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tv   Witness  BBC News  June 29, 2018 9:30pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc world news, the headlines: eu leaders have reached an agreement on migration policy at the end of a summit in brussels. asylum centres are to be set up across europe on a voluntary basis, but so far no country has volunteered to host one. brexit also dominated at the summit. the president of the european council, donald tusk, called on the uk to ‘lay its cards on the table‘ if it wants to resolve outstanding issues police in the us state of maryland say an attack at a newspaper office in which five people were killed had been planned. jarrod ramos has been charged with five counts of first degree murder. three decades after britain's worst sporting disaster, at hillsborough football stadium, the police commander in charge on the day is to face charges of manslaughter by gross negligence. 95 fans weer killed. at 10pm fiona bruce will be here with a full round up of the days news.
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first it's time for witness. hello and welcome to witness. i am here at the british library to guide you through another five extraordinary moments from recent history. we'll meet a survivor of an australian town that was devastated by asbestos. we will talk to an architect tasked with replacing the twin towers after 911. we have the colonel who fought for gay rights in israel's military. and we will hear how the world cup disappeared in
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1966 and how it was found by one man and his dog. but we start with a spy scandal and a diplomatic row between london and moscow. sound familiar? this one took place in the 1970s in the midst of the cold war. and resulted in 90 - officials resulted in 90 soviet officials being expelled from britain. we've been hearing and inside account of the fairfrom george been hearing and inside account of the fair from george walden who was then on the soviet desk in britain's foreign office. at london's heathrow airport someone, somewhere has got a list. net 19 names, airport someone, somewhere has got a list. net19 names, russians, men and women considered by the security services of this country to have some part in activities organised by the russian intelligence service. espionage and a massive scale. every country has its intelligence services, some of them to put it delicately are more active than
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others. in the case of the soviet union their offensive intelligence services were well beyond anyone else's. we were getting increasingly fed up simply with the volume of soviet intelligence officers who we re soviet intelligence officers who were being stuffed into the embassy and the trade delegation in london. i recall at the time the security services, mi5, telling me they could not actually keep an eye on such massive numbers of people and i learnt to my surprise that it took about nine security men to follow one soviet espionage officer. and so we we re one soviet espionage officer. and so we were 011 a one soviet espionage officer. and so we were on a losing game. we did not know because of the sheer numbers, really, what they were up to. this man agreed to talk about his experiences with the kgb. he is british and we will: jim. he is a
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research scientist in the field of nuclear energy and sometime ago he was at a conference. he taught particularly to one russian, a man he came to know as victor, a soviet diplomat. the soviet intelligence agents which the embassy and trade delegation were stuffed at the time, we re delegation were stuffed at the time, were approaching large numbers of people in order to recruit them as agents. this film, shot as it happened, shows a vector, the soviet diplomat collecting intelligence material from a dead letter box after an elaborate series of instructions. relations between the west and the east were not good at the time. there was still underneath quite a lot of mistrust. and suspicion as to what the soviets were up to. and that spilled over in the spy affair.
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the whole thing was obviously brought forward by the defection at the beginning of august of a senior kgb official, now named as leg. his information made it plain that something had to be done. the important thing about the defector was that he dotted the eyes and crossed the tees and so we realised there were even more soviet intelligence officers masquerading as diplomats than we previously thought. he gave us a pretty good idea of the scope of their activity which was very large. the reason these men had to go was simply that their organisation had outgrown the resources of oui’ their organisation had outgrown the resources of our organisation whose job it was to deal with them. the russians were given two weeks to leave when the expulsions were announced on september 24. today means they have gone almost a week
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early. looking back on it from today's perspective i very much think it was the best thing to do. because respect for us from the soviet side went up i think, although they didn't like it. but it certainly went up. they dealt with us more certainly went up. they dealt with us more seriously after that, they took us more seriously. george walden. now a devastating story about a town that was effectively wiped out by asbestos. it grew up around in asbestos mine in the 1940s but little did the residents know at the time that asbestos was lethal and could cause lung diseases and cancer. lived in the town as the child and is one of the few members of family who alive. people were warned but they did not take it seriously until people started to die. i lost both parents, both
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grandparents, my brother, three uncles, about four cousins i can think of and that's just the immediate family. i was born in 1958 in the far north of western australia. the blue asbestos mine was the genesis of the town. asbestos is a naturalfibre that's encased in rocks. they would extra ct that's encased in rocks. they would extract the asbestos out of the mine and the mill would then bag it and ready for shipment. it was sent to places around the world for the various things they use asbestos for. fire resisting, sound inheriting product and on a piece of rock. the practical uses are numerous. articles ranging from packing for steam engines and lining
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for friction services to bulkheads for friction services to bulkheads for aeroplanes. there were a lot of immigrants who came into australia after the second world war and a lot of them were just looking forjobs and there were jobs to be had. of them were just looking forjobs and there werejobs to be had. my dad was one of them. he was a jack of all trades, he drove the bus to ta ke of all trades, he drove the bus to take the guys from time to the mine everyday. my mum and her sisters all met her husband ‘s up there. had all the elements of a normal country town. they would have race day is there would be balls and all sorts of social activities everyone was involved in. my parents were not aware of the dangers at all. i don't think a lot of people in the town we re think a lot of people in the town were aware of the dangers. asbestos fibres get into the lungs and those fibrous can cause asbestosis or mesothelioma. it encases the lung cancer and prevented from breathing.
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the asbestos was not confined to the mine, it was used in gardens, it was used on driveways, it was used on the roads. it was literally everywhere. if you went out to play as all small children do, you are playing in asbestos. 0ne as all small children do, you are playing in asbestos. one of the flying doctors flew into town and said as soon as he got there, we have to close this, it has to stop. the mine was very profitable so it was decided that that was not the case. 1966 before they actually closed minds. but people had started to die. we left when my dad got sick and we now know in actual fact he had asbestosis at that time. it's almost like having an asthma attack, where you cannot breathe and you are fighting to catch your breath. my mum and my brother died from
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mesothelioma. it's an extremely harrowing disease, to see someone dying from mesothelioma. there are just hundreds of people that i know of that have gone with mesothelioma or asbestosis. none of my family in a photograph are alive, they are all gone. every one of them. there is no compensation for taking away your appearance or your family. there compensation for taking away your appearance or yourfamily. there is no justice appearance or yourfamily. there is nojustice in appearance or yourfamily. there is no justice in that at all. nothing. money doesn't bring them back. money doesn't compensate for their death. 0r watching miss. doesn't compensate for their death. or watching miss. next we are off to israel and the story of a former israeli intelligence colonel. in the 19905 israeli intelligence colonel. in the 1990s he led the battle for equal rights for gay and lesbian soldiers in israel's military. ijoined the
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military and i served in the formal service and then as a reserve officer from 20 years. i was up to the level of colonel in the intelligence. the law at the time was that if you were known to be gay you cannot have access to classified information. because of the belief that you were prone to extortion. the atmosphere in israel was such that you did not talk about games. it was something to be ashamed of. i had to live in the shadows. it's not a pleasant way of living. being in the closet is very difficult. in 1982 ina the closet is very difficult. in 1982 in a standard security clea ra nce 1982 in a standard security clearance check, people came here
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and asked about how i lived. at that timei and asked about how i lived. at that time i had a lover with me, living together. that was enough to cause an avalanche of events which ended in my being demoted to a low ranking clerical position. no reasons were given. it was like a slap in the face. i decided it's time to fight back. in 1993 a member of parliament decided to organise the first debate about the issues. and i was the main speaker. and i was very apprehensive. i did not know how people would react. up up to that time, no single gay person of high social ranking would come out and say i am gay, look. the message of my speech was that we
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wa nt to the message of my speech was that we want to be the same as you. we don't demand anything that you don't have. we wa nt demand anything that you don't have. we want to be allowed to continue in the military and other parts of society. i was called to the prime minister's office. he asked me what they want, i said once that what happened to me will not happen again. so instead of negotiating with north korea experts —— with military experts, it took a very short time because three months after i started my complaint —— campaign, the law was signed. the law starts with the words that is really distinct —— defence horses did not discriminate against gay people in their recruitment, basement or the ranks. it was quite
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revolutionary. in 2004 i was first 93v revolutionary. in 2004 i was first gay member of parliament to be elected which created a lot of uproar. nowadays i live openly as a public figure, if you want. i have a husband who is with me. i have an adopted son who is also gay. everyone around me knows i'm gay. i feel at peace with my environment. was it worth it? for me, yes. a pioneer. remember you can watch witness every month on the bbc news channel or catch up on all our films along with more than a thousand radio programmes in our online archives. now we head to new york. after the 911 terror attacks the city was left with a gaping hole in
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its skyline where the world trade center once stood. in 2006 reconstruction work began. we spoke to one of the designed a new skyscraper for the site. most of the people around simply cannot understand what happened. people are just standing around, talking and nodding their heads. 0h oh my god. we've got to go. we've got to go. we've got to go. oh my god. on the day of 9111 was actually not in new york, i was in hong kong. i had gone there for a client meeting. it was evening when the news broke. come on, come here. this is incredible. i've never seen anything like this. it was very,
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very unsettling for us. a lot of concern about the people, what was happening, the office which is right next to the site. my family. it was a day next to the site. my family. it was adayi next to the site. my family. it was a day i regret not being in new york. it was a tragic scene. there was a lot of recovery necessary at the site. we felt challenged. at the heart of manhattan is still a huge gap to be filled by one of nine competing designs offered by a who's who of global architecture. larry silberstein won the rights to be the landlord of the site. the col de sapin said please come over, i want your help. —— he called us up. my role was kind of acting as the
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organiser, leader, putting the team together, dealing with architects, engineers, clients and contractors. 0ne engineers, clients and contractors. one of the most important things that we wanted to do was to repay the hole in the sky, the tear in the sky. what i mean by that? new york city is for its skyscrapers. it's known from the empire state building. the chrysler building. and it was known for the twin towers. the trade centre. that was gone. people realised that lower manhattan looked differently without it. the original design of the trade centre was a square normally 200' by 200' in plan and that is the footprint of the new design. the reginald trade centre rose to a height of 1363 feet above grade. and that's the height
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of the design of one world trade center at the parapet, the glass and metal parapet. as the project was completed and even today the response has been overwhelmingly positive. i think we've really done a fantasticjob of making it the building feel very approachable. very democratic almost. it's got this light glass thing on it, in the evening it glows with a light emanating from inside of it. you feel like you can go right up to it and want to be next to it and almost touch it. this is a project that i never leave behind. i come to work, get out of the subway and i can see the building. i looked out the window and i can see the building. it never leaves me. finally an unusual story about the
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world cup. back in 1966 england were hosting the tournament but shortly before the event was due to begin the world cup trophy itself was stolen. from a display in central london. remarkably, it was one man and his dog who came to the rescue. we were told when the couple went in here that the most stringent security precautions were being taken to security precautions were being ta ken to protect security precautions were being taken to protect it. today, somehow, the field. it was headlines, world cup stolen. some critics saying the best police force in the world have lost the cup. we found out security was very sparse. 170 odd—year—old guard looking after it and he had gone on his dinner break. i'm afraid at this moment i am unable to make any realform at this moment i am unable to make any real form of statement. i
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at this moment i am unable to make any realform of statement. i must ask you to appreciate the amount of pressure i have been under. 0nce ask you to appreciate the amount of pressure i have been under. once i had a chance to gather my somewhat scattered wits i will indeed talk with you and give you everything i can possibly do. the general feeling people had was that the police were not going to find it. i took my dog pickles out for a walk and he scooted round the front of the house and he went over to the front of my neighbour 's and he went over to the front of my neighbour '5 car. he was sniffing around so i walked over to put the lead on him and i noticed there was a package on the floor, wrapped in newspaper will stop very tightly bound with string all the way up. so curiosity, honestly, i picked it up, tore that of the newspaper i saw brazil, west germany. being a
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foot ball brazil, west germany. being a football fan and all the publicity going on about the cup, my heart started thumping against my chest. it's the world cup! i take it up to the police station. ijumped in the car, i've got these slacks on and the top and my slippers. i can remember pushing the doors open and going straight through and there is the sergeant standing behind the big polished desk and i say to him, i think i found the world cup. his boss comes and he says right, taken up boss comes and he says right, taken up to scotland yard. suddenly it dawns on me that i'm number one suspect. after a couple of days the police come down, question me again. after that it stopped and i became a witness when the prosecution was brought against the guys who stole it. it's all a bit bewildered winford pickles and thoroughly suddenly world —famous pooch winford pickles and thoroughly suddenly world—famous pooch there is more. the national sporting club
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honoured the stolen trophy finders. henry cooper uncovered a special treat for pickles but it is turkey are nothing these days. the chap had something to impress david corbett, our award cheque for £1000. after the game when we won the cup, we we re the game when we won the cup, we were invited to the reception. in london. and we drove up to the hotel, the road was completely blocked with people and it had a big balcony out the side, the team up there. we went up with them and bobby picked him up and showed him to the crowd. it was really exciting for me. i think it was really exciting for the whole country. it was through pickles that my life changed. he helped me by this house.
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and he is buried out in my garden and on the nice summer nights i go out there with a nice glass of wine and have a little talk to him. cheers, thanks. the remarkable story of david corbett and pickles, an unlikely world cup hero. that is from witness this month here at the british library. we will be back next month with more accounts with more extraordinary moment in history. but for now, from me and the rest of the witness team, goodbye. for the 50 in a row, friday brought us for the 50 in a row, friday brought us temperatures in excess of 30 degrees. west wales once again the hotspot, temperatures just above 32, 32.5 degrees to be precise. northern ireland not too far behind. cumbria close to 30 and scotland once again up close to 30 and scotland once again up into the high 20s. come the how
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long can this trend go on? quite a bit longer i have to say. saturday could start cloudy in places, the code breaking up nicely to give long spells of sunshine, the orange colours extending across the chart, cooler to those northsea coasts temperatures up to 29, perhaps it once again up to 30 degrees. 0ne temperatures up to 29, perhaps it once again up to 30 degrees. one of the features of the hot spell so far has been that the nights have been relatively cool but that's going to begin to change particularly in the south as we go through saturday night, it will continue to the weekend, more in the way of humidity and night—time temperatures will climb. this is londonjust for example, as we get into sunday night temperatures no lower than 16, could be warmer still on monday night. it's all because we will be importing ourairfrom it's all because we will be importing our air from the it's all because we will be importing our airfrom the near continent, more humid with that. and
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an area of low pressure as we get into sunday, trying to showers and thunderstorms during sunday, some of us thunderstorms during sunday, some of us perhaps into wales possibly northern ireland but at the same time we will be importing the very warm and humid airfrom the near continent. temperatures in the south—east corner up to 30, 301 degrees perhaps even higher than that. we will be tapping into the speed of warm air from the near continent as we move out of sunday and monday. that means it will be a warm night, quite a warm start and still that area of low pressure caused by we should see showers and thunderstorms clipping into the far south west. most areas will be dry and those temperatures again well up into the 20s. always a bit cooler for the north sea coasts. as we move through tuesday and wednesday its essentially more of the same, mainly dry conditions, spells of sunshine,
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hottest weather in the side. chance of one or two showers at times. all driven by a weak area of low pressure, drifting close to our shores as we get into wednesday. this is how wednesday works, showers across the south—west fringing into south wales but everywhere else should be fine, long spells of sunshine and the temperatures as we have seen up into the 20s. further ahead? the low pressure will be with us during thursday, potential for showers and western areas and still we will be drawing the very warm and dummettairupfrom we will be drawing the very warm and dummett air up from the near continent. as we move beyond thursday towards the end of the week and into next weekend ‘s it looks like high pressure will reassert itself, building its way back in from the south west. that should mean from the south west. that should m ea n less from the south west. that should mean less showers and it certainly means a continuation of this mainly dry and very warm weather. going into next weekend little rain in the forecast, lots of sunshine, it will feel very warm and the chance thunderstorms that most places will
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stay dry and pretty hot as well. the eu tells the uk — it's time to lay your cards on the table over brexit. as theresa may leaves the eu summit, she's told time is running out. the most difficult tasks are still unresolved. if you want to reach a deal in october, we need quick progress. theresa may says she is ready to accelerate and intensify the pace of negotioations. also tonight... the police commander in charge on the day of the hillsborough disaster is to stand trial. the firefighter who left his colleagues and tried — and failed — to rescue a girl trapped in the grenfell fire. the migrant parents in america still separated from their children, despite donald trump promising to stop it. translation: what they have done is horrible. i have had no information and it's been more than 50 days. i call, and no—one tells me anything.
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