken response. on brexit, the eu 27 have ta ken note of response. on brexit, the eu 27 have taken note of what has been achieved so far. however, there is a great deal of work ahead. and the most difficult tasks are still
3:08 pm
unresolved. if you want to reach a deal in october, we need quick progress. this is the last call to lay the cards on the table. the prime minister goes back to checkers on friday, calls the full cabinet. one of the proposals is the single market for goods and agricultural products, that could solve the problem on the irish border. that would be a big sell to the cabinet. who knows, maybe there could be resignation. if she back with that plan, the mood music would be that doesn't work? it is something they doesn't work? it is something they do worry about here. if they see theresa may go through the kind of fire in westminster, emerge with something and come here and it doesn't fly, and one of those is dividing the four freedoms. there are some member states who have more interests in a goods relationship
3:09 pm
with the uk who are more sympathetic. they say we do it with the swiss. there are countries in the swiss. there are countries in the eu that think that is a good arrangement. the problem is it is not all countries. a lot of them hate the idea and see it as a wedge into the single market and a model for other countries to think, well, why bother with membership? to agree something like that before brexit day and to make clear you can leave and the principles of the eu don't hold firm, that is a huge decision. you could imagine something being ground out like the swiss have managed over a decade. but to do it ina few managed over a decade. but to do it in a few months is hard. just a quick one on your story they read today about the work that is going on for a today about the work that is going on fora in today about the work that is going on for a in deal within the commission. the secretary general keeping his cards close to his chest, but that work for it is being done? yes and there is two types of
3:10 pm
preparedness, preparedness is saying is to companies, you licence will die, airlines need to find a new way to certify their parts and make sure they're safe. that is the kind of legal problem. they don't have the infrastructure, the people to e nforce infrastructure, the people to enforce the law on brexit day if there is no deal. so they have to start thinking about what happens in the first week and the first month and the six months. how do we stagger the worst affects so it doesn't blow up. and they can't let it close the channel tunnel, cause food shortages. they're thinking through that and they're quiet about it, because it is a political weapon in the negotiation and they don't wa nt in the negotiation and they don't want some companies to think they're going to come with a safety net so they don't have to prepare themselves for what brexit might bring. thank you. just to say that
3:11 pm
there are two 273 days until brexit day. and the eu commission was saying, we are not going to disappear through the summer holidays in augustf disappear through the summer holidays in august f you want to talk, we're ready 24/7. they're looking at october. but there may be an emergency summit in november and maybe another one beyond that. back to you. thank you. the police commander during the hillsborough disaster is to go on trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 liverpool football fans. david duckenfield — a former chief superintendent of south yorkshire police — and four other men will face charges linked to the tragedy which happened almost 30 years ago. it follows a ruling by a judge at preston crown court. judith moritz sent us this update. the relatives of those who died were at preston and at a video hearing in
3:12 pm
liverpool to watch the ruling that the former match commander, david duckenfield will be prosecuted for 95 charges of gross negligence manslaughter. not 96, although 96 people died. the 96th person to die, died some years after the disaster and can't be included in the prosecution. but the 95 liverpool fans prosecution. but the 95 liverpool fan s who died, their names will all appear on the legal papers. one charge for each of those fans from ten—year—old john paul gilhooley through to gerard barron was 67. the charge sheet shows that david duckenfield is accused of breaching his duty of care to those fans during the disaster and that amounted to gross negligence. there was an order put into place after a previous prosecution 18 years ago
3:13 pm
that prevented david duckenfield from being prosecuted again. today, thejudge has ruled that from being prosecuted again. today, the judge has ruled that that order should be lifted and that is kwhie this trial can 0'—— why this trial can go ahead. i should tell you that there are four other men whose trials will also go ahead although they had applied to to have proceedings stopped. graham mccell, the former secretary at sheffield wednesday and a former officers. they all face charges connected either to hillsborough or to its aftermath. there is a sixth defendant, sir norman bettison, whose case is still to be heard. it has been adjourned until august. he too is applying to have the prosecution stopped agains him. but the news today that the match commander will go on trial and that trial expected to begin in septd. a firefighter who tried
3:14 pm
to tackle the blaze at grenfell tower has described being on a "personal rescue mission" to save 12—year—old jessica urbano ramirez from the burning tower. david badillo told the public inquiry that after learning about jessica's death, he "cried every day". our correspondent tom burridge is at the inquiry now. it has been emotional listening to the firefighter and his quest to rescue a 12—year—old girl trapped high up in grenfell tower on her own. he found out about that, because he when he went out the building, he passed jessica's sister who, said can you rescue her. here are the keys. he went up once on his own without breathing equipment to try and get to the 20th floor where the flat was. he said the lift stopped at the 15th floor. five floors short and it filled with smoke. he described how he thought
3:15 pm
he was in trouble at that moment. how thick black smoke came into the lift. he got out and went down by the stairs and found his way out. he described looking up at the building for the first time. he had been inside and he was shocked, like many other firefighters, about the speed at which the fire had spread three quarters of the way already up the building. he went to speak to his watch manager, who we have already heard evidence from at the inquiry. and he said, we need more resources. he was instrumental in the decision to up grade the incident to a 25 pump incident. that means it was worthy of 25 fire engines. he was asked by the barrister questioning him asa asked by the barrister questioning him as a witness for the inquiry what he thought the upgrade in resources mea nt what he thought the upgrade in resources meant and what the strategy was at that moment in time.
3:16 pm
at the time, get as many people as there to get as many people out as we could. so your thoughts were on evacuation. yes. how, ok, following that, how did you think you were going to get everybody out of that building? at the time, like i said, i was thinking about... getting jessica out. and making pumps 25 was getting as many people there as we can to... get even out. that is significant, because we know the fire brigade did keep the stay put strategy in place for two hours after the first 999 call. now, we
3:17 pm
have heard evidence today from daniel brown, another firefighter. he talked about the problems with radios. he spoke about the time when he went into flat 16, where the fire started and put the fire out and realised it was still smoking outside the building and looked and saw two columns were on fire. he said he sprayed it on water. but he said he sprayed it on water. but he said the water was bumping off the cladding. he didn't realise it was cladding. he didn't realise it was cladding. but the cladding was burning. that is how the fire spread. going back to the first witness, jessica did unfortunately die. he went up with colleagues and late hear the night, but sad by will have then she called nine nine nine and said she had moved up to the 23rd floor. he got up to the 20th floor where the flat was. he wasn't aware of that information and they searched forjess kashgs but ica,
3:18 pm
but she wasn't there. thank you. london fire brigade say a flat fire that broke out on the 12th floor of a tower block in the east end is now under control. eight fire engines and 58 firefighters were called to the blaze in mile end this lunchtime — following reports that half of the 12 floor was alight. the cause of the fire is not yet known. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. eu leaders, meeting in brussels, call for "realistic and workable proposals" from the british government on its plans for a post — brexit trade deal. nearly 30 years after britain's worst sporting disaster — at hillsborough football stadium — a judge has ruled that the police commander in charge on the day — david duckenfield can face trial. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames on the outside of the building. and in sport. andy murray will play his opening match at wimbledon on tuesday —
3:19 pm
if he decides he's fit enough to compete. he's been drawn against frenchman benoit paire. england have returned to their hotel in repino following their 1—0 defeat to belgium yesterday. preparations begin to take on colombia in the knock—out stages. and lewis hamilton was quickest in both first and second practice ahead of this weekend's austrian grand prix. more on those stories at about half past. a man has been charged with murder, after five people were shot dead in the newsroom of a local newspaper in the us state of maryland. another two people were injured in the shooting at the offices of the capital gazette in annapolis. nada tawfik reports from there. hands raised and rushing to safety — this has become a familiar scene in america. this time, the target was a local community paper. mid—afternoon, just as initial reports of the attack
3:20 pm
were coming in, staff inside detailed the horror. the capital gazette's crime reporter said the gunman shot through the glass door. phil davis hid under his desk during the rampage. he said nothing was more terrifying than hearing multiple people shot, and then the gunman reload. he later compared the scene to a warzone. police apprehended the suspect without exchanging any fire. they described this as a targeted attack. the suspect carefully planned each move, and stormed into the building with a smoke grenade and a shotgun. us media have identified him as 38—year—old jarrod ramos. thursday night, investigators were searching his residence in maryland. the deputy chief of police, bill krampf, said the suspect likely held a vendetta against the paper. threats were sent over social media. we're trying to confirm what account that was, and we're trying to confirm who actually sent them. he also confirmed that all five victims were staff members
3:21 pm
of the capital gazette. in the wake of the attack, security has been stepped up at major media outlets across the country, including in new york. the staff at the capital gazette have continued to cover the story, despite being at the centre of it. and in a sign of strength and determination, they've vowed to put out their friday morning paper. tada tawfik, bbc news, in annapolis, maryland. the bbc has apologised for underpaying its former china editor carrie gracie, and has reached an agreement about her back pay. the journalist has said she will donate the money to the gender equality charity the fawcett society. carrie gracie gave this update a short time ago. i love the bbc. it has been my work family for more than 30 years and i want it to be the best. sometimes families feel the need to shout at each other but it is always a relief when you can stop shouting. i'm grateful to the director—general for helping me resolve this.
3:22 pm
i do feel that he has led from the front today. in acknowledging the value of my work as china editor, the bbc has awarded me several years of backdated pay. but for me this was always about the principle and not about the money so i'm giving all of that money away to help women who needed than i do. after all, today at the bbc i can say i am equal. and i would like women in workplaces up and down this country to be able to say the same. bae systems has beaten off competition from italy and spain to win a £20 billion order to supply the australian navy with its next generation of warships. it's the world s biggest naval defence contract in a decade, and the first overseas order for the new british—designed frigates. all nine of the type 26 submarine hunters will be built in australia.
3:23 pm
prince edward has opened the newly refurbished royal air force museum ahead of its formal reopening to the public this weekend. he arrived via helicopterjust after midday for a tour of the improved site. our reporter thomas magill has been at the museum. the royal air force is celebrating its centenary this year and used that anniversary to relaunch its museum here in north london, one thatis museum here in north london, one that is dedicated to the contribution and sacrifice of the planes and people have made during that time. it is now a museum genuinely fit for the 21st century. let me introduce you to one of the curators and the director, karen whiting. what is going on. what is the new attractions here? here at the new attractions here? here at the raf museum we are about telling the raf museum we are about telling the whole story of the first hundred
3:24 pm
yea rs of raf the whole story of the first hundred years of raf and we are looking at what is the raf doing today and in the future. we have got a lot of high technology interactives for people to get engaged with. so they're as accurate as possible. we are encouraging people to get involved in those missions with us. why is it important that we remember what contribution the raf made as pa rt what contribution the raf made as part of the armed forces over the last hundred years? we believe that the raf has formed our nation. and it continues to do so today. every day the raf is above our heads, defending our skies, working on behalf of the uk. it is important that the the generations remember the sacrifices of the past, the role of the raf in the second world war and that the raf is still working for us today. i know you're going to be showing me around later on. and this place has already received a
3:25 pm
royal seal of approval, the earl of wessex officially opened the new museum. but you can come from today. —— from tomorrow. now we can go live to the eu summit, where european council president donald tusk and brussels' chief negotiator michael barnier are giving a press conference to mark the end of the summit. here is the french president emmanuel macron. he said that europeans will remain united on the ireland border issue. that is one of the very difficult matters that still needs to be resolved. president macron said the remaining 27 eu member states can no longer wait for progress on brexit. we
3:26 pm
heard earlier that donald tusk and jean—claude juncker have been heard earlier that donald tusk and jean—claudejuncker have been urging theresa may to put all her cards on the table, recognising that time is rung out to reach a deal with britain due to leave next march. now the weather. another hot and sunny day for most parts of the uk. in england the highest temperatures are in the north—west. a different story in some eastern areas of scotland where there is a lot of mist and low cloud. as you head inland and further west, this is where we see the highest temperatures. not quite the highest temperatures. not quite the heat of yesterday. but 30 degrees possible in western parts of northern ireland and the west of wales. temperatures widely in the high 20s. cooler around the eastern coasts. the winds are light, but
3:27 pm
coming in from the east or north—east. hence the drop in temperature and this low cloud coming back inland across scotland towards the midlands and the west country. further west, clearer skies after temperatures no lower than 13 or 14 degrees. into the weekend, and we still keep a lot of heat, still dry weather and sunshine for the most part, although there is a chance of a shower in the south west. high pressure in charge, that front may bring a rogue shower to the far north—west. but more likely to catch a shower from this low pressure ore biscay. we are drawing in some warm air and increasing humidity. for the start of the weekend, some mist and low cloud. won't be long before that breaks up. sunny skies across the board on saturday and light winds too. it is going to feel very warm or hot.
3:28 pm
temperatures widely in the mid to high 20s. cooler right on the north sea coasts. during sunday, the winds stronger, more south—easterly. but bringing the chance of a shower in the south—west of england and wales and just steering to the south of northern ireland. elsewhere dry, sunny and it is getting hotter in the south—east. temperatures approaching 30 degrees. if we look ahead into next week, there is very little rain around. maybe a few showers to the south—west. perhaps into south weather otherwise it is likely to be dry, more heat, more sunshine and high temperatures for wimbledon. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. british representatives are called back to brussels for brexit talks after the eu's chief negotiator said ‘huge and serious' differences remain over britain's withdrawal. theresa may is told to put her cards on the table. the match commander at hillsborough — david duckenfield — will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95
3:29 pm
football supporters. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames on the outside of the building. a warning that fizzy drinks, beer and meat may run out in some supermarkets by the weekend as a carbon dioxide shortage affects supplies. sport now on afternoon live with katherine downes, and we know andy murray's opponent at wimbledon next week if he decides to play. that is right, we do. benoit paire, number 48 that is right, we do. benoit paire, number48 in the that is right, we do. benoit paire, number 48 in the world, so not the most complex first—round match for andy murray. but he is still one of the top 50 players. the two—time winner has only recently returned to the court
3:30 pm
after almost a year out following hip sugery. he is on the practice courts at the moment. he's a wimbledon institution these days, after winning it twice. he's been hounded by reporters asking him if he will make it through the weekend. yes, i feel all right. not much different to howl yes, i feel all right. not much different to how i feel a couple of days ago really for the hadley made a decision? yes, most likely, yes. i will chat to my team this afternoon and also see how the next couple of days ago. i'm playing sets tomorrow. for most likely —— but most likely i
3:31 pm
will play. aryna sa balenka is through to the final at eastbourne. she beat the polish former world number two agnieszka radwanska in three sets. sabalenka will play either danish top seed caroline wozniacki or germany's angelique kerber in saturday's final. they're currently into a third set in the other semi. wozniacki is a break up. and now to the england belgium game? it has split supporters. but they have shown they are beatable and they have maybe also shown they have lost momentum. other people say it's a smooth the path through the knockout stages for england but colombia will be a tough opponent. yes — so a disappointing result and performance for england
3:32 pm
last night although those changes to the line—up mean that every member of the squad has now played some part in the world cup during the past 10 days. one goal decided the result — this wonderful effort from former manchester united star adnan januzaji. but the result means that england now play colombia on tuesday. that's after the south americans secured a 1—0 win over senegal thanks to a yerry mina header. and the former england winger chris waddle says colombia will be difficult to beat. colombia will not be a walkover, they are talented, as we have seen on their day, they can be a very good side and they can beat anybody. colombia will not lie down and say, we have got this far, because they will want to win. they will be thinking this is a winnable game., "we can beat england", they have a lot of experience and technical players, and they have a big following of fans, so it will be a cracking atmosphere and game, but england have a very good chance.
3:33 pm
one other piece of football news for you and marouane fellani has a new two year contract with manchester united. the midfielder, currently with the belgium side in russia, has been at old trafford for five seasons — but after letting his existing contract expire, he has decided to stay withjose mourinho's side. lewis hamilton was fastest in second practice at the austrian grand prix. the world championship leader was 0.176 seconds quicker than teammate valteri bottas. sebastian vettel finished up third quickest in his ferrari. that's all the sport for now. secure centres for migrants may be set up in eu states to process asylum claims under a deal reached after marathon talks at a summit in brussels. the controlled centres would be set up by eu states on a voluntary basis and migrants whose claims were rejected would be "returned". refugees could be resettled in eu states which agreed to take them. joining me now from
3:34 pm
our brussels studio is elizabeth collett, director of the migration policy institute europe, an independent think tank dedicated to analysis of the movement of people worldwide. how clare are you about what these plans will amount to? —— how clear. the conclusions were vague and they we re the conclusions were vague and they were based on a 4—page document which was submitted which was also quite short on detail so a lot is to be worked out but i think it is not an enormous shift in terms of where these might be located, people expect them to be in italy or greece, but the major shift is the idea that people would be detained upon arrival are not allowed to move on in order to minimise secondary movement across the eu and i think isa movement across the eu and i think is a question of how that will with current european laws which suggests
3:35 pm
blanket detention for people is not allowed. how much pressure will this plan take off greece and italy?” suspect in order to have some agreement, they would have asked for informal commitments from other member states, that they would take those who were in need of protection from those centres and relocate them voluntarily across the eu, but that is not in the document and the document is also short on explicit commitments. states are voluntarily taking the centres so there will be a lot of shuffling in the next few days. austria and france were asked if they would host these centres, but they said, not us, by not front line states, and so the southern states are very much in the online —— they are not front line states. what are the numbers in terms of people arriving? they have dropped
3:36 pm
enormously since 20 —— 2015, 2016, because of the landmark deal with turkey to limit the numbers of people arriving to greece which was the main source of concern back then. what we see now, just 40 dozen people so far this year have arrived by boat across the militarised you -- 40,000 by boat across the militarised you —— 40,000 people so far this year have arrived by boat across the mediterranean sea. this is a smaller flow which italy has historically dealt with well in the past so this is not a crisis built on numbers but there is a tension in politics in italy and germany and other countries that have precipitated this discussion right now. in terms of how inclined member states will be to settle refugees, how has that changed? be to settle refugees, how has that changed ? we be to settle refugees, how has that changed? we remember the numbers that germany took in. there are
3:37 pm
divisions between eu member states maintained and one of the biggest debates has been how they divide up responsibility for asylum seekers and make it more equitable, and there does not seem to have been a resolution, and in that regard many of the central and east european states have pretty much won, because this will now done a voluntary basis and it will rely on particular states who believe maintaining the principle of asylum is important, so we don't have the europe—wide solidarity we might have wished for and that places the entire system under strain. the hope is by strengthening external borders and managing arrivals in the mediterranean and creating these control centres eu will take the pressure off itself to come to an —— to have to come to a decision on sharing this responsibility over all. thanks forjoining us. crumpets have become the latest
3:38 pm
casualty of the carbon dioxide shortage which is affecting production in the uk's food and drink industry. the shortage has been caused by a longer than usual break in production of ammonia, one of the key sources of food—grade c02 in europe — which is used to carbonate drinks and preserve some packed fresh foods. joe lynam has been finding out more. could we soon see gaps on supermarket shelves? that is the concern of the food and drink federation as the c02 crisis deepens. food producers say that an extreme shortage of carbon dioxide means there might be fewer chicken and pork products on the shelves this weekend. we will see fewer chicken dishes, fewer pork and bacon dishes. we will see probably less carbonated drinks and certainly bakery and other things that benefit from what is called modified atmosphere packaging. and it is notjust packaged food which relies on c02 to keep it fresh.
3:39 pm
10 million pints of beer is made using c02 every day in britain and even smaller craft breweries will not benefit from bigger companies being in trouble. the role that co2 plays in the brewery, we use it all the time, we use it to move beer in between tanks, we use it to purge tanks. most breweries use c02, so even if you are a cask brewery only doing cask, you probably have a much easier time than the keg producers but it is definitely still going to be a struggle. carbon dioxide is a vital ingredient in the food and drinks sector. it is used to make carbonated drinks and vacuum packed food to keep it fresh. c02 is used to stun animals as well before they are slaughtered. the shortage is causing problems for farmers but planned shutdowns and unplanned technical problems means that only two of the uk's five c02 making factories are working. so far consumers have not faced too many problems buying beer or packaged food but there might
3:40 pm
soon be an issue with another popular staple — crumpets. warburtons, the biggest bakers in britain, said that co2 prices means it has stopped producing crumpets in half of its factories. c02 is used to keep it fresher for longer. the good news is that co2 factories will be coming back on stream soon. most of them should be producing again by next week but it'll take a few days before supplies will reach food and drinks producers who need them most. in the meantime, the advice is keep calm and enjoy your favourite products as usual, if you can. joe lynam, bbc news. it's now been six days since a group of teenagers and their football coach disappeared in a cave in northern thailand. the huge search for the group, thought to have been cut off by rising floodwater, has gripped the country. a team of specialist british cave divers is now helping with the search, as our correspondent jonathan head reports. we are on our way up the side
3:41 pm
of the mountain to check out holes on the ground. it is hot, steep and very slippery. but there is just a chance, a small one, that it might lead to the missing boys. there have been so few possibilities for getting into them caves that the thai police are making the most of this one. the national police chief has hiked up to direct this operation. their plan is to lower climbers into a narrow crack barely wide enough for an adult. it's one of several such holes, but this is the most hopeful, discovered by two british cavers yesterday. we're watching police climbers going down this really very small opening in the rock. it is very tight. they have tied a rope to a log across it to hold them. there is a lot of people up here but it feels
3:42 pm
like they are improvising, trying to find a way through to see if this leads to the caves. where's rob? are you moving in now? the two british cavers have come back from climbing down another hole that did not lead anywhere. they have explored these caves thoroughly in the past, valuable experience now. we can say here, about 26 metres over there, is where the end of the cave underneath us is likely to be. and it is unlikely, very unlikely, but we have to rule out all possibilities that the children could have got to that point. as they descend, the claim is sent back video of progress. latex in the day, they discovered a large chamber, a rare piece of positive news. although it's not clear yet whether this connects to the main caves.
3:43 pm
they will now be supplied by helicopter so they can stay up here on the hillside and keep on looking. jonathan head, bbc news, northern thailand. in a moment what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. eu leaders meeting in brussels call for "realistic and workable proposals" from the british government on its plans for a post—brexit trade deal. nearly 30 years after britain's worst sporting disaster — at hillsborough football stadium — a judge has ruled that the police commander in charge on the day — david duckenfield — can face trial. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames on the outside of the building. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. from sunday, the fee paid each time a cash machine is used —
3:44 pm
by banks to the machine operator — will be cut. then it'll be cut each year until 2021. link, which oversees cash machines, has says it's vital for the sustainability of the network. consumer group which? claims it causing 300 atms to close a month, but that number is disputed by link. tata steel and tissenkrupp are close to agreeing a merger that will create europe's second—biggest steelmaker, after arcelor mittal. sources have told the bbc that the deal — which has been under negotiation for more than a year — could be concluded in the next few days. it will see tata steel's uk plants like port talbot merged into a pan—european venture with annual sales of about £13bn. the british economy grew 0.2% in the first three months of the year — not 0.1% as the office for national statistics
3:45 pm
originally estimated. the reason it's revised its numbers is because services output rose had its fastest spurt of growth in aprilfor six months. hot isn't it? good for the solar panels? yes and no. apparantly the hotter it gets the less efficient they are, usually above 25c. u nless unless you are heating water. it is something to do with photons but don't press me on this! it is an interesting industry, though, because remember these subsidies
3:46 pm
we re because remember these subsidies were withdrawn. joining us now is chris hewett, chief executive of the solar solar trade association. the government is not subsidising them so much, does that mean the industry can prosper on its own? solar power has come along way since 2010 when it was a niche technology and last year 10% of the uk energy is coming from solar and on a day like today it is something like 25%, those costs have come down. an average system those costs have come down. an ave rage system was those costs have come down. an average system was £12,000 in 2010 and it is now around £5,000 and we expect that to come down and it makes it more affordable. do you think solar panels will grow in terms of the number? one of the worries is that the countryside will be plastered with these things. we have a thousand solar farms already in this country and mostly they are
3:47 pm
out of sight and not seen, and solar is the most powerful and popular technology in the country, and we don't want it to run out, cause, and the best place to put them is on the roof. that is where we will see the growth and long—term. roof. that is where we will see the growth and long-term. do you see this is part of small—scale energy production or as part of the national grid? primarily a dish emitted energy, it feeds into the local network — — emitted energy, it feeds into the local network —— primarily a energy. the fact is it is very easily deployed and it can be built quickly and it can be deployed where the energy is needed in cities and towns. one of the arguments is that ok, it is towns. one of the arguments is that 0k, it is fine when by r and running, you are not omitting any c02 but what about the production?
3:48 pm
—— when they are up and running. how damaging is it? what is the ecological effects? plenty of studies have shown that solar power is the most energy efficient technology even if you take into account the manufacturing. they last for a long time and that is really far less damaging than any other form of energy. we will leave it there, thanks for joining form of energy. we will leave it there, thanks forjoining us. the markets? all of them looking very strong. the agreement in the eu very strong. the agreement in the eu very important for the dax, general feeling of optimism. there were worries about the future of angela merkel, and there's a sense of optimism now. the pound is strong against the euro and also against the dollar and that is because of
3:49 pm
the dollar and that is because of the gdp figures being stronger than we thought. that has put into the minds of people that we might get interest rate hike in august. maybe more on the cards than it was a few days ago. jamie, thanks forjoining us. there'll be a new recruit amongst the ranks of the 3rd battalion the royal welsh, when it celebrates armed forces day tomorrow — a new goat mascot. over the last few months, we've been following the progress of shenkin the 4th, since his predecessor, shenkin the 3rd, died last year. he's spent the last few months being tamed and trained as alex humphreys has been finding out. another day, another stroll in the welsh capital, with a goat. but no ordinary goat. meet shenkin iv, the new goat mascot of third battalion the royal welsh. since 1884, the role of the goat mascot has been to lead the battalion wherever they go and since shenkin iii died back in september, the race has been on to get a new goat trained. this is not something you see every
3:50 pm
day in cardiff but today, shenkin and i and his goat major are on a mission. he's getting a lot of attention here. and mark, this is exactly what you want. it is most certainly, yes. what we're here to do today is, obviously, he's got to get used to crowds, different road surfaces, sheer volume because it's all the build—up now for national armed forces day when he's going to be marching in front of thousands of people and the bigger picture again is the stadium when we lead wales out, so he's got to be people friendly. so our aim today is to have a walk around the city centre. people can come up to him and say hello to him, he can get used to different things as part of his training process. but training a goat is no easy task. initially, when it was just me sat in the pen with him, all day long waiting for him to come to me to earn my trust. which, as you can see, we are doing quite well. shenkin lives in maindy barracks in cardiff and spends so much
3:51 pm
of his time with mark that it's become a bit of a family affair. it'd be weird having a goat friend. he is a little bit naughty and really funny because he jumps up on the wall and walks across it and he's naughty 'cause when i try smoothing him, he goes like this with his horns. next stop, raglan barracks, newport for a band rehearsal. this evening, what we've done is to get shenkin to experience the sheer volume and the loudness of the regimental band and corps of drums and to accept it as it's not going to hurt him and march off in peace. and what was he like tonight? tonight, not too bad, not too bad. but it's been a long, warm day so he's a bit agitated towards the end. but, all in all, he's
3:52 pm
done pretty well. no, not my fault. there's no grapes in my pocket either. he's going to hear this a lot, isn't it? all his life. do you think he's ready? yes, yes. let's just hope there's no kidding around on his big debut in llandudno. enough! alex humphreys, bbc news. now, an experiment using a vending machine specifically designed for crows has revealed something about how intelligence evolves. new caledonian crows make and use tools — including a kind of fishing hook — and can solve complex problems, including capturing grubs by repeatedly poking them with a stick until they are so agitated, they bite. now scientists have discovered the birds can also manipulate items in their enivronment to make intricate tools from memory or previous experiences, rather than just copying the behaviour of other crows completing the same tasks. time for a look at the weather. here's darren bett.
3:53 pm
another hot and sunny dave most parts of the uk, in england some of the most warmest areas are in the north—west and this has been a lovely picture here in cumbria. different story in eastern areas of scotla nd different story in eastern areas of scotland where this picture shows miss and cloud and that is also on the eastern coast of england as well —— gully and further west is where we have the highest temperature, 30 degrees possible in western areas of northern ireland and the west of wales and temperatures widely in the high 20s but cooler in the eastern coasts. the wind is light but the breezes coming in off the north—west, hence the drop in temperature on the coast. further west clear skies and after the heat of the day temperatures might be no lower than 13. into the weekend we
3:54 pm
keep heat coming our way, dry weather and sunshine of the most part, although the chance of a shower in the south—west. high pressure in charge of the weather, the weather front might bring a roker shower but more likely to catch a shower from this low— pressure over catch a shower from this low—pressure over biscay where the pressure is falling in the second half of the weekend and the wind direction is changing slightly, drawing in warm airfrom the near continent and increasing humidity. the start of the weekend, some low cloud, it won't be long before that brea ks cloud, it won't be long before that breaks up. sunny skies across the board, and very light winds, as well, so it will feel very warm, temperatures in the mid to high 20s. sunday, the winds is a bit stronger, more south—easterly, blowing away the cloud, but bringing the chance ofa the cloud, but bringing the chance of a shower in the south west of england and wales, steering clear of
3:55 pm
northern ireland perhaps, but elsewhere it will be dry and sunny and getting hot in the south—eastern temperatures approaching 30. looking into next week, not much rain around, maybe a few showers in the south west into south wales but otherwise it is likely to be dry with more heat and sunshine and higher temperatures for wimbledon. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 4. huge and serious differences remain say eu leaders — as they suggest the uk's proposals for brexit need to be more " realistic and workable". the most difficult it is a it cans are still unresolved. if you want to reach a deal in october, we need quick progress. this is the last call to lay the cards on the table. the match commander at hillsborough — david duckenfield — will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 football supporters. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames
3:56 pm
on the outside of the building. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. we know who andy murray has drawn at wimbledon. yes he is most likely to be there on tuesday for his opening round match with benoit. i will have the latest on his come back. darren has the weather. it looks glorious. yes for the fifth day in a row we have seen temperatures over 30 degrees. will we take the heat into the weekend? there could be one or two showers. all the answers to those questions later on. thank you. also coming up: crumpets become the latest casualty of the gas shortage — amid warnings supermarkets shelves will run out of some fizzy drinks, beer and meat by the weekend. it took the 27 leaders time to reach
3:57 pm
the conclusion. there wasn't much to read in the draft conclusions, just four paragraphs and the central message was let's get on with it. time is short. this was the summit they were supposed to be discussing concrete measures on the irish border. but another deadline has come and gone and we look to the summit in october. what the commissioners said today is we're ready 24/7 to talk to the british side. we will talk all the way through august. but everyone now looks to this meeting next week and whether theresa may can find a deal
3:58 pm
with her cabinet. here is donald tusk, the european council president. the eu 27 have taken note of what has been achieved so far. however, there is a great deal of work ahead. and the most difficult tasks are still unresolved. if you wa nt tasks are still unresolved. if you want to reach a deal in october, we need quick progress. this is the la st call need quick progress. this is the last call to lay the cards on the table. dona tuesday it can. -- tusk. a couple of interesting lines. one from emmanuel macron, the french president, he said whatever deal they come to on brexit, european jurisdiction must prevail. 0f they come to on brexit, european jurisdiction must prevail. of course that would mean either a role for the ecj or the court that norway belongs to. the irish taoiseach saying the proposal you may have
3:59 pm
read about a single market for goods and agriculture that may solve an issue on the irish border, he said that won't fly, because it will divide the four freedoms of the single market. so theresa may could try to get it past the cabinet, but it falls flat here when she is comes here on 16thjuly it falls flat here when she is comes here on 16th july for talks. let's talk to a writer on migration and brexit for the wall street journal. i looked at the odds, it is even money a no deal. do you think, do you think it could collapse? the european union has a very strong position. you cannot cherry—pick and have an a la carte agreement where you only have part of the single market access and no ecj jurisdiction and no eu rules and a
4:00 pm
divergent system where the uk would bea divergent system where the uk would be a competitor. so they are really hammering home that point that you cannot come with some white paper where you will have a fudge of options that from their point of view it is unacceptable. so a failure of talks is at this point in the cards. but we have seen of course on migration when there is a crisis and governments might fall, at the 11th hour they come up with a deal. in fact it was the ninth hour. the question is, do the pure kiss at —— purists, do they win or do they find a fudge when the leaders get together. the way the negotiations have been structured is that leaders don't negotiate with theresa may directly and that is an experience that greece had to endure as well
4:01 pm
during its bailout talks, where leaders refused to hammer out a deal on the details of that bailout with directly and similarly leaders are steering clear from negotiating the nuts and bolts of a brexit agreement. if there would be a fudge, i would expect that to come before the summit rather than at a long over night summit as we have seen on migration, which was a lot about the survival of chancellor angela merkel. one european leader said without concrete proposals from the british side, they can't do very much and as time goes on, it is like the british side holding a gun to their head and saying, we will pull their head and saying, we will pull the trigger and they're saying, go ahead. they don't have the cards on their side. but theresa may did pull out one important card and that is security. how did that go down. that didn't go down very well, threatening them indirectly with the
4:02 pm
likelihood of more terror attacks in europe if all the security agreements that are in place and work well and have prevented attacks suddenly cease to exist. obviously, it will be in the strategic interests both of the eu and the uk not for this to be bogged down in the customs union, ecj discussion. but in the end nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. are you putting your ten euros on even money? i'm not betting on brexit? i think we will be here more in october and maybe even in november. they are talking of an emergency summit. let's turn to migration, the plan is for new migrant centres to be set up in eu countries on a volu nta ry be set up in eu countries on a voluntary basis no country has actually volunteered to host one. external bored controls will be
4:03 pm
strengthened and migrants prevented from moving in the eu. there could be camps outside the eu to process refugees, although no african country appears willing to have them. so lots to discuss about the options that have been put forward of the one line from donald tusk was a warning to the ships manoeuvring about the libyan coast, that they have to let the libyan coastguard ta ke have to let the libyan coastguard take priority. but there is concern from charities that once the boats drift from the libyan coast, there will be no help for the migrants and they will drown at sea. one vessel is run by the charity and gavin lee has been on it. it has been turned away at malta and italy and it has docked in marseille. the end of a 4,000—mile sea
4:04 pm
odyssey for the aquarius. the crew finally allowed to dock in france, after being at the centre of a political storm. the problems started when they rescued more than 600 migrants from unseaworthy rubber boats off the libyan coast, but were suddenly banned from using italian and maltese ports, which forced them to take migrants to spain. the italian deputy prime minister, matteo salvini, has since stopped all foreign—flagged, charity—run ships from entering italian waters, accusing them of encouraging people smuggling. over the past ten days, the bbc has been on board and witnessed the crew travel back to the search zone and carry out practice rescue drills, while the italian authorities excluded them from helping. they instead instructed the eu—trained libyan coastguard to intercept all migrant boats in distress. as the team returns to land for a crew change and refuelling, they are exhausted and frustrated at the political efforts to keep them from working off the libyan coast,
4:05 pm
and they say the lack of access to nearby ports has effectively rendered their operations futile, and they're calling on eu leaders to consider the consequences. this is where migrants are taken — detention centres in tripoli, condemned by the un as inhumane. eu leaders say they're working on a longer—term solution, but that might not involve ngo ships. the aquarius crew is considering whether it can continue. if the authorities controlling the search and rescue zone are not willing to let others do thatjob, of course we will have 2"still what we are doing out here. in the meantime, we will continue to be present and try to do thatjob. today, around 100 people are thought to have drowned off libya's coast. the future of these ngo ships rests on whether europe's leaders see them as a taxi service for illegal migrants, or allow their presence as humane life—savers. gavin lee, bbc news, marseille. here is the italian prime minister
4:06 pm
threatening to veto the entire conclusions of the summit unless he gets what he wants, did that play well? the impression is that no, it didn't work very well. first, that isa didn't work very well. first, that is a wild card you can use only once and looking at the test of the conclusion it doesn't seem we have a changed page on the way migration is dealt with. secondly, many of the few things that are there in the document most likely one of the things that italy could have got also without threatening the veto,
4:07 pm
because angela merkel needed an agreement on secondary movements. so the impression is that the italians didn't play well the wild card.” wonder how much solidarity there is, isaid wonder how much solidarity there is, i said the migration centres are on a voluntary basis. but france said they have to be set up in frontier countries. it is still italy and greece bearing the brunt? yes and until the moment where we have real reform of the asylum regulation all these things are not really likely to change much. we have to understand also one thing that on migration there is at stake the future of the european central right. the austerity and globalisation have strongly weakened the centre—left. as now migration,
4:08 pm
we see how much is weakening the moderate centre right and strengthening the radical right. so migration has many levels and there isa migration has many levels and there is a reason why one of most read books where one where the theory was migration for europe what nine lever was for the us. —— what 9/11 was for the us. the greek prime minister said the eu is divided and you have nationalist forces and the democratic ones, we ended up with a text that is not as we wanted, but we avoided several dangers. a final word on the german chancellor she has announced, that she has a bilateral agreement to return migrants who have registered in one country. she has an agreement to return them to spain and greece. will that be enough to get her out
4:09 pm
of the political mess she is in in in berlin? we will find out this weekend. back to you. thank you. the police commander in charge of hillsborough is to go on trial. the relatives of those who died at hillsborough were here at preston and also at the video link hearing in liverpool to watch as sir peter openshaw ruled today that the former match commander, david duckenfield, will be prosecuted for 95 charges of gross negligence manslaughter. not 96, although 96 people died at hillsborough, the 96th person to die, tony bland, died some years after the disaster and so cannot be included in the prosecution. but the 95 liverpool fans who died, their names will all
4:10 pm
appear on the legal papers, one charge for each of those fans. from 10—year—old john paul gilhooley, the youngest child to die, up through to pensioner gerard barron was who 67. and the charge sheet shows that david duckenfield is accused of breaching his duty of care to those fans during the disaster and it is alleged that that duty of care amounted to gross negligence. there was an order which was put into place after a previous prosecution 18 years ago, that prevented david duckenfield from being prosecuted again. today, thejudge has ruled that that order should be lifted. that's why this trial can go ahead and its expected to start in september. i should also tell you there are four other men whose trials will also go ahead, although they had also applied to have proceedings stopped chltsd they are to have proceedings stopped.
4:11 pm
they are graham mackrell, the former company secretary at sheffield wednesday, former solicitor peter metcalfe and former officers donald denton and alan foster. they all face charges which are connected either to hillsborough or to its aftermath. there is also a sixth defendant, sir norman bettison, whose case is still to be heard. it has been adjourned until august. he too is applying to have the prosecution against him stopped. but the news this morning that is the match commander, david duckenfield will go on trial and that trial expected to begin in september. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: eu leaders, meeting in brussels, call for "realistic and workable proposals" from the british government on its plans for a post—brexit trade deal. nearly thirty years after britain's worst sporting disaster — at hillsborough football stadium — a judge has ruled that the police commander in charge on the day — david duckenfield can face trial. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames
4:12 pm
on the outside of the building. in sport: andy murray says he is likely to play at wimbledon. his opening match is on tuesday. england have returned to their hotel after their 1—0 defeat to belgium yesterday. preparations begin to ta ke yesterday. preparations begin to take on columbia. lewis hamilton was quick nest first and second practice ahead of this weekend's austrian grand prix. iwill ahead of this weekend's austrian grand prix. i will have morejust after 4.30. a firefighter who tried to tackle the blaze at grenfell tower has described being on a "personal rescue mission" to save 12—year—old jessica urbano ramirez from the burning tower. david badillo told the public inquiry that after learning about jessica's death, he "cried every day". our correspondent tom burridge
4:13 pm
is at the inquiry now. more harrowing testimony? yes it has been really moving listening to the firefighter giving a vivid picture of the conditions on the ground as he worked with the first firefighters at grenfell tower. he has been describing what was described to him as a personal rescue mix. he —— mission. he agreed it was to rescue young jessica. he bumped into her sister, who gave him her keys to the flat on the 20th floor and he tried to go up in the lift at grenfell tower. we were shown cctv image of him getting into the lift that night. we were then basically taken through the moments. he described how the lift stopped on the 15th floor. we know there were problems with the lift. it didn't
4:14 pm
operate as it should have done for firefighters and he described what happened when the lift door opens five floors short of the 20th where he thought jessica was.” five floors short of the 20th where he thought jessica was. i thought, i'm in trouble here. your first thought was i'm in trouble here? yes. what did you do immediately after having had that thought? tried to find my way out. what did you do? felt around, held my breath and... walked forwards to where i thought the door was to the lobby. to the stair well. right. so you got out of the lift? yes. could you... i'm scared to say, exploring that, was
4:15 pm
there an option to shut the lift and go back down? no, because the lift filled with black smoke. sol wouldn't have been able to breathe in the lift. i see. and apart from thoughts about getting out of there, did you have any thoughts at all about the extent of the fire and smoke spread in the building at that point? at that moment, when... when you were confronted with the wall of black smoke, did you have thoughts about the extent of the smoke and fire spread in the building? at that exact moment when i can't breathe andl exact moment when i can't breathe and i can't see and i'm... no, not until i escaped out of the lob y. he didn't have breathing equipment on that attempt. he got the breathing equipment and went in with collea g u es equipment and went in with colleagues and went up to the 20th floor. what he didn't realise that
4:16 pm
isjessica had called 999 and spent a long time on the phone with an operator, about the fact that she was trapped on the 23rd floor. because she had gone up to be with other residents further up the building. unfortunately that information didn't get through to the firefighter and he got to the 20th floor, searched the flat and didn't find her and sadly aborted the mission at that point, not knowing where she was. we have had evidence today that the radios of the firefighters weren't working as they should have been. and this has been described as a recurring well known problem. the fire brigades union has put out a statement saying communication failings have been an issue in major incidents for a long time and it is something they have raised with fire and rescue services on numerous occasions. we have been hearing from daniel brown a firefighter, he was describing how
4:17 pm
when he realised they had put the fire out inside the flat. but a candle like flame was dancing around the window. he put water on to the cladding. he didn't realise it was cladding. he didn't realise it was cladding at the time. but he said that water was bouncing off and we got a picture from the firefighters of how they were overwhelmed. we have heard that in evidence, by how quickly it spread. thank you. london fire brigade say a flat fire that broke out on the 12th floor of a tower block in the east end is now under control. eight fire engines and 58 firefighters were called to the blaze in mile end this lunchtime — following reports that half of the 12 floor was alight. the cause of the fire is not yet known a man has been charged with murder, after five people were shot dead in the newsroom of a local newspaper
4:18 pm
in the us state of maryland. another two people were injured in the shooting at the offices of the capital gazette in annapolis. nada tawfik reports from there. hands raised and rushing to safety — this has become a familiar scene in america. this time, the target was a local community paper. mid—afternoon, just as initial reports of the attack were coming in, staff inside detailed the horror. the capital gazette's crime reporter said the gunman shot through the glass door. phil davis hid under his desk during the rampage. he said nothing was more terrifying than hearing multiple people shot, and then the gunman reload. he later compared the scene to a warzone. police apprehended the suspect without exchanging any fire. they described this as a targeted attack. the suspect carefully planned each move, and stormed into the building with a smoke grenade and a shotgun. us media have identified him as 38—year—old jarrod ramos. thursday night, investigators were
4:19 pm
searching his residence in maryland. the deputy chief of police, bill krampf, said the suspect likely held a vendetta against the paper. threats were sent over social media. we're trying to confirm what account that was, and we're trying to confirm who actually sent them. he also confirmed that all five victims were staff members of the capital gazette. in the wake of the attack, security has been stepped up at major media outlets across the country, including in new york. the staff at the capital gazette have continued to cover the story, despite being at the centre of it. and in a sign of strength and determination, they've vowed to put out their friday morning paper. nada tawfik, bbc news, in annapolis, maryland. the bbc has apologised for underpaying its former china editor carrie gracie, and has reached an agreement about her back pay. the journalist has said she will donate the money to the gender equality charity the fawcett society. carrie gracie gave this update a short time ago. i love the bbc.
4:20 pm
it has been my work family for more than 30 years and i want it to be the best. sometimes families feel the need to shout at each other but it is always a relief when you can stop shouting. i'm grateful to the director—general for helping me resolve this. i do feel that he has led from the front today. in acknowledging the value of my work as china editor, the bbc has awarded me several years of backdated pay. but for me this was always about the principle and not about the money, so i'm giving all of that money away to help women who needed than i do. after all, today at the bbc i can say i am equal. and i would like women in workplaces up and down this country to be able to say the same. looks slightly strange doesn't it?
4:21 pm
now the weather forecast with darren. we will turn our attention to oman. i'm going to show you this temperature. i have never experienced been on holiday where the temperature has been 43 degrees. but this was 43 degrees as a minimum temperature. at night. monday night into tuesday morning. 42.6. you cannot believe those sort of numbers. it happens a bit across this part of the world, because this location is a small fishing village. it is next to the gulf of oman and the waters are particularly warm. sea surface temperatures are up to
4:22 pm
30 degrees celsius. that is the sort of temperature we have had in the airforthe of temperature we have had in the airfor the last of temperature we have had in the air for the last couple of days. you don't get a chance to cool down and recover from the heat. we have heat health warnings in the uk issued by the met office and the government. and they relate to high temperatures by day and also by night. because it is by might you have the chance to cool down. no heat stress. you get a chance to recover from the heat stress. but with these temperatures there is no let up and day time temperatures are 51. here then over night, nothing like that, but quite variable the temperatures? the highest minimum temperature last night 17. that was in mumbles in south wales. the lowest weather was about five celsius that was in north yorkshire. a difference, because we had a lot of heat in the western
4:23 pm
side of the uk. less heat further east. not particularly high up. it is on east. not particularly high up. it isona east. not particularly high up. it is on a small knoll. it is on a slight knoll, 119 metres above sea—level. what is the forecast like. but first where was the highest temperatu recorded today? g raves highest temperatu recorded today? graves end. no you let me down. it is the same place we have had for the past three days!” is the same place we have had for the past three days! i have been... in france! all right. rub it in. port maddock in wales. 32 degrees. yesterday, it was 33. 90 fahrenheit. we get temperatures close to 30 degrees this weekend. here we have had the sunshine. head to the east coast and we have had more cloud. it
4:24 pm
has not been as warm either. it has been a different feel for much of the day in the east of scotland and that low cloud has dragged its way down to norfolk as well. so we have seen the high temperatures further inland. notfar seen the high temperatures further inland. not far inland. but further west of course with 30 degrees in the north—west of wales. but we haven't reached 30 degrees anywhere else that i have seen. high 20s or so. it has not been as hot as recently in scotland and particularly cooler near the eastern coasts. the winds are light in most places. there is a breeze. but is still an easy breeze, so it is chilly on the north sea coast and tonight the low cloud will come back in across scotland and midlands to the west country. further west the temperatures will be higher tonight after the heat of the day. to the weekend, and there is more heat on the way and more sunshine and for
4:25 pm
most of us more dry weather. but the chaps of a shower or —— chance of a shower or two to the south—west. that is courtesy of that cut off low. we will find that pressure will dropa low. we will find that pressure will drop a bit. still most places will be dry. ahead of that, we are drawing in some warm if not hot air. the wind direction changes to a south—easterly and that will increase the humidity in the south. so as we head through saturday, any mist and cloud goes and blue skies across the way. temperatures into the mid to high 20s. again with light winds. cooler along the north sea coasts. the second half of the weekend, the wind picks up, it pushes away all that mist and cloud and instead we may pick up a shower in the south—west of england. perhaps into wales. smaller risk for northern ireland. some places wanting some rain. not guaranteed that rain, most places will have a
4:26 pm
dry day and it will hot up in the south—east. temperatures higher than they have been for the past couple of days. that is as we start at wimbledon where it will be dry with sunshine and high temperatures. if you're hoping for rain, some people are, there is a chance of showers in the south—west and possibly into south wales, otherwise again it looks dry. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. theresa may is told to ‘lay her cards on the table' as the president of the european council — donald tusk issues a "last call" for a brexit deal — warning time is running out. the match commander at hillsborough — david duckenfield — will face trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 football supporters. one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames on the outside of the building. a warning that fizzy drinks, beer and meat may run out in some supermarkets by the weekend as a carbon dioxide shortage affects supplies.
4:27 pm
sport now on afternoon live with with katherine downes. and we know andy murray's opponent at wimbledon next week if he decides to play. he hates the build—up to wimbledon, normally because of the pressure, but this year it is about are you going to play because he had that hip surgery in january. going to play because he had that hip surgery injanuary. he hasjust made his comeback to competitive tennis at queens and eastbourne. he is in the draw for wimbledon on monday, playing benoit paire, the world number 48 on tuesday. he still has a decision to make as to whether his bodyis body is strong enough to hold up to five sets. but he says he is most likely to play because as usual at the all—england club andy murray doesn't
4:28 pm
go anywhere without a flock of reporters. yeah, i feel all right. not much different to how i felt a couple of days ago really. have you made a decision? are you going to play? yes, most likely, yes. i will chat to my team this afternoon and also see how the next couple of days ago. i'm playing sets and stuff tomorrow. but most likely i will play. he sounds very excited to be playing! top seed caroline wozniacki beat angelique kerber to reach the final at eastbourne for the second year in a row. the dane saved a match point and came from a set down to win. having just missed out on the title last year, the world number two has another chance in tomorrow's final. wozniacki will play bela russian aryna sa balenka in the final tomorrow. sabalenka beat the polish former world number two agnieszka radwanska in three sets. some great tennis at eastbourne this
4:29 pm
afternoon. halfway through the world cup and no matches but another duty for fifa to reflect on the var. they have been having a debrief today. having reached the halfway point of the tournament going into the knockout stages will stop var has been a talking point of the world cup, it has split supporters. some people say it takes too long. it is taking out any level of intrigue and drama but other people save it has added extra excitement. —— say. statistics have come out. it has produced even more drama and more penalties. pierre luigi collina — former italian referee — head of fifa's referee committee —
4:30 pm
suggests var should have helped england out when harry kane was wrestled in box, but they were missed. there were some incidents that suddenly disappeared. we had some holdings at a certain moment but the following matches they disappeared, almost for >> studio: -- or they we re almost for >> studio: -- or they were punished by a technical decision, a penalty kick. because of course we noticed and we intervened. suggesting there that harry kane did not benefit from var but they corrected that in later matches. one other piece of football news for you annd marouane fellani has a new two year contract with manchester united.
4:31 pm
the midfielder, currently with the belgium side in russia, has been at old trafford for five seasons — but after letting his existing contract expire, he has decided to stay withjose mourinho's side. lewis hamilton was fastest in second practice at the austrian grand prix. the world championship leader was 0.176 seconds quicker than teammate valteri bottas. sebastian vettel finished up third quickest in his ferrari. and finally, ben stokes has been named in england's squad for the three—match one—day international series against india which starts on 12july. stokes hasn't played since tearing his left hamstring at the start ofjune, but he's set to return as a specialist batsman for durham's t20 match against yorkshire on 5thjuly. fellow all—rounder chris woa kes misses out though. he continues to struggle with knee and quad injuries. that's all the sport for now. let's return to brexit —
4:32 pm
and leaders of the remaining 27 eu countries have urged theresa may to give more clarity on what future relationship with the eu britain wants. the prime minister says she hopes a new phase of talks will be possible after a cabinet meeting next week to finalise a government paper setting out the uk's post—brexit plans. our political editor laura kuenssberg is in brussels — and she asked the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, how confident he was that theresa may can bring her front bench together. do you think theresa may will be able to resolve her cabinet differences? yes. what happens if she doesn't? she will. why are you confident? because i know her. you think you can trust her to do that which much i was always trusting the british prime minister. as we've heard the eu has again warned the uk that time is running out for a brexit deal to resolve issues on the irish border.
4:33 pm
but the problem does not face the uk alone ? new figures out today help explain just how much is at stake for the republic of ireland. reality check correspondent chris morris gives more detail. it is no secret that the future the irish border between northern ireland and the republic is proving to bea ireland and the republic is proving to be a massive challenge in the brexit negotiations. the talk of no deal is making people nervous. it is not just it is notjust in the uk that this is making people nervous. the republic of ireland is hugely dependent on trade with the uk for its economic well—being. there has been a lot of talk about north—south trade across the border with northern ireland and the need to avoid the reimposition of any border checks, but economically east west trade across the irish sea between ireland and great britain is far more important. we have had a look at freight traffic leaving the republic of ireland and the majority of it goes from dublin with the busiest routes to ports like holyhead
4:34 pm
and liverpool, so how much trade are we talking about? we can look at the data on roll on roll off freight containers and many of these containing food and everyday items, and ireland's central statistics office have said in 2017 more than 550,000 loaded freight containers on trucks and trailers were shipped from ireland to the rest of the world. only a tiny number of those went outside of the eu. 85% of trade goes to british ports and this is more than 475,000 containers exported to the uk. we can break that number down further, the irish freight transport association estimates the final destination of roughly 60% of those freight containers is britain itself and 40% are destined for elsewhere in the eu, transiting across britain via ports like dover or the channel tunnel.
4:35 pm
this means any breakdown posed by the failure to reach a brexit agreement will have a huge impact on ireland's trade with the uk and also on their trade with the rest of the eu. and don't forget we are looking at irish exports here, but ireland is equally dependent on the uk for their imports, so could ireland cut out the british land bridge and trade directly with the eu? one luxembourg based shipping company has introduced a couple of new huge roll on roll off ferries on a route from dublin to rotterdam and they can carry 650 trucks each, extra freight capacity is also being planned on another route to france. to give you an idea of the scale of the problem, the port of dublin has said last year it sent nearly 32,000 loaded roll on roll off containers to belgium and holland but nearly 190,000
4:36 pm
to holyhead alone. while there are contingency plans being made, it is not nearly enough to replace the trade that currently goes to or through britain. that is a reminder that ireland needs a good brexit deal almost as much as the uk. it's now been six days since a group of teenagers and their football coach disappeared in a cave in northern thailand. the huge search for the group, thought to have been cut off by rising floodwater, has gripped the country. a team of specialist british cave divers is now helping with the search, as our correspondent jonathan head reports. we are on our way up the side of the mountain to check out holes in the ground. it's hot, steep and very slippery. but there is just a chance, a small one, that it might lead to the missing boys. there have been so few possibilities for getting into the caves that the thai police are making the most of this one. the national police chief has hiked
4:37 pm
up to direct this operation. their plan is to lower climbers into a narrow crack barely wide enough for an adult. it's one of several such holes, but this is the most hopeful, discovered by two british cavers yesterday. we're watching police climbers going down this really very small opening in the rock. it is very tight. they have tied a rope to a log across it to hold them. there is a lot of people up here but it feels like they are improvising, trying to find a way through to see if this leads to the caves. where's rob? are you moving in now? the two british cavers have come back from climbing down another hole that did not lead anywhere. they have both explored these caves thoroughly in the past, valuable experience now. we can say here, about 26 metres
4:38 pm
over there, is where the end of the cave underneath us is likely to be. and it is unlikely, very unlikely, but we have to rule out all possibilities that the children could have got to that chamber. as they descend, the climbers send back video of their progress. later in the day, they discover a large chamber, a rare piece of positive news. although it's not clear yet whether this connects to the main caves. they will now be supplied by helicopter so they can stay up here on the hillside and keep on looking. jonathan head, bbc news, northern thailand. crumpets have become the latest casualty of the carbon dioxide shortage which is affecting production in the uk's food and drink industry.
4:39 pm
the shortage has been caused by a longer than usual break in production of ammonia, one of the key sources of food—grade c02 in europe — which is used to carbonate drinks and preserve some packed fresh foods. joe lynam has been finding out more. could we soon see gaps on supermarket shelves? that is the concern of the food and drink federation as the c02 crisis deepens. food producers say that an extreme shortage of carbon dioxide means there might be fewer chicken and pork products on the shelves this weekend. we will see fewer chicken dishes, fewer pork and bacon dishes. we will see probably less carbonated drinks and certainly bakery and other things that benefit from what is called modified atmosphere packaging. and it is notjust packaged food which relies on c02 to keep it fresh. 10 million pints of beer is made using c02 every day in britain and even smaller craft breweries will not benefit from bigger companies being in trouble. the role that co2 plays
4:40 pm
in the brewery, we use it all the time, we use it to move beer in between tanks, we use it to purge tanks. most breweries use c02, so even if you are a cask brewery only doing cask, you probably have a much easier time than the keg producers but it is definitely still going to be a struggle. carbon dioxide is a vital ingredient in the food and drinks sector. it is used to make carbonated drinks and vacuum packed food to keep it fresh. c02 is used to stun animals as well before they are slaughtered. the shortage is causing problems for farmers but planned shutdowns and unplanned technical problems means that only two of the uk's five c02 making factories are working. so far consumers have not faced too many problems buying beer or packaged food but there might soon be an issue with another popular staple — crumpets. warburtons, the biggest bakers in britain, said that co2 prices means it has stopped producing
4:41 pm
crumpets in half of its factories. c02 is used to keep it fresher for longer. the good news is that co2 factories will be coming back on stream soon. most of them should be producing again by next week but it'll take a few days before supplies will reach food and drinks producers who need them most. in the meantime, the advice is keep calm and enjoy your favourite products as usual, if you can. joe lynam, bbc news. prince edward has opened the newly refurbished royal air force museum ahead of its formal reopening to the public this weekend. the raf is using its 100th anniversary to relaunch the building in north london. our reporter thomas magill has been at the museum. the royal air force is celebrating its centenary this year and it has used that anniversary to relaunch its museum here in north london. it is dedicated to the contribution and sacrifice that the planes and people
4:42 pm
have made during that time, and this is now a museum fit for the 21st century. let me introduce you to one of the curators, the director of the museum. what is going on? what are the new attractions? we are about telling the whole story of the first hundred years of the raf and also we are looking at what they are doing today and what it will be doing in the future. we have a lot of high—technology interactives and we have worked with the raf to develop these so they are as accurate as possible and we are encouraging people to come down and get involved in those missions. why is it important that we remember what contribution they have made as part of the armed forces? we believe the raf has formed our nation over the 100 years and continue to do so today, every day the raf is over our
4:43 pm
heads defending our skies, working on the half of the uk, so it is important generations remember the sacrifices of the past and the role of the raf in the second world war but also that they are still very much working for us today.” but also that they are still very much working for us today. i know you will be showing it me around later on, this place has already received a loyal seal of approval, from prince edward. —— royal. he opened it efficiently, and you can visit it from tomorrow. —— he opened it officially. jamie is here. in a moment he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. eu leaders, meeting in brussels, call for "realistic and workable proposals" from the british government on its plans for a post — brexit trade deal. nearly 30 years after britain's worst sporting disaster — at hillsborough football stadium — a judge has ruled that the police commander in charge on the day — david duckenfield — can face trial.
4:44 pm
one of the first firefighters to enter grenfell tower tells the public inquiry how he leant out of a window to try to put out flames on the outside of the building. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. from sunday, the fee paid each time a cash machine is used — by banks to the machine operator — will be cut. then it'll be cut each year until 2021. link, which oversees cash machines, has says it's vital for the sustainability of the network. consumer group which? claims these cuts are causing 300 atms to close a month, but that number is disputed by link. tata steel and tissenkrupp are close to agreeing a merger that will create europe's second—biggest steelmaker, after arcelor mittal. sources have told the bbc that the deal — which has been under negotiation for more than a year — could be concluded in the next few days. it will see tata steel's uk plants
4:45 pm
like port talbot merged into a pan—european venture with annual sales of about £13bn. the british economy grew 0.2% in the first three months of the year — not 0.1% as the office for national statistics originally estimated. the reason it's revised its numbers is because services output rose had its fastest spurt of growth in aprilfor six months. the pound is on its way up? that is because of the growth i was just talking about, and the other background is the brexit negotiations going a bit better than we thought. although michel barnier says there is a lot of work to be done. however, the pound the more attractive and it goes up in value asa attractive and it goes up in value as a result. so many ingredients. bc 02 story? —— the c02 storage.
4:46 pm
as a result. so many ingredients. bc 02 story? —— the c02 storagem as a result. so many ingredients. bc 02 story? -- the co2 storage. it is interesting. there are some interesting. there are some interesting stories, we have heard about the ramifications. who would have thought it would have so many different uses. is this just one of those stories which is beaten into a froth by journalists? maybe, those stories which is beaten into a froth byjournalists? maybe, maybe not. we spoke to one beer maker who said she can't do any bottling at the moment because her bottom does not have —— her bottler does not have any c02 at the moment. with this will have any effect, i think the chances are less, because there is a rush to produce this stuff and people will actually produce c02. produce this stuff and people will
4:47 pm
actually produce co2. notable resignation? yes, inga beale, the head of lloyds insurance. she has been something of a breath of fresh air for the insurance market. she was the first woman to run lloyds in its 330 year history. she introduced a lot of modern practices not least banning boozy lunches. there was also a resource for lgbt people working at lloyds which she was behind. her leaving lloyds comes on the same day as the treasury select committee are talking about not enough women at the top of the bank of england, at the monetary policy committee, which sets interest rates. joining us now is richard dunbar, investment director at aberdeen asset management.
4:48 pm
what you think about her leaving and they're not being enough women at they're not being enough women at the top of organisations? —— they're not being. there is a feeling that women are not allowed into the top positions. she is a loss to lloyds and she has done a good job. she continued the process of modernising that business and it is one of the most important businesses in the uk, the global insurance market looks to lloyds for leadership and she and bay have given that so she is a loss to the firm —— she and they have given. numerically it is clear there are not enough women at the top and most financial services and phone nigel firms are trying to do something about that —— financial firms. is that true? many people would say they are not.” firms. is that true? many people would say they are not. i believe it
4:49 pm
is true, we are trying to do that at all levels, from graduates to the top level of management, it is self—interest, if you like. experience suggests diversity in all its forms makes better decisions so if you can attract diversity and retain diversity that must be better. our profession and industry can do better but it is trying to do that. what about the markets at the moment? the pound is on the way up. maybe higher interest rates? negotiations going better on brexit? the figures were a bit better in sums of growth compared to the original statistics but the bar was pretty low —— in terms of. not much to write home about. the pound ebbs and flows in terms of brexit, and the dollar had been on a great run
4:50 pm
in the last couple of months and the shine has come off that are allowing the pound and the euro to appreciate against it. and what about carbon dioxide? i never thought! against it. and what about carbon dioxide? i never thought i would ask a markets guest about carbon dioxide. is this storyjust whipped up dioxide. is this storyjust whipped up by dioxide. is this storyjust whipped up by us because this is a good story? it is an interesting story. we have all become experts in c02, but it also shows how short supply chains are these days and how low stock levels are in various companies impacted by this, and we saw last week with the car industry, about the potential impact of brexit, they are very efficient these days, companies, and as soon as there is any interruption we see
4:51 pm
the implications we have had in the la st the implications we have had in the last new weeks. yes, it is like the black swan, when you see one, it is a major event. we are victims of our own efficiency. there we go. markets. the ftse has come off a bit. the dax is looking good because ofa bit. the dax is looking good because of a reasonably successful talks at the eu summit. the pound is looking pretty strong against the euro and also upa pretty strong against the euro and also up a cent against the dollar. lovely to see you. have a pleasant evening. that's it from afternoon live today. jane hill is coming up with the bbc news at 5 — but first here's the weather with darren bett. another hot and sunny day for most parts of the uk. 30 degrees in the west of wales, and
4:52 pm
to the west of london, as well, but temperatures in the high 20s. cooler in the north sea coasts where we have more low cloud. the low cloud will push inland in scotland, and in england towards the midlands and the west cou ntry england towards the midlands and the west country late in the night. further west, clear skies. the low cloud should not last long. and then we will have lots of strong sunshine and light winds and that building heat. widely the mid to high 20s. sunday the wind proof will be stronger, although we will find temperatures rising in the south—east —— winds will be stronger. today at 5pm... last call for a brexit deal — the warning from the european council president.
4:53 pm
donald tusk at the eu summit says the most difficult issues remained unresolved — he calls for "realistic" proposals from the uk. if you want to reach a deal in october we need quick progress. this isa october we need quick progress. this is a last call to lead the cards on the table. after marathon talks at the summit, a deal was struck to set up secure migrant centres in eu states. we'll have the latest from brussels in moment. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm... the match commander at hillsborough, david duckenfield, is to stand trial for the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 liverpool fans. one of the first firefighters into grenfell tower tells
4:54 pm
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
4:57 pm
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

188 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on