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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  July 5, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's thursday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme in two hours' time, the goverment‘s emergency cobra committee meets to discuss the nerve agent poisoning of a man and a woman in amesbury in wiltshire. police say the substance was the same as that used in the attack on a former russian spy and his daughter. following the detailed analysis of those samples, we can confirm that the man and woman have been exposed to the nerve agent novichok, which has been identified as the same nerve agent that contaminated both yulia and sergei skripal. we'll be live in amesbury with the latest. and if you live in the area — or run a business or shop there — tell me what you think of this latest development? how do you regard the chief medical officers‘ advice that the risk to you remains low? send me an email, victoria@bbc.co.uk who are the football lads alliance? they say they're standing up against extremism and in favour of free speech. but are they simply a front for anti—islamic bigotry? we're always embracing their religion, they don't
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want to know about us. do think it is possible for muslims and non—muslims to live in the same country? no, i don't think it is. i think it's gone too far. the government are protecting the muslims too much. this week the head of the unite union called the fla a far—right group. we've been investigating — watch our exclusive film just after 10. more than a thousand musicians, including sir paul mccartney and james blunt, are calling for eu politicians to vote for changes to copyright laws, which they say will protect the music industry. my name is james blunt. i've been so lucky to be able to make music, but the next generation of artists coming through need to get a better deal when their music is used online. but critics say the new laws would put the future of the internet as we know it at risk. we'll discuss the pros and cons with people from inside the music industry. hello.
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welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. this morning — i want to hear from you if you are due to get married on saurday. what are you going to do about the england—sweden game, kick off at 3 o clock? we want to talk to people getting wed this saturday, so do send me an email or text. also this morning, the nhs was born exactly 70 years ago today. so what does the national health service mean to you? the government's emergency cobra committee will meet later to discuss its response to the nerve agent poisonings of a man and a woman at amesbury in wiltshire. last night, police said government scientists believed dawn sturgess and charlie rowley were poisoned by novichok — the same toxin used against the former russian agent, sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, in salisbury earlier this year. ben ando reports.
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the spectre of a chemical weapon attack is back. a number of areas around salisbury and amesbury and wiltshire cordoned off for forensic tests. two people, named locally as dawn sturgess and charlie rowley, unconscious in hospital. the victims we now know of novichok poisoning. a full counterterrorism investigation is under way. people in the area can expect to see an increased police presence, which will include officers wearing protective equipment as they carry out activity at a number of sites. this will look very similar to some of the activity you have all seen take place in salisbury earlier this year. in march, former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia were poisoned with novichok. while there are striking similarities, the police say it is too soon to link the cases. the alarm was raised on saturday, when both charlie rowley and dawn sturgess were admitted to hospital. over the weekend, their symptoms caused increasing concern.
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on monday, samples were sent to porton down laboratory. yesterday, those results came back positive for novichok. a major incident was declared. with novichok known to be involved, this investigation is a priority, with 100 counter terrorism detectives drafted in. theirjob is to find out all they can about charlie rowley and dawn sturgess. and to find out how two apparently random members of the public came into contact with this potentially deadly nerve agent. but is there are still danger? public health england says it does not think so and it is unlikely anyone else is contaminated. you do not need to seek advice from health professional unless you are experiencing symptoms, as any individual who had been significantly exposed at the same time would by now have symptoms. as forensic work continues in wiltshire, in london later there will be another meeting of the government's
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cobra emergency committee, where perhaps some of the many outstanding questions can begin to be answered. our assistant political editor, norman smith joins me. the home secretary is due to make a statement, what is he likely to say? i think the first thing he will try to say is a message of reassurance. there will be considerable concerns by people living in and around salisbury now that another couple have been poisoned. as part of that, he will try to update mps on the effo rts he will try to update mps on the efforts government agencies are making to identify and track down this latest novichok. of course, until that happens, there is still the potential for other people to be similarly poisoned by the novichok. added to that, i expect there will be concerned about the reassurances that were offered after the skripals
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we re that were offered after the skripals were poisoned, the suggestions it was all clear and sorted, we now know that was not the case. the other thing we will hear is more criticism of russia and the utter recklessness, it seems, involved in using this nerve agent to attack the skripals, now putting british lives at risk, and why it is particularly important now is because russia is in the middle of a bounce on the back of the world cup, when it is enjoying this huge diplomatic positive, for the question marks and accusations about russian conduct to resu rfa ce accusations about russian conduct to resurface now would potentially be extraordinarily damaging, and comes just one week ahead of a crucial nato meeting to consider how nato should frame its response to russia and, of course, at the same time as president trump is due to meet president trump is due to meet president putin. any heightening in russian and west tensions at this point could have serious diplomatic ramifications. you will hear the
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statement of the home secretary live on bbc news at about 12.30. if you live around the area, let us know what to think about the development. you were told the area was no longer contaminated after the poisoning of the skripals, what do you think of this development and how reassured you by the words of dame sally davies, who says that the risk to the public remains low? certain businesses and shops were hit, certain tourists stayed away from the area. what do you think of the latest development? send us an e—mail. let's bring you the rest of the news so let's bring you the rest of the news so far. a teenage boy has been arrested on suspicion of murdering six—year—old alesha mcphail on the island of bute. police scotland say it is a significant development in the investigation into her death, but still want to hear from potential witnesses. alesha's body was found in woodland on monday morning, several hours after she was reported missing.
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rescuers in thailand say they re facing a race against the weather to free the group of boys and their football coach. who've now been trapped underground for 12 days. they say good conditions in the last 2a hours have helped lower the water level inside by an average of a centimetre and a half every hour — but they're concerned a turn in the weather could reverse the progress they've made. the uk's biggest car maker, jaguar land rover, says it urgently needs "greater certainty" on post—brexit trade with the eu. the company says it needs clarity if it is continue to invest heavily in the uk, safeguard suppliers and 40,000 jobs. business secretary greg clark said ministers are determined that the company should continue to "prosper and invest in britain". last month, the firm said it was moving the production of the land rover discovery to slovakia, putting hundreds ofjobs at risk. meanwhile, downing street has set out some of the detail on a new plan for how customs could be handled after brexit. the latest model is known as a "facilitated customs
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arrangement" and number ten says it would use technology to guarantee frictionless trade with the european union, while also allowing britain to strike its own trade deals. today marks 70 years since the creation of the national health service. a series of events are being held across to the uk to mark the anniversary. more than 3,000 people — including nhs staff past and present — will attend services at westminster abbey and york minister. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9:30. thank you for your messages, they are always welcome. this tweet on the nhs which is 70 today from "tanglednic". "i'm currently an inpatient at northumbria nhs trust's flagship emergency hopsital in cramlington. as someone with severe crohns disease and asthma, i've been admitted at least 20 times this year. without our nhs i wouldn't be here.
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i think it's incredible!" i know that isn't everybody‘s experience, but let us know what you think this morning. let's get some sport. jeanette kwakye is at the bbc sport centre. no football today jeanette, so a good day to have a proper chat about wimbledon. and it's a big day for the brits? plenty to look forward to, including both british number ones. let's start with joe, she describes both british number ones. let's start withjoe, she describes her opponent as being a tough test. she will be looking for the spark and consistency which saw her reaching the semifinal last year. and her counterpart, kyle edmund, his confidence flying high after his first—round performance. he is up against
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american bradley khlan. whats more exciting is that if he gets past this, he could set up a clash with novak djokcovic. but i'm sure it's one game at a time for our british number one. all that and more on bbc two from 11.30am two of the greats making easy work of the tournament? serena williams serving a reminder as to why she is the seven time champion at sw19, racing into the third round in style. it is well known that she's had a few struggles in recent weeks, including an injury which meant she had to withdraw from the french open. there were no signs of that, as she made light work of bulgarian viktoriya tomova — 6-1, 6-4. williams insits she is not trying to put too much expectation on herself. but i guess expectation of a 23 time grand slam winner may be a bit higher than our own estimation. her sister venus is also through to the third round. and it was another evergreen performance for roger federer. he powered his way through to the next round. beating slovakia's lukas lacko in straight sets.
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the defending champion again showing us his class and why he is the favourite to lift the trophy. tim henman called it "a near—perfect performance". he is looking very good. a word on england, a slight injury worry? a couple days off from the world cup is doing wonders for my nerves and my finger nails victoria — but still plenty of football news to keep us going until england lace up their boots against sweden this saturday. just 48 hours to go and the latest from camp england is that — leicester striker jamie vardy is a big doubt for the quarterfinal game against sweden. a groin injury he picked up on tuesday night needs time to recover. fabian delph, if you remember, flew back from russia for the birth of his third child — well good news all around, he welcomed a daughter yesterday and was straight back on a plane to link up with his teammates in repino. no night feeds for him. that's all the sport for now.
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the home secretary will make a statement in the commons today about the poisoning of two more people in wiltshire by the nerve agent novichok. you'll be able to watch his statement live here on bbc news. and police — so far — have no idea where they came into contact with it. counter terrorism officers have been called in to investigate after the pair were taken ill on saturday at their home in amesbury. it's just a few miles away from salisbury — where the former russian spy, sergei skripal and his daughter julia were poisoned by the same substance back in march. england's chief medical officer sally davies says the risk to the public remains low but she's warning local people to take precautions. my advice for any individual that may have been in any of the area now cordoned off from 10pm on friday evening onwards is highly precautionary. as before, my advice is to wash your clothes and wipe down any personal items, shoes and bags with cleansing or baby wipes before disposing of them in the usual way.
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this is the same public health advice i gave during the previous incident, but now is a belt and braces approach. i should also warn the public to be careful, as always, picking up any unknown or already dangerous objects, such as needles and syringes. our correspondentjon kay is in amesbury for us now. it is the same advice as last time, but it didn't work. what are people saying? well, we are not sure whether it works or not. i mean, there would appear to be a link. it is novichok, it is highly unusual, two people contaminated in march, 110w two people contaminated in march, now two people a few miles away. on the face of it you think there must be some kind of connection. the police saying that we have to keep
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an open mind. it is possible it is an open mind. it is possible it is an entirely different batch, it is possible this is not connected. they are saying, let's take a step back, look at this bit by bit. what they are doing is, crucially, trying to track down what this couple, dawn stu rg ess track down what this couple, dawn sturgess and charlie rowley are the names we have been given locally, they lived in this house and this is where they collapsed on saturday. the authorities are desperately trying to go back in time over the last few days and work out where this couple had been in the days and hours before they collapsed, where they might have been exposed to this nerve agent. they are looking not just that this property, several sites nearby, a park where there was a hog roast on saturday afternoon, a church, and maybe this is the connection bit, potentially looking in salisbury, eight miles away from here. another park is cordoned off. that is eight miles from here, but only one mile from the home of the skripals, where they were poisoned. is this where the couple went and
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picked up some kind of residue? it is possible there was a discarded item when they went there. that is one of the possibilities the authorities are examining. what our local residents, local business owners saying about this? they have been, in terms of businesses and shops, they have been affected after the last poisoning, haven't they? yes, that was in salisbury, and we saw business dipping in salisbury. there were royal visits to try to boost the economy, to reassure the public that decontamination had happened. clearly, this will be alarming for businesses there. this isa alarming for businesses there. this is a whole new community, eight miles away, trying to think, how do we fit into this? this is a brand—new housing estate where the couple live. it is very tight, small roads, lots of families, tightly packed in together. people here are now nervous, as well as in salisbury
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itself. maybe they were at the hog roast on saturday afternoon. what do they need to do? do they need to wash their clothes and wipe down personal items, as sally davies just said in that cliff? people also have questions, despite reassurances that the risk is low. people want to know why it took 48 hours after this couple had collapsed here for the samples to be sent to porton down to be checked for novichok? something like the skripal case had happened so recently, showed that have happened sooner and would the public have got answers sooner? here we are, day five after what happened, and they are still waiting for more clarification. they are also preparing to see officers in hazmat suits, more forensic tents and scenes going up, i think it will get busy as the day goes on and this will look more like the scenes we saw in salisbury a few months ago.
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thank you. the security minister ben wallace has been giving more informtion on what's being done to reassure local residents. there are thousands of people that live in that part of salisbury. we have used whatever facts and intelligence we have to guide whatever clear up we can. being safe, we can make people as safe as possible. we can issue scientific advice about what to do in a situation and how you can take precautions to keep yourself safe. the nature of a nerve agents such as novichok is it is an absolutely tiny needle in a very large haystack that we have to find. joining me now from bristol is chemical weapons specialist, dr richard guthrie. what other ways this couple could have come into contact with novichok? the most likely method is an item discarded by the perpetrator
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of the attack on the skripals. it looks very likely that the attack on the skripals was carried out by pasting the poison on their door handle. that individual, of course, will have wanted to make sure they we re will have wanted to make sure they were protected, so probably wearing a thick coat, gloves, they would not wa nt to a thick coat, gloves, they would not want to wear what was obviously protective equipment, they may have had a small amount of the material left over. you would expect a halfway competent would—be assassin to dispose of those relatively carefully, because they would be a forensic gold mine. but it is quite possible, and i think the implication is, it is one of the leading lines of inquiry, that one of these items has not been hidden as well as expected and has been found, and that two individuals have become contaminated because of it. does that mean the decontamination process after the poisoning of the skripals was not done properly, thoroughly? as far as i can tell,
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the decontamination process of those areas identified as contaminated or possibly contaminated was carried out very effectively. the problem would be if somebody is trying to dispose of an item which would have some forensic evidence in it, they are not going to dispose of it somewhere obviously. so obviously the decontamination process to catch all of those things would require, 01’ all of those things would require, or cleaning up every spot within miles of salisbury, and that is obviously relatively implausible. the problem is that one or two objects that were contaminated, hidden in a location, can later be discovered. again, using your experience, what kind objects might have been hidden? something like a thick coat, a pair of gloves. the simplest way of putting the liquid onto the door handle could be to haveitin onto the door handle could be to have it in a syringe, where you gently squeeze the syringe across the door handle to leave the
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material there. you might then have some material left in that syringe, but you also, for your own protection, would want to make sure you have got gloves and perhaps a thick coat on, because he would not wa nt to thick coat on, because he would not want to put what was obviously chemical weapons protective gear, that would draw attention. but a thick coat and gloves would give you a lot of protection. you probably wa nt to a lot of protection. you probably want to dispose of those rather than go through an airport where something might be detected or you might get further contamination on yourself. what i understand it, and absolutely tiny drop of this stuff can be lethal? yes, a very small amount can be lethal, but it depends on how long you have it on your skin. if it is going through the skin, the time of exposure, as well as the quantity of the material you are exposed to, is very important. it takes some hours getting through firm skin, such as on the hands, it ta kes firm skin, such as on the hands, it takes some hours to get into the bloodstream. the longer you have it on your hands on the higher dose you
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will get. the advice from the chief medical officer, as she said, the same as last time. wash your clothes, do those really obvious, sensible things. would that be reassuring? it is hard to tell. it would be reassuring to me in the sense of if i had been in a location where one of these two individuals had been, they might have left behind some contamination and you picked up a small amount. cleaning those things would be sensible to reduce what is already a very low risk to a very tiny risk. the skripals, as we know, survived the assassination attempt on them. should this give us some optimism that this couple will survive? well, i guess there is a lot of optimism. novichok is relatively unknown, they'll viscerally came from a secret programme. so the medical countermeasures were not exactly known because each nerve agent has a
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slightly different reaction with the body. the factory individuals have survived gives optimism for the latest individuals poisoned. it was very good medical treatment that the original three people who were affected by novichok, that medical treatment was key. it is very appropriate to think about the excellent medical treatment they received when we are celebrating the nhs's 70th birthday. a viewer has tested in to say this, we were told there was no risk to public health, now two more people are seriously ill. , is now two more people are seriously ill., is put before public safety. amesbury are so close to sailsbury, i will not shop there again in a hurry and i think the authorities need a kick up the backside. kevin lives in livestock, i don't think the businesses that have been affected have been properly compensated. i live close by and i have noticed a real reduction in the amount of tourists. the latest
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incident shows there are still more potentially lethal amounts of the nerve agent as yet undiscovered. the sheer recklessness of the russian agencies involved cannot go without some form of sanctions. i hope nobody else is affected, but i fear we have not seen the last of it yet. is this an opportunity, in your view, for the russians to help us? even though they say they have nothing to do with the poisoning? the russians have given a very clear denial that there is strong evidence that would point towards them. the other possibility is somebody who was trying to make the russians look bad, by which they would have left a lot of the same physical evidence. it is very difficult to pin down... the security minister referred to it asa the security minister referred to it as a needle in a haystack, any item that may have been discarded. the risk is extremely low. it would not stop me going to amesbury or go to salisbury, in fact i may end up
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going there later today today filming. iam going there later today today filming. i am not concerned going there to do that filming. thank you for talking to us. we are going to talk to one of the local councillors in the next hour or so of the problem. day four of wimbledon — first on centre court is two—time champion rafa nadal. then it's time for the brits, johanna konta and kyle edmund both play later. sally nugent is at sw19 for us this morning. good morning. delighted to report there are no flying ants today. we also have jeff tarango. there are no flying ants today. we also havejeff tarango. victoria was mentioning the brits we have coming up. let's start with johanna mentioning the brits we have coming up. let's start withjohanna konta. she has had a tricky year. what is her challenge? is it managing her game, or maybe managing her brain?|j
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was game, or maybe managing her brain?” was talking to michaeljoyce about that, her coach, we grew up together. he said it was more about her settling into herself, there is not much coaching that can go on. evenif not much coaching that can go on. even if she talks to him about the service, it will mess her up even more. she just needs to be comfortable. we have seen her lose her temper? she is frustrated, you see that from andy murray as well. she would not be there if she didn't get frustrated and push herself harder. as a great athlete, you have to do that. we have not seen it from kyle edmund. he seems to have a different temperament, much more of an even keel. cannot work? he plays within himself and he gets fired up sometimes. he gets going, and he puffed himself up like a jockey. i like the way he has developed. he is
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really coming strong. he had better watch out, he is playing a lefty from stamford, they can do some damage on grass. it will be a great match. this is his biggest challenge? it is a big challenge, he does not know bradley that well. he wants to be better than his dad. he is one of those guys out there fighting for any opportunity he can get. they can be annoying, those that want to be better than their dad! there are a lot of tennis playing parenting is round. serena williams is famously one of them. is this her year, or is it too soon? it is too soon, but if you talk to her, it is her year. there is no
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stopping her. she is go, go, go. i think how well she has done this year she will definitely win next year, but she wants it now. she wants to prove herself now. she has beenin wants to prove herself now. she has been in better shape every match she plays. not playing doubles, which is a big plus this time. usually she does better when she plays doubles. this time, she smartly did not. i put her as the favourite with all the ladies that have gone out. favourite for this year? that is incredible. her mental strength is like nothing i have seen before. if you are in a room, you can sense it. i have been friends with her since she was eight years old. i walked to say hi, i thought, i'm she was eight years old. i walked to say hi, ithought, i'm not she was eight years old. i walked to say hi, i thought, i'm not going to disturb you. she has an aura about herand disturb you. she has an aura about her and you don't want to get into that bubble and be the one that knocked her off mark o'hara concentration. how does anybody attempt to play against that? you have to scrap and fight. that sounds
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terrifying. you think it will be rafa nadal and roger federer in the final? i think they did a great job in seeding them one and two. nadal has more of a chance to be vulnerable. he is playing way to back on the court. he will give someone like del potro a good chance. in the finals against federer, a totally different mental matchup. i think federer has a nice road to march through to the finals. it could be one of the best matches we have seen. thank you. it could be one of the best matches we have seen. i watched one of the best matches we have seen. iwatched federer one of the best matches we have seen. i watched federer yesterday and he looked amazing. i think he is getting better as he gets older. like so many of us, don't you think? iagree! still to come. as the nhs celebrates
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its 70th birthday today, tell us this morning — what does it mean to you? luke said i'm grateful to the nhs, i was born prematurely in 1994 and only had a small chance of survival. i was only had a small chance of survival. iwas in only had a small chance of survival. i was in hospitalfor 98 days only had a small chance of survival. i was in hospital for 98 days and only had a small chance of survival. i was in hospitalfor 98 days and i believe i'm very lucky to be here today. that is incredible, luke, thank you. and should youtube pay music artists when their videos are uploaded to the platform? there's a big vote in the european parliament today on exactly this — on the one side there's paul mccartney and james blunt saying please vote for this reform. i=on the other — stephen fry and wikipedia founderjimmy wales saying a vote in favour could threaten freedom of speech on the internet. we'll debate. time for the latest news — here's annita the home secretary, sajid javid, will make a statement to parliament today to update mps on the nerve agent poisoning of a man and a woman in wiltshire. scientists believe dawn sturgess and charlie rowley were contaminated by novichok —
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the same toxin used against the former russian agent, sergei skripal and his daughter in salisbury in march. they're still seriously ill in hospital. the government is holding a session of its cobra emergency committee this morning. meanwhile downing street has set out some of the detail on a new plan for how customs could be handled after brexit. the latest model is known as a "facilitated customs arrangement" and number ten says it would use technology to guarantee frictionless trade with the european union, while also allowing britain to strike its own trade deals. a teenage boy has been arrested on suspicion of murdering six—year—old alesha macphail on the island of bute. police scotland say it is a significant development in the investigation into her death, but still want to hear from potential witnesses. alesha's body was found in woodland on monday morning, several hours after she was reported missing. rescuers in thailand say they re facing a race against the weather to free the group of boys and their football coach
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who've now been trapped underground for 12 days. they say good conditions in the last 24 hours have helped lower the water level inside by an average of a centimetre and a half every hour, but they re concerned a turn in the weather could reverse the progress they ve made. the uk's biggest car maker, jaguar land rover, says it urgently needs "greater certainty" on post—brexit trade with the eu. the company says it needs clarity if it is continue to invest heavily in the uk, safeguard suppliers and 40,000 jobs. business secretary greg clark said ministers are determined that the company should continue to "prosper and invest in britain". last month, the firm said it was moving the production of the land rover discovery to slovakia, putting hundreds ofjobs at risk. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now withjeanette. johanna konta plays at wimbledon
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today. and she will be followed by the other british no one, kyle edmund. there is an injury concern over england strikerjamie vardy ahead of saturday's world cup quarterfinal with sweden. he had an injection in his groin after the win over columbia. chris froome said he can understand why organisers moved to block him from competing in the tour de france before the doping charge was dropped. in the wake of the second world war the then—labour health secretary nye bevan made it his life goal to provide free health care for all british citizens. he was determined that hospitals, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, opticians and dentists were all brought under state control. and while he faced opposition from some health professionals and opposition politicians, on the 5thjuly 1948, exactly 70 years ago today, the national health
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service was born. the first of its kind in the entire world, it had an overall cost of £437 million. and as the cost to the taxpayer has increased dramatically — close to £120 billion today — so the debates and discussions about it have continued. but one thing almost everyone agrees on, is that the nhs is a real source of pride for british people. every hour, uk hospitals deal with 12,000 appointments, 3,000 visits to a&e, and over 2000 procedures and operations. in 24 hours, 33,000 calls are made to uk ambulances — half of those cases go to emergency departments. cataract surgeries, tooth removals and hip replacements are among the most common procedures carried out in england. nearly half a million admissions a year as a result of people falling. over 2,000 babies are born every day across britain — that is 85 an hour.
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every day, 1.5 million pieces of laundry are washed and 400,000 meals are served up. from doctors and cleaners to nurses and porters, the nhs employs the biggest workforce in the uk with 1.5 million staff. public spending on health in the uk last year was £150 billion. this works out at three times the defence budget. it is nearly double the education budget. let's speak now to lucy watts. she says she owes her life to the nsh — she has survived sepsis 12 times. rachael hogg had cancer and a heart defect as a baby and whose life too was saved by the nhs. teresa chinn, received an mbe for her services to nursing. lucy, you have spent a lot of time
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in hospital and at one point there we re in hospital and at one point there were 12 consultants looking after you. yes, i have a rare condition, we don't know what it is yet. still undiagnosed. yes i was misdiagnosed for many years. but a lot of things didn't make sense and it took until 2016 to realise it was something else. i have been under palliative ca re else. i have been under palliative care for seven years. you else. i have been under palliative care for seven years. you were else. i have been under palliative care for seven years. you were told in 2012 you wouldn't live for five yea rs. in 2012 you wouldn't live for five years. they said it was unlikely, but i'm still here and i put that down to the nhs and the fantastic care. tell us about more about the people who look after you. they focus on me as a person, they say,
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what can we help you with and we together work out what we can do and achieve what i want out of life. this is how you're fed?” achieve what i want out of life. this is how you're fed? i have a line that goes into my heart and i'm fed through the tube. it costs £250,000 a yearfor the fed through the tube. it costs £250,000 a year for the feed. do you have any idea how much your treatment would have cost if you had had to pay for it? millions. i do think millions. i say if we had an insurance—based system i wouldn't be able to get insurance and i wouldn't be able the keep myself alive. molly helps as well. she is great. she helps as well. she is great. she helps as well. she is great. she helps a lot. a beautiful spaniel with us this morning. rachel, you we re with us this morning. rachel, you were diagnosed with cancer as a baby. you had a tumour in your kidney that weighed over two pounds. that was removed. how have the nhs saved your life. when i was 11
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months old, my mum noticed i had a swolle n months old, my mum noticed i had a swollen stomach. the gp thought she was overreacting, but the gp shared her concerns and sent me to hospital, where the same die i was diagnosed with cancer and transferred to hospital, where within 24 hours i was in surgery, had my entire kidney removed with the tumour. at the time they realised that i had a heart condition. sol realised that i had a heart condition. so i had a leaky valve. i was the first person in the uk to have that treated by key hole surgery. unfortunately that didn't last, because as i grew the thing they put in, i outgrew it and i had to have the surgery redone at three. i had chemotherapy for the cancer. but the nature ves nhs have been incredible from the gps to the nurses, to everyone and a lot, i saw
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a lot of same nurses and doctors through my life until i was 18. it was. . . through my life until i was 18. it was... how old are you now 28. that was, must have been a challenging start for you, but for your mum and dad, they would have been wondering thenis dad, they would have been wondering then is our daughter going to make it. yes, i think that is the thing. everyone was so positive all the time and there was so much care and consideration around everything that happened and i feel lucky that i don't remember it. my first memory was waking up in hospital after my second surgery. let me read some m essa 9 es second surgery. let me read some messages from people. jane said the nhs is wonderful and doesn't matter whether rich or poor. every patient receives the best treatment that is free. i have a rare illness and can become ill quickly. without the nhs i wouldn't be here. another says, i have had a few operations and have
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nothing but the highest regard for the nhs. but with increasing demand, it is time to cut some services and make more go private. so many have medical insurance, so make them use it. it is the only way the save the nhs. it will never cope even with millions more. what do you think of that point? well, i mean... the nhs, the whole point of it is it is free at the point of contact and people can go and have treatment, they can walk in off the street and just the stories we have heard today from these two lovely ladies, it goes to show that it works and it has to keep work. we don't need to have private health insurance. we have got the nhs and we should strive ha rd got the nhs and we should strive hard to keep that working. you got an mbe foryour hard to keep that working. you got an mbe for your services to nursing,
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but it wasn't for a traditional approach. tell us what you did to try to make the nhs a bit more of a modern place to work. so i started my career modern place to work. so i started my career in the nhs and i then, as my career in the nhs and i then, as my children got older, i don'ted to started to do bank and agency work andi started to do bank and agency work and i found i was quite isolated. i reached out on twitter and started to talk to other nurses on twitter about nursing— related to talk to other nurses on twitter about nursing—related topics. it was through that what i set up we nurses, it is an informal chat group that now has 75,000 people. what is the benefit of that? it this to support nurses, to help them with learning and professional development. so you know, take for example tonight we're discussing sepsis. we share experiences and idea and resources and through that
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you can learn more and then put that into your own practice. not everyone has a good experience with the nhs. we look at high profile inquiries into the mid staffordshire hospital and the gosport war memorial hospital, do you think we are too sentimental sometimes about the nhs. no, ithink sentimental sometimes about the nhs. no, i think we need to have a culture where we are open and we need to have dialogue and be honest and learn. what would you say? as well there needs to be more support for front line staff. the things they have to deal with day in day out is crazy. i read adam kay's this is going to hurt. it turns out there no support for staff and that is so needed. would that help patient outcomes? i think so, needed. would that help patient outcomes? ithink so, because doctors and nurses and front line
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staff would be healthier and happier and hopefully able to cope more with the thing they're doing. neville said when i was young i caught pneumonia twice and nearly lost my life. from what i know, my mother had nearly given up on me. i had a cancer scare in 2001. ijust hope the nhs gets the funding it deserved. rob said, i owe my life to the nhs many time over. i now look after other people in my community. the nhs saved me and taught me to ca re the nhs saved me and taught me to care for others. another text, without the nhs my husband would have died. he is 44 and he has heart failure. our nhs does need more money and even should pay into the nhs, instead of paying council tax. i don't see why the government hasn't thought of this. some have
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suggested this, a ring fenced tax for the nhs. diane says can't thank them enough. in 75 i was badly burned in a chip pan fire and still have to have facial grafts. but thank you for putting my face back together. steven large is with us. who pioneered the use of non—beating heart donors. thank you forjoining us. hello. you wanted to be a vet didn't you, but your mum said it was more important to look after humans. tell us about that. well, i was brought up in africa and had lots of pets, adored them. got upset when they got ill or died. it seemed a sensible thing to do. but mum suggested that humans needed some attention too. so i came back to the uk and through a quaker schooling
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got me to guy's hospital and the most amazing training. it was a great privilege. then through a wonderful series of hospitals in this country and in the united states, which was important, and probably important to what we are talking about today, down in alabama, working there for a year withjohn alabama, working there for a year with john kirkland, a alabama, working there for a year withjohn kirkland, a pioneer in the field and back to papworth to get a senior position there where i have been since 89 as a consultant. tell us been since 89 as a consultant. tell us about the procedure that you helped to develop, which increased the number of possible heart donors. we noticed our colleagues in liver and kidney transplant patients were looking at people who had treatment wran withdrawn and then declared dead. a request being put forward from the intensivists and the
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relatives that treatment should be withdrawn in that hopeless state. some folk have made this extraordinary gift of organ donation in that situation, we said, why can't we use the heart? work in the early pa rt can't we use the heart? work in the early part of this millennium, we showed that these hearts would tolerate a short 30 minutes of no blood supply and then they would be in trouble. so we pushed forward in experiments with in nonhuman experiments with in nonhuman experiments in the united states and canada and lately here in the uk. from that it became clear we could realise heart transplantation from these donors and fulfil their final wish to be a multiple donors in the horrible, unpredicted early death. so wei horrible, unpredicted early death. so we i think we benefitted the donors and so many recipients. we
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have done 45 so far. the challenge we have got is to have a cheap way of doing it. we have got an expensive machine at the moment from the united states. you say you have been privileged to work for the nhs. why do you say that? well, when you see other health care deliveries and the united states, i have been over asa the united states, i have been over as a student and down in alabama as as a student and down in alabama as a researcher, you see the whole thing so focussed on the availability of cash to pay for the service and here i think what we have got with this extraordinary creation in 1948 of free at the point of delivery a health service that will take on anything, it is a corner stone of a civilised society. i think it is fundamental. it is magnificent. do you think we can be
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too sentimental sometimes about it and perhaps blinds us to its imperfections? yes i think you know there are many things to criticise. todayis there are many things to criticise. today is not a day to criticise our 70—year—old construct. our amazing construct. there are a lot of things to sort out. i don't think that it can really deliver a comprehensive package, which is what it is trying to do, but i think it can provide the most wonderful rescue when there isa the most wonderful rescue when there is a crisis and i have been a recipient of the nhs health care. i ran into trouble with a very nasty tumour which reflects my tropical upbringing and had to go to a specialist centre in sheffield and had wonderful care and cured of my problem. that sort of thing is very moving and there is only the issues
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of coming to terms with the... the fa ct of coming to terms with the... the fact that i have had to go through that and no fansial burden. —— financial burden. in the united states i would have had a huge bill and my life would have been changed not just because of and my life would have been changed notjust because of tumour, but because of the financial burden it produced. so magnificent, free at the point of delivery. thank you very much. and thank you to our other guests. at least four of us who wouldn't be here without the nhs. coming up: online fashion retailer asos accepts the challenge to offer buyers more accessible fashion, and for the first time, features a model in a wheelchair on its website.
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now, let's talk about why these three artists are amongst more than a thousand who want to tighten up rules about music videos on the internet. we're talking about this, because politicians in europe will vote later this morning on whether to change online copyright laws. the most controversial change would require websites to enforce copyright — which would mean websites like youtube would have to pay artists or record labels to show their music. the move has received support from artists including sir paul mccartney and james blunt. my name is james blunt. i've been so lucky to be able to make music, but the next generation of artists coming through need to get a better deal when their music is used online. i believe we need a world where the effort and creativity that goes into making music is rewarded fairly. that's why the proposals in europe to ensure online services get licenses for the music they use are so important to performers
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and songwriters who are trying to make a living and build a career in music. we need this problem fixed. creators need the support of members of the european parliament, and we desperately hope you'll give it to us. thank you. but some fear that changing the online copyright rules would amount to censorship of the internet and "threaten essential human freedoms". critics include wikipedia founder jimmy wales and stephen fry. last week fry tweeted about this issue — saying article 13 threatens eu creators, leaving us vulnerable to censorship in copyright‘s name. don't believe the creepy pretence that it's there to protect copyright holders. it's about putting power in the hands of media corporations. we can stop it! contact your mep let's now talk to singer and writer, lucy pullin who is also an artist rights campaigner and has worked with the likes of robbie williams and lily allen. geoff taylor — chief executive of british phonographic industry
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and the brit awards. and jim killock — executive director of the civil liberties organisation open rights group. is there an irony here — youtube has been brilliant for helping new artists get a widerfollowing, once that new artists becomes successful they want paying for their music to go on the same platform? ido i do think there is an irony. i think that the way that fans now access music has changed. but it is still the same amount of time and money and energy that the creators need to be able to create the work andi need to be able to create the work and i think you know i find it extremely cynical that the creators are now being pointed out to be somehow wanting to break the internet and all these scaremongering terms, just to be, to have their work that they created accounted for fairly. is it
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scaremongering for people like you? we seem to be talking about two proposals. i understand youtube does pay artists, the copy right laws exist and if material is licenced by youtube, it has to be licensed, so the payments take place. is that correct? the situation isn't as clear. what we have been labouring under is laws that are 20—year—old. big platforms have been able to hide behind the laws to pay very little. artists receive about a 20th from youtube to what they would receive from spotify. people publish material and maybe i upload something on youtube and somebody uses an image or a video to make a
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parody and this has some reuse of copy right material. it seems to be the contention of the thing that we are looking at today that these platforms should identify anything that are user uploads that might infringe somebody else's copy right. that is happening with fifa. they're going around, looking at people cheering in front of a match where there is a goal being scored and they're removing people's tweets and videos on the basis of copy right. that is probably legal. is there something wrong with that? yes it is probably leg in the uk to do that, you're not really infringing, doing anything to damage fifa's revenues. what you're doing is showing everybody the excitement about football. the question is when does this enforcement become somewhat
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absurd and the problem with filters is they're not humans, they're robocop zapping anything. so it leads to censorship. do you buy that? ? creators want their music out there. the way jim has described it would lead to censor ship. out there. the way jim has described it would lead to censor shipm out there. the way jim has described it would lead to censor ship. it is. copy right law has exceptions for parodies. what this proposal will do is set a principle and clarify the law so tech companies have to, if they're exploiting music, they have to reward the musicians who created it. and yes let's use technology to simplify it. it is absurd that a creator has to spend time searching for infringements of their rights.
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we did ask youtube to come on, but they declined. what is the value gap, lucy? 0k, they declined. what is the value gap, lucy? ok, i they declined. what is the value gap, lucy? 0k, ithink like any value gap, where money is being made and if we talk of google and youtube, we are talking of user generated content and fans creating new content. you have to sit through a carad to new content. you have to sit through a car ad to get will or watch something and up will pop an ad, for me it was swim wear, because i'm going on hol day, i'm watching a band i like and up pops a adverse for swim wear. that will never go to that band. but at least the content that band. but at least the content that they're hosting should be accounted back to the creators, or the rights holders, otherwise it is why should they get the right to host this for free? i don't understand. youtube are already doing this. and it goes wrong a lot.
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particularly with classical music, where people record songs which are out of copy right and gets misidentified. can ijump in? i work with a classical composer who has millions of views on youtube from his fans uploading his music. he will never see that revenue or it will never see that revenue or it will come and it will be 20 pence. youtube allow him to monetise that by doing that. a 24 hour policing job, rather than composing music. and fans actually want to access, i think fans assume that artists are getting paid fairly. i would. think fans assume that artists are getting paid fairly. iwould. let jim finish. of course copy right enforcement can be difficult, but assuming that robot algorithms deciding what is right in copy right law is equally absurd. we are in an
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age where so much material is copy right and what we do reuses and is in that space between copy right and infringement. i have in that space between copy right and in fringement. i have faith in that space between copy right and infringement. i have faith because of cookies they keep throwing at me. it is not absurd to ask tech companies to use tech. it can be a simpler solution that is good for everyone and will mean better music for fans and tech companies will do well, and if you look at the companies getting licenses as they should like spotify, they're doing brilliantly. next will be extremism, hate speech and other material. that is what the eu have a consultation on. it will be censorship by robots. it is no not about free speak. youtube said we have believed there
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isa youtube said we have believed there is a better way for european creators and consumers and it is vital preserve linking sharing and creativity on which so much of the web's success it built. thank you. thank you for your comments, those of you who are getting married on saturday, what are you doing about the england and sweden kick off? sean said we chose the date about 12 months ago and we did joke with a few friends and workmates about it clashing. obviously i said england will never get that far! we are getting married at 12.30 on saturday and the wedding breakfast begins at 2.30. some guests have asked if the venue has a tv or signal. one guest askedif venue has a tv or signal. one guest asked if he could miss the breakfast to go toa asked if he could miss the breakfast to go to a pub and watch it. well, he's barred! the e—mail says the marriage should last longer than 90 minutes or you might be in the penalty zone for a long time. just
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recorded and cuddle up late and enjoy it together. henry says if a football match is more important than your wedding, give it a little bit more thought! we would like to see what you're doing in terms the arrangements. also coming up, here are the football lads alliance? they say they are promoting free speech and standing up against extremism. we will bring you our investigation. now the latest weather. i will start off across scotland and northern ireland, that is where we have the highest temperatures. we got to about 29 celsius in the north of northern ireland and in aviemore. things are through the night. we
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have had a cold front moving its way through. it has brought some cloud, but more importantly, behind it, much cooler airfeeding in. today, these are the maximum temperatures, 1519 degrees. a significant change in how it is going to feel across scotla nd in how it is going to feel across scotland and northern ireland. more cloud across northern areas. we will keep that sunshine into the rest of the afternoon. plenty of sunshine for scotland. across the south is where we will start to see some showers cropping up. some of those showers cropping up. some of those showers could be on the heavy side, perhaps even thundery down towards the south—east of england in particular, just to the south of the london area. you could catch one of those showers. for wimbledon, london area. you could catch one of those showers. forwimbledon, like yesterday, a chance of a shower developing. the risk that could be quite heavy. a warmer day,
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temperatures into the high 20s, perhaps scraping 30 degrees. elsewhere, those temperatures are widely in the mid—to—high 20s. we're showing you across scotland and northern ireland things which are significantly cooler than yesterday. not a great deal of change overnight, there will be some cloud around the north sea, the north—east of woodland. uncomfortable for sleeping across the south. temperatures here about 16 or 19 degrees. elsewhere, temperatures of nine or 12 celsius, fresher further north. for friday, a bit of cloud at first across the northern and eastern areas which will burn back to the coasts. for many it is a day of sunshine. the heat is going to build again during friday. temperatures across scotland and northern ireland might be a degree or so higher than today. we are looking again at temperatures widely in the high 20s, 30, 30 one celsius in the high 20s, 30, 30 one celsius in the south—east of england. then into the weekend, this is a pressure pattern we have seen plenty of over
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the last couple of weeks. high pressure is still firmly in charge, light wind. temperatures rising in scotland, northern ireland, into the mid—20s, across southern areas we keep that sunshine and in the london area, around south, the temperatures area, around south, the temperatures are still about 29—30, perhaps even 32 degrees. hello, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. in about an hour's time, the goverment‘s emergency cobra committee meets to discuss the nerve agent poisoning of a man and a woman in amesbury in wiltshire. police say the substance was the same as that used in the attack on a former russian spy and his daughter. following the detailed analysis of those samples, we can confirm that the man and woman have been exposed to the nerve agent novichok, which has been identified as the same nerve agent that contaminated both yulia and sergei skripal. we'll be live in amesbury with the latest and if
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you live in the area — or run a business or shop there — tell me what you think of this latest development. who are the football lads alliance? they say they're standing up against extremism and in favour of free speech. but are they simply a front for anti—islamic bigotry? they are here, that is fine. nobody stops them putting up mosques. but they'll try to throw it down our throats. they can't do that, try to change our laws, everything, they can't do that. they, who do you mean? just muslims in general. this week, the head of the unite union called the fla a far right group. we've been investigating — and will bring you our exclusive film shortly. and, the broadcasting watchdog ofcom now tell us they've had 2632 complaints to the broadcasting watchdog about the treatment of a contestant, itv 2's love island — and all reality television shows
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are under pressure to take better care of their stars‘ after the shows finish. imagine, a girl he has recently been seeing, and now she is in here. i just knew it was too good to be true. that is the scene that most of the complaints were about. we have fourformer and current the complaints were about. we have four former and current contestants on the programme. here's annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the days news. the home secretary, sajid javid, will make a statement to parliament today to update mps on the nerve agent poisoning of a man and a woman in wiltshire. scientists believe dawn sturgess and charlie rowley, who are seriously ill in hospital, were contaminated by novichok — the same toxin used against the former russian agent, sergei skripal and his daughter in salisbury in march. the government is holding a session of its cobra emergency committee this morning.
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a teenage boy has been arrested on suspicion of murdering six—year—old alesha mcphail on the island of bute. police scotland say it is a significant development in the investigation into her death, but still want to hear from potential witnesses. alesha's body was found in woodland on monday morning, several hours after she was reported missing. rescuers in thailand say they're facing a race against the weather to free the group of boys and their football coach who've now been trapped underground for 12 days. they say good conditions in the last 24 hours have helped lower the water level inside by an average of a centimetre and a half every hour — but they re concerned a turn in the weather could reverse the progress they ve made. the uk's biggest car maker, jaguar land rover, says it urgently needs "greater certainty" on post—brexit trade with the eu. the company says it needs clarity if it is continue to invest heavily in the uk, safeguard suppliers and 40,000 jobs. business secretary greg clark said ministers are determined that the company should continue to "prosper and invest in britain". last month, the firm said it was moving the production of the land rover discovery to slovakia, putting
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hundreds ofjobs at risk. meanwhile downing street has set out some of the detail on a new plan for how customs could be handled after brexit. the latest model is known as a "facilitated customs arrangement" and number ten says it would use technology to guarantee frictionless trade with the european union, while also allowing britain to strike its own trade deals. today marks 70 years since the creation of the national health service. a series of events are being held across to the uk to mark the anniversary. more than 3000 people — including nhs staff past and present — will attend services at westminster abbey and york minister.
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i need contact lenses, i am sick of doing that. get in touch, particularly if you are getting married on saturday, the day that england play sweden in the quarterfinals of the world cup in russia. let's get some sport now. jeanette is at the bbc sport centre. let's start at wimbledon, day four of the championships today, and a big one for the brits. johanna konta's second up on centre court this afternoon against the former world number four — dominika cibulkova. after konta's finished, it's the turn of kyle edmund. he is up against the american bradley khlan, and if he wins he could set up a clash with novak djokcovic. let's have a quick look back at what happened yesterday, she beat the bulgarian qualifier viktoriya tomova in straight sets. the seven time champion said she's "trying not to put too many expectations" on herself" for the rest of the tournament. it was better than my first round, you know?
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i'm happy that i'm going in the right direction. how close to think you are to your best wimbledon groove? i'm getting there. i don't think i am there yet, but i expect to get there and continue to go there, not only for wimbledon but for the tournaments to continue in the future. in the men's draw the evergreen roger federer made light work of slovakia's lukas lacko. beating him in straight sets. the defending champion has now won 26 consecutive sets at wimbledon and remains the favourite to take a ninth title. there s an injury concern over strikerjamie vardy ahead of england's world cup quarter—final with sweden on saturday. he didn't train yesterday and had an injection after injuring his groin in the win over colombia. the leicester striker was due to take the fifth penalty in the shootout but eric dier stepped in to take, and score it. meanwhile fabian delph has flown back to russia following the birth
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of his third daughter. he went home last friday and his wife natalie gave birth on wednesday morning. he also found time to watch his teammates beat colombia, describing it as "the most amazing 24 hours of his life". one other line of football news to bring you and cristiano ronaldo could be on the move. real madrid are considering an offer of about £88 million from italian champions juventus. the 33—year—old is real‘s all—time top scorer, and won his fifth champions league title with the spanish club in may. chris froome has admitted he can understand why organisers wanted stop him from competing in the tour de france. the three—time winner and defending champion says it was a big relief when the anti—doping investigation into him was dropped ahead of the race starting on saturday. his boss, team sky general manager dave brailsford, says he s unhappy with how his team has been treated. we have always absolutely abided by
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the rules, done things exactly the right way. we have tried to take young cyclists and develop them in an environment where they are absolutely guaranteed they will not be pressurised or put under pressure to do anything. at times, that has been lost. so, that is disappointing. nonetheless, we are absolutely proud of what we do, how we do it and we are going to continue. that's all the sport for now. thank you for your messages about the nhs, celebrating its 70th birthday today. this text says thank you to the nhs, my girl was born prematurely in 2016 and was in hospitalfor prematurely in 2016 and was in hospital for 26 prematurely in 2016 and was in hospitalfor 26 months. the doctors and nurses were awesome. another says, i had a very rare cancer, cancer of the cartilage, nine years ago, when i was 35. oncology care at uclh in london was amazing. my
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surgeon, a world leader, took on my surgery, which was risky and challenging in order to save a moment to two young children, a precious daughter and sister. i cannot and will not be able to thank every individual involved in. the nhs saved my life after i contracted pneumonia. an otherwise healthy 46—year—old man, it hit me out of the blue. an emergency gp appointment at eight o'clock in my local surgery saw me referred to er ata high local surgery saw me referred to er at a high priority. the specialist at a high priority. the specialist at my local nhs hospital said another 24 hours without high dependency care and monitoring with the fabulous intensive care nurses andi the fabulous intensive care nurses and i would have died. i can't thank the nhs enough. those are so moving, thank you very much for those. injust an hour, the government will hold an emergency cobra meeting after two more people were poisoned by the nerve agent, novichok, in wiltshire. it's the same substance used to attack the former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter, julia, back in march.
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in russia, the deputy speaker of the lower house of the federal assembly has accused the uk are whipping up hysteria and dismissed the incident as an attempt to spoil england football fans‘ positive perception of russia. ben brown is in amesbury for us. good morning. there is real shock and disbelief here in this brand—new housing estate in amesbury. a lot of people have just moved housing estate in amesbury. a lot of people havejust moved into housing estate in amesbury. a lot of people have just moved into the homes around here very recently. they can't believe what has happened. just behind me, number nine, were dawn sturgess and charlie rowley live. on saturday they were both rushed from their flat by paramedics to hospital. first was thought there may have taken some sort of drugs overdose, eyewitnesses said that charlie rowley was seen
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looking like a zombie, hallucinating, foaming at the mouth, and it has taken four days now for the authorities to work out that it was novichok. now, the authorities do not believe that this was any kind of attack on this couple. they do not believe that they had any connection whatsoever with russia. so, the working theory, the working assumption by police is that this couple went to salisbury on friday night and somehow came into contact with some of the novichok that was used in the attack four months ago on sergei skripal and his daughter. let's talk about a town councillor here in amesbury. the former mayor of the town, john wright. thanks for being with us. just tell us, what are people making of this? sima kotecha are very shocked ——” are people making of this? sima kotecha are very shocked -- i think they are very shocked. it can be
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tragic, businesses might close. i hope not, but it could happen. what would you like the authorities to do now? are you looking for more reassurance about what has happened here? obviously a lot of people in amesbury are very, very worried. they are, i am growing to see the mayor and see what will happen. the couple here are now fighting for their lives in hospital, in salisbury district hospital. will there be any impact on business? we have seen quite an impact in salisbury on business. this is clearly different because it does not appear that this was an attack on the people that lived in the flat? it could be tragic, but we do not know until the authorities find out where it came from. in porton down they are doing examinations. what do you think of the fact that it seems that the novichok russian nerve agent that was used to attack
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the skripals, somehow it was lying around in salisbury, maybe in a syringe or something, and it has been ingested by this unfortunate couple? i really don't understand it. you are shocked like everybody else? yes. john bright, thank you. we have had a message from the chief medical officer of england, saying that there is a low risk to the general public, despite what has happened. but if anybody has come into co nta ct happened. but if anybody has come into contact with any of the areas that have been made clear by the police where it is thought this couple went on friday and saturday, either in salisbury or here in amesbury, that they should wash down their clothes and wiped down their belongings with any kind of wipes they can find. fakie very much. chemical weapons expert hamish de bretton gordon joins me now from melksham in
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wiltshire. should the public be reassured by what the chief medical officer has said? they should be, but i understand the fears they have. i am a local resident of salisbury and i was there yesterday. i think a bit more contextualisation of this would be helpful. we got the messaging rather wrong over the skripals, and i hope we get some more clear messaging. i do agree, it think the threat in general is very low. what appears to have happened is there is some gaye dashed —— debris, possibly ina some gaye dashed —— debris, possibly in a medical container, discarded or the most likely thing as it was discarded by the attackers shortly before after the attack. for some reason, it has reappeared in queen elizabeth gardens, or possibly from the river that is very low at the moment. what we do know is that they have had quite a high dose, which is
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why they are seriously ill, although a high dose of novichok is probably a high dose of novichok is probably a small drop that would be insignificant on your small finger ona hand. insignificant on your small finger on a hand. so, it is high in novichok terms, but small in actual quantity. i think the chances that there is more novichok outside the areas that are currently contained and being contaminated is probably unlikely, which is why i agree with the medical officer about the threat to the general public being low. this text i have just had into the programme, iam this text i have just had into the programme, i am a resident of salisbury and i am just astonished that after four months of careful cleaning and monitoring we find ourselves with traces of the substance still hanging around. how many more times should we expect this to happen? one of the challenges with novichok, this is a secret russian chemical warfare agent that was designed to over match nato capabilities to detect
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it. so, detecting it is very difficult indeed. we also believe it is quite consistent. one thing that would be really helpful at the moment is, with the russians engaging with us, because they know about this stuff, so that we can do better in protecting it and finding it. that is unlikely to happen, you may have heard the deputy speaker of the state duma say that this is effectively cooked up by the brits to spoil relations between england doing well in the world cup?” to spoil relations between england doing well in the world cup? i know from my twitter feed the russian bots are in full flight about this, but it would seem counterintuitive, surely it would be the other way round? i think that is a ridiculous accusation. the russians, if they do wa nt to accusation. the russians, if they do want to help, they could engage and give us more information on this stuff. it is the detection that is the challenge. from what we know,
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andi the challenge. from what we know, and i understand the police and counterterror investigation is moving forward to track down these assailants, or at least find out who they were and where they went, the chance that we will find more debris or collateral from the attack in march, i believe, is pretty low and unlikely. the fact is two had a large dose, inferring they ingested a reasonable amount, a couple of pinheads size, it seems to be the re m na nts of pinheads size, it seems to be the remnants of what was used in the attack. what was used in the attack is probably a quarter of a couple anyway. so, to find any more of it would seem unusual. —— quarter of an 999 would seem unusual. —— quarter of an egg cup. it is key that the areas are cordoned off and decontaminated. i hope the government spokesman and others would come out and reassure the public that the threat is low. i know that being in salisbury and amesbury yesterday that people are
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still concerned. knowing more about it than most, i said i was more than happy to be there within the areas that these people had been to, and i would reiterate what the government says. i think the threat going forward is low. thanks very much. we will see what the home secretary says this lunchtime. coming up... the broadcasting watchdog has now had over 2,600 complaints after the treatment of dani dyer on itv 2's love island. it's led to calls for better support for those who go on reality tv shows. we'll speak with contestants from each of the four series about the issue later in the programme. who are the group that call themselves the football lads alliance? this week at the unite union conference its general secretary len mcluskey hit out at the new group who have been taking to the streets ostensibly to protest against extremism and in favour of free speech. he called them a far—right group and said they need to be tackled head on.
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so who are they? and are they — as many suspect — simply a front for anti—islamic bigotry? are they the new edl, english defence league? a few weeks ago, our reporter sean clare went to meet members of the group. his exclusive report contains opinions that some people may find offensive. chanting: england! we are not going to bite our tongues any more! when you remove a man's right to object, do not be surprised when he starts to become violent. no—one cares any more. we have been labelled as racists. english hoopla going to stand up to
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it, we are not going to buy down. —— english people are going to stand up to it. what do we want? free speech! when do we want it? now! the football lads alliance formed last year following a number of terror attacks in the uk. it is a street movement led until recently by a convicted football hooligan. over the last year, they have held a number of big marches across the country. they insist they are standing up to all forms of extremism and they say they are giving ordinary people with worries about terror a voice. supporters of the football lads alliance and its offshoot, the democratic football lads alliance, say the government isn't listening to them and the media doesn't represent them. who are they and why do some, like the trade union unite, want to see them stopped? we are honest, hard—working, taxpaying people. we do not know what is happening in our country. we have had to travel 150 miles to get an opinion because our media outlets, we feel, we are meant to believe, are not giving us an honest opinion of the landscape we are living in. anti—racist campaigners say
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it began as a movement of middle—aged men — football fans. they fear it is now being used by people on the far right. that it is becoming the latest incarnation of the english defence league, a nationalist movement previously led by tommy robinson. since appearing here, he has been jailed for contempt of court. i'm a second—generation immigrant to this country and i feel that tommy robinson is a hero. ifeel that he has been maligned and i feel that, in the next ten or 20 years, people will have a different opinion of who he is. i am a lone wolf, mate. i stand on my own. i am proud to wear english defence league. is this like the new english defence league? is this a new version of it? yeah, i would say it is the new english defence league. we are all getting together. we have all had enough of it. but what is it? fla and dfla supporters are marching on downing street. they say it's to defend free speech.
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you are the rebellion! by staging this event, are tommy robinson and the football lads alliance speaking to large swathes of people who feel ignored by the political and media elite? everything they are doing, everything, the people sitting in there are tarnishing us, slandering us, trying to silence us. they are fascists because they hate freedom of speech and we are patriots because we love freedom of speech. is free speech a cover to promote anti—muslim sentiment? we wanted to talk to fla supporters about why they are here. where are you, politically? have you been involved before? what was it that made you think enough is enough? chanting every few minutes here,
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tommy robinson's name is being sung by the crowd. but fla supporters insist he's not a racist. and most of what he says is very anti—islam though, isn't it? you do not hear him speaking out about white british terrorists very often. no. but you get white british people killing mps, running over people outside mosques. it is overwhelmingly white though, isn't it? the question for politicians and the media is, what happens when people feel their concerns aren't seen as legitimate? where could that lead ? nobody in power wants
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to intelligently discuss what people seem to be worried about. i remember nelson mandela saying, when you remove a man's right to object, don't be surprised when he starts to become violent. do you think we are on the verge of some kind of violence? is that the way things are going? i do not know. not today, no. in a small amount of years to come, yes. you cannot keep suppressing the people and expect nothing to happen. the fla says it wants tougher action against terrorists. beyond that, its demands are vague that the sentiment is something must be done. we want the government to take responsibility and actually start saying, look,... i want to be able to walk down the street, have a beer, and not have a problem. now we are walking down the street wondering if a van is going to come, someone is going to stab us, or someone is going to blow us up. there is one target that comes up
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again and again — muslims. as long as they don't want to embrace us... we are always embracing their religion. they don't want to know about us. do you think it is possible from muslims and non—muslims to live in the same country? no, i don't think it is. i think it has gone too far. the government is protecting the muslims too much. there are varying views on muslims and islam expressed here. and among concerns about terror and grooming gangs, some have bought into the idea that parts of the uk are now under islamic law and that there are no—go areas for non—muslims. when you say they, who do you mean? do you not think he should be mayor then?
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there is not no—go areas though, is there? scared of what though? the other targets of people's anger and frustration here are liberals, mainstream politicians and the media. they feel difficult questions about integration, terror, grooming gangs, are not being confronted head—on. the distrust is palpable and feeding into that vacuum of distrust are people like tommy robinson.
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the people of this country have been silenced for 20 to 30 years with the tag of racists. it looks like they're just letting terrorists in. they are going over there, cutting people's heads off. they are allowing them back in, getting them houses and housing them in our communities. political correctness comes into it. they won't speak about it anywhere. things like this happen and tensions are rising. it is their fault for not talking about it. let's talk to the writer and broadcaster mohammed shafiq, from newcastle. we can speak to show racism the red card chief executive ged grebby and from the unite conference steven saxby — a member of the labour party and of unite who has been speaking out against the fla. steven saxby, this is what unite's general secretary wrote this week: "unite are determined to expose the racism at the heart of the football lads alliance and to stop the group from poisoning the working
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class with hatred. what is the evidence for len mclusky saying that? there is a lot of evidence is they're going to football clu bs, evidence is they're going to football clubs, infiltrating clubs and stirring up hatred in those clu bs. and stirring up hatred in those clubs. when you say infill rating, you mean going to matches? going to matches, meeting fans and spreading this sort of message of hate and encouraging people, actually exploiting people. we understand a lot of people in society are angry because of austerity that's happened in our society and they're exploiting that and trying to divert that anger into an enemy. what they're saying is that they want to stop the islam—making of britain. they are using this language of free
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speech. it is nothing to do with free speech. tommy robinson was put into prison for contempt of court. we are not trying to stop anyone speaking out. but they're trying to whip up hatred and encourage people to engage in violence. we saw that at the demonstration in whitehall, they were attacking police officers and making nazi salutes. that is not my kind of patriotism and i don't think most work class people share that. i'm glad len spoke out about that. i'm glad len spoke out about that. linda says standing up against extremism is considered far right. the left have lost the plot. what do you say to that? show racism the red ca rd you say to that? show racism the red card looked at football lads alliance and spoke to fans and took them on face value that they were not extremists. but the facts are and your film showed that over the
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la st and your film showed that over the last year on social media, on the demonstrations, there has been a outright racism. there has been attacks. and i think they have exposed themselves as not being an anti—extremist organisation, but a far right group. with genuine people in it no doubt, but they're being misled and we would urge them to have nothing to do with these people. some of those genuine people who are members might say, that is patronising, we're not being misled. we know what we have signed up to. if you look at the group, it was meant to be against extremism, your film showed they lump all muslims together. they're against the religion. there was quotes in the film there, tommy robinson, who is undoubtedly seen as their leader and the leader of the english defence
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league before it, is openly attacking the muslim religion. we would say to people, look at the broader question. these people are trying to give you false answers for the problems in society. have nothing to do with the football lads alliance or the english defence league. is the football lads alliance the new english defence league? yes it is the new version. there is a concerted effort to silence voices in the muslim community. you look at somebody like me,| community. you look at somebody like me, i have been subjected to death threats from these groups. but people associated with these groups have launched a campaign to silence me, because i feel that i'm more of an enemy. the other issue i want to pick up, if you look at what happened at the finsbury park mosque la st happened at the finsbury park mosque
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last year, the attack by darren osbourne. we didn't see any statement of condemnation from these groups. they say they're against extremism. we didn't see them marching with us in support ofjo cox. they're against extremism from one community. if they want to take one community. if they want to take on terrorism and make a difference, you don't do that through marching, you don't do that through marching, you don't do that through marching, you do it through changing the law and unity and love. we approached the football lads alliance and asked them to come on the prosecution programme and they were not interested. how do you tackle groups like this head on? i think we just need to make sure they don't claim the narrative. they don't represent the narrative. they don't represent the majority of british people. the majority of british people are tolera nt majority of british people are tolerant and want to work with their neighbours. i live in a community
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with lots of muslim, we get on, we have open days at the mosque. that is the majority of our country. that is the majority of our country. that is the majority of our country. that is the kind of country that we are and we want to be. jo cox was murdered by a right—wing extremist and what she said, she said those beautiful words, we are much more in common than that which divides us. that is the message we have to get across to those tempted to go along with the racism that is being stirred up by the hard core members of the football lads alliance, who are of the football lads alliance, who a re really of the football lads alliance, who are really actually a rehash of the national front, the are really actually a rehash of the nationalfront, the edl and britain first. would you call on the government to ban the football lads alliance? i wouldn't. government to ban the football lads alliance? iwouldn't. our union isn't. we believe in free speech and that people should have the right to express their views. there isn't any restriction for people doing that. but what we don't allow in british law is we don't allow people to incite violence and encourage people
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to engage in violence. there is evidence to suggest that is what people in the football lads alliance are doing and anyone found doing that should be prosecuted in accordance with the law. tina said, biased reporting, which is part of problem, the lads are protesting about, media, that is you bbc, and politicians, shutting down the debate about muslims by attacking anyone who raises problems. as a muslim, i'm not saying my faith is not questionable. anyone who wants to criticise and question my faith, go ahead. but what isn't acceptable is the hatred that is being directed towards a small community and the other thing is that i talk about we're not fascist, but nay supported a fascist march in poland. so let's ta ke a fascist march in poland. so let's take on the narrative of the terrorist, but let's call out the
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racism that we see from the football lads alliance. would you want the government to ban this group? i don't. i don't i would have wanted to debate with them. i want to expose them. if they want to debate, let's have a debate. if they want to ta ke let's have a debate. if they want to take on terrorism and do a joint march in peace and love, i would be on the same line. you're inviting them tojoin you on on the same line. you're inviting them to join you on a on the same line. you're inviting them tojoin you on a march on the same line. you're inviting them to join you on a march against terrorism. yes people like me are on the front line of taking on the narrative of al-qaeda and isis. but being anti—muslim sells and if you look at tommy robinson, it is profitable. a final word, would you wa nt profitable. a final word, would you want the government to ban the football lads alliance? no we shouldn't, we believe in freedom of speech and also the need the debate these people. iwouldn't speech and also the need the debate these people. i wouldn't be joining
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them on any demonstrations, if you look at the world cup, then football isa look at the world cup, then football is a fantastic way of bringing people together from all over the world and these people are a dead end and! world and these people are a dead end and i believe that that will be exposed in time and hopefully they will go the same way as the english defence league and the national front before them. thank you. it will be interesting to see how the football lads alliance respond to your invitation to join them on a march. natasha said there are many angry and reasonable people on the far right, but there are people who wa nt far right, but there are people who want intelligent nonviolent discussions. i thought your reporter was balanced and challenged where he needed to. still to come... reality tv programmes are under pressure to provide better support for contestants.
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it follows more than 2,500 complaints about the treatment of one contestant on itv 2's love island and the recent death of a former contestant who struggled with anxiety and depression. cally, tina, chris and rosie from love island are here to discuss the issues. we meet the wheelchair—bound woman who not only lobbied the online retailer asos for more accessible clothing and won, but features as a model on its website. that's chloe ball hopkins. we'll also talk to actor and disability campaigner samantha renke. rescuers in northern thailand are facing a race against the weather to free a group of boys and their football coach who have been trapped in a flooded cave complex for 12 days. they say good conditions in the last 24 hours have helped
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decrease the water level. a little earlier i spoke to our correspondent howard johnson who is close to the caves. he told me that it's still uncertain when the boys will be brought to the surface. the thai prime minister said he won't pin point a day when they will extra ct won't pin point a day when they will extract the boys. yesterday the governor of the province said he wa nted governor of the province said he wanted to make sure they were 100% sure it was safe to remove the boys. we are seeing further down the road, they're trying to pump out the water. there was a hitch today when the electricity supply failed on one of the pumps. they have been pumping out around four to five centimetres an hourat out around four to five centimetres an hour at the moment. but we seeing that today, because of the failed pump they‘ re that today, because of the failed pump they're pumping a centimetre and a half. what we are also seeing
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isa and a half. what we are also seeing is a communication hub trying to be established at chamber three, the command post for the elite divers. ca bles were command post for the elite divers. cables were pulled out of the complex. they tried to put it into the chamber, but the route was too tricky. we have seen today the thai navy divers taking the cables back in. we assume their the communication cables, and they hope to be able to speak too their pa rents, to be able to speak too their parents, who have been waiting for more than a week to speak to their children. those cables, which would allow the families for the first time to talk to their sons and to the coach, that would be a huge psychological boost to those children? a massive boost for them. they really are down there in a very dark and dank place. but they are with two thai medics who are keeping
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them in good spirits. we saw the video where they were joking and laughing. the boys obviously have been through a very protracted ordeal. we know that physically many of them are quite emaciated and need to get their energy levels back up. when they do get their energy level back up and there is the potential to leave, the strongest boys will leave first. that what is the thai prime minister said. there have now been 2,632 complaints to the broadcasting watchdog ofcom about love island on itv2 — specifically because of the show‘s treatment of one of the contestants dani dyer when her boyfriend jack's ex was brought into the villa. imagine, it is a girl he has recently been seeing. he clearly had feelings to be seeing her. now she's in here. ijust knew it was' too good to be true.
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it comes amidst the tragic news of the death of 2016 contestant sophie gradon. sophie described her struggle with crippling anxiety and depression in a series of social media posts just months before her death and its led to calls for better support and after—care for reality show contestants. here to talk to us about that are four contestants — one from each of the series. callyjane beech, was part of the 2015 series, tina stinnes, was on the 2016 series. chris hughes was a contestant in 2017. and rosie williams was a part of the current show. these complaints to ofcom about the treatment of dani dyer, up to 2,600, the producers are accused of distorting what jack was really doing in order to provoke dani dyer.
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is that manipulative. and if it is don't people know what to expect.” would say a little bit. you know what you sign up for. but i can see why people were still like, why didn't they show herjosh kissing instead of that. because it is about love. it is love island. people were angry that they have fallen in love and why are we splitting them up? i think it is a bit part of what the show‘s about. think it is a bit part of what the show's about. it is what you sign up for. yes. you know things might be distorted to create drama? exactly. just testing your relationship. you know you're going in to be tested on how strong you are as a couple. dani and jack haven't been tested yet. that was their test. i can't understand, how a production company can be used as a scapegoat for
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mental health issue. do you think they are? yes completely, it is an established reality show. they know what they're facing. it has gone along the same path as last year. because it is established you know there are twists and turns and it is a show to create drama to test a relationship. that is the background and that is why it gets viewers. did you find it upsetting to see see dani crying. yes it is hard, they are dani crying. yes it is hard, they a re close dani crying. yes it is hard, they are close friends. but we are fully aware that we are in there to be tested as a couple and the best thing is if they make it through entire series, they will be stronger. you have been upset in the show. most famous for the relationship with adam. we have a
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clip of you confronting adam. let's have a look. you have no shame you did it right in front of my face. you have no idea how much you have hurt me and upset me. the worst thing is i don't think you actually care. how do you feel about that now? it is sad to watch. i did go through a hard time. but it was adam's fault, not the show's fault. it was what adam did to me. the producers were nothing but supportive. without them i probably would have left. some women have thank you? yes i have had a lot of positive support. a lot of people said they have got out of toxic relationships because of me. it is amazing that i may have helped somebody. how do the producers look after you before during and after? they're involved. you don't see the behind the scenes when it us not on
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air. you only see a certain amount. they pop in and out of villa and ask how you are. they're very hands on you feel you have the support. for me, with the experience i didn't, everything was fine and i was lucky. sol everything was fine and i was lucky. so i have got on with it.” everything was fine and i was lucky. so i have got on with it. i think they're supportive. they're there to talk to you if you're upset. they don't force you do anything. and if you're upset they will pull you aside. it is not all filmed. what would you say? before and after you see a psychologist. in the series i was in they spoke to somebody before and during yourtime was in they spoke to somebody before and during your time in the show you can speak to somebody. and before we flew home, we still had a duty of ca re flew home, we still had a duty of care from itv we had an opportunity to speak to them. that is set in
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stone. they can prepare you for what to expect when you land in england as to the... attention. how big the show was. itr said all our islanders are offered psychological support and we take our duty of care seriously. we discuss with islander before and after how their lives might change and the difficulties they might face and help them through the process. when i filmed another show of itv, another reality show, we were given support by a psychologist from when ever we wa nted psychologist from when ever we wanted it. me and olivia spent hours speaking to her. they were worried about that side of things with us. you have received death threats though. you have had people threaten to throw acid in your face. how do
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you deal with that? i think it is either, i look at it it is a child, it might not always be and i think you have got to be careful, but i don't know. i can handle it. i can deal with it. but it is not nice for anyone to get anything like that. how do you cope with trolling?” haven't had much and anything i have had is only my page and i delete it andi had is only my page and i delete it and i think you don't deserve time on my page. that is the individual writing it and it is their fault and their problem. you actually found love. yes. it has lasted. yes. you have a child. yes we have a little baby. it has been great for me. it is so different you know when when we was in the first series, now they're coming out to millions, i think we had 60k. now it is like massive. but at the time with ours
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we had live shows, the concept changed a lot. i think with the first people that went in, it wasn't, we was really shocked what wasn't, we was really shocked what was happening and when we got the texts, now people expect that.” wa nt to texts, now people expect that.” want to ask you about the way eve ryo ne want to ask you about the way everyone looks in love island, you're beautiful young people, bright and articulate, because everybody looks amazing ing if that puts pressure on people to conform toa puts pressure on people to conform to a certain look? ? everyone is beautiful in their own way. jack hasn't gone out, we never put pressure on him. we think he is beautiful. it is a mixture of people. it is a topic that arises on
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so many platforms, notjust people. it is a topic that arises on so many platforms, not just from love island, but regarding magazines and stuff. image will always be something that does occur in every society. you can't escape the media for. it is, it is one of those shows. it is notjust love island, but every show, social media. shows. it is notjust love island, but every show, social mediam doesn't have to be. we are all very different. thank you so much. nice to meet you all. in recent years the catwalk has become a more inclusive place — we've seen models with disabilities showcasing fashion for some of the top design houses. but when it comes to online models this is very new territory — for the first time the online fashion retailer asos has used a model in a wheelchair on its website. here's the image of 22—year—old paralympic athlete chloe ball hopkins who also happens to work for the bbc — she contacted them to ask them to stock and design more clothes suitable for people who use wheelchairs. chloe, who has muscular dystophy,
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ended up designing a fashionable and practical waterproof and then modeling it. some have been praising asos on social media — but what more does the fashion industry need to do to better include those with disabilities? let's talk to chloe ball hopkins — and actor and disability campaigner samantha renke. chloe, you went to a festival and needed to keep dry, what did you wear, did you like it and is that what prompt you to get in touch with them? yes that was my thing. i got home and i was like, this needs to change. i ended up wrapped in what goes on the dog in the boot. i felt i ended up ruining my outfit and it ruined the evening. i was 21 and i
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wa nted ruined the evening. i was 21 and i wanted to look good at a festival. you need too keep dry for your health. you got in touch and they took you up on it? yes there is a lot of people like me, in a chair you get cold easily and you have a lap that can get wet too. so i was like, i need to do something and i sent a few e—mails out and i was chuffed when asos said yes. what do you think. amazing, we were speaking la st you think. amazing, we were speaking last night and everyone is like, this is what we need. normally the individual, is i'm fed up and something needs to change and we come up the design ideas and propose. it is fantastic. but it makes me think why should it be down to us. why hasn't big brands. why has it taken so long for inclusive fashion tojust start has it taken so long for inclusive fashion to just start to creep in. the stats are amazing, there are 14
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million people with disabilities, they contribute £249 billion to the fashion industry. not small change. what is your shopping experience like? i like going shopping on my own. it is independence. you know, so it isa own. it is independence. you know, so it is a bit of you know retail therapy as you do, take myself off, but time and time again i come across not only physical barriers, but attitudes. inaccessible shops. cash machines i can't reach and it really ruins the whole experience. i find that a lot of staffjust don't know how to approach someone with a disability. you know, ithink training needs to get better. it would be great to have a personal shopper. if i have a lot of clothes, i can't wheel my weaning. ——
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wheelchair. it is notjust about what is on offer. it is physically getting in the shop. chloe, i mean, you know, you have done this modelling for one online fashion retailer, presumably that is not enough? no this isjust the start. i don't want people to think it is just a little thing we have done. this will be something that happens now and i would like to see more of this and the response we have had from this has blown me away. i would like to think a lot more people can just approach me or anybody and say, what can we do. i think this is just the starting point. thank you. i agree and inclusion and it is a buzz word and i hope they keep doing this it should be a long—term project for more thanjust it should be a long—term project for more than just a few retailers. and get on with it. it is 2018. thank you. thank you for coming on. thank you for all your messages,
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particularly about the nhs. pat says, steven large, one of our guests was the surgeon who performed a heart transplant on my husband in 1992. he gave us an extra 20 years. i can't thank him and the team enough. dave says happy birthday nhs, the most incredible institution this country has and must be kept going. ann said i worked in the nhs for 30 years and i feel proud to be a nurse. a person said i'm 70 september and had a life saving op in 1948. back tomorrow. have a good day. many of us have sunshine. we have
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more cloud across northern ireland and the south of england. this is the season many of us have with clear blue skies. the cloud in the south could produce the odd shower. particularly in the south—east where there should be a thunder storm this afternoon. more cloud for northern ireland and that will break up. but fresher for scotla nd will break up. but fresher for scotland and northern ireland. temperatures here about 18 to 20 degrees. nor nor nor some cloud around the north sea tonight. fresh in northern areas. but warm in the south. tomorrow, more dry weather and this is bbc news at 111 o'clock. i'm ben brown in amesbury. two people from one of the flats by
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me are still critically ill fighting for their lives in hospital after being exposed to norwich, the same russian nerve agent used on sergei skripal and his daughter yulia four months ago in salisbury. the nature ofa months ago in salisbury. the nature of a nerve agent such as nobbyjock is it is an absolute tiny needle in a very large haystack that we have defined. the government's emergency cobra committee is meeting, to discuss the latest of elements in vulture. health
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