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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 30, 2018 9:00am-10:01am BST

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water companies warn customers to urgently cut usage as demand surges in the heatwave. from varicose vein operations to snoring surgery — new nhs plans to cut procedures it says are a waste of money and often don't work. this is the scene live at winter hill near bolton where firefighters are battling another fast—moving moorland fire. as russia 2018 reaches the knock—out stage could we be seeing the last of two of the greatest players of all time, at a world cup? we are looking at quite a bit of cloud this morning which will melt away and we are in for another hot and sunny day with temperatures pushing into the low 30s in the hottest areas. a full forecast later on. a full forecast later on. it's saturday 30th june. our top story: water companies across the uk are warning customers to urgently cutback on how much they use, amid increased demand during the current heatwave. the first hosepipe ban to be introduced in northern ireland in nearly 25 years came into force last night, while united utilities
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has warned a ban could follow in north—west england, as peter ruddick reports. as the mercury rises, the water flows. however it is the scale of the increased demand during the recent heatwave that is beginning to seriously worry utility companies. in rugby, bottle stations have opened up as a precaution amid fears a nearby water storage facility could run dry this weekend. customers are being asked to conserve supplies and it is a story being played out across the country. severn trent says people are using about one third more water than usual. it has led to several disruptions and outages already and they are asking everyone to act neighbourly. in the north—west, united utilities says it needs urgent help while they may be forced to introduce a hosepipe ban on monday. they have asked people not to wash their cars or take baths this weekend.
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a ban is already in place in northern ireland, it came into effect on friday evening and it is the first to be imposed in the nation for nearly a quarter of a century. the problem is not a lack of water, as reservoirs are actually nearly full after a rainy spring. however, huge spikes in peaktime demand mean companies are struggling to treat the water quick enough, so it is ready to be supplied to our homes. the problem we have got is people are watering gardens and using so much more water that it is going out of the pipes as fast as we can get it in. some of them are enormous, probably about that size, and some can go down to that side serving an individual street. that size will not get much bigger and we can only get a certain amount of water down it. get a certain amount of water down it. with hot and dry conditions set to continue into next week, both weather and water warnings could be here to stay. peter ruddick, bbc news. the nhs in england has set out plans to stop hundreds of thousands of patients every year receiving treatments which it says are useless or too risky.
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it's drawn up a list of procedures including tonsil removal, breast reductions, and snoring surgery, asjon donnison reports. nhs england says it wants to stop people from having treatments that qfe eiefief meieeeese ii? if: too many risks. it has drawn up a list of 17 procedures including snoring and varicose veins treatment, arthroscopies for osteoarthritis, and steroid injections for non—specific backpain. in all of these health bodies say ther is little bodies say there is little evidence the treatments work or that the risks outweigh the rewards. but some doctors have questioned those beliefs and say patients will either miss out or will be forced to pay for private treatment that would actually give them some relief. the proposals are still to be put out to consultation but nhs england says they could mean 100,000 fewer unnecessary treatment a year, unnecessary treatments a year,
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saving around £200 million. it says the money could then be reinvested in front—line cancer care, mental health, and other critical services. jon donnison, bbc news. the army will stay on saddleworth moor in greater manchester throughout the weekend and into next week to help keep control of moorland blazes which have been burning for six days. 0n winter hill in neighbouring lancashire, where grass fires broke out on thursday, a man has been arrested on suspicion of arson with intent to endanger life. 0ur reporter kevin fitzpatrick is there. we can still see, kevin, it is a very sunny day again and the fire brigade is behind you and there is also lots of smoke. what is happening? you might need to move? rings are looking a bit better. they are coming through and we will have to move. we will move onto grass
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here. we willjust let the fire brigade to do theirjob and we will get out of the way for now. things are looking a bit better. about an hour ago the flames were right across this top area and you could see it was spreading across that valley. in the time we have been here the fire had spread across the valley. 20 firefighters marched in a line—up there, a couple with hosepipes and a couple with beaters, and they manage to get on top of this section of blaze. this is one of two front lines. there is another front line on the other side of the hill and this section of this front line. the fire goes up to two miles along this area. you can see further up along this area. you can see further up on the hill that the clouds are bigger and they have got a lot bigger and they have got a lot bigger in the last 20 minutes, so even though they are on top of this
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one, further up the hill there is a big blaze to deal with. the priority is stopping its jumping across this road which should be a natural break. about 80 firefighters overnight were keeping an eye on this buyer and it sounds like there could be more today. in saddleworth the fire is over a huge area, it has covered seven miles square, and the army turned up on thursday morning to help they will stay for an extra couple of days. the good news is they believe they are on top of that fire, it is under control for the time being. the hope would be that if any pockets fire pop—up, they can keep on top of them for long enough. hopefully once and for all these fires can be put to bed. but this one is an ongoing situation and it is very dangerous depending on where you are on the mower. kevin, thank you, i will let you get your face mask on and move out of the way. we
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will keep you up—to—date with that situation. the future of britain's largest steel plant at port talbot has become clearer this morning, after the german firm thyssenkrupp approved a merger with its owner tata steel. the deal would create europe's second largest steel—maker and follows a year of negotiations. but the firms have previously warned that thousands ofjobs could be lost. unions hope the announcement will bring an end to uncertainty for its workers. there's been a big rise in the number of uk citizens taking on the nationality of another eu country since the brexit referendum. new figures obtained by the bbc, reveal almost 13,000 britons claimed citizenship of one of the 17 member states which responded to a freedom of information request. fewer than 2,000 did so in 2015. the figures don't include most people who are already entitled to an irish passport, as our political correspondent chris mason reports. it is two years since this moment,
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the eu referendum and victory for the leave campaign. since then, there has been a big rise in the number of uk citizens getting a new nationality. the figures obtained by the bbc were collected from the european union and individual national interior ministries or statistics agencies. they show that seven times more british people took up the nationality of another eu country in 2017 after the referendum than in 2016, the year before it. it is really a sense of still having the door open and being able to get up and go if you really want to. most of the people we know who are getting citizenship in other european countries have no intention at all of living there, it is just knowing the fact that they have the citizenship in their back pocket. so, let's look at the statistics more closely. in 2017, 12,994 uk citizens obtained the nationality of one of the 17 eu member states from which the bbc
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has received figures. this compares with 5025 in 2016 and 1820 in 2015. the most frequent new nationality was german, with a 12 fold increase between 2015 and 2017. french was the second most popular nationality and then belgian. meanwhile, here in brussels, negotiations trundle on between the uk and the eu before brexit happens at the end of march next year. chris mason, bbc news. 0lympic diver tom daley and his husband, the filmmaker dustin lance black, have become parents. the couple revealed the news in the times with an announcement of a son — robert ray. tom daley first announced they were to have a child via a surrogate mother on valentine's day, by posting an image of the baby scan on twitter.
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while tens of thousands of people a year climb up mount snowdon, one man has become the first person to perform a wingsuit flight down it. if you do not like heights, you might not want to watch this. if you do not like heights, you might not want to watch this. sam laming from kent started his journey 12,000 feet above the ground. the views are absolutely gorgeous. he'd been preparing for his adventure for the past five years. his next challenge is to fly down a mountain in the netherlands this weekend. someone who likes the adrenaline, but the views are spectacular. amazing. i would but the views are spectacular. amazing. iwould be but the views are spectacular. amazing. i would be quite scared. my amazing. i would be quite scared. my stomach is doing flip. if you focus on the screen as if you are doing it. no, iam doing it. no, i am not there with that. you will get there in the end.
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you will get there in the end. let's get more on one of the stories we've been telling you about this morning — criticism of the standard of accommodation provided to members of the armed forces and their families. mps on the defence committee say service personnel have endured sub—standard housing for years. lauren twort from the think—tank the royal united services institute has been looking at the state of military housing and is in our london newsroom. thank you very much forjoining us. what is the problem at the moment? we are seeing that housing has come out as a particular issue out the report and this is not a new phenomenon. this problem has been going on for a while. as you can see, it is mainly a going on for a while. as you can see, it is mainlya number of going on for a while. as you can see, it is mainly a number of issues that have come to the fore. we have got the selling off of the defence estate in 1996 which brought issues of affordability to the mod. we have
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got a new charging system which was introduced in 2016 and that means 81% of service families are paying more under this new charging system. also mentioned in the report we have the lamentable performance of carillion amy which has been in the news over the last few years as well. their performance in terms of maintaining service family accommodation has been very poor. we are seeing the trend in satisfaction going down over recent years as well. there has been a sale of housing stock as well. tell us about that. that was the sale in 1996 and agreement. what we have now is a rent review coming up in 2021. at the moment under the agreement we have got 58% subsidised but that could change under this negotiation. the mod may end up paying out more money. under that selling of the
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majority of service family accommodation the mod has lost out approximately between two and 4 billion. to be fed to the mod they did not realise that house prices would rise so much, but that is by how much they lost by selling the property, rather than maintaining the estate. give me your thoughts on procurement in general because you mentioned carillion and its performance. i will give them the right to reply. it released a statement and said, it is proud to have secured the continuing employment of more than 1500 employees at this time. it has recognised that is the need for improvement and are confident a new delivery model is in opportunity to undertake the review of the contract to make it better. i am summarising what it said. talk to me about the procurement levels if you are seeing m ista kes procurement levels if you are seeing mistakes like you mentioned were the mod did not predict house prices would rise so it has lost money on the recent sale of its housing stock. with carillion it has been in
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the news and there have been improvements over the years. itjust lacks that broad improvement. as the committee suggests, it is reaching the minimum standards of the contract and that is the problem. the setting of the standards being so the setting of the standards being so low, and perhaps that should be improved when they go out for contract were some of these jobs. what examples can you give me of low standards of living, the kind of things families are dealing with?l lot of this comes from service family charities and what is being reported to these organisations is sometimes basic provisions such as heating, roofs leaking over a long period of time. what seems to be consistent in a lot of these issues is the response time, so people being on hold for a long time on phones, not getting people coming back to them. that seems to be more of the issue, the response times,
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but you have issues where it goes beyond and you have people with young children often in the house who do not have basic provisions. such as? heating and water, these types of things. goodness. thank you for joining types of things. goodness. thank you forjoining us. thank you forjoining us. a lot of us are thinking how long is this heatwave going to last? 0bviously this heatwave going to last? obviously it is a mixed picture for people because for some people it is causing chaos with water supplies and the fires and that is one of the images you can see there. chris, tell us a bit about it. this is an image from nasa, one of their satellites went over saddleworth moor are a couple of days ago. you can see the smoke plume extending right across merseyside, liverpool, birkenhead and into the irish sea. the blazes
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are still raging, but the plume of smoke is less than it has been in recent days, so there are signs the firefighters and the army are doing a good job up there. it has been very hot, and in the last five days temperatures have reached 30 degrees 01’ more temperatures have reached 30 degrees or more in at least one location in the uk. we have got more of that hot and sunny weather to come today, although we start off with patches of morning cloud. but it has been evaporating as the strong sun has got to work on it and in the next couple of hours it will have gone and we will be looking and clear blue skies and nationwide with little overall change for the rest of the afternoon. those temperatures will continue to build and the air will continue to build and the air will be quite fresh, not particularly humid, so pleasant conditions and temperatures into the low to mid 20s. but for much of the uk it will be in the high 20s and even the low 30s with the hotspots
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in the south—west of england and wales. temperatures could go into the low 30s this afternoon. hot and sunny, very high levels of pollen and uv. 0vernight tonight a bit more cloud comes into of eastern scotland and eastern england and maybe northern ireland as well. 10—16 either temperatures overnight. tomorrow this area of low pressure will bring some thundery showers into south—west england and the winds turn into a south easterly direction and that will drag in more humid air, so more oppressive feel to the weather. it will be hot once again. those temperatures build through the afternoon, probably one of the hottest days we have seen so far. in london temperatures at least 30 and the highest temperatures could be about 32 or 33. it will get close to be the hottest day of the year to date. those temperatures
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will stay up overnight given it is more humid, at least the past 20 degrees. this is thejet more humid, at least the past 20 degrees. this is the jet stream pattern and it has split again. one branch goes up to iceland and another goes through the mediterranean. this is the pattern we have seen for quite a few weeks, high pressure over the uk, and that has brought in the hot and sunny weather. that will continue for most of us next week. there could be a few showers, but for the vast majority of us it will stay dry, hot and sunny. temperatures into the high 20s and the low 30s. how h ow ofte n how often do you see all of those stats and only one raindrop? there will be a few showers around, but very hit and miss. for the vast majority of people it is a dry week
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with not a drop of rain around. going to the theatre is supposed to be an immersive experience but a new production in south wales is taking that idea to another level. it's called splish splash and is designed for children with complex learning needs. it's touring special schools and hospitals and huw thomas has been to see it. at this special school in neath, the children are being immersed in theatre. splish splash is a show for a tiny audience ofjust two children, and accompanied by a grown—up each, they are taken on a treasure hunt. along the way, there is music and mischief, all designed to stimulate and surprise, with the swimming pool giving freedom to children whose movements outside the water are restricted. every child is totally different, you know. and sometimes you will get somebody smiling, and you canjust see the carer with them,
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sort of going come over here to see them smile, because maybe that's not something that happens very often, or giggle, or even, you know, even just splashing the water. the show has been developed with national theatre wales to travel to special schools and hospital hydrotherapy pools. this show is completely immersive. the water isn'tjust a stage for the actors. it is also a comfortable space where these children can experience the magic of theatre. demi has complex learning needs, and she is supported in the water by her teacher, who can sense her enjoyment. she was really excited, the arching back she gave, the smile, it was really beautiful. so you could tell she was enjoying it. everything, the raspberry she does is a sign she's happy, so you could tell she was happy. two by two, the children get to experience the show,
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and its fabulous floating instruments. and it sounds better wet, as well, so that's why i always turn it upside down to play it. and it sounds a bit like this. it is a rare opportunity for these children to enjoy a theatre. for over 30 years, 0ily cart has been pioneering this kind of production, and the work is having a dramatic effect on its audiences. we're not therapists, we're theatre people. so we wouldn't make any claim other than, i think, in our shows we make life seem more joyful, more beautiful, more interesting, more funny, for a while. in the water, they found the treasure atjourney‘s end, as the show prepares to move on to more pools across the country. such a cracking idea because it
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plays to all your senses. time now for a look at the papers. chief constable mike barton from durham police is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. tell us where we are starting. we are starting with a shocking story which is where the rail companies will have to shut this crossing in derbyshire because people sit on the crossing to take selfie ‘s. people sit on the crossing to take selfie 's. what? because it is picturesque. i have got a thing about selfie is when people stop in the street in front of you, so i am not keen on them to begin with, but this takes it to another level. that photographed at the top is a mother taking photographs of her two
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children sitting on the lines. that is so irresponsible. it is incredible. how busy is this crossing? is it manned or automatic? it is unmanned, but it is a single line so you do not know which way the trains are coming from. but they are so the trains are coming from. but they are so worried, the authorities, that they will now close the crossing. so people who lose it legitimately will be inconvenienced. it is pretty shocking really and coming so soon after those three graffiti artists were killed on the rail lines in london. people do not seem rail lines in london. people do not seem to get it. come on, people, think about it. this one is about scrapping old desk phones. think about it. this one is about scrapping old desk phoneslj think about it. this one is about scrapping old desk phones. i think a lot of companies, the new companies, have never had desk phones, but these are traditional old companies
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who are getting rid of telephones because people just use who are getting rid of telephones because peoplejust use mobiles. interestingly, specialist areas where they want security, they will still need desk telephones, so it does not mean the end of them, but it is certainly declining. does not mean the end of them, but it is certainly declininglj does not mean the end of them, but it is certainly declining. i am wondering how this works in terms of billing. this morning i had an it problem and i had to use the desk telephone to get through to the it department. it was graham in it and he fixed it and sorted me out straightaway, but i would not have those numbers logged into my mobile telephone, which is my personal mobile phone. if i lost telephone, which is my personal mobile phone. ifi lost my telephone, which is my personal mobile phone. if i lost my mobile phone, i would lose my life because eve ryo ne phone, i would lose my life because everyone is in it. do you ever use your desk phone? yes, i do. i quite like pressing the hands—free and
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then you can write while you are on then you can write while you are on the phone, so i like it for that. but people still need residential phone lines because we need broadband connections. but between 2010 and 2017 the number of minutes we have spent on landline phones has halved, both in the workplace and in domestic circumstances. i quite find it useful. i will show you where the speaker button is on your mobile telephone. we were talking earlier with paul lewis about scams and fraud and you pick out a story relating to that. a lot of people get scammed and they might think, i would always be able to spot it, but in a lot of cases people are ending up in trouble. fraud is the biggest category of crime in the uk. what i like about
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this story is how to beat it. nobody ever asks for your pin number. nobody legitimately asks for your pin number, so never give it to anybody. what the scammers are doing is they are conning many older people to go and get cash out. never ta ke people to go and get cash out. never take cash out. in durham we have got two simple messages. take five, tell two. take five minutes to think about it. people renew and they put the phone down and they see ring this number. if you take five minutes, that phone line will be disconnected. take five minutes to think about it. a lot of people are told to not tell anybody, it is secret. tell two people, your friends or your carers, and that can resolve it. take five, tell two. have you been watching the football?
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yes, i have. did you feel a bit restless from the games?” yes, i have. did you feel a bit restless from the games? i got over it. it is tuesday, england versus colombia. a fabulous picture of a face painting. the way the colombians celebrate, the way they enjoy the festivities is pretty cool enjoy the festivities is pretty cool. it is the latin american flamboyance about them. this is the challenge. all of those people who think daubing a red cross with a few white dots is face painting, that is face painting. but what a nightmare if you are standing behind that present at the match, you would not be able to see anything. present at the match, you would not be able to see anythinglj present at the match, you would not be able to see anything. i don't know what sit down is in colombia. the fans have been getting more and more confident about getting dressed up more confident about getting dressed up and putting their kit on. when they first went out the english fans we re they first went out the english fans were worried about that. there were
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so were worried about that. there were so many stories about what the police were going to be like, what the far right fans were going to be like in russia. but from my perspective i think it has been planned well. thank you very much for joining planned well. thank you very much forjoining us. nice to see you. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when andi 0liver takes over in the saturday kitchen. andi, what's on the menu for us? how are you doing beautifuls? well, thank you, you are looking very colourful. i am looking forward to the programme. it is the summer and we have amazing guests today. our special guest is a brilliant writer and comedian. i am very excited to have you here. tell me your idea of food heaven. i like most things, i ama food heaven. i like most things, i am a foodie. i like fish and i like salmon and chicken, most vegetables.
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you are a good eater. can't you tell? what is your idea of food hell? i am not convinced by anchovies. i love and anchovy. seafood, cockles and things like that. they are delicious. i have got some lovely things in store for you. we have got three great chefs. ryan and liam simpson. a beautiful married couple in the studio today. what is on the menu? barbadian spice boat with plantain and tomato. and what will you be making? we are cooking with some delicious eggplants. and we are in safe hands with the wine. and i might have found a bargain of the year on the
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wine front, potentially. there is no website today, so your fate rests with our chefs. we will see you at 10am. that sounds delicious. whenever we talk about it, it makes me hungry. but just whenever we talk about it, it makes me hungry. butjust now i have been able to smell some food because you have just had able to smell some food because you havejust had some able to smell some food because you have just had some toast. there we are. the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and naga munchetty. coming up before ten we'll get the weather with chris. but first a summary of this morning's main news. water companies across the uk are warning customers to urgently cut back on how much they use, amid increased demand during the current heatwave. the first hosepipe ban to be introduced in northern ireland in nearly 25 years has come into force. united utilities has warned a ban could follow in north—west england. severn trent handed out emergency bottled water in rugby last night, following fears that a nearby storage facility might run dry.
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water tanks are filled up overnight and these are the tanks that are underground. and this is where we have a lot of storage already built—in to the treated water system. the problem is that people are watering gardens, using so much more water that it's going out of the pipes as fast as we can get it in. and don't forget those pipes, some of them are enormous. some of them go down to probably about that size serving an individual street. that size isn't going to get any bigger. we can only get so much water down it. the nhs in england has set out plans to stop hundreds of thousands of patients every year from receiving treatments which it says are useless or too risky. it's drawn up a list of 17 procedures including snoring, varicose vein surgery, and steroid injections for non—specific back pain. the measures are part of plans to cut waste, as the government prepares to increase nhs spending by £20 billion a year by 2023. asa
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as a doctor if i make decisions based purely on budget and not on the effectiveness to the patient then that would be unprofessional andi then that would be unprofessional and i think that is what this is saying. what is the point doing these procedures when you read the advice, it is saying that these procedures involve risk. and when you look at the risk against benefit it does not stack up. the army will stay on saddleworth moor in greater manchester throughout the weekend and into next week, to help keep control of moorland blazes which have been burning for six days. 0n winter hill in neighbouring lancashire, where grass fires broke out on thursday, a man has been arrested on suspicion of arson with intent to endanger life. the future of britain's largest steel plant at port talbot has become clearer this morning, after the german firm thyssenkrupp approved a merger with its owner tata steel. the deal would create europe's
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second largest steel—maker and follows a year of negotiations. but the firms have previously warned that thousands ofjobs could be lost. unions hope the announcement will bring an end to uncertainty for its workers. accommodation for members of the armed forces has been described as sub—standard by mps. the ministry of defence says it is committed to providing high—quality and subsidised accommodation for its troops. but mps on the defence committee say service personnel have endured poor quality housing for years. there's been a big rise in the number of uk citizens taking on the nationality of another eu country since the brexit referendum. new figures obtained by the bbc reveal almost 13,000 britons claimed citizenship of one of the 17 member states which responded to a freedom of information request. fewer than 2,000 did so in 2015. chester zoo has released heart—warming footage of the first
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sun bear ever born in the uk, weighing just 400 grammes. they get their name because of a mark on their stomach that looks a bit like the sun. sun bears are the world's smallest bears and are a highly threatened species from south—east asia. they weigh up to £100. and you describe that horseshoe shape of colour on their chest and in some folktales that is said to represent the rising sun. the cub's parents were rescued from poachers in cambodia. that is all happening at chester zoo. what do they like to eat? i think
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that they like annie. fruit and honey and also lizards, little birds and insects. but they tear open trees to get at the insects. and they have got a really long time to get at the honey. well the serious stuff starts today. well england don't play their knockout match until tuesday against columbia. 0ur correspondent david 0rnstein is at their base in reppino. what's the latest from the england camp, david? as you can see behind me i will take
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you straight to the training pitch, we have been allowed inside the 15 minutes, the media. so we have got where a glimpse of the players being put through their paces for the next match tomorrow. they fly off to moscow on monday morning ahead of that crucial last 16 match with colombia. 21 of the 23 strong england squad are in this session. the only absentee fabian delph who has returned to the uk ahead of the arrival of his third child and also ruben loftus—cheek who is working at the hotel on an individual plan. nothing to be concerned about, he's not considered to be an injury doubt. expect england to return to their first choice starting line—up, their first choice starting line—up, the one we had against tunisia in the one we had against tunisia in the first match and that would
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include dele ali who has recovered from a thigh problem and harry came. so these are the final couple of days of operation ahead of a crucial match. if england lose they are out, a huge moment for gareth southgate and a huge test for england. aiming to win theirfirst and a huge test for england. aiming to win their first knockout match at major tournament since 2006. only this six since 1966. our first two knockout fixtures are played today. and the three o'clock kick off features lionel messi as argentina take on france, how do you see that one playing out? lionel messi is now 31 and ronaldo is 33. let's talk about argentina 's first against france. they started off slow in this tournament, seem to be on the verge of elimination until
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lionel messi stepped up to the plate against nigeria and scored that spectacular opening goal. nigeria equalised but lionel messi helped argentina to that last gasp victory and became the first player in world cup they are to score goals at the competition in his teens, his 20s and in his 30s. he may feel he still has time left in him but there is speculation that he could retire from international football after this competition. but ronaldo just keeps on scoring, the joint second top scorer behind harry kane at this tournament with a hat—trick against spain and four in total. in an interview this year he said despite being aged 33 that he has the biological age of 23—year—old and can go on until the age of a1. so we could see him back in a couple more world cup tournaments yet. arching against france is the first match. —— argentina. and then after that
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day off yesterday, a fantastic couple of matches. and here's how you can keep across all the action. france against argentina is on bbc one — kick—off at 3 — and there's build—up on radio 5 live from 12 o'clock. later, it's uruguay—portugal, with commentary on 5 live. andy murray says he will "most likely" be playing at wimbledon, which starts on monday. he'll face the frenchman benoit paire in the first round if he feels he can compete. after 11 months out, murray made his return at queen's this month before playing twice at eastbourne. this is what he had to say at wimbledon yesterday. yeah, the thing is, obviously i don't know, like, every single day exactly how things are going to be. i need to play it a little bit by ear. i can't — i can't predict how i'm going to feel in two days. but if i feel like i do today in a couple of days, i will be playing, yeah. top seed caroline wozniacki will take on belarussian aryna sabalenka in the women's final
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at eastbourne today. sabalenka beat agnieszka radwanska, with wozniacki coming from behind and saving a match point before beating angelique kerber. wozniacki was the beaten finalist last year. and there was a surprise in the men's tournamet with slovakia's lukas lacko, who's ranked 9ath in the world, beating italy's marco cecchinato in straight sets in the semi—finals. he'll face germany's mischa zverev for the title this afternoon. lewis hamilton looked good at the red bull ring in practice for the austrian grand prix. lewis hamilton looked good at the red bull ring in practice for the austrian grand prix. it's a track he enjoys — he won there two years ago — and he finished quickest in the first two practice sessions, just ahead of his mercedes team—mate valteri bottas, with sebastian vettel third in his ferarri. and before i go, near the hotel in kazan where argentina are staying ahead of their game against france this afternoon there is a rather large mural of lionel messi's great rival christiano ronaldo.
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don't worry though there's one of messi too! that could have been awkward! thank you very much. prostate cancer kills more men than breast cancer kills women, but the initial test to see if you've got it is hit and miss at best. now a cambridge research team is working on a new, cheaper, quicker and more accurate test — using microchips normally found in a mobile phone, as our science correspondent richard westcott has been finding out. there's a touch of the james bond baddie lair about this place. but the work going on here could play a vital role in finding prostate cancer. using something you normally find in a mobile phone. that is it.
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that's it? that's a sensor. that is what we're putting all this effort into making. they are developing a new testing device for the disease. because the current method is so hit and miss. hello, mark, how are you? i'm very well. good to see you again. good. and you. so we're just going to do a psa for you today. called a psa test, it takes five days and the results are often confusing. and i heard exercise as well can increase your count? yes, physical activity, having an infection at the time. things like riding a bike. so once you are in position, you just fire it. surgeon vincent gnanapragasam has already invented this low—cost device for safer prostate checks. this dark area here mimics a tumour? a tumour, yes, if you like. they practice on a model. the prostate is the blue lump. he calls the cancer a two headed beast. one type spreads quickly and is lethal. the other‘s sleepy and may never need treating. but current tests struggle
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to tell them apart. what we found is there are a sizeable number of men who actually were being treated because they were considered to have potentially lethal disease who probably would be fine by monitoring for long years to come. now, in terms of an estimate, i suspect that probably about one in five men may be treated for cancers they don't actually, will never actually cause a problem. or at least not yet. vincent is leading a multi—skilled cambridge team, including engineer andrew here, to find new ways of fighting the disease. and they've come up with a new testing device. so andrew, this is a silicon wafer, is it? that's right. so this is what we are making our devices on. and then we dice that wafer up into lots of little chips. this is just water. but eventually your gp will simply put a pin prick of your blood on top of the adaptive chip and it could spot signs of cancer by weighing the molecules inside. critically, it should be able to distinguish between the lethal form and the slow—growing type you can potentially leave alone. it could be ready in just five
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years' time, cost a quarter of the price of the current test, and give you immediate results. if you could have a test which is in a gp‘s surgery which is really cheap, really easy, where the gps sat there with the patient and saying, you know what, just to be on the safe side, let's look and see if you've got this. probably not, but let's try it. and the cost and ease of doing that is just so low and so easy, it makes that practical. by the time the nhs is 75, the first step to finding prostate cancer may be just a case of putting a drop of blood on this little thing. richard wescott, bbc news, cambridge. former burnley football club chairman barry kilby was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2012 and now campaigns for more men to get tested. he's with us now. how are you? i'm fine, it was five
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yea rs how are you? i'm fine, it was five years ago and luckily the prostate cancer which was advanced was caught. but taking the necessary medication i am fine and back and working. and still being treated at the moment. still being treated but it is under control and because the test was found with just about got it in time. and you did not have any symptoms. tell us how you found out. that is the problem, i had no symptoms, it was just part of a general checkup i was having. even know i did not even know what the psa test was, it came back and it was something wrong. and from that it generated out. one of the things we said before we saw the report was that at best that test is hit and miss and that is a problem in terms of encouraging people to find out or
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see if they are at risk. it is but i would save what else is there, there is this positive, negative thing about it. what we do when we do testing is kicked a football terms, if it is read, a high score it is something wrong. yellow like a yellow card something wrong. yellow like a yellow ca rd it something wrong. yellow like a yellow card it could be. and growing your0k. ithink yellow card it could be. and growing your ok. i think hit and miss is a bit cavalier because definitely run the tests we have been doing throughout football, people come back to me and we have saved about 100 lives. while we compare that to breast cancer is saying more men die from prostate cancer than women from breast cancer. but it seems breast cancer, it seems so many people are more aware of how to get tested. what you think is needed to break down those barriers when it comes to men. i think publicity and getting the word out. you are right, men are
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terrible is going to get tested at the doctor. anyone now was the -- with a busy life. so this connection with a busy life. so this connection with football men will go down to the football ground with their mates and football has a publicity angle to it as well. so just keep pushing on that line and i have a vision of my team doing every ground in the country. and a lot of guys now where that little symbol of the prostate cancer charity. i think now it is starting to be known. it is a problem that they do not really have any symptoms until it can be too late. so you've got to get tested and this is the route that my appeal is taking to get men down to get
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tested. what did you think watching that east, this idea of a pinprick of light on a microchip. anything that improves things come it is a little bit hit and miss but as i say there is nothing else so i will be interested in that and taking that route to getting people tested for top —— for it. there will be more on this story on this week's sunday politics east which will also be available on the iplayer. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. a lot of people have been enjoying it but also causing chaos for water supplies and fires. and you have a shot there showing one of the fires on the motherland. yes this is saddleworth moor, a
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plume of smoke extending right the way across the report and into the irish sea. the hot weather has been causing problems and we have had a remarkable run of hot weather. the last five days has seen somewhere in the uk pushing above 30 degrees. now as far as the weather goes this weekend we're attentive sunshine around, already we have seen morning cloud burning away. you can see that on the satellite picture. then through the rest of the day we have strong sunshine so you might want to think about using suncream and also high levels of pollen in some areas. it is going to be hot, the highest temperatures towards the south and west of the uk. south—western parts
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of england and wales, why we have temperatures nudging up to 30 degrees. slightly fresher across north east england, it is to scotland. 0vernight tonight we keep those clear skies initially that they will be more cloud forming across scotland and maybe northern ireland later in the night. looking at tomorrow some subtle changes, the low pressure just to the south will move up thundery showers into parts of england and wales through the afternoon. some welcome rain for a few areas. but otherwise another dry day with any early morning cloud burning away. it will feel more humid across england and wales and that humidity combined with higher temperatures in the south of england will start to feel quite oppressive. 30 degrees in london. temperatures
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could the cluster 33 degrees. a one night to follow with humidity temperatures slow to fall. so quite unpleasant conditions and then into next week put up this is the jet strea m next week put up this is the jet stream pattern, a passion we have seen now stream pattern, a passion we have seen now for quite a few weeks. it gives high pressure over the uk and it is that that has been bringing us this prolonged spell of hot dry and sunny weather. little overall change in the week ahead. we could have some isolated thundery showers but hit and miss in nature. many areas having a trying week with more hot sunshine on the way. —— dry week. keep cool!
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these devices may seem a bit clunky nowadays — but once upon a time they formed a multi—million pound industry. video rental shops became a thing of the past when blockbuster finally closed its stores in 2013, due to the rise of dvds and the emergence of streaming services. but one man is trying to rewind time this weekend with the opening of a new vhs shop in liverpool. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been to take a look. it's one of the least likely openings of the year. liverpool has a brand—new video rental shop. meet the man who wants to rewind to a bygone era. here's the selection? it's really been a dream of mine for a long time. i used to work in a video shop.
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and then the crunch came when my dad was downsizing his house and it was kind of like an ultimatum, are you going to take these videos to the tip or are you going to actually do something with them? and so i thought yes, i'm going to go ahead and open a video shop. the video is one of britain's growth industries. it has created 20,000 newjobs in the past two years... vhs players dominated for two decades at the start of the millennium, they were still outselling dvds. but andy is worried film history is being lost. we've actually got a whole range of vcr players that we can rent out as well, so i think there's going to be a lot of people who maybe cant find films on line, they want the hard copy. real good film fans. because when you think about it, these are works of art and they are the first edition. we've got phantasm, hell—raiser. like all good video shops, it has a horror section. evil dead ii. maniac cop iii. maniac cop iii, exactly. and evil dead ii. generally considered the better film! so is maniac cop iii the best of the trio as well? if you going to invest an evening in maniac cop,
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go for the third one! this is the kind of advice you don't get online. when you're scrolling through thumbnails, that's right. and a certain boy wizard is represented. what's happening with harry potter fans is they are all reaching that age now when they are starting to experience the nostalgia of it and for people who grew up buying the books, this would've been probably first way they watched the movie at home. but is there really a market for this? we wanted to know when people had last used a video recorder. at my nan's, watching the clangers. that's an old, old kids programme. i had land before time, that's my favourite. and you've still got it on vhs, in the attic? theyjust rubbish, aren't they? too big and bulky. i have it in my house. what kinds of things? probably wrestling, i imagine — wwf. we took one to the car— boot sale last week. and did it sell? no, and then it went to the charity shop.
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just time to pop back to vide0dyssey and make a decision on my weekend viewing. malkovich. colin patterson, bbc news, liverpool. andy willis teaches film and media studies at the university of salford and has his own impressive collection of vhs tapes. some i still have and some i threw into the bin a few years ago. i do not play them because the quality is awful. that is why they died a death, new technology comes along but we like to reminisce but there was a reason. dvds were better. i think this shop in liverpool is like a nostalgia trip. you will not get new films because they do not, on vhs so it is just people looking back and remembering when they first
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saw something on vhs and all getting together to watch it.|j saw something on vhs and all getting together to watch it. i just like that you could see everything at once, that is what i struggle with, trying to decide what to watch. if you go into a store again you can just have more of a look at things. you use streaming services? streaming, yes. so you think people might like it for that reason?” think they will until this down and watch it. it made got caught up in the video player and then the picture those fuzzy. good luck to that fellow but i'm not sure that it will catch on again. but a lot of people still do have vhs. people have been sending in their pictures and we have plenty to show you.” still have one but i hardly ever use
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it. i just keep still have one but i hardly ever use it. ijust keep itjust in case there is one day. i dusted off the things i brought in today. what you —— what should you be doing with your old vhs, can be recycled? some things are important to keep. there isa things are important to keep. there is a myth that everything is available today and you can go online and find anything and that is not the case. so there are films i've kept specifically on vhs because you cannot find them. here i have a british film from the 1980s which is really hard to find. ping—pong. a really good film. which is really hard to find. ping—pong. a really good filmm which is really hard to find. ping-pong. a really good film. if it was that good would they not have put it on something else? sometimes the library might have been bought by someone who does not want to put out an old thriller from the 1980s.
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i think foreign films are an interesting area. that is the only copy with english subtitles i have ever found. ping-pong, a great tag line. lovely to talk to you. that's all from us for today, christian and tina will be here tomorrow from six. have a good day, bye—bye. this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at ten: the nhs in england plans to rule out some procedures deemed "ineffective or risky". the 17 treatments range from tonsil removal to haemorroid surgery. tata steel, which owns the port talbot plant, has confirmed merger plans with germany's thyssenkrupp. one of the uk's largest water compa ny‘s urges people to conserve water, as it makes emergency deliveries during the heatwave. also coming up this hour, the latest on the saddleworth moor fires which have been burning for the past six days. the army extends its deployment into next week to keep control of the blaze. and at 10:30 the travel
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show is in bulgaria to explore one of the most extraordinary and controversial abandoned buildings in the world.
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