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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 3, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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warmer further north as well. —— towards the end of the week, temperatures still close to 30. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2:00... a female health care worker is arrested on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder of another six, in cheshire iam i am live in chester as the community reacts to what the police describe as a highly complex and sensitive operation. the 12 children and their football coach found alive in a cave in thailand — the authorities say it may take months to get them out. two british rescue divers who had flown out to join the search found the boys last night — nine days after they disappeared. an action plan to tackle discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people — the government promises four million pounds to drive greater inclusion coming up on afternoon live all the sport with tim hague. hello, simon. good to see you. we
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know all about england's match in moscow this evening but who could they be playing if they were to win? switzerland or sweden is the answer and they are kicking off in the next hour and also the latest from wimbledon, including a win for johanna konta. wimbledon, including a win for johanna konta. thank you, we will speak to you later on. how long is this going on? for the foreseeable future, lots of hot and dry weather. there is the chance for a shower and i will tell you when later on. we will look back at june's i will tell you when later on. we will look back atjune's weather and no great surprise, it has been trier and warmer than average. also coming up — as we mark the 100th anniversary of the royal air force, we'll meet one of the few left of the few. the pilots who took part in the battle of britain described by winston churchill
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as their finest hour. hello everyone. this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. a female health care worker has been arrested on suspicion of murdering eight babies, and attempting to murder another six. it follows a long running investigation into a high number of deaths at the neo—natal unit at the countess of chester hospital. cheshire police won't reveal the role of the person who's been arrested. dave guest reports. cheshire police began investigating the neonatal unit at the countess of chester hospital in may of last year. they'd been called in by the hospital management to look into the deaths of 15 babies who died betweenjune 2015 and june 2016. but their investigation was then expanded to cover 17 deaths and 15 non—fatal collapses. this morning, detectives announced that they'd arrested
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a female health worker, and that she was being questioned on suspicion of murdering eight babies and the attempted murder of six others. they've given no details as to her job, whether she's a doctor, a nurse, a midwife or some other form of health worker. but detective inspector paul hughes said that while the arrest is significant, this is still very much an ongoing investigation, and there's no timescale as to when it will be completed. a hospital spokesman said that they were continuing to cooperate fully with the police, and that calling detectives in in the first place was not a move that the hospital had taken lightly. however, the hospital insists it is satisfied the baby unit here is safe. dave guest, bbc news, chester. 0ur correspondent sarah walton is at the hospital now. we are not getting told very much, are we? the investigation is
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continuing. we have heard from the hospital this morning. there is a great deal of shock. it was the hospital management themselves who first alerted the police and called in detectives when they noticed an unusual spike in the unusual deaths of newborn babies and babies younger than four weeks here at the neonatal unit. they said they called in detectives following that. since that time, they have downgraded the neonatal unit here and it no longer deals with the most high risk pregnancies and births so they are saying this is a safe place for women to have their babies. the hospital said they are cooperating with this investigation because they wa nt to with this investigation because they want to find out what happened to these children. the police investigation is ongoing and they are questioning this woman described asa are questioning this woman described as a health care professional and no more details as to herjob and she
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is questioned on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder of six others. police say this is a complex investigation and they are asking people to remember at the heart of this, our parents whose newborn babies died in very sad circumstances. parents who have questions as to what happened to their children. police cannot put a timescale on their investigation and they do not know when it is going to end but they are working fast as they can to get answers for those pa rents. they can to get answers for those parents. sarah, thank you very much. rescuers in thailand say it could take weeks, or even months, before a group of boys will be able to get out of a flooded cave where they've been trapped for ten days. the army says they will be sent four months' worth of food supplies and will be taught to dive while they plan a safe rescue through the partly—flooded tunnels. the 12 boys, aged 11 to 16, and their football coach were found alive yesterday. they entered the cave network in the chiang rai region last month while on a day trip. since then there has been an extensive round—the—clock search to find them, after the caves became flooded following heavy rainfall.
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rescuers had hoped they would find safety on a ledge in an underground chamber nicknamed pattaya beach. but they were discovered 400 metres away, after being forced to move to higher ground to avoid the rising water. british cave divers were the first to reach the boys — they had been called in by the thai authorities shortly after the football team went missing. more than 1,000 people have been involved in the operation, from all over the world. richard galpin reports. how many of you? more than a week after becoming trapped deep inside the cave complex, the boys and their football coach are finally found by british rescue divers. monday, monday. 0ne monday, monday. one week, you have been here ten days. you are very
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strong. they are weak from hunger, but managed to drink water from dripping stalactites. the breakthrough on monday bringing a moment of absolute elation for the children's families. translation: it's unimaginable. i've been waiting for ten days. i never imagined this day would come. i would like to thank the military, police and all the officials who came to help find my son. but the expert diving teams from thailand and around the world taking part in this rescue now have to work out how they will get the boys and their coach out of the cave safely, and before monsoon rains cause more flooding. translation: today is the best day. what we will send down there is food. but we're not sure what we
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will find because it has been ten days. it's in the far north of thailand, in chiang rai, that the long tham luang cave complex lies. after entering, the group moved a long way inside, trying to get to high ground to escape the rising flood water, and now to get out, they'll probably need to use scuba equipment but as the rescue teams themselves have found, the diving is dangerous, through murky, narrow, underwater passages. they could give the children full facemasks, or give them breathing equipment and strap them to stretchers to pull them through the water if the passages are wide enough. if none of this is possible, then the boys may have to wait months for the water levels to drop. the football team had cycled to the cave ten days ago after a training session, going inside supposed to have been part of a birthday celebration. although they've been found, getting them out is going to be very difficult.
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richard galpin, bbc news. there's been huge praise for the work of the two british divers who found the group. thai authorities called for help from rick stanton and john volanthen who have a reputation as among the best cave rescuers in the world. colleagues have described the pair as the "a—team". daniela relph reports. 0n the far left is rick stanton, on the far right isjohn volanthen. highly accomplished and experienced cave divers. the reassuring words ofjohn volanthen the first contact with the outside world the boys and their coach had had in more than a week. monday, monday. you have been here ten days. ten days. you are very strong. this wasjohn volanthen this morning, helping prepare thai navy seals. the team have been in thailand for several days, chosen
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for the expertise of low visibility cave dives and specialist knowledge of breathing equipment. john and rick, they are calm, very collected, very organised, extremely disciplined, and consummate professionals. so i feel confident from this point on that things are going to work. the british cave divers are volunteers. rick stanton is a retired firefighter from coventry. he was awarded an mbe in 2012 for services to cave diving. john volanthen is an it consultant from bristol. he's been cave diving since he was a teenager. his family have been closely following this rescue. it's a feeling of pride, but to john, it's just another everyday job. he's quite a private person. if you're a mother, you know what it is like to worry about your children, no matter how old you are. in 2004, the bbc filmed both men
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as they attempted to reach chamber 26 of wookey hole in somerset, where no one has ever gone before. it was an insight into their skills and courage. when people landed on the moon, they had a map, they knew where they were going. but in a cave, if you are beyond the known limit of the cave, nobody knows where it goes and you will never know what will happen round the corner. the british divers are just part of a huge rescue effort, but their experience will now be crucial going forward. daniela relph, bbc news. a man who accused that there was a
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paedophile ring in the matter has been charged. he has been charged with 12 counts of perverting the course of justice with 12 counts of perverting the course ofjustice and one count of fraud in relation to an alleged claim he made to the criminal injuries compensation authority. this relates to the operation known as operation midlands which was set up as operation midlands which was set up by as operation midlands which was set up by scotland yard to investigate allegations of a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster. nick said he had been systematically abused in the 1970s and 80s and he witnessed three boys being murdered and he named a number of leading, high profile figures including harvey proctor, the former conservative mp lord bramhall and the late leon britton. scotland yard to 18 months to carry out their investigation and it resulted in no criminal charges
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whatsoever. the enquiry cost £2.5 million and the met was subject to fierce criticism after a report by a retired judge. what is the next stage? the details of these allegations have been set out today by the crown prosecution service. they say it is alleged that nick made a false allegation of witnessing the homicide of an unnamed boy by harvey proctor. it is said he made an false allegation of witnessing the killing of a boy named scott. that he provided sketches of locations of which he had been physically and sexually abuse, falsely claiming he produced those images from memory. it also says he provided a penknife and two military epaulettes, falsely alleging he had retained them from when he was abused as a child. it gives you an idea of the kind of allegations he faces in terms of perverting the course ofjustice. he
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will next appear in court in westminster magistrates' court in due course. danny, thank you very much. football coach george 0rmond has been convicted of 35 charges of indecent assault and one of indedency which he committed against players over nearly 25 years. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: a female health worker is arrested on suspicion of murdering eight babies — and attempting to kill six others at the countess of chester hospital the children found alive in a cave in thailand are being assessed physically and mentally before emergency teams decide on the best method to rescue them. england prepare to take on colombia tonight in moscow for a place in the world cup quarter final. in sport, we will have more on the moscow preparations but which one, switzerland or sweden could play if they win, in the quarterfinals. they
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will kick off in the next 45 minutes. great start to wimbledon forjohanna konta. she wins in straight sets and is into the second round already. kyle edmund is trying tojoin her. he has dominated his match so far and is already two sets up. i will be back with more on that at 14:30pm. kick off is just a few hours away in england's crucial world cup game against colombia. manager gareth southgate has called tonight's match england's biggest knock—out game in a generation — if england win, they'll reach their first world cup quarterfinal since 2006. 0ur correspondent sarah rainsford sent us this update from moscow. the build—up has definitely begun here in the centre of moscow. earlier this morning as you are hearing from natalie, it was hard to find any england fans and the colombians were definitely in the majority. i'd say they're still in the majority now perhaps
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3:1 in terms of numbers against england fans. but the england fans, small in numbers but big on dreams. they are certainly extremely optimistic about this world cup, about this team, about england's chances. as you were hearing, the first time england hope to get to a quarterfinal in 12 years. it is a big challenge, a lot of pressure but talking to the fans, you certainly do get the impression that they not only help, that they not only hope, but they do think england can do it this time. of course, colombia is no walkover. talking to the columbia fans here, they are extremely positive too, extremely optimistic about their chances. there's an awful lot riding on this of course for both sides. it is the colombians who have been the loudest here, the most obvious. but i have seen england flags from across the country from gillingham up to leeds and via wolverhampton. they are all here, they are praying now that england can actually live up to all of this expectation. 0ur correspondentjen smith is at the kirby estate in bermondsey a lot of support clearly? exactly,
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who needs the red square in moscow when you have the kirby estate. every flat has got involved and it is not just every flat has got involved and it is notjust the red and white of st george, i have seen brazilian flags, portuguese, spanish and moroccan. 0ne portuguese, spanish and moroccan. one of the brains behind this was chris, joins us now. the idea started with a couple of neighbours when they put one flag up a piece. then another neighbour put one up and then it went toe to toe, they ke pt and then it went toe to toe, they kept doing it. then i thought, i need to get involved so we completed every single balcony on the estate. every flat has got involved in this? yes, we went door—to—door, explained what he wanted to do, we asked where they were from and if they were from a different country, we said we
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would buy their flag for them. what is your prediction for the game? england will win, 3—1. is your prediction for the game? england will win, 3-1. i think 4-2 to england. we have some confident people here. we're not sure how your neighbours will feel about this. upstairs, we have flags of all nationalities and we have even got colombia. as we have heard from the experts it will be a close game. we think a penalty or a free kick between it. what do the colombian family thing? we havejust heard it will be a 3—1win england, what do you think about that? 2-1 winning columbia. 2-1 columbia. 3-1. what is it like daily—macro been like on this estate and everybody coming together for the football. it will bea together for the football. it will be a really nice atmosphere. mixing
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the two nationalities, it will be fun. you will get on, regardless of who wins? erm... yes. there fun. you will get on, regardless of who wins? erm. .. yes. there will be celebrations whoever wins, but we don't know who's flag will be flying at the end. get an answer from him. 0ur presenter wants to know what will — be? 0ur presenter wants to know what will - be? 2-1 columbia. columbia! columbia! it is pretty obvious. that is what i thought would happen. we will speak to you later on. the dutch prime minister has warned clarity is urgent needed
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for every aspect of the future relationship between the uk and the european union after brexit mark rutte's comments come as theresa may visits the hague for talks with the dutch pm — ahead of an awayday at chequers on friday — where cabinet ministers will discuss which customs model the uk will use after brexit. 0ur correspondent anna holligan is at the hague. he is getting frustrated but he's not in that? certainly, he is speaking for the whole eu 27. we have just seen the dutch prime minister leave his official residence in the head by bike so we note the meeting is officially over. it started off jovially, note the meeting is officially over. it started offjovially, they note the meeting is officially over. it started off jovially, they walked around the garden, they sat down with the flowers but then the dutch pm lived up to his reputation of being a straight talking politician. he said we need urgent clarity on this. theresa may didn't actually mention the word brexit while the cameras were around the table for this working lunch. she chose to focus on the positive ties that have
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historically existed between these two countries and the recent past. she talked about things like the dutch support for the investigation into the chemical attack in salisbury. she talked about the dutch support for the uk at the 0pcw in terms of giving the organisation for the of it and of chemical weapons greater powers. and then they briefly mentions trade and the fa ct they briefly mentions trade and the fact this relationship had existed but also things like security and the fact the uk would continue to support the netherlands in the investigation into the perpetrators of mph 17 and the anniversary is coming up in a few days. she spent an hourorso coming up in a few days. she spent an hour or so sitting around the table with some recognisable collea g u es table with some recognisable colleagues and she will be hoping she can count on the dutch pm's support as she heads towards checkers. he is increasingly
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influential in europe and she will be hoping she will have him on board for whatever plan she eventually does to present to her colleagues and then to the eu as well. thank you very much for that. the government wants to ban gay conversion therapies as part of an action plan to tackle discrimination. it comes after the largest national survey of lgbt, lesbian, gay, bisexual and tra nsgender people. ministers are also promising to improve sex education in schools, and give police more training to identify hate crime. campaigners have welcomed the plans, but insist there is still a long way to go before lgbt people achieve full equality. let s talk to britain's first openly gay rugby league player keegan hirst who joins us from leeds. how much further have they got to 90, how much further have they got to go, how tough is it? i think it is a
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lot easier than what it used to be. these measures they are talking about will make things easier. 0bviously people talk about equality and there is marriage and things like that, but it is little things like that, but it is little things like two thirds of people didn't feel comfortable holding their partner's hand feel comfortable holding their pa rtner‘s hand in feel comfortable holding their partner's hand in public. those things where you have to think about how to behave in a public space because of the negative reaction you feel you will get. it has a massive bearing on how you are, your relationship and what other people see when it becomes a focus. like you say, there is still a long way to go but it is easier than it was 20 or 30 years ago and 50 years ago when it was illegal. you came out in 2015, how tough was that, did people's attitudes change to you
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after that? i had a lot of support andi after that? i had a lot of support and i have a lot of support from within the lgbt community. i play a fantastic community sport and that made life easier. i am six feet five and 17 stone, i will not get a lot of grief from people on the street that other people will who look a bit different to idea. i was very lucky in the fact that it was relatively easy for me. a lot of people going to school, i think it said in the survey 25% of lgbt people had received verbal abuse from people outside the family home. it is an appalling amount. i have been really lucky. i don't know if you are in a relationship at the moment but if you and your partner
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wa nted moment but if you and your partner wanted to walk down the road and hold hands, would you think twice? yes, you would. then you have to go for it because it is important people see it is not an issue because the more you don't do it, i hate to use the word "normal" because it isn't normal to hold somebody‘s hand whether they are the same sex or the opposite. i have thought about it and i am sure a lot of other people have as well. it is a sad state of affairs when you holding your partner's hand is a statement when he should be just somebody that you love hands. rugby league is a rusty tufty world, i wonder because your smile says it, you didn't get the reaction from your colleagues he were expecting?” didn't know what to expect, when i came out, the lads i'd
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two householders have won lads i'd compensation of around £15,000 each from network rail — because invasive knotweed spread from its land to their gardens. the court of appeal ruled that knotweed posed such a threat that landowners should try to eradicate it before it spread. the ruling could open the way for similar claims time for a look at the weather. it is going to be hot! idle you probably already knew. but the statistics forjune. the numbers have been crunched. there are some interesting things that have come out of this. this is how it looked in glasgow last thursday. the sun
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was shining and we recorded some high temperatures. the met office have crunched some numbers and not too far away from here in motherwell, we recorded 33.2 degrees. isn't that the hottest day everin degrees. isn't that the hottest day ever in scotland? father's day ever in scotland last week. —— the hottest day. it was a notable record the break. if you are not in scotla nd the break. if you are not in scotland lets look of the rest of the country. this is the maximum temperature compared with what we would normally expect injune. just about all areas, temperatures have been above average. this is the, read, shows temperatures for degrees of the average. scotland and the west of wales have the first? not the highest temperatures necessarily from west wales that have the highest temperatures, but this is compared with the average temperatures in west wales and parts
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of scotla nd temperatures in west wales and parts of scotland and northern ireland and they have the way above average or they have the way above average or the time of year. this surprised me this morning, parts of north—west scotla nd this morning, parts of north—west scotland have had over 170% of the sunshine they would normally get. close to double the sunshine you would expect in the north—west highlands at this time of year. everywhere have above average sunshine and here is the big one from everyone is talking about how bright it has been. this round, almost black collar on the chart shows rainfall. if this usually dramatic. some parts of the south and the selfies have had four or 5% of the rainfall. some parts of the south, if have been the driestjune on record. the only place that have more than average was the far north—west of scotland. what are we going to get over the next few days? pretty much more of the same, more
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dry weather for most of us. we have had feelings like this. it is northern ireland, blue skies overhead. but not that plain sailing. the rest of the see lots of dry and warm weather for the chance ofa dry and warm weather for the chance of a shower. storm clouds are gathering close to torquay. you can see down to the south, we have seen some shower clouds moving towards the channel islands and drifting towards the south—west of england. 0ne towards the south—west of england. one or two scattered showers in the rest of the afternoon. if it crops up rest of the afternoon. if it crops up where you are a cubby heavy and thundery but many places will fall between the showers and up
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up to the north—east, pepper cloud across scotland, north—east england, cabot is quite a range, and nine in norwich, 16 in cardiff. warm and mod it was the south west because of some extra humidity are associated with that cloudy showery weather which would lift its way in tomorrow. you cannot see too many showers on the chart, many places here will stay dry. more cloud further north as well, some sunny brea ks further north as well, some sunny breaks but the cloudier skies, the temperatures but be a little bit lower, down to 24 or 25 celsius. that is how we expect it to look at wimbledon. cloudy skies overhead, a very small chance for a change in the north—west on thursday. this weather front if you're hoping for rain, you will be disappointed, but behind it and we do introduce some cooler air across north—western parts. scotland and northern ireland. warmer colours hold onto was the south—east. if
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anything, england and wales will have more sunshine during thursday, a small chance of a shower in the south. temperatures, big contrast by this stage. hot weather down towards the south—east, 30,000, but further north and west, remember that cooler here, glasgow, belfast, 19 houses. but as we head towards the weekend, commuters in the north will begin to climb again. further south, commuters in the north will begin to climb again. furthersouth, close commuters in the north will begin to climb again. further south, close to 30 celsius, a small chance of a schama but most places will stay stubbornly dry. police have arrested a female health ca re police have arrested a female health care worker who they suspect was involved in the murder of eight babies in the attempted murder of another six in cheshire. 12 boys and their football coach trapped in a cave in thailand have been warned it could be months before they can be rescued because of rising floodwaters. two british rescue divers who travelled to thailand for the search found the boys last night, nine days after they disappeared. the government has
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placed £4 million to tackle discrimination and drive greater inclusion for the uk's lgbt community. the law enforcement is 100 anniversary, we will meet one of the last pilots that flew in the iconic battle of britain. sport now, with tim hague. not too much hype about the match a due i was away. injured against colombia. the eyes of the nation will be on moscow this evening it seems, as the countdown continues for that last 16 match. england looked very relaxed as they arrived at the spartak stadium yesterday evening. but we know that knockout football means the potential of penalties, and historically, england have an awful record. but the manager feels they are ready this time. was the debt that point, we know our
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ranking of players and what we have seen, not just with ranking of players and what we have seen, notjust with ours but over a number of years in players that have taken more in certain matches than others. we are prepared, but there isa others. we are prepared, but there is a lot of football before that point. we're now less than half an hour away from kick—off in st petersburg where swizerland take on sweden — the winners of that will face england or colombia in the quarterfinals. if you think england's knockout record is poor at major tournaments then they're in good company — it is 24 years since sweden won a knockout game at the world cup, while opponents switzerland have not scored a goal at this stage since 1954. to wimbledon next — its day two and both british number ones are in action. one of them is already through! holly hamilton is at the all—england club for us — it's been a good day so far for the brits then, holly? absolutely. plenty of british action
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as you say still to come, still on court right now, butjohanna konta has ordered a played her opening match of wimbledon so far. she got through to the semifinals last year, so high hopes for the british number one. probably make it a little bit more difficult for her that she would have liked against russia's natalia blanche above. she won in straight sets eventually, looking quite composed early on in that match, but the second set when to a tie—break, struggled through that and at one point she painted back. she needed her sixth match point to beat the russian and take her place in the second round. she has since being in the second finals last year, she has slipped back to 24th in the rankings, but plenty of support for her today as the british number one, and again not the only break in action today. a big ask for
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naomi brodie. she was up against the defending champion have been a commuter, and the numberfour did hold her own any first set however. muguruza fruitfly she will be one of the favourites once again, taking that first set 6—2, but then the second brodie looking much more co mforta ble, second brodie looking much more comfortable, really holding her own, still battling back currently, 6—5, and she is 30—0 up, looking to take that last set and take her place in the second round. elsewhere, the division number one, kyle edmund, he's also in action, making a convincing start to his campaign. huge pressure on him with no andy murray here. kyle edmund and his campaign against alex bolt, smooth sailing to begin with, come to be taking the first two sets 6—2, 6—3, any third however built like making
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any third however built like making a bit ofa any third however built like making a bit of a comeback, a bit more difficult, not going to be smooth sailing. currently 5—3 to bolt, and this should be an easy win for kyle edmund, some of who made it to the semifinals of the australian open earlier this year. able are really putting an pressure on kyle edmund to do quite well and come quite far in the campaign. people are getting behind him, with no andy murray, no worry, some are saying. before i go, they have to say there is a another match we are looking forward to later, centre court, rafael nadal be in action to start his campaign, they world number one. we will be looking forward to that, if you want to follow the action did he go to the website where all those games will be available. there is a little bit of football fever here, you will be happy to know. everybody here and here to support their heroes in the world of tennis, a new england
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shirts throughout the crowd if you ta ke shirts throughout the crowd if you take a little look more closely. 0ne thing in the back of everyone's minds. that's all the sport for now. thought you later, thank you very much. this year marks the 100th on a busy and there were epos, events happening around the country to mark that occasion, including image of flight that occasion, including image of flight over london featuring the largest concentration of military aircraft in recent memory, from spitfires to most modern aircraft. it was the second world war that saw the raf was like most iconic action, the raf was like most iconic action, the battle of britain, described by winston churchill as its finest hour. 0nly winston churchill as its finest hour. only a handful of buyers are still with us, and over the next few days we will be hearing from three of them. this manjoined the raf are just 18 years old in 1939.”
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remember walking out with a parachute over my shoulder, helmet on, looking at this elegant relaxed fighter, obviously a thoroughbred. i thought, i have got to fly there is, the chap said to me, go and fly it, but do not dare break it. it was a magnificent machine, and it seemed to flow around in the sky, then of course i thought, there is a very important part of this trip coming off, we have got to land it. eventually managed to land it, and it landed me. have liked to spend some time talking about life on dispersal, waiting for that phone to ring. that moment, you absolutely... it was a difficult time. once you we re it was a difficult time. once you were strapped in your aeroplane and airborne, then it was up to you.
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that was it. for me, that was the relief. the relief of this waiting. tell me about your first combat mission. i remember the controller coming on and saying, vector 140, 150 plus coming in over dungeness. my 150 plus coming in over dungeness. my goodness, it looked it. we went into it head—on. i was lucky enough to get a hind call that day. i can see it now. 150 plus. the 109 is costing them above. a lot of gnats ona costing them above. a lot of gnats on a summer evening. they were doing 300 mph. that is 600 mph closing. it isa 300 mph. that is 600 mph closing. it is a very quick initial burst. everything happened may quickly. and
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you are also watching your tail or somebody‘s having to watch your tail evenif somebody‘s having to watch your tail even if you are not, because of these fighters. the whole secret of survival was never to stay still, straight and level for more than 20 seconds. i was shot out three times, and one of the blokes shot me out quite badly, but i didn't even see him. the other thing i wanted asked about was the way in which all of you coped with the losses. you dismissed it. you just accepted it. it was a dangerous game, a dangerous war. if you lost a particularly close friend, yes, there was a little bit of... by lester out to the local pub and light—hearted, but you accepted it, you had to. what sense of pride did you have at that time? we didn't have any pride at all. i wouldn't have said pride, it
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was just we were after all young fighter pilots doing a job. which was... defending our country against the king's enemies. the fly-past by beating place over london onjuly ten. the british weather can be configured for hoddle plans come how do the armed forces plan their workaround? simon king, bbc weather presenter, and an ex—raf officer is here. you know the sort of thing they will worry about or perhaps not with this current forecast. but when i played a crucial part. it does, the first thing that any breathing well have is a weather forecast right at the top, side you stand there in front of the commanders, there in front of the commanders, the aircrew, and you tell a body weather forecast errors. talking very specific forecast and well, but divisibility, the cloud bases, thickness, when any rain might occur to the hour or so. quite detailed
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forecast that the pilots were then used and do what they need to do. we are looking at un action. —— looking at you in action. is there at the back of your mind the thought that their lives at risk a? absolutely. the forecast that you are getting is primarily for aircraft safety and for the pilots add the ground troops as well. 0ften for the pilots add the ground troops as well. often the forecast was the one thing that ended up in the ghetto, no—go decision. huge pressure. sometimes you might get it wrong, sometimes you would get it... most of the time he would get it right. next week, involving various planes from various errors and as an career of the side you are doing to know some plates are little more susceptible to certain weather conditions. the older aircraft from the battle of britain memorial flight will have much lower weather limits than the newest aircraft that
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the raf have, such as the lightning while the red arrows. we will be looking at cloud bases which is the big one, and visibility. the lower the cloud base might be, the more aircraft that might not be able to ta ke aircraft that might not be able to take part in the formation. they will look at closely, the raf were sent a helicopter to do a reconnaissance and it will hover there to check on the conditions. wind speed, wind direction, each of these pilots will have to take that into consideration. they will have to meet the information in the fly— past to meet the information in the fly—past at a very specific point at the very specific time. if they missed their slot because they had miscalculated the wind speed, then obviously they are going to win all that i missed out.... if you're in a jet which has the computers of the century, you are probably a little better prepared. in a spitfire, you don't know when you are. yes, that is why the newer versions have all
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the modern technology which they are able to operate in much limited abilities and some of the older style aircraft. even the forecast for next week, while you have heard that the heatwave continued, pressure pattern is not going to change rai, one thing i will keep my eye on is low cloud. they will be holding around the wash come around lincolnshire, so perhaps we may seize and low cloud moving its way in. i will be looking at that for next week and whether or not that might cause any issues. in your time, in the last conflict in the iraq war, a lot of people would probably say, better, not difficult, but actually not true. a lot of my friends said, quite highly going to the desert, it is just hot and sunny? but there is extreme weather in the desert, in afghanistan and in iraq. we had severe thunderstorms passing through, and when you get
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these big thunderstorms moving through, big wins will rip up the sand, big... guys like that is a weather balloon? yes. it is like working and hostile conditions, trying to do yourjob as a weather forecaster, sending the blues up in the atmosphere to get all the data you need to be the forecast together. it is quite tricky because you think of the uk, lots of observations, lots of data we can use. very sparse country like afghanistan, you do not have that information. it is much more difficult to put together a forecast. in the wintertime we had snow, severe thunderstorms, torrential rain, and all the things can stop aircraft from flying. and the weather is bad, it is always your fault. of course. that is everywhere. all the time. weather forecast is a uniform, there is a thing here. the italian air do the
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broadcast lu in their uniform. they used to anyway, i don't know if they still do. ayes great to talk to you. thank you. pc news has been told that the conditions at birmingham prison are horrendous and chaotic. the prison was the scene of a right involving 600 prisoners in 2016. now the chairman of its monitoring board says inmates are living in insulin conditions for study for aids which ru ns conditions for study for aids which runs the site if this it is in control and is bigging improvements. —— making improvements. december 2016, hmp birmingham saw the worst prison riot in decades. it took 12 hours before the authorities were backin hours before the authorities were back in charge. this is me having one of my attacks. 80 monthly car, one of my attacks. 80 monthly car, one of my attacks. 80 monthly car, one of the prison ‘s former officers said she is suffering from severe
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anxiety said she is suffering from severe a nxiety after said she is suffering from severe anxiety after working at the jail. his wife recently felt having a panic attack. what have i done? he describes the privately run jail as being at a crisis point. it was absolutely horrendous, you didn't really have any control of the prisoners. the prisoners were controlling you. the prisoners were running the jail. he said he was dismissed by geforce as in on medical grounds. hmp birmingham. despite recent video filmed by inmate inside the present showing them smoking drugs are and using mobile phones. we need to get people in here. the man who monitors the cheer up its a place of a desperate needing attention. crane the prison is infested with vermin in the victorian side. that cause these people distress in terms of their
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living conditions. these cells are crowded, so two people are living in a cell that the victory is designed for one, and effectively it is an open toilet. even so, he said, new leadership has led to significant improvements, and sees the jail going ina improvements, and sees the jail going in a positive direction. g for s took over the running of this prison in 2011, a senior source at the organisation has told the bbc that the company is in a state of chaos and that it is struggling to figure out how to bring control at this jail. the company strongly refute the allegations made in this report. over recent weeks, i have seen a downward trend in violent incidents, i have seen an upward trend in positive staff indicators. to me, that is indicating that change is happening in an appropriate way. but a stark verdict from someone who has lived and
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breathed jail life. and is getting worse, worse post—riot. they had the chance to get a grip on things and change things. they never did. here are headlines. the british chambers of commerce has published a list of what it cost 23 real—world questions. the list cove rs real—world questions. the list covers subjects including vat, paris, customs and regulations. the uk construction sector picked up in june, according to the latest study. more work in the residential sector
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and acceleration on commercial building was behind the rise will stop it was the third month in a row that was set to grow after contracting in march. big pay deals to bosses and investors by water companies have damaged customer trust, according to the regulator. it has published new rules that will force films to explain how bosses pay late performers and to prioritise customers interests. it comes as the bosses of several water firms prepare to be quizzed by mps. my firms prepare to be quizzed by mps. my own headlines. good afternoon. that is talk about glencore.. massive mining company the fortune global 500 list of 2015 to get as a number ten biggest company in the world, so it is huge. anglo swiss, headquarters in switzerland and trading on the london stock market.
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it has been asked by us authorities to hand over documents relating to money—laundering probe. this does not mean there is any formal investigation, it hasjust not mean there is any formal investigation, it has just been asked to hand over documents. as you know, the markets do not like any of this kind of thing. its share price has fallen. initially quite significantly over 10%, i have to say the share price has pulled back slightly but we will ignore that because we wanted to be a big story. despite the fact are still there. things have improved. what is the story? you don't want to know from me, do what from some of their living it. paul blake is in the centre of everything in the new york stock exchange. i am building you up here, so do not let me down. china mobile delhi glencore, talk me through what it has been asked to hand over? for people who live in a country with a different legal
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system, the subpoena is in order to tone of evidence and documents. we do not know a tonne about it, it was brought under the foreign corrupt practices act which is a law that bars bribing foreign officials in countries where you perhaps want to do business, it has also bought undera do business, it has also bought under a money—laundering law, and we do not know much about it but it relates to glencore's business in nigeria, the congo as well as venezuela says 2007 until the present. not a plan of detail, but their shares have been on a wild ride. what is the reaction on the share price? it has been a wildlife, it was down to around 12%, which is a fairly significant depth. it has pulled back, but still last checked before i came on air head was still down to around 5% if i remember correctly. the copy says it is
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reviewing the order to figure out what is make move is where it is going, and analysts who are looking at this have said this isjust an order, just an order to turn over evidence, not the innocent of april investigation. they are seeing the price gap on the stock market as a major overreaction, saying that this is not a good look but it is an overreaction in the eyes of credit analysts. we will have to see exactly what this means. markets. they look a little bit squished. i wish they would do me in that format, i might look skinnier. laughter malamud and does not matter how it lose, we can see the green arrows. things are looking really good with the ftse. it has lost a bit of weight and looks slim, but it is higher. glencore, down to 5%. the
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markets obviously a big knee jerk reaction, but they have pulled back slightly. paddling in pools, my culture about that later, to keep cool culture about that later, to keep cool. you are very hot, simon, you are. join us in an hour if you want more of that, viewers, please. despite quit while you're behind. a spell of very warm and mostly sunny weather goes on through the rest of this week, but what we do and into the mix isjust the rest of this week, but what we do and into the mix is just the chance ofa and into the mix is just the chance of a shower, and the storm clouds have already been gathering across parts of south west england and also the channel islands. you can see from the satellite picture, the way that the shower clouds have come up from the near continent and push into southern and south—western parts of the british isles. the afternoon, the risk of some showers
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across the channel isles and south—west of england, hit and miss, most south—west of england, hit and miss, m ost pla ces south—west of england, hit and miss, most places avoiding it. those you catch could be heavy and funky. elsewhere sunshine, lingering cloud for northern and eastern coast, tebbit is a touch lower than they we re tebbit is a touch lower than they were yesterday. this evening and tonight, one or two showers spinning into southern parts, perhaps of wales, also more cloud creeping its way in from the north sea. cool and fresh night was the northeast, a bit warm and a bit more humid out was the south—west. tomorrow, generally more cloud, rolling its way in from the north sea, spinning his way up from the south which could again reduce the odd rogue shower. bright sunny spells and well, perhaps for northern ireland, north wales, part of northern england, and as temperatures because of the acer cloud, will be held back, but still getting up to 2425 sources. more cloud over wimbledon tomorrow, and there is just a very small chance of catching a shower, but you would be unlucky to get one at wimbledon.
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mainly dry, temperatures around 23 or 24 celsius. deeper into the week, one frontal system tried to push its way across the north—west of scotland, not much rain with that, but behind it some cooler hair sta rts but behind it some cooler hair starts to work its way in for the north—west. at the same time, southern and eastern errors hold onto that very warm air, thursday there is more in the way of sunshine across inland and wales, eastern scotland, is not out of a shower in the south, plenty of heat. the temperatures on the way up to 28, 29, 30 celsius, but the coolerfeel across parts of the weekend, mainly dry spells of sunshine, southern errors perhaps of two 30 celsius. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3:00... a female health care worker is arrested on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder
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of another six, in cheshire. how many of you? brilliant. the 12 children and their football coach found alive in a cave in thailand — the authorities say it may take months to get them out. two british rescue divers who had flown out to join the search found the boys last night, nine days after they disappeared. john and rick, they are calm, they are very collected, very organised, extremely disciplined and consummate professionals. a man known as ‘nick‘, who alleged there was a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster, has been charged with perverting the course of justice. a call for school children to visit abattoirs to learn more about where their food comes from. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with tim hague. there is wimbledon but a certain
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football match as well? certainly is, england against colombia in moscow this evening. but the starter has been served, switzerland against sweden in st petersburg. it is just kicking off and the winner will play england or columbia in the last eight. also the latest from wimbledon. thanks tim, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. ben rich has all the weather. very little change in the forecast over the next few days. lots of sunshine but the small chance for a shower. i will tell you were a little bit later on. thanks ben. also coming up — as we mark the hundredth anniversary of the royal air force, we'll meet one of the few left of the few... the pilots who took part in the battle of britain —— described by winston churchill as their finest hour. hello everyone, this
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is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. a female health care worker has been arrested on suspicion of murdering eight babies, and attempting to murder another six. it follows a long running investigation into a high number of deaths at the neo—natal unit at the countess of chester hospital. cheshire police won't reveal the role of the person who's been arrested. dave guest reports. cheshire police began investigating the neonatal unit at the countess of chester hospital in may of last year. they'd been called in by the hospital management to look into the deaths of 15 babies who died betweenjune 2015 and june 2016. but their investigation was then expanded to cover 17 deaths and 15 non—fatal collapses. this morning, detectives announced that they'd arrested a female health worker, and that she was being questioned on suspicion of murdering eight babies and the attempted murder of six others.
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they've given no details as to her job, whether she's a doctor, a nurse, a midwife or some other form of health worker. but detective inspector paul hughes said that while the arrest is significant, this is still very much an ongoing investigation, and there's no timescale as to when it will be completed. a hospital spokesman said that they were continuing to cooperate fully with the police, and that calling detectives in in the first place was not a move that the hospital had taken lightly. however, the hospital insists it is satisfied the baby unit here is safe. dave guest, bbc news, chester. earlier i spoke to our correspondent sarah walton, who is outside the countess of chester hospital. there is a great deal of shock. it was the hospital management themselves who first alerted the police and called in detectives when they noticed an unusual spike in the number of deaths of newborn
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babies and babies younger than four weeks here at the neonatal unit. they said they called in detectives following that. since that time, they have downgraded the neonatal unit here and it no longer deals with the most high risk pregnancies and births so they are saying this is a safe place for women to come and have their babies. the hospital say they are cooperating with this investigation because they want to find out what happened to these children. the police investigation is ongoing and they are questioning this woman described as a health care professional and no more details as to herjob and she is questioned on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder of six others. police say this is a complex investigation and they are asking people to remember at the heart of this, are parents whose newborn babies died
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in very sad circumstances. parents who have questions as to what happened to their children. police cannot put a timescale on their investigation and they do not know when it is going to end but they are working fast as they can to get answers for those parents. rescuers in thailand say it could take weeks, or even months, before a group of boys will be able to get out of a flooded cave where they've been trapped for ten days. the army says they will be sent four months' worth of food supplies and will be taught to dive while they plan a safe rescue through the partly—flooded tunnels. the 12 boys, aged 11 to 16, and their football coach were found alive yesterday. they entered the cave network in the chiang rai region last month while on a day trip. since then there has been an extensive round—the—clock search to find them, after the caves became flooded following heavy rainfall. rescuers had hoped they would find safety on a ledge in an underground chamber nicknamed pattaya beach. but they were discovered 400 metres away, after being forced to move to higher ground to avoid the rising water. british cave divers were the first to reach the boys —
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they had been called in by the thai authorities shortly after the football team went missing. more than 1,000 people have been involved in the operation, from all over the world. richard galpin reports. how many of you? 13? brilliant. the boys are finally found by british rescue divers. monday. you have been here ten days. ten days. you are very strong. very strong. it is unimaginable, i have been
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waiting for ten days. i never thought this day would come. i would like to thank the military, the police who came to help my son. but the experts taking part in this rescue have to work out how they will get the boys and their coach out of the cave safely and before monsoon rains cause more flooding. translation: what we will send down there is food but we're not sure what they can eat because it has been ten days. we still need to get them out, get them home. it is in them out, get them home. it is in the far north of thailand, in chiang rai that this cave complex lies. after entering, the group moved a long way inside, trying to get to high ground to escape the rising flood water. one option to get them
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out now is to teach them how to use scuba—diving equipment. but as the rescue teams have found, the diving is dangerous through murky, narrow underwater passages. they could give the children face masks making underwater breathing easier. but another suggestion is to give them breathing equipment but strap them to stretchers and pulled them through the water if the passages are wide enough. if none of this is possible, the boys may have to wait months for the water levels to drop. the football team had cycled to the cave ten days ago after a training session, going inside was supposed to be part of a birthday celebration. although they have been found, getting them out is going to be very difficult. richard galpin, bbc news. we can speak now to alex daw who is the station commander at west midlands fire service where rick stanton one of the british cave divers is a firefighter.
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iam i am wondering, were you surprised when you heard it was rick who had find them? we were not surprised at all. since he retired he has taken up all. since he retired he has taken up his cave diving and rescue operations full—time and he used to practice it over the 30 years he was with the fire service. what is it about him that drives someone to do something like cave diving. i cannot think of anything worse, frankly because it is a very dangerous thing to do? it is very dangerous, but alongside a career in the fire service, rick, it was a passion of his all through his career in the fire service. he is a very calm gentlemen, very knowledgeable and very experienced and he was well trained in what he has continued to do now since he retired which is the cave rescu e do now since he retired which is the cave rescue and cave diving. there
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are similarities because you are going into an environment where you have no idea what you will come across? absolutely, yes. and he is well trained, well knowledgeable in what he does in the caves. like i said, ye has been doing it for at least 20, 30 years, if not longer. he has equipment that enables him to stay down there longer so he can go further. he is very calm and if those people have got him there he is the best person for the job, most definitely. when you say he is very calm, what mental toughness do you have do have when you go into a situation where you are not sure where you are going, if your air will last enough, and what you'll find when you reach the end of the tunnel, that would be my nightmare? he has that adventurous quality and he is calm and collected. he doesn't
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buckle under pressure, he is very knowledgeable in what he does and he supports the people around him really well and he will support the children and he is amazing at interacting and keeping people calm in those situations. how do you think he would have felt when he surfaced and saw the group and realised they were all there?” surfaced and saw the group and realised they were all there? i am sure there was probably some shock, considering what was happening in the caves at the time of the flooding and that these people were there and obviously ill prepared for what had happened. but then he would adapted that situation and from that point on, look to help and get them out safely. he and those involved in this rescue will be going through an operation you will be familiar with, which is now we have found people, how do we get them out? how will he approach that? it isjust a
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systematic approach of planning, we're looking at the situation we have looking at our resources, what resources ca n have looking at our resources, what resources can we get in here and how are we going to be able to get the people out safely? it is looking at each individual, keeping people calm. the thing you don't want to happen is for people to become u nsettled happen is for people to become unsettled in that sort of environment and rick is good at keeping people calm and feeling at ease. we are talking about 11, 12—year—old boys who must be frightened, obviously hungry and they have been in the dark for ten days. how do you keep them calm when you have to persuade them at some stage to go into those tunnels and they may have water in them. how do you keep youngsters calm in that situation? it wouldn't be a nice situation? it wouldn't be a nice situation to be in at all. as i said, rick is very good at keeping people calm and as a rescuer, you have to stay calm yourself and have
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an idea of what you are capable of and what you can do to achieve the results. alex, station commander, thank you forjoining us. a man who alleged there was a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster has been charged with perverting the course of justice. the man, known as "nick", whose real name is being withheld for legal reasons, is also accused of fraud. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw explained the background to this a little earlier. this relates to the operation known as operation midlands which was set up by scotland yard to investigate allegations of a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster. it was sparked by claims of somebody called nick. nick said he had been systematically abused in the 1970s and 80s and he witnessed three boys being murdered and he named a number of leading, high profile figures including harvey proctor, the former conservative mp lord bramhall and the late leon britton.
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scotland yard to 18 months to carry out their investigation and it resulted in no criminal charges whatsoever. the enquiry cost £2.5 million and the met was subject to fierce criticism after a report by a retired judge. what is the next stage? the details of these allegations have been set out today by the crown prosecution service. they say it is alleged that nick made a false allegation of witnessing the child homicide of an unnamed boy by harvey proctor. it is said he made an false allegation of witnessing the killing of a boy named scott. that he provided sketches of locations of which he had been physically and sexually abused, falsely claiming he produced those images from memory. it also says he provided a penknife and two military epaulettes, falsely alleging he had retained them from when he was
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abused as a child. it gives you an idea of the kind of allegations he faces in terms of perverting the course ofjustice. he will next appear in court at westminster magistrates' court in due course. danny, thank you very much. a football coach has been found guilty at newcastle crown court of sexually abusing young players. george 0rmond, who was an assistant coach at newcastle united and a youth coach, was convicted of abusing 18 boys and young men over 20 five years from 1973. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: a female health care worker is arrested on suspicion of the murder of eight babies — and the attempted murder of another six, in cheshire. the children found alive in a cave in thailand are being assessed physically and mentally before emergency teams decide on the best method to rescue them. a man known as "nick", who alleged there was a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster, has been charged with perverting the course of justice. and in the sport, we will have more
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on england's moscow preparations in their last 16 tie against colombia in the world cup but sweden or switzerland could play england in the quarterfinals and they are under way in st petersburg. dolus at the moment. great start to wimbledon for johanna konta, she wins in straight sets and is into the second round. and the men's british number one, kyle edmund has joined and the men's british number one, kyle edmund hasjoined her. he dominated his match and also one in straight sets on court number one. i will be back with more on all that at 3:30pm. kick off is just a few hours away in england's crucial world cup game against colombia. manager gareth southgate has called tonight's match england's biggest knock—out game in a generation — if england win, they'll reach their first world cup quarterfinal since 2006. 0ur correspondentjen smith is at the kirby estate
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in bermondsey in south london, which has come alive this world cup, she sent us this. who needs the red square in moscow when you have kirby estate. 0ver who needs the red square in moscow when you have kirby estate. over 300 flags covered this place and every single flat has got involved. it is not just the single flat has got involved. it is notjust the red and white of st george, i have seen brazilian flags, portuguese, spanish and moroccan. 0ne portuguese, spanish and moroccan. one of the brains behind this is chris. what was the idea? it started between a couple of neighbours where they put one flag up a piece and then another one put one up and then then another one put one up and then the other one the other side put one up the other one the other side put one up and they kept doing it. i thought, i need to get involved and we completed every balcony on the estate just to make sure it is all cove red. estate just to make sure it is all covered. as you say, every flat has got involved? yes, we went door—to—door and explained what we wanted to do. we said if you are from a different country, tell us where you are from and we will buy
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your flag for you and put it up. it is great to see. what is your prediction? it is an england win, 3-1. prediction? it is an england win, 34. what prediction? it is an england win, 3-1. what do you think? a 4-2 win england. we have some confident people here and i am not sure how your neighbours will feel about this, we have flags of all nationalities and we have even got colombia. as we have heard, it is going to be a close game, we think just a penalty or a free kick between it. what did the colombian family thing? we have heard it is going to be a 3—1win family thing? we have heard it is going to be a 3—1 win to england, what do you think about back? 2-1 win for colombia. 2-1. 3-1 fair enough. people on this estate have come togetherfor enough. people on this estate have come together for football. enough. people on this estate have come together for footballm enough. people on this estate have come together for football. it will bea come together for football. it will be a nice experience today. it is
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going to be a nice atmosphere. mixing the two nationalities, it will be fun. you will get on regardless of who wins? erm. .. yes. we don't know which flag we will be celebrating and which one will be flying at the end of the night. ask him one more time, get an answer from him. ok, our presenter really wa nts to from him. ok, our presenter really wants to know, who will be and who will win. for the final wants to know, who will be and who will win. forthe finaltime, wants to know, who will be and who will win. for the final time, what is the score? 2-1 colombia. colombia, columbia! the dutch prime minister has warned clarity is "urgently needed" for "every aspect" of the future relationship between the uk and the european union after brexit mark rutte's comments come as theresa may visits the hague for talks with the dutch pm ahead of an awayday at chequers on friday, where cabinet ministers will discuss which customs model
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the uk will use after brexit. meanwhile, the president of the european council, donald tusk, has once again warned the uk government that time is running out for them to get the best brexit deal. he was updating meps at the european parliament on last week's eu summit in brussels. there is much work ahead with less and less time. i was very honest in my assessment, including when i spoke to prime minister theresa may last week. the sooner we get the precise uk proposal on the irish border, the better the chance to finalise the brexit negotiations this year. put simply, we cannot make progress unless a solid backstop is presented by the uk and accepted backstop is presented by the uk and a cce pted by backstop is presented by the uk and accepted by our irish friends. we are now looking forward to the white paperfrom are now looking forward to the white paper from the uk
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are now looking forward to the white paperfrom the uk and we are now looking forward to the white paper from the uk and we very much hope it will bring the necessary clarity, realism and impetus to these negotiations. the government wants to ban gay conversion therapies as part of an "action plan" to tackle discrimination. it comes after the largest national survey of lgbt, lesbian, gay, bisexual and tra nsgender people. ministers are also promising to improve sex education in schools, and give police more training to identify hate crime. campaigners have welcomed the plans, but insist there is still a long way to go before lgbt people achieve full equality. richard lister reports. the people started abusing us. these men know what it is like to be abused for their sexuality. men know what it is like to be abused for their sexualitym men know what it is like to be abused for their sexuality. it is ha rd to express abused for their sexuality. it is hard to express your feelings. because we are also humans. so why people treat as badly? 4096 of the
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lg bt people treat as badly? 4096 of the lgbt community survey said they suffered a hate crime. most never reported it and thousands said they had been offered so—called conversion therapy to change their sexuality. it should be banned, this therapy should be banned. conversion therapy should be banned. conversion therapy is torture, it is like a punishment. the government's lgbt survey is the largest ever carried out. 2% of the people said they had undergone conversion therapy well and another 5% said they had been offered it and said no. the royal couege offered it and said no. the royal college of psychiatrists supports the government ‘s plan to ban it. your sexuality and gender identity are inherent and there is no evidence base and no therapeutic treatment to change what is part of a person's nature. michael davidson says therapy helped him resist homosexual feelings and now offers it to others. simply to ban it on the grounds that many gay activist,
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there is only one point of view and one ideological perspective, i think is not acceptable in this date and age. banning so-called conversion therapy is one of 70 things on the government's action plan to improve the lives of lgbt people in the uk. also on the list, police training, sex education reform and appointing an national lgbt advisor. the government says it wants to deliver a lasting change for people who, too often, feel the need to hide their sexuality. richard lister, bbc news. countryfile presenter tom heap has suggested school children should be made to visit abbatoirs, in order to improve their understanding of where their food comes from. writing in radio times magazine, heap said visits should be encouraged as part of the curriculum. the presenter has called for greater transparency of food production practices to increase awareness of animal welfare. and tom joins us now from coventry.
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good afternoon to you. good afternoon, simon. what age schoolchildren are you suggesting should visit abattoirs? let me make it clear, i am not going to march children kicking and screaming against their will to see animals being killed. buti against their will to see animals being killed. but i am suggesting it isa being killed. but i am suggesting it is a good idea when the time children have left school, 16, that they have been offered the chance to see how an animal lives and how an animal dies. i think if we are going to enjoy meat, the least we can do with respect to the animal is understand how it lived and how it died. how do you think the farming industry would react to that? well i think they might be quite open about it. one of the things the farming industry often say is that we are too squeamish. this is the response
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we often get on country file we don't show the reality of life in the country because when it comes to the country because when it comes to the rearing of animals is about life, sex and death and that is a lot of what happens with livestock. we need to be more honest about this. i think the more enlightened amongst them will be thinking there is an opportunity, there is suspicion about where the food comes from at the moment and i think opening up, clearing away the obstacles and being more transparent could be a sales opportunity. if it was up to me, i would be putting out a brand called the visible peg or the candid cockrell. if they didn't wa nt to the candid cockrell. if they didn't want to visit themselves, they could put on the webcam and they could know what happens before the food gets to your plate. it is the issue many parents may have that in many circumstances, it is not a pleasant thing to watch, whether you eat meat or not. maybe it is something we
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should do later in life, it is the issue of getting schoolchildren to see that and know about it so early? i think we overestimate the squeamishness of children and it is something i push back on regularly and it does come on the programme, which is a family programme. there is often a full and frank discussion between me and the editorial team. we don't want to shock people unnecessarily but i think there is a role for being as honest as we can be with people about how our food is produced. ie agree this could be uncomfortable. but isn't a small amount of discomfort is a price we should be able to pay if we are expecting another living being on this planet to be born, reared, killed and eaten by us? i don't come from this point as a vegetarian. many people do and i have respect
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for that, but which ever side of this debate you are on, knowledge is key. simon, in many ways this is a journalist making a plea for transparency and in some ways, that this something we should all be in favour of. you are a journalist and you work on one of the most watched programmes on the network and if you did show what you are proposing this might bea did show what you are proposing this might be a sensible way of dealing with this, so why not? we have, we have shown, with particularly sheep, all the way to them being stunned. we haven't actually shown their throats being slipped because we think it is something we don't need to show, it is a line we didn't cross at 7pm on sunday night. if i was taking people into an abattoir, i wouldn't them and they saw the actual incision of the knife into the net. i am not mad about this, but all i am saying is an
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understanding and a few of these places. i am understanding and a few of these places. iam not understanding and a few of these places. i am not talking just about abattoirs, iam places. i am not talking just about abattoirs, i am talking about the life of an animal, as well as its death. like you go into an aquarium and you have a perspex tunnel and the fish swimming around ireland have a perspex tunnel in chicken houses and poor producers, let people see how it is done. with that knowledge comes the ability to make an informed decision. you are a vegetarian, people will say you are just trying to push that agenda? to be clear, i said i am not a vegetarian, as a matter of fact but i have respect for people on both sides of this argument. 0ne i have respect for people on both sides of this argument. one of the interesting thing is, when we did show a lot of this material on how animals are down when we have shown abattoirs as well, it is not scientific because this is a social media response but a lot of people have got in touch and said, thank you for showing me, it wasn't that pleasa nt you for showing me, it wasn't that pleasant but i needed to know and i
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can make my peace with that. it is important to say that some others may want to choose the chicken that lead a happy life and roamed around all the time free range, but that much more expensive than other chicken. i am much more expensive than other chicken. iam not much more expensive than other chicken. i am not in a position to say you cannot have chicken because you haven't got the fluffy nice stuff. tom, great to talk to you. let's have a look at the weather. the warm weather returns this week. we do have the risk of some showers. i suspect the shower might be quite welcome for many at the moment and elsewhere lots of hot sunshine to
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come. through this evening and over tonight more cloud rolling in over southern england and more cloud pushing in of the north sea towards scotla nd pushing in of the north sea towards scotland and northern england. quite a range in temperatures. we go into tomorrow and there will be more cloud around than today but where the skies day on the grey sideburns temperatures will be lower. 24, 20 5 degrees at best. as we head towards the weekend, most places will be dry and there will be spelt of sunshine and there will be spelt of sunshine and temperatures in the south getting back up to 30 degrees. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: police have arrested a female health care worker who they suspect was involved in the murder of eight babies, and the attempted murder of another six in cheshire. 12 boys and their football coach trapped in a cave in thailand have been warned it could be months before they can be rescued, because of rising floodwaters. two british rescue divers who travelled to thailand to join the search found the group last
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night, nine days after they disappeared. police have charged a man who claimed there was a paedophile ring operating at the heart of westminster. the 50—year—old man faces charges of fraud and perverting the course of justice. the dutch prime minister is calling for clarity on every aspect of the future relationship between the uk and the european union after brexit. and coming up, as the royal air force marks its 100th anniversary, we meet one of the last pilots who flew in the iconic battle of britain. sport now on afternoon live with tim hague. let's go straight to moscow, then, where gareth southgate has urged his team to write their own history when they play colombia in the last 16 of the world cup tonight. as if you didn't know already! 0ur correspondent natalie pirks is inside the spartak stadium, and, natalie, southgate has been speaking about england's old foe, penalties!
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i don't even want to talk about it. we are at that stage now because we've already seen two of the knockout games go to penalties and that of course could be felt england tonight. no team has a worse record the major treatment than in penalty shoot outs. lost six of seven, all three in the world cup. gareth southgate knows all too well about penalty failure. he missed one in euro 96. it was 98, argentina, that game had everything. the michael 0wen goal and the red card for david beckham. and then we get to 2006 against portugal and it was lampard and gerald at this time that missed
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penalties in that much. england have plenty of miller misery when it comes to penalty shoot out but they are relaxed ahead of this game. they have been out and about this afternoon, popped into the coach to doa afternoon, popped into the coach to do a light training session ahead of the game before coming here less than two hours to go to kick off. they are trying to write their own history and forgetting what happened. some were not even, eight yea rs happened. some were not even, eight years old, the last time england one—day knockout match. they cannot be thinking about it too much. this stadium should hows about 3000 england fans officially but we are expecting around 6000 to come to moscow. they will be heavily outnumbered not only in the stadium but everywhere because the colombians have used moscow as a basic right from the start to sub everywhere you go our colombians singing, dancing, chanting, decked out in their colours. they have turned red square decidedly yellow
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and are going for the consecutive quarterfinal. they became every mutual funds favourite team after the choreographed celebrations. i hope you will have the bragging rights in your house with your colombian husband. thank you very much indeed. well, from moscow to st petersburg as swizerland are taking on sweden in the penultimate last 16 match. the winner will face either england or colombia in the quarter finals. so far only switzerland have managed a shot on target through steven zuber. sweden have had a couple of good chances, but their wayward shooting has let them down. o-o 0—0 in that match so far, it was a three o'clock kick—off. that was a dreadful miss. day two at wimbledon next, holly hamilton is there for us. and a mixed start for the brits who have been in action, holly. and the king of clay is back on the grass too. absolutely. more rafael nadal in
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just a moment, here's one action on centre court right now. both british number ones have been in action today, both getting the start that they wanted. but forjohn hannah contact, —— johanna konta, they wanted. but forjohn hannah contact, ——johanna konta, she made it more difficult. she was on court earlier against a natalia vikhlyantseva. she earlier against a natalia vikhlya ntseva. she looked earlier against a natalia vikhlyantseva. she looked very composed in the first set but struggled in the second, eventually taking it to a tie—break. she needed her sixth much point to beat the rush in and take place in the second round. she will be looking to do very well here at wimbledon. she made it the semifinals last year but recently, and in the warm up games coming up to wimbledon, she hasn't looked at impreza. someone else who did look quite impressive was the british number four naomi
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did look quite impressive was the british numberfour naomi broady. she was up against garbine muguruza. she was up against garbine muguruza. she took the first set 6—2. but naomi broady looked much more co mforta ble naomi broady looked much more comfortable in the second set and really helped her own, but she just couldn't stop the spaniard marching into the second round with the spaniard eventually taking the second set 7—5 in the men's drop, the british number one kyle edmund was in action earlier on. he looked very impressive. not some pressure on him with no andy murray this year. he was up against alex bolt. it was smooth sailing for the most pa rt it was smooth sailing for the most part and he looked in complete control during the first two says. he didn't drop a point on his first serve while breaking the australian four times. it was trickier in the third set, alex bolt looking more impressive, but kyle edmund came back looking very strong. the fans getting very excited. he eventually
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won 7—5. as you mention, the king of clay has to put up with the grass. rafael nadal is one court right now, the world number one. he is one set up the world number one. he is one set up and is leading to games to love in the second set. fresh off the back of his french open victory, he will be looking to make and oppression —— an impression here. expectations are high but he has not had an awful lot of practice time leading up to the grass court season, so time will tell. but it is only greg nelligan, plenty of action. you can keep up to date with all those matches on the website. rafael nadal hasn't had at his own way on the grass at the last few yea rs way on the grass at the last few years but the two—time winner at wimbledon. thank you very much indeed. we will keep our eyes on rafael nadal. on thursday, the nhs
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turns 70 years old and to mark the occasion the bbc have been speaking to staff and patients about some of the stories throughout the years. today, we're joined byjodie scaddan and her son will. he born with no heart rate on delivery. his doctor, nischal rao, said it was highly likely that not much reached his brain for 38 minutes after being born. and we're joined by them now. it's a great powers to welcome you all here. gilles the first of all, ta ke all here. gilles the first of all, take me back, because it was the 29th of march 2017, your second baby, and things started to go wrong. what happened? my husband and i were wrong. what happened? my husband and iwere in wrong. what happened? my husband and i were in the labour ward and everything was completely fine. i was a few weeks early but nothing of concern. completely at ease and suddenly everything went wrong from then on in. we suddenly had a rush of people commented room and told that i needed to go for an emergency
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ca esa rea n that i needed to go for an emergency caesarean section. your baby is 14 months old and he is behaving like any 14—month—old is. you're presumably quite quickly not aware of what was going on because they knocked you out. pretty much a straightaway i was put under and that was it. after that, the first thing i was told was by my husband asi thing i was told was by my husband as i came around, that it had gone catastrophically wrong. we'll move on. nischal, you've never met to jodie before and europe were brought into a situation where every second is crucial. absolutely. by the time will was out, my team is already working on him, doing all the things they should be doing, and ijust got in there and we carried on doing what people have started doing. thankfully, it went according to
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plan and it was like clockwork. as i say, every second is crucial. a baby with no heart rate, you've trained, i know, for this sort of thing, but you must be sharing jodie's husband's concerns about what is going on. absolutely. when i first metjodie and going on. absolutely. when i first met jodie and will together i was very skewed when i saw it. i saw a lifeless, then the baby with no heart rate, not breathing, and pale asa heart rate, not breathing, and pale as a sheet. we had to get things done very quickly. what was it you did? are team were already on the ground and waiting for the baby to come out. as soon as it came out, they put a breathing tube down, given oxygen, starting at midnight moustaches cardiac massage. that's such a fabulous shots but what it
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doesn't show as per floor manager, who is just out of shot looking after will brilliantly. we give moxon, did cardiac massage and petty catheter through the umbilical cord, give blood, sailing, everything to get his heart kicking back into action. you must have thought, this has been going on too long. we are looking at a baby who will have severe problems. we don't know how long it has been going on when the baby comes out. we just hope and pray for the best. that was it, hoping and praying. but forjodie, you have put all yourfeeds into hoping and praying. but forjodie, you have put all your feeds into the hands of this man. and my team. i've never spoken to a daughter that hasn't said and my team. but that's the point. the main thing for me was that when i came round and my husband was there, he was completely optimistic because he had said he
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had gone from being on the floor ten minutes into the nightmare, he was told, hang on a minute, this man picked him up and said they are going to be ok. did you believe what you were saying at the time? the way he responded to what we were doing was quite crucial to what i was telling him. usuallyl was quite crucial to what i was telling him. usually i am not that optimistic but one that diy was because the way he was picking up to what we were doing was amazing. he's not only a normal baby, more full of life than most. he is quite busy down here. when someone has a go at the nhs, what do you say?” down here. when someone has a go at the nhs, what do you say? i think far too much focus is put into the political side of the nhs and what is overlooked is the amazing work that the teams do. we went from the tea m that the teams do. we went from the team at the whittington that recovered will to being transferred down to ucl h where my husband and i
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for hours, days, when he was in the interests, , sat watching for hours, days, when he was in the interests,, sat watching hundreds of nhs staff running around tirelessly, caring for multitudes of children, and making a massive difference. if it wasn't for the nhs he wouldn't be here without brain damage was but the fact he is here without any scratch is testament to her amazing these guys are and how the awkwardly underappreciated. nischal, when you get home after a day like that, do you think, i've saved a life today? it's one of the most satisfying journeys ever emotionally, to get this gratitude from mothers and fathers, grandfathers and grandmothers, and his uncles. looking at him now, he would not be around hedging not had a rather good day at work that day. absolutely. it's as simple as that, isn't it? if
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you had a message for the team, what would it be? that's a big one. i have tried to portray that to them on my occasions but i thinkjust com plete on my occasions but i thinkjust complete gratitude. the way that i feel about him and the team is something i will never be able to describe in words because it is very emotionalfor me. what i have now got as a result in their efforts, i can't describe it. it is just unfounded gratitude. do people say thank you enough? most of the time, yes, i think so. we do feel appreciated. but every now and then, when extra things happen, special things happen, it is a special thing. you go to work one day only normal day, your faced with something like this and you're living on your training, whips and a of luck. absolutely. i think i should say they have on everyone. good to see you. jodie and will. we
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need to say goodbye to will. say bye— bye. need to say goodbye to will. say bye-bye. bye-bye. you are fabulous, thank you very much to all of you. bbc news has been told that conditions at birmingham prison are horrendous and chaotic. the prison was the scene of a riot involving 600 prisoners in 2016. now, the chairman of its monitoring board says inmates are living in inhumane conditions. from birmingham, sima kotecha reports. december 2016 and hmp birmingham saw the worst prison riot in decades. it took 12 hours before the authorities were back in charge. this is me having one of my attacks. 18 months later and one of the prison's former officers says he's suffering from severe anxiety after working at the jail. his wife recently filmed him having a panic attack. sobs: what have i done?
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he describes the privately—run jail as being at a crisis point. it was absolutely horrendous. you didn't really have any control of the prisoners. the prisoners were controlling you. the prisoners were running the jail. he says he was dismissed by g4s in october on medical grounds. hmp birmingham... a recent video filmed by inmates inside the prison shows them smoking drugs and using mobile phones. we need to get some people in here to terrorise them. the man who monitors this jail paints a picture of a place in desperate need of attention. there are cockroaches and rats around the premises, so the prison is infested with vermin in the victorian side. that causes people distress in terms of their living conditions. the cells are crowded so two people are living in a cell that the victorians designed for one and effectively it's an open toilet. even so, he says new leadership
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has led to significant improvements and sees the jail going in a positive direction. g4s took over the running of this prison in 2011. a senior source at the organisation told the bbc the company is in a state of chaos and they're struggling to figure out how to bring control at this jail. g4s strongly refute the allegations made in this report. 0ver recent weeks i've seen a downward trend in violent incidents. i've seen an upward trend in positive staff indicators. to me, that indicates that change is happening in an appropriate way. but a stark verdict from someone who's lived and breathed jail life. it's getting worse. it's worse post—riot. they had the chance to get a grip of things and change things and they never did.
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sima kotecha, bbc news, birmingham. in a moment we'll find out what's hot and what's not in the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: a female health care worker is arrested on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder of another six in cheshire. two british rescue divers who had flown out to join the search found the boys last night, nine days after they disappeared. a man known as nick, who alleged there was a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster, has been charged with perverting the course of justice. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. a warning over brexit from a major business organisation. the british chambers of commerce has published a list of what it calls 23 real—world questions that it wa nts urgently a nswered. the list covers subjects including vat, tariffs,
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customs and regulations. the uk construction sector picked up injune, according to the latest study. more work in the residential sector and an acceleration in commercial building was behind the rise. it was the third month in a row that the sector grew after contracting in march big pay deals to bosses and investors by water companies have damaged customer trust, according to the regulator 0fwat. it's published new rules that will force firms to explain how boss' pay is linked to performance and to prioritise customers' interests. it comes as the bosses of several water firms prepare to be quizzed by mps. cyber security is always an issue, particularly for small businesses. a newly—launched annual report by cybersecurity firm coalfire shows midsized businesses are outperforming larger firms when it comes to protecting their cybersecurity. this is despite bigger businesses
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having smaller budget and resources. larger companies do not seem to be getting on it when it comes to cyber security. we will now talk to the director of coalfire. first of all, talk me through how you conducted the survey. what we did was take the results of over 300 engagements we'd worked on with our customer base, where they engaged us as their penetration testing company. that means we provide a simulated assault on the infrastructure in a similar way to the way a criminal would and then produce the findings they can use to better support their defences they need to put in place to help stop the criminals get further involved and steal their data or manipulate their systems. why do smaller companies, better? the middle market and so, it quite well
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mainly because they tend to have a singular focus mainly because they tend to have a singularfocus and mainly because they tend to have a singular focus and that means they can't proportionally use more of the cyber security spend any more effective and manage capacity. —— they can proportionally use more. larger companies struggle from lots of larger complexity, legacy infrastructure that is difficult to make more secure. the very small section ten to half more alive range of other vendors, whether these big cloud providers with lots of security breakdown. what companies fear the worst? it's hard to say when you talk about who does the best and worst because in some cases you can be comparing apples and oranges. if you take the retail sector, which is often held up of an example where there are lots of breaches, there are higher targets and high—profile target because there's lots of personal data and credit card information. but they are different target to oil refinery or major piece of infrastructure, you can also feel badly but for
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different reasons. the compromises of both a very different. in one case you can have a nation state with many different motives but organised criminal group trying to steal personal data. thank you very much for talking to us. i know yesterday you were concerned about me getting very hot and said so. likely hear commercial but with a much better looking model! we have had lots of figures today. argos has seen its biggest week ever for paddling pool sales — it sold an average of 15 paddling pools every minute last week — my my daughter is going on a play date tomorrow and the mother looking after his already text of me to say she is getting the paddling pool
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out. that is a picture of my family, i'm kidding! normally be screaming and upset. basically, paddling pools, big sales. 154,000 sales for a course in total. building sandcastles was also high on the agenda for sun—loving families, with argos selling over 21,000 bags of play sand, enough to fill over 13 articulated lorries. place and is really popular with kids and adults alike because you just come home and pretend you're on the beach. no, you don't. meanwhile, bbq sales continued to sizzle, up 239% year—on—year. garden accessories were also in high demand with gazebos up 252%, there a sausage with lots of sweetcorn. wowcher are reporting that a 1341% increase in sales of fans and cooling systems this week. personally, i'm not a big fan of
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fans, but they do call you down. do we have a picture of the man? i have no idea what that is. was that advertising? why have i shown you a picture of radishes? because apparently, simon, sales of the pink pepper re—route vegetable rises significantly when the weather improves. because basically, people want to make salads and radishes look good, they are salads and radishes look good, they a re pretty. they add a bit of colour. they add a bit of colour. they are saying they are the new avocado formalin deals. i prefer the sweetcorn and sausage, frankly. the ftse100 is up and the big
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mining conglomerate is down after us authorities are to over specific documents regarding a fraud investigation. the markets don't like that is sure prices down. generally, the markets are loving the sunshine. the london market will slow down significantly when eve ryo ne slow down significantly when everyone goes home for the england match before the end of the working day. watch me run! and tomorrow it will be right up. yes, because we will win 5—0. thank you very much. it was the second world war that saw the raf‘s most iconic action in the battle of britain, described by winston churchill as its finest hour. only a handful of pilots are still with us, and over the next three days we'll be hearing from three of them. today, robert hall speaks to squadron leader geoffrey wellum, now 96, who joined the raf atjust 18 years old, in 1939. the moment the telephone rang you we re the moment the telephone rang you were absolutely... it was a difficult time. once you were
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strapped in your aeroplane and airborne, it was up to you. it was, for me, the relief of this awaiting. tell me about your first combat mission. i can remember the controller coming on and saying, victor 140, 150 plus coming in over, 150 plus. my goodness, it looked at. we went and had one. i was lucky enough to get a higher call that day but i can see it's no. 150 plus with the 109 escorting, like a lot of nuts on a summer evening. they were doing 300 mph. that's 600 miles per
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hour closing, so a very quick initial burst. everything happens very quickly. ijust want very quickly. i just want to bring you very quickly. ijust want to bring you some breaking news from our team in bbc suffolk. 100 firefighters tackling two major crop fires in suffolk, this is mere berenson edmonds. people are being advised to stay away from the area while crews deal with burning crops. 24 acres were destroyed in the fire and suffolk fire and rescue also dealing with several smaller grass fires this afternoon and reports that a stately home is under threat from one of those places. we will keep you in touch with that but obvious lie with this hot weather, this is the latest ina number of this hot weather, this is the latest in a number of fires that have sprung up around the country as a result of gender dry conditions. let's see what the prospects are for all of us with the next few days forecast. for the vast majority, that is very
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warm weather continues throughout the rest of the week. but we aren't in the chance of one or two showrooms. they risk a show was this afternoon across parts of the south—west of england and channel islands. i say risca, i suspect a shark might be quite welcome at the moment. elsewhere, lots of hot show was to come. through this evening, more cloud across the southern england and south wales. more cloud also pushing is wearing off the north sea towards scotland and northern england. wait a range of temperatures, 9 degrees in norwich, 16 in cardiff. they will be more cloud tomorrow than today. still some sunny spells at times. read the skies stay great, temperatures will be lower. 24—25 at best. towards the end of the week, most places will be dry. they will be sunshine spells and temperatures in the south getting close to 30 degrees. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy.
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today at 4... a female healthcare worker is arrested on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder of another six in cheshire. how many of you? 13? the 12 children and their football coach found alive in a cave in thailand — the authorities say it may take months to get them out. two british rescue divers who had flown out to join the search found the boys last night — nine days after they disappeared. he's very calm and if those people have got him there, then he's the best person for thejob have got him there, then he's the best person for the job now definitely. a man known as ‘nick‘, who alleged there was a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster, has been charged with perverting the course of justice. coming up on afternoon live... all the sport — tim hague. it is the big one tonight. england against colombia in moscow. 0ne
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it is the big one tonight. england against colombia in moscow. one of those two teams will play either switzerland or sweden in the quarterfinals, we'll bring you the latest on that matt and all the action from wimbledon as well. thanks, tim. and ben rich has all the weather. a bit overdressed for the beach. little bit about anything else might bea little bit about anything else might be a bit much for this afternoon. fine weather to get to the beach for this afternoon and no great surprises in our genes statistics either. it has been drier and warmer than average. go figure. —— in our june statistics. thanks, ben. also coming up... as we mark the hundredth anniversary of the royal air force, we'll meet one of the few — the pilots who took part in the battle of britain ? described by winston churchill as their finest hour. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. a female healthcare worker has been arrested on suspicion
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of murdering eight babies, and attempting to murder another six. it follows a long running investigation into a high number of deaths at the neo—natal unit at the countess of chester hospital. cheshire police won't reveal the role of the person who's been arrested. dave guest reports. cheshire police began investigating the neonatal unit at the countess of chester hospital in may of last year. they'd been called in by the hospital management to look into the deaths of 15 babies who died betweenjune 2015 and june 2016. but their investigation was then expanded to cover 17 deaths and 15 non—fatal collapses. this morning, detectives announced that they'd arrested a female health worker, and that she was being questioned on suspicion of murdering eight babies and the attempted murder of six others. they've given no details as to her job, whether she's a doctor, a nurse, a midwife or some other form of health worker. but detective inspector paul hughes said that while the arrest
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is significant, this is still very much an ongoing investigation, and there's no timescale as to when it will be completed. a hospital spokesman said that they were continuing to cooperate fully with the police, and that calling detectives in in the first place was not a move that the hospital had taken lightly. however, the hospital insists it is satisfied the baby unit here is safe. dave guest, bbc news, chester. earlier i spoke to our correspondent sarah walton — who is outside the countess of chester hospital. there is a great deal of shock here. it was the hospital management themselves who first alerted the police and called in detectives when they noticed an unusual spike in the number of deaths of newborn babies and babies younger than four weeks here at the neonatal unit. they said they called in detectives following that. since that time, they have downgraded the neonatal unit here and it no longer deals with the most high risk pregnancies and births so they are saying this is a safe place for women to come and have their babies.
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the hospital say they are cooperating with this investigation because they want to find out what happened to these children. the police investigation is ongoing and they are questioning this woman described as a health care professional and no more details as to herjob and she is questioned on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder of six others. police say this is a complex investigation and they are asking people to remember at the heart of this, are parents whose newborn babies died in very sad circumstances. parents who have questions as to what happened to their children. police cannot put a timescale on their investigation and they do not know when it is going to end but they are working fast as they can to get answers for those parents. rescuers in thailand say it could take weeks — or even months —
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before a group of boys will be able to get out of a flooded cave where they've been trapped for ten days. the army says they will be sent four months' worth of food supplies and will be taught to dive while they plan a safe rescue through the partly—flooded tunnels. the 12 boys, aged 11—16, and their football coach were found alive yesterday — they entered the cave network in the chiang rai region last month while on a day trip. since then there has been an extensive round—the—clock search to find them, after the caves became flooded following heavy rainfall. rescuers had hoped they would find safety on a ledge in an underground chamber nicknamed pattaya beach. but they were discovered 400 metres away, after being forced to move to higher ground to avoid the rising water. british cave divers were the first to reach the boys — they had been called in by the thai authorities shortly after the football team went missing. more than 1,000 people have been involved in the operation, from all over the world. richard galpin reports. more than a week after becoming
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trapped deep inside the cave complex, the boys and their football coach are finally found by british rescue divers. they are weak from hunger, but managed to drink water from dripping stalactites. the breakthrough on monday bringing a moment of absolute elation for the children's families. translation: it's unimaginable. i've been waiting for ten days. i never imagined this day would come. i would like to thank the military, police and all the officials who came to help find my son. but the expert diving teams from
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thailand and around the world taking part in this rescue now have to work out how they will get the boys and their coach out of the cave safely, and before monsoon rains cause more flooding. translation: what we will send down there is food, but we're not sure if they can eat since it's been ten days. we still need to get them out, get them home. it's in the far north of thailand, in chiang rai, that the long tham luang cave complex lies. after entering, the group moved a long way inside, trying to get to high ground to escape the rising flood water, and now to get out, they'll probably need to use scuba equipment but as the rescue teams themselves have found, the diving is dangerous, through murky, narrow, underwater passages. they could give the children full facemasks, or give them
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breathing equipment and strap them to stretchers to pull them through the water if the passages are wide enough. if none of this is possible, then the boys may have to wait months for the water levels to drop. the football team had cycled to the cave ten days ago after a training session, going inside supposed to have been part of a birthday celebration. although they've been found, getting them out is going to be very difficult. richard galpin, bbc news. a little earlier, i spoke to alex daw who is the station commander at west midlands fire service where rick stanton — one of the british cave divers — was a firefighter before he retired. alongside a career in the fire service, it was a passion of rick's hole through the fire service, he is a very calm gentlemen, very
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knowledgeable and experienced anti—war is well trained in what he's doing now since he retired which is rescued cave driving. a lot of similarities because you're going into an environment where you don't know what you're going to come across. absolutely, yes. he is well trained, well knowledgeable in what he does in the caves, like i said he's been doing it for 2030 years, if not longer. he's even made himself equipment that enables him to stay down there longer so they can go down further. these very calm and of those people have got him there, he's the best person for the job. most definitely. when you say he is very calm. what is it? what mental toughness that you have two happy to go into situation where not sure what you're going to face the leader in how long the error is required, what you will find at the end of the tunnel if you ever reached it. that would be my night
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now. yes, i think that adventurous quality and being calm and collected, not buckling under pressure, being very knowledgeable in what he does and he supports people around him really well. he will support the children and he is amazing at interacting with young people can in those sort of situations. how would he have felt when he surfaced and saw that group there realising they were all the? i'm sure there was probably some short rare of considering what was happening in the caves at the time of the flooding. —— there was some shock there. all preparing for what had happened but adapting to the situation and from that point on, looking to help and get them out safely. he will now be going through an operation you'll be familiar with
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witches, 0k, an operation you'll be familiar with witches, ok, now we have found people, how on earth do they get them out? how will he approach that? it is just them out? how will he approach that? it isjust a them out? how will he approach that? it is just a systematic approach of planning. you're looking at what we have, the situation we have, looking at our resorts is, what resources can get in there and how are we going to be able to get the people out safely? it is about looking at each individual and keeping people calm. the thing you don't want to happen is for people to become u nsettled happen is for people to become unsettled in that sort of environment and rate is very good at keeping people can. —— rick is very good. more on that later but breaking news coming. this comes from the case of arthur dingley and billy caldwell who suffered from epilepsy and were treated with medicinal doses of cannabis. we are just hearing after the governors asked to set up a review that britain was magic medical officer concluded that is a case for the medicinal use of
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cannabis and the government will look to extend its review into changing rules for such use, coming from a spokesman for the prime minister said the chief medical 0fficer concluded there is benefit of medical use for medical conditions. the second part of the review will be completed by the advisory council on the misuse of drugs considering what changes should be made to the classification of these rules after the balancing of these rules after the balancing of hamas and public health needs. more on that later. kick off is just a few hours away in england's crucial world cup game against colombia. manager gareth southgate has called tonight's match england's biggest knock—out game in a generation — if england win, they'll reach their first world cup quarter—final since 2006. sarah rainsford is in moscow. i cannot see an england flag behind you but i can see someone else's.
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plenty of columbia fancier as you can see. we reckon on a rough count at least pre—columbian fans in moscow to day but england fans today and also some very loud was blind. the turnstiles have opened, the atmosphere is building ahead of the game. no pressure from gareth southgate following this the challenge of a generation. the england fans here have plenty to say. this is the gordons from london. your seventh game, how important is it? biggest match for 12 years. how you feeling? nervous. two or three beers first. confident at the same time. we went to the panama game and england were fantastic. we were nervous for that game but it was good to see a younger side, a lot more confidence and a new manager, fresh ideas. no wayne rooney. no one was expecting
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6-1 wayne rooney. no one was expecting 6—1 against panama, what about against colombia? we will still do all right. 3—0 i reckon. kane will score. we are having trouble competing with the band here. the loud noises are you all the time. there is a party atmosphere. this has been an amazing world cup with a great atmosphere and as far as the russian fans are concerned, that is pa rt russian fans are concerned, that is part of it. you can see the columbia fancier. the turnstiles are open, the crowd is beginning to build the crucial match for both of these teams. it is this or go home. you're meant to be impartial but what are the score going to be? my the score going to be? my predictions are always very reliable. 2—1 colombia ? my predictions are always very reliable. 2—1 colombia? no. 2—1 england. i wish i hadn't asked. the autopsy very much. thanks —— the autopsy very much. thanks —— the autopsy later. itinerary much. 0ur correspondentjen smith is at the kirby estate in bermondsey in south london, which has come alive this world cup. she sent us this.
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who needs the red square in moscow when you've got clear the estate? 0ver when you've got clear the estate? over 300 flanks, this place and every single flat has got involved. it is not just every single flat has got involved. it is notjust be red and white of st george, hitting brazilian flags, portuguese, spanish and even the mark in. one of the brains behind this is with this now. what was the idea? it started between a couple of neighbours than it would one flag up each and then another one put one up, then you the other side and put one up, they went to two to an ipod, no, this is not right, i have to get involved and be completed every balcony on the estate to make sure it was all covered some looked right. every single flat has got involved. we went door to door, told people what he wanted to do. said if you are from a different country and we would go and buy a flag, put it up we would go and buy a flag, put it upfor we would go and buy a flag, put it up for you but everyone has embraced that, got involved, come together as a community and it is lovely to see.
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the big question ahead of tonight, what all these gaudy? england win. 3-1. i reckon 4-2. some very confident people here. not sure about your neighbours feeling about that because it is notjust the red and white of st george, flags of all nationalities and even colombia. as the third from the experts, it will bea the third from the experts, it will be a close game, just a penalty or a free kick between eight so what do our colombian family think? we are here to find out. we heard 3—1 to england, what do you think about that? 24 england, what do you think about that? 2-1 win for colombia. 2-1 colombia. wing 3—1. that? 2-1 win for colombia. 2-1 colombia. wing 3-1. fair enough. alejandro, what is it like being in an as alejandro, what is it like being in anasa alejandro, what is it like being in an as a stage when your people from all of the world coming together from football? it'll be a really nice experience today. all the british and colombian friends, nice atmosphere and mixing the hall to
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nationalities will be fun. you will getan nationalities will be fun. you will get an regardless of who wins? yes. same again, yeah, yeah. we shall see. we know there will be celebrations tonight, we don't know which flag will be celebrating and which flag will be celebrating and which flags also be flying at the end of the night. at him one more time than the letters get an answer. 0ur presenter really want to know who will win, what will these gaudy? 2-1. 2-1. 2-1. -- what who will win, what will these gaudy? 2—1.2—1.2—1. —— what will be score be? shy columbia! no chance. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. a female healthcare worker is arrested on suspicion of the murder of eight babies — and the attempted murder of another six, in cheshire. two british rescue divers who had flown out to join the search found the boys last night — nine days after they disappeared. a man known as ‘nick‘, who alleged there was a paedophile
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ring at the heart of westminster, has been charged with perverting the course of justice. and in sport the meeting hearing all about it, england against colombia in moscow. just under three hours away. which one of switzerland or sweden could england play in the quarterfinals? it is all this in saint petersburg and they are into the second half. what a mess that was. great start to wimbledon forjohanna konta, the british number one win in straight sets and as into the second round. and the men's british number one kyle edmund hasjoined her, he dominated his match against birdie winning in straight sets on court number one. more on all of that at half—past. just to bring you an update on the huge moorland blaze being tackled in
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the greater manchester area, we are hearing the government has agreed to extend the support which has been given to the fire service in greater manchester due to run until 5pm but now extended until friday at 5pm. the prime minister's spokesman said it was to ensure the fire service get the support they need to fight the fires and any further support needed after friday will be looked at in the usual way. currently 100 soldiers deployed alongside the fire service at saddleworth moor. 200 firefighters quickly on the scene for files firefighters quickly on the scene forfiles in saddleworth firefighters quickly on the scene for files in saddleworth moor. newport. the firefighters tackling the blaze at the public not to make the blaze at the public not to make thejob any the blaze at the public not to make the job any harder as head the blaze at the public not to make thejob any harder as head of the blaze at the public not to make the job any harder as head of the england world cup clash later this evening. they are saying whilst you're watching the match, think of our crews. work on that later on. the dutch prime minister has warned clarity is ' urgent needed' for ‘every aspect‘ of the future relationship between the uk and the european union after brexit.
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mark rutte's comments come as theresa may visits the hague for talks with the dutch pm — ahead of an awayday at chequers on friday — where cabinet ministers will discuss which customs model the uk will use after brexit. meanwhile, the president of the european council, donald tusk has once again warned the uk government that time is running out to get the best brexit deal. he was updating meps at the european parliament on last week's eu summit in brussels. there is much work ahead with less and less time. i was very honest in my assessment, including when i spoke to prime minister may last week. the sooner we get the precise uk proposal on the irish border, the better the chance to finalise the brexit negotiations this year. put simply, we cannot make progress unless a solid backstop is presented by the uk and accepted by our irish friends. we are now looking forward to the white paper from the uk and we very much hope it will bring the necessary clarity, realism and impetus to these negotiations.
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the mpjared 0'mara is to be readmitted to the labour party after receiving a formal warning over sexist and homophobic comments on social media. the sheffield hallam mp was suspended last year after a series of postings — many dating back over a number of years — came to light. the party's national executive committee disputes panel has ruled that the case did not meet the threshold required to be referred for expulsion but that he should undergo mandatory training. a man who alleged there was a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster has been charged with perverting the course of justice. the man, known as "nick", whose real name is being withheld for legal reasons, is also accused of fraud. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw explained the background to this a little earlier. this relates to the operation known as 0peration midlands which was set up by scotland yard to investigate allegations of a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster.
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it was sparked by claims of somebody called ‘nick‘. nick said he had been systematically abused in the 1970s and 80s and he witnessed three boys being murdered and he named a number of leading, high—profile figures including harvey proctor, the former conservative mp lord bramhall and the late leon britton. scotland yard took 18 months to carry out their investigation and it resulted in no criminal charges whatsoever. the enquiry cost £2.5 million and the met was subject to fierce criticism after a report by a retired judge. what's the next stage? the details of these allegations have been set out today by the crown prosecution service. they say it is alleged that nick made a false allegation of witnessing the child homicide of an unnamed boy by harvey proctor. it is said he made an false allegation of witnessing the killing
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of a boy named scott. that he provided sketches of locations of which he had been physically and sexually abused, falsely claiming he produced those images from memory. it also says he provided a penknife and two military epaulettes, falsely alleging he had retained them from when he was abused as a child. it gives you an idea of the kind of allegations he faces in terms of perverting the course ofjustice. he will next appear in court at westminster magistrates' court in due course. danny, thank you very much. the government wants to ban gay conversion therapies as part of an ‘action plan‘ to tackle discrimination. it comes after the largest national survey of lgbt, lesbian, gay, bisexual and tra nsgender people. ministers are also promising to improve sex education in schools, and give police more training to identify hate crime. campaigners have welcomed the plans, but insist there is still a long way to go before lgbt people
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achieve full equality. joining me now is bex stinson, head of trans inclusion at stonewall charity. is your reaction? it is incredibly welcome. the government have committed to an action plan, a 75 point action plan that will address some of the inequalities that lgbt people face. we how hard life can believe lgbt people face. we how hard life can believe lg bt people people face. we how hard life can believe lgbt people and we know the fight is not over for a full equality? it is absolutely fantastic that at a time when tensions are high for the lgbt community that the current originating in this way. high for the lgbt community that the current originating in this waym there evidence that they are higher now than they were ten or 20 years ago? yes. a survey done by stonewall and by the current say two thirds of lg bt and by the current say two thirds of lgbt people will refrain from
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holding hands with a sameness ends the mac sex partner nec first of your physical assault. 0ne the mac sex partner nec first of your physical assault. one in eight trans people in the past 12 months have been physically attacked at the place of work, that is annexed at abolishing figure. at the place of work. for one of eight is astonishing. —— that is an astonishing. —— that is an astonishing figure. how much of this is because it he said trans tenures ago people would not have thought of transgender people in the way that we now do? is this just a social attitude problem or is it something worse? it is an interesting question and does a lot of things to do with this. it is multifaceted. time has moved on and then only discourse, the language changed and we know we understand people more than we used to ten or 20 years ago. societal attitudes are changing and installed more people are learning about what it means to be lesbian, gay or bisexual and more people are learning what it means be trans.
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what is interesting is if you get older, hate crime is still present and other it is reduced, it is still present and the moment there is a media campaign against trans people and then they are suffering a lot. in what way? the government hasjust launched to day very recently the gender recognition actually vomit that give trans people your ability to tell the government what needs to happen to make sure they achieve equality in the future. this recognition process is really crucial for them but at the moment it is being misrepresented well public life and people and commentators everywhere are misrepresenting what it means to be trans and what it means to achieve recognition of your gender. what they say to parents of children at school who are being told that the school who are being told that the school well start educating children in trans issues, lesbian and gay issues? parents say actually, i would rather... that is my parental
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duty, not for schools to do and there was a sense that these issues are being forced on youngsters far too early in the life. that is a complaint you sometimes you. what is interesting is the no young lgbt global —— we know a young lgbt people know themselves before anyone else does. that is not the case for everybody and schools are to be a supportive environment. as well as the sexual relationship education plans in schools have to be inclusive of lg bt plans in schools have to be inclusive of lgbt because it is not something we are getting away from. we are not been about a lifestyle choice, it is about people‘s lives and experiences at home, school, where they work, play, prey. these are important issues. is there a regional issue is that if you walk around in london and see two people of the same—sex walking down the street holding hands, people don‘t bat an eyelid and yet 30 miles away, perhaps attitudes are different. is there an issue there?
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are you being slightlyjournalistic when you say everyone has an issue? it is interesting you would say that. this morning, i work for a large lgbt organisation and one of my colleagues told me a story yesterday facing harassment from holding hands in public in central london. these are issues that people face everywhere and we cannot stigmatise rural location or small villages in wiltshire northumberland who could be very welcoming communities. you have to say this is a question of time eventually. people will eventually be as excepting at this as anything else. that can be complacent. this is about action, not time. what the government have announced today with the consultation as well as their action plan overall is a wake—up call that things are not done yet and there is still more to do for broad lgbt equality and if we use the money coming use the time and the money coming use the time and the weasel horses, and give to achieving equality for all lgbt
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people. —— time in these authors. —— time in resources. one of britain‘s most wanted fugitives is in custody in switzerland, where he‘s been arrested after two years on the run. mark acklom, who‘s 45, allegedly duped a woman into handing over £850,000 of her life savings, after posing as an m16 agent. he was tracked down to a luxury apartment in zurich. there will now be an extradition hearing. two householders have won compensation of around 15 thousand pounds each from network rail — because invasive knotweed spread from its land to their gardens. the court of appeal ruled that knotweed posed such a threat that landowners should try to eradicate it before it spread. the ruling could open the way for similar claims across england and wales. time for a look at the weather. i‘m not saying it‘s predictable as it is beginning to sound a bit. we quite like it when it is
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predictable. that is ourjob. we are going to look back because we‘ll —— back before we look forward because what was june? —— june‘s back before we look forward because what wasjune? —— june‘s the back before we look forward because what was june? —— june‘s the weather like? it was warm and sunny in most ways of the numbers have been crunched as we have from the met office the provisional figures. crunched as we have from the met office the provisionalfigures. they will today become technically official part we don‘t expect them to change and a lot. 0ne official part we don‘t expect them to change and a lot. one thing we saw was scotland had a temperature just creeping in under the finishing line, 33.2 celsius in motherwell last week and that that the highest temperature record in scotland. not just during june but of all time. that is a pretty aggressive record that black lewes was broken for the rest of the country has been warm as well. these maps show you that the difference between what we would normally expect, the red in the west is where temperatures have been two, three, four celsius higher than average friday so much warmer weather than usual. it has been funny as well, sunny than average
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across north—west scotland, some places close to twice the amount of sunshine you would expect and this is the big one, the rainfall. at this. it speaks for itself really but the brown colours are almost the parched earth indicating where the rainfall has been the lewes way below average. some parts of the south having 5% of the rainfall they would expect and some having the driestjune would expect and some having the driest june they would would expect and some having the driestjune they would expect. the forecast does not change very much but you could have told me that. larry mize like the last few days, starting today in county down, lots of sunshine around, more through the rest of this week, some warmth, dry weather and one thing we are introducing into the forecast is the chance of a shallow. shower clouds across devon earlier and this is the satellite picture from today. the crowd in eastern areas, turning a night in the south, the new continent spins in some shower clouds that have moved across the channel islands into the south—west of england, quite hit and miss but
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the song will continue through the rest of the afternoon and if you do catch one, to be heavy, possibly thundery and quite breezy generally across the southern part as well. elsewhere, sunshine to close at the afternoon and averages well into the 20, 20 8-29dc afternoon and averages well into the 20,20 8-29dc in afternoon and averages well into the 20,20 8—29dc in some sports. into this evening and those showers with some cloud as well continue to roll across the south—west of england, in new south wales, maybe the south midlands by the end of the night, not too many showers. many places they drive and while all that goes on, we bring this lead of cloud. you can view across parts of scotland and northern england. 0ne can view across parts of scotland and northern england. one thing about tomorrow is there will generally be a bit more cloud than we have had today. equally, some styles of sunshine, one of two showers, if you look at the map, creeping across southern england and into south wales. what gave you catch one but on the other side of the coin, marty of you catch one because there is not much more rain any forecast than that. —— lucky if you catch one. wimbledon tomorrow, more cloud in the sky, some blue sky
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getting too at times i suspect that temperatures around 23 celsius to a cooler feel. moving further ahead, thursday, frontal system working into the picture. some rain may be on the way but there was not too much hope. what the front will do is introduce some cooler air across parts of scotland and northern ireland, particularly staying warm the further south and east. though he isa the further south and east. though he is a day of contrast across england and wales. small chance of an afternoon shower under storm further west, you can see from the lighter shades the average gradient here, much coolerfor lighter shades the average gradient here, much cooler for scotland and northern ireland, 20 celsius. highs of 29 in london and former likely to get up to 30. getting to the end of the week, again very little change isa the week, again very little change is a lot of dry weather, spells of sunshine, close to 30 celsius in the south and even for scotland and northern ireland, it averages out to climb. no changes just yet. this is bbc news,
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our latest headlines: a female health care worker has been arrested on suspicion of murdering eight newborn babies and attempting to kill another six at the neo—natal unit of the countess of chester hospital. 12 boys and their football coach trapped in a cave in thailand have been warned it could be months before they can be rescued, because of rising floodwaters. police have charged a man who claimed there was a paedophile ring operating at the heart of westminster. the 50—year—old faces charges of fraud and perverting the course of justice. the government has pledged four million pounds to tackle discrimination and drive greater inclusion for the uk‘s lgbt community. the dutch prime minister has made an urgent call for clarity on every aspect of the future relationship between britain and the european union after brexit. and coming up, as the royal air force marks its 100th anniversary, we meet one of the last pilots who flew in the iconic battle of britain. sport now on afternoon
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live with tim hague. there‘s a lot going on. england against colombia is now less than three hours away. the manager gareth southgate has urged his team to write their own history in the last 16 of the world cup tonight. 0ur correspondent natalie pirks is inside the spartak stadium in moscow, take it away, nat. as you said, 2.5 hours to go until kick—off. the england or isjust down this game are starting to protect their flags. it is down this game are starting to protect theirflags. it is beginning to feel real. with gear of the knockout games already going to appeal to such errors, that is not isa appeal to such errors, that is not is ajewish appeal to such errors, that is not is a jewish in england wants to be intimate. note written team has a worst record at world cups. gareth southgate is urging them to go out and write their own history and
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forget about the failures of the past. this team is quite removed from that. one player was eight the last time england won a knockout match any major tournament. they had a light training session earlier and they appear very relaxed indeed. gareth southgate was keen not to focus was on this match, not who they would get on a quarterfinal, just about as much and playing with freedom and his captain, harry kane, agrees with him. it has been a great start to the campaign, which has been amazing. enjoying every moment of it so far. hopefully we can just continue that. we‘ve been doing great, i‘ve scored goals, we‘ve got through co mforta bly, goals, we‘ve got through comfortably, so i‘ll be thinking about is the next step and i‘m sure further down the line, after the tone and you will look back and remember these moments, which will be great, but for now it is just about concentrating on the next one.
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we are all determined to do well and win and it‘s important we have that. those days where maybe it‘s a bit slower than usual, training in height temple, people get behind it and focus on the job. there are some fascinating match ups to come tonight, harry kane against his spurs team—mate sanchez, whether guardado will be able to exploit ashley young. it seems a 50—50 in terms of how the fans feel and it will be england‘s first real test. as the ceiling and can go on to great things about this team just be another england failure consigned to the chapter of history? yeah, it‘s a bigger one. thank you very much. not long to go until kick—off. well from moscow to st petersburg as swizerland are taking on sweden — in the penultimate last 16 match. they are into the second half.
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and sweden are in the lead. after missing a host of good chances, emil forsberg finally found the net. a heavily deflected strike it was. the winner will face either england or colombia in the quarter finals. it‘s day two of wimbledon and there has been some british success already today. last year‘s semi—finalist, jo konta is into the second round. natalia vikhlyantseva natalia vikhlya ntseva it natalia vikhlyantseva it was a challenge to beta natalia vikhlyantseva. but the british number one came through 7—5, 7—6 9—7). but there was no such luck for naomi broady. she had the uneviable task of taking on the reigning champion garbine muguruza. and whilst the world number 138 gave a good account of herself, she lost 6—2, 7—5 against the third seed. let‘s go the men‘s draw now then and with no andy murray this year, kyle edmund is the home fans‘ best hope.
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and he is into the second round. he was really good against australian debutant alex bolt. the 21st seed winning 6—2 6—3 7—5 in under two hours. it is only edmund‘s second win in the main draw at wimbledon. but there was disappointment for british teenagerjay clarke on his grand slam debut. he took ernests gulbis to five sets out on court 18. but the former world number ten won the decider 6—4. 19—year—old clarke is ranked 218 in the world and was playing just his fourth atp tour level match. it looks like he has got a big future. well, rafael nadal is on court at the moment. the world number one is cruising against dudi sela on centre court. winning the first 6—3 and then the second 6—3. as you can see, 5—2 up and
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potentially the final set. it looks like it may well be the final set. they are into the first point. rafael nadal has not had a great few yea rs rafael nadal has not had a great few years and grass, the victim of the few shocks over the years, nick kerry was beating him a few years ago, but here‘s the world number one, winning the french open in his last major event. that was just a few weeks ago. but grass is not his favourite surface but a two—time winner at wimbledon and looking good in in his first round match as well. just on the brink of victory. that‘s all the sport for now. 12 boys and their football coach who were lost in a cave in thailand but eventually found alive may have to learn to dive in order to escape. the group were missing
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in the flooded caves for nine days but after being miraculously discovered yesterday, rescuers are working out ways to set them free. the team, which includes two british elite divers, joining me now via webcam from preston is dr sarita robinson, who lectures in survival psychology at the university of central lancashire. looking at the images of those youngsters yesterday, it is a long time to be underground. how do you think they are coping? they actually seem to be coping quite well. they might have found some very withdrawn children, potentially not able to speak, looking highly traumatised, but we found children that were alert and able to converse with the people that had dived into the cave, and they didn‘t look actually into a state. huge pressure on their coach, the only adult there. how will he be trying to keep them motivated? what do you try and do with youngsters?
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because it only starts to takes one to start getting jittery and it can spread fast. fickle trash on good readership in this situation. the key things are to keep the children motivated to look after their personal needs. also to instil optimism. because as soon as they start to fall into pessimistic thinking, that it can be a certain way to not survive the situation. if we are optimistic, obviously we do everything we can in our powers to keep on surviving because we believe there‘s going to be a positive outcome. the minute we start to think there will be a negative outcome, we started out our actions and believe that it is inevitable that we will die. at that point, we could see people just not even trying to survive. so, hope is obviously huge factor here. but so
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is something practical like food. how important is it to get the meeting, feeling that there is that hope going? absolutely. we know the boys have not had any food for ten days. they have been surviving on minimal amounts of water. 0bviously the boys‘ physical needs me to be met and we do know that if the brain falls out of its very comfortable priorities, it doesn‘t like to get to hot or cold, doesn‘t like to be dehydrated, likes to have a constant supply of glucose, then it can start to malfunction. that‘s when you can get her decision—making or depressive thoughts falling in. physical needs need to be met not only to keep the boys physically healthy but also to promote their mental health. god willing, we get them out eventually. presumably there are long—term effects of any events like this. humans tend to be
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quite resilient. we know that when people go through dramatic incidents, not everybody goes on to develop things like post—traumatic stress disorder. they tend to say that it‘s about 5—10 people in 100 that it‘s about 5—10 people in 100 that will have long—term marks of adverse effects that need intervention. the first things that psychologists will do when the boys are returned hopefully to their families is a period of watchful waiting. we would rather have the natural support of teachers, pa rents, natural support of teachers, parents, friends, extended family helping the boys to readjust and we adapt to life rather than a complete stranger going in and trying to do some sort of formal therapy. it‘s much better in the first few weeks to do this watchful waiting and then if the boys do seem to be having problems such as loss of intrusive thoughts, nightmares, flashbacks, it‘s at that point that we might offer some were formalised therapy.
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thank you so much forjoining us this afternoon. on thursday the nhs turns 70 years old, and to mark the occasion the bbc has been speaking to staff and patients about their experiences of the health service. earlier i spoke tojodie scaddan and her son will. when he was born, he had no heart rate. his doctor, nischal rao said it was highly likely that not much oxygen reached his brain for more than half an hour after he was being born. jodie told me why she thinks the nhs is so important. i think far too much focus is put into the political side of the nhs and what‘s completely overlooked is the amazing work that the teams do. we went from the team at the whittington that recovered will to then being transferred down to uclh, where my husband and i for hours while he was in this induced coma, for days, even, sat there watching hundreds of nhs staff running around tirelessly, caring for multitudes of children. and making a massive difference. if it wasn‘t for the nhs, he wouldn‘t be here,
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never mind without brain damage. but the fact that he‘s here without any scratch i think is just testament to how amazing these guys are and how i think they are completely underappreciated. nischal, when you get home after a day like that, do you think, i‘ve saved the life today? yes, it's one of the most emotionally satisfying journeys ever, to get this gratitude from mothers and fathers, grandfathers and grandmothers, aunties and uncles. looking at him now, he would not be around had you not had a rather good day at work that day. absolutely. it‘s as simple as that, isn‘t it? and if you had a message for the team, what would it be? that‘s a big one. i mean, i‘ve tried to portray that to them and many occasions but i think just completed gratitude. the way i feel about him
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and the team is something i never going to be able to describe in words because it is a very emotional thing for me. what i‘ve now got as a result of their efforts. so i can‘t actually describe it, it‘s just unfounded gratitude. do people say thank you enough? i think so, most of the time, yes. we do feel appreciated. but every now and then, when extra things happen, special things happen, it's a special thing. so you go to work one day, normal day, and then you‘re faced with something like this and you‘re living on your training and your wits and a bit of luck, is that it? absolutely, absolutely. i think i should say thank you on behalf of everybody as well because it needs to be said a lot more. good to see you, nischal, jodie and will, we need to say goodbye to will. let‘s say goodbye. say bye—bye. bye— bye. you were fabulous. thank you very much to all of you. you enjoyed that, didn‘t you?
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he was so cute, and so were you. their business news injust he was so cute, and so were you. their business news in just a he was so cute, and so were you. their business news injust a moment but first the headlines. a female health care worker is arrested on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder of another six, in cheshire. 12 boys and their football coach trapped in a cave in thailand have been warned it could be months before they can be rescued. a man known as nick, who alleged there was a paedophile ring at the heart of westminster, has been charged with perverting the course of justice. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. a warning over brexit from a major business organisation. the british chambers of commerce has published a list of what it calls 23 real—world questions that it wa nts urgently a nswered. the list covers subjects including vat, tariffs, customs and regulations. the uk construction sector picked up injune, according to the latest study. more work in the residential sector
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and an acceleration in commercial building was behind the rise. it was the third month in a row that the sector grew after contracting in march. big pay deals to bosses and investors by water companies have damaged customer trust, according to the regulator 0fwat. it‘s published new rules that will force firms to explain how bosses‘ pay is linked to performance and to prioritise customers‘ interests. it comes as the bosses of several water firms prepare to be quizzed by mps. so, business and brexit. our two favourite topics. what's the latest? pcc which represents a lot of businesses around the uk have said they want to see more from theresa may in terms of how she prepares for brexit. they have called a 23 real word questions, basic things like
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how will vat work on things that we bring into the country after brexit, however customs and regulations work. they are asking for a bit of a fondness regarding this. —— up front regarding this. we have seen oil prices rising above $75 a barrel, the first time that it has happened. that is spoiled by the shot of an oil rig! 2014 was the last time we saw prices of oil that is high because of possible issues with oil supply because of disruption in libya and canada, and of course the reintroduction of sanctions on iran, which is a major oil producer, by the united states. things also hotting up for glencoe. it was ranked as the tenth biggest company in the world is back in 2015. it has been asked by us authorities to hand
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over documents, we does know about what, just that it is regarding fraud investigations. that has put its sheer price a lot lower. let‘s joining us now isjeremy thomson—cook, chief economist, world first 0il bcc. when we last checked pattaya beach, is share price was down. a big fall and investors alike it. they don't like it when it gets involved and stars a subpoena documents when it talks about corruption. the countries that glencore has been operating in as democratic republic of congo, venezuela and nigeria. this is focused on copper and oil mining details out of those countries. you may ask why glencore, a swiss company listed in london and
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obviously with issues around the world, being investigated by the department of justice. the department of justice. the department of justice is department of justice. the department ofjustice is an avaricious prosecutor and the fact that any of these deals that glencore we have signed on the basis of corruption, purely the fact they we re of corruption, purely the fact they were priced in us dollars, the department of justice says were priced in us dollars, the department ofjustice says it is enough for them to count as its jurisdiction. investors don't like it, it has bounced back by 5% which isa sign it, it has bounced back by 5% which is a sign that while they are likely to be found at the end of this, you should fine, something around 10—12% of the company's value, would be extraordinary. let's talk about oil prices, because they have risen above the $75 a barrel for the first time since november 2014. what‘s behind this rise? simple supply and demand is to be honest. we have seen backlogs of oil in the us starting to dwindle over the course of the
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past couple of months. the next infa ntry past couple of months. the next infantry number that stewart is on thursday evening and markets are betting that number will be lower thanit betting that number will be lower than it was last month. suppliers starting to be choked off. thank you very much indeed. there‘s a pitcher al show you that will show you what has happened. sweden have just beaten in switzerland and had a penalty in the last second of injury time, which was disallowed, but the final score, 1-o. was disallowed, but the final score, 1—0. that‘s means that sweden will face the winners of the game played later tonight, england versus colombia. switzerland have one player sent off and, as i say, a disallowed penalty in the last moment of extra time. and there, the other side of a world cup game, the
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losers. they will be consoled thereby the winners. sweden through, england playing at seven o‘clock and thatis england playing at seven o‘clock and that is your football update. this year marks the hundredth anniversary of the royal air force, and events are happening around the country to mark the occasion. they include a major fly—past over london next week featuring the largest concentration of military aircraft in recent memory — from spitfires to the most modern aircraft. it was the second world war that saw the raf s most iconic action —— the battle of britain —— described by winston churchill as its finest hour. only a handful of pilots are still with us, and over the next three days we ll be hearing from three of them. today, robert hall speaks to squadron leader geoffrey wellum, now 96, who joined the raf atjust 18 years old, in 1939. ican i can remember walking out. i can remember walking out with a parachute over my shoulder, helmet on, and looking at this elegant, relaxed fighter, obviously a thoroughbred, and thinking i‘ve got to fly this.
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the chap said to me, go and fly it, he said, but don‘t you dare break it. it was a magnificent machine. and it seemed to flow around the sky. and i thought, there is a very important part of this trip coming off, we‘ve got to land it. eventually i managed to land it, well, it landed me, really. i‘d like to spend a little time, if i may, just talking about life on dispersal, waiting for that phone to ring. the moment that phone rang, you went... absolutely... that was a difficult time. once you were strapped in your aeroplane and airborne, then it was up to you. and that was, for me, that was the relief of this waiting. tell me about your first combat mission. i can remember the controller coming on and saying, vector 140,
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150 plus coming in over dungeness. 150 plus. and my goodness, it looked it, too. and we went into it head—on. and i was lucky enough to get a hind call that day. but i can see it now. 150 plus. with the 109s escorting them above, like a lot of gnats on a summer evening. they were doing 300 miles an hour. we were. that‘s 600 miles an hour closing. so it‘s a very quick initial burst. everything happened very quickly. and you are also watching your tail, or somebody is having to watch your tail, even if you aren‘t, because of these fighters. the whole secret of survival was never to stay still, straight and level, for more than 20 seconds. i was shot out three times,
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and one of the blokes shot me out quite badly, but i didn‘t even see him. the other thing i wanted to ask you about was the way in which all of you coped with the losses. you dismissed it. yeah? you dismissed it, you just accepted it. it was a dangerous game, it was a dangerous war, if you lost a particularly close friend, yes, there was a little bit of... but let‘s go out to the local pub and... but you accepted it, you had to. what sense of pride did you have at that time? you didn‘t have any pride at all. i wouldn‘t have said pride, it was just, we were, after all, young fighter pilots doing a job, which was defending our country against the king‘s enemies. remarkable.
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that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5. time for a look at the weather. it's it‘s going to be very hard for all of us. for the vast majority, there is a very warm weather continues through the rest of this week. but we do add into the mix adjusted the chance of a couple of showers. the risk of showers this afternoon across parts of the south—west of england and the channel islands. i suspect a shower might be quite welcome for many at the moment. elsewhere, lots of hot sunshine. tonight, more cloud across a southerly wind, south wales. the chance for a shower. more cloud also off the north sea towards scotland and northern england. quite a range of temperatures, nine in norwich, 16 in cardiff. tomorrow they will be more cloud around than today. still
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sunny spells at times but without skies stay great, temperatures will be warmer. 24—25 at best. the week and, most places will be dry. there will be spells of sunderland temperatures in the south getting back. 30 degrees. today at 5:00 — a female health care worker is arrested on suspicion of murdering eight babies and attempting to kill six others at a hospital. it follows a long—running investigation into the deaths of newborns at the countess of chester hospital in 2015 and 2016. we‘ll have the latest from chester hospital in a moment. the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00... how many of you? 13? brilliant... the 12 children and their football coach found alive in a cave in thailand — rescuers consider the best way to bring them to safety.
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the boys were found by two british divers nine days after they disappeared — colleagues paid tribute to their professionalism.
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