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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 6, 2018 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm duncan golestani. our top stories: theresa may declares a cabinet rake through on brexit, announcing ministers have agreed the basis of britain's future relationship with eu. -- britain's future relationship with eu. —— breakthrough. aftera britain's future relationship with eu. —— breakthrough. after a day of talks at her country residence, chequers, ministers have signed up to the idea of a free trade area for goods. this is a proposal which i believe will be good for the uk and the european union, and i look forward to it being received positively. aid diver has died in thailand are taking supplies to 12 boys and their football coach, trapped in a flooded cave for nearly two weeks now. police release more information into the nova chok investigation, revealing it could take weeks or months to figure out how the victims came into contact with the nerve agent. england arrive in samara ahead of their quarter—final clash with sweden tomorrow. hello, and welcome
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to bbc world news. prime minister theresa may says the cabinet has agreed a collective vision on proposals for a new trade agreement with the eu after brexit. it follows a meeting of the cabinet at chequers today, were theresa may told ministers it was their duty to agree a blueprint for brexit. —— where. the government's plans would create a uk— eu free trade area with what is being called a common rulebook on industrial goods and agricultural products. the prime minister emphasised no changes to trade rules would take place without the approval of members of parliament. this plan, she says,
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will meet the uk's commitment to having no hard border with northern ireland, and to maintain frictionless trade. theresa may also outlined what the government are calling a business friendly customs model which would allow the uk to control its own tariffs but still make independent trade deals with other countries. the prime minister said she will continue to stress to eu leaders the need an increased pace on both sides future negotiations, and she hopes the uk's plan will be received positively. michel barnier gave little away in his response to the news this evening, posting on twitter that the eu would have to assess proposals to see if they are workable and realistic. theresa may spoke to reporters earlier this evening at chequers. well, in detailed discussions today, the cabinet has agreed our collective position on the future of our negotiations with the future of our negotiations with the eu, and our proposal will create a uk— the eu, and our proposal will create a uk- eu the eu, and our proposal will create a uk— eu free trade area, which establishes a common rulebook on
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industrial goods and agricultural products. this will maintain high standards, but we will ensure no changes can take place without the approval of our parliament. as a result we will avoid friction in trade. that will protectjobs and livelihoods, and also meet our commitment to northern ireland. we have also agreed a new business friendly customs model with freedom to strike trade deals around the world, and now we want to get on at pace, negotiating this with the eu, to bring prosperity and security to people. we have had good, in—depth detailed discussions today. crucially, what we have agreed is the creation of a uk— eu free trade area. this will maintain high standards. it will be a common rulebook for industrial goods and agricultural products. we will also ensure that nothing can change without the consent and approval of oui’ without the consent and approval of our parliament. just finally, prime minister, in terms of what you have agreed today, you have managed to get consensus in cabinet. are you
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confident you have something you can pass through the europeans?” confident you have something you can pass through the europeans? i have been talking to european leaders over the last week or so, and obviously i have been talking to them about the need for us to increase the pace on both sides of oui’ increase the pace on both sides of our negotiations for the future. this is a proposal that i believe will be good for the uk and good for the eu, and i look forward to it being received positively. well, this is an important further step in oui’ this is an important further step in our negotiations with the european union, but of course we still have work to do with the eu in ensuring that we get to that end point in october. but this is good, i have come today following our detailed discussions to a positive future for the uk. this will deliver prosperity and security for our people. our political editor, laura kuenssberg, was at chequers as news of that deal emerged. broadly, this
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isa of that deal emerged. broadly, this is a softer version of brexit and many of the brexiteers had argued for. what does that mean? it means within it, there is a proposal that the uk will, by law, stick to a common rulebook with the european union, so when it comes to goods, a big part of the economy, british businesses will seemingly forever have to follow the same rules that are decided in brussels by brussels for businesses right around the continent. and that common rulebook is the kind of thing that brexit is had always wanted to tear up. —— brexiteers. alongside that is a kind of shared customs area. in order to try to protect jobs of shared customs area. in order to try to protectjobs and protect the irish border without having to put backin irish border without having to put back in place the hard border of the past, theresa may is proposing a system were essentially, the uk and the eu will share a huge amounts of customs information. —— where. they will try their hardest, using
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technology, to not put any barriers in place. that comes with a cost, and the cost could be that it will be less tempting other countries outside the eu to sign up to trade deals with the uk. not impossible, but quite likely less attractive. but for many voters in the uk, and this is very important to number ten, the deal that she has an agreement for around the table can knights says that there will be an end to unlimited european immigration as we know it. —— around the table tonight. she has put out the table tonight. she has put out the prospect of some kind of system where people can still come to work oi’ where people can still come to work or study in the uk, but as we know it, european immigration will come to an end. politically, i suspect that will be the biggest prize she will offer, and dangle in front of the brexiteers, when they say this is too soft, she will be able to say that immigration as we know it is coming to an end, you have the big prize. don't worry about it, the details are less important. but it
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is important to understand that theresa may has eventually plumped for a site here. for so long she has been stuck a20 eurosceptic wing and those were on the side of the reaminers in her party. —— stuck between the eurosceptic wing. in the last 2a hours, she has picked a side, but we really can't be sure what will happen next. laura kuenssberg there with her thoughts on what happened at chequers. we can speak to the conservative mp dominic grieve, who is on the line. good evening. the prime minister, as we have just heard, has evening. the prime minister, as we havejust heard, has picked evening. the prime minister, as we have just heard, has picked a side. is that how you see it? hello? hello, dominic, can you hear me? yes, sorry, i lost you per about five seconds. no worries, i thought i had lost you. but we try again. laura kuenssberg talked about the prime minister picking a side, the
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suggestion being she has gone closer to the soft brexit route then the harder brexit route. is that how you seeit? harder brexit route. is that how you see it? i see it as a reflection of reality, that's leaving the eu without a satisfactory deal to maintain frictionless trade would be so maintain frictionless trade would be so disastrous for our businesses and so so disastrous for our businesses and so disastrous for our businesses and so disastrous for our businesses and so disastrous for the union of the united kingdom in the context of northern ireland, that it is a com pletely u na cce pta ble northern ireland, that it is a completely unacceptable risk to take, and we have, in the course of this cabinet meeting, on the basis of collective responsibility is maintained, finally acknowledged this ina maintained, finally acknowledged this in a way which i am obviously very pleased to hear. so you think this is a positive outcome?|j this is a positive outcome?” certainly think it is a positive outcome. that said, there are lots of details which are going to continue to be worked out. we have to bear in mind this is our negotiating position, and negotiations are going to require listening to the other party and trying to get the best deal can. but at least for the first time, it
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seems to me, we have a collective decision on a future framework agreement. i think we may have lost dominic grieve again, clearly a slightly dicey fine line between him and us. can you hear us again? yes, sorry, didn't realise i'd lost you. you momentarily disappeared. but we try one more question. where do you think the difficulties lie now in terms of the elements of this deal and where the european union might be most doubtful about it? some of the elements do look quite complicated. we are continuing to try to operate a customs arrangement of considerable complexity, and it is not clear when it could ever be brought in. i cannot but help think that we are going to have to make some choices about this, because u nless we some choices about this, because unless we can persuade our eu collea g u es unless we can persuade our eu colleagues that such an arrangement can be made to work, then we have to do either effectively been some form of customs union, or, what we are
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hoping to achieve, is not going to be possible. so i do see that as one potential obstacle, although i wish the prime minister well in her negotiations on that. the second thing, it is worth bearing in mind, we are abandoning any hope of passporting services into the eu, where 80% of our exports go, that is quite an important sector. i would like an assurance from the government has to how they see that working in practice in terms of its impact on the uk's gdp. i see those two at an spot things —— principal things, and in addition to that, i think the government needs to have an honest debate about the reality of international engagement. we seem to have got very hung up on the continuing impact on the european court ofjustice in this country, but the fact is, if we are trading with a large block, which is in fact oui’ with a large block, which is in fact our main trading partner, it means throughout that the impact of
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european court of justice throughout that the impact of european court ofjustice decisions cannot be entirely eliminated from oui’ cannot be entirely eliminated from our country's jurisprudence. cannot be entirely eliminated from our country'sjurisprudence. i cannot be entirely eliminated from our country's jurisprudence. i am pleased they have acknowledged that, but i also recognise that something which makes some of my colleagues who wanted brexit very upset. again, i think they have been utterly unrealistic about the reality of how international relationships are conducted. you may regard their view as unrealistic in that area specifically, but would you now worry about those with a more pro—brexit view within your party then you have, and what they might do now? well, i always worry. i like party cohesion to be maintained at possible. but cabinet has collective responsibility now and this will undoubtedly help achieve that, and i am pleased the cabinet has collectively signed up to this position. when you get beyond that, imean, i position. when you get beyond that, i mean, iwould position. when you get beyond that, i mean, i would simply ask collea g u es i mean, i would simply ask colleagues that we have to look realistically at what is in the united kingdom's best interests.
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nobody is going to thank us if we carry out a brexit which leaves us three orfour muckle carry out a brexit which leaves us three or four muckle five years down the line markedly impoverished in comparison with our eu neighbours. —— markedly. people would look at this and say, you've done something wrong, however they voted in the referendum. ijust wrong, however they voted in the referendum. i just don't wrong, however they voted in the referendum. ijust don't believe they will thank us for it. that is they will thank us for it. that is the real risk that we run, and i am so the real risk that we run, and i am so pleased that prime minister has recognised that risk in substantial pa rt recognised that risk in substantial part in the way in which today's business has been conducted. what does it say about this government andindeed does it say about this government and indeed your party if it has taken to make years to get to a point where a meeting as significant as this is held, and the only way it can be conducted is if cabinet ministers have to hand in their mobile phones before they sit down to debate anything? —— taken two yea rs. to debate anything? —— taken two years. what does it say about the state of our country generally, in terms of the political dialogue on a subject of massive importance? the
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two main parties have serious splits and differences of view on the matter. but the conservatives have a majority in parliament and the country remains immensely divided on this issue. —— there is no majority in parliament. my colleagues who have the privilege of serving in government have got to do this, but i don't think we should be altogether surprised that it is proving rather difficult. and potentially more difficult over the weekend? we are so early into the reaction to this. are you fearful that more strong voices, voices that are maybe not in the same ballpark as yourself, are yet to be heard?” hope people will go away and reflect on what has happened rather than coming out with broad statements. we have obviously got to read the white paper. the statement we have is only a microcosm of the white paper,
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which will be more detailed. that will be a topic on which we have debates and discussions and we can go forward. in the meantime, my view is that people should just reflect. the national interest clearly requires us to try to achieve an outcome that does not damage the country economically. that would reduce the quality of life of our citizens. there is a very real risk we are going to do that if we are not careful. you confidence that you could turn around to one of the 52% who voted for brexit, and the arrow many on the other side of the argument he would say to you, these people wanted clarity and they wa nted people wanted clarity and they wanted to end the immigration issue as it stood, they wanted out of the customs union and the single market, have they actually got that now? because there will be plenty of them who are doubtful. it is impossible to make a judgement as to what the 52% were voting for, or even for that matter what the 48% were voting for, exactly. each person may have had a slightly different view of what they wanted. this has always
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been the problem of why the question was asked in an abstract form which couldn't be immediately implemented, it was so full of risks. ultimately, if people are dissatisfied with the outcome of the negotiation, the only possible solution to its would be to have a consultation with the public with another referendum or a people's vote, whatever you call it, to ask them if they likely outcome. i have no idea what they would say, imight add, i have no idea what they would say, i might add, the second instance. perhaps people ‘s views have or haven't changed. the trick is that parliament can only do its best to give effect to what the people want, which has been done by triggering article 50, but it then has to take steps to mitigate the risk. i realise there are some people around who couldn't care less about the risks, but that is not something i find acceptable as a member of parliament. dominic aggrieved, thank you for your thoughts. we will have some more political reaction now, and speaking specifically of the
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liberal kratz, brexit spokesman tom brake, whojoins liberal kratz, brexit spokesman tom brake, who joins me liberal kratz, brexit spokesman tom brake, whojoins me on the line. good evening. what do you emerge of —— what do you make of what has emerged from chequers?m —— what do you make of what has emerged from chequers? it is a bit too early to be certain about what has emerged, but one thing which is clear is that yes, the prime minister has moved towards perhaps a softer brexit, although for the liberal democrats, any brexit is going to be much worse than the present arrangement we have with the european union. we are better off staying in. buti european union. we are better off staying in. but i think what she has done is she has confirmed that in relation to, for instance, goods and agriculture, where there is talk of harmonisation, that in fact the uk will end up being a rule take rather than a rule maker. —— rule taker. so if we want to continue trading in eu goods and agricultural process, eu rules are what we are going to be following. my understanding of the details of the chequers statement is
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that parliament would have the final say on how these rules are incorporated into uk law, retaining the right to refuse to do so? well, of course, but what is also said in the statement is that if that were to happen, then that would put at risk the frictionless trade, and also the security and i suspect the border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland. in practice, given the prime minister has made a commitment to there being no change to the border with northern ireland, that in fact we will continue to follow those rules. i think the other big issue, which dominic grieve referred to, is this question of services, which is most of what the uk is involved with. if we are going to see divergences services, which we sell in large quantities to the european union, it is not clear how that is going to work and whether or not we are going to continue to retain the same sort of access. there are some real, significant issues, and of course if the prime minister has moved towards a softer brexit, we are only
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one—hour after the statement and it is very unclear how some within her party are going to respond. in fact, whether the collective responsibility that is currently being upheld one—hour after the announcement is something that will survive the weekend. a strong reciprocal arrangements and greater flexibility. i assume you would like to know more about what that means. i would and i am sure businesses would as well and i am sure the eu leader will as well. it is all very well for us to talk about what the prime minister may or may warn —— may or may not want that the eu has been quite clear in the past that splitting goods and services is not something they are willing to entertain. is there something that will fly with the eu? i think at the moment we have no idea. on business leaders, they have welcomed the
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plans for a free trade area. it was called a genuine confidence boost and said the prime minister delivered —— deserved credit. is clear praise from an organisation that has had such significant doubts of late. i think it is a positive noise that they are making and i think that is because the proposal for a shared customs area, one has a sneaking suspicion that they may amount toa sneaking suspicion that they may amount to a customs union which is something that business has called for. it would be impossible for large companies such as bmw and others to operate efficiently and continue to run their plans here if they do not have a customs arrangement that allows them to ship components across borders between the uk and the eu in an unrestricted fashion. if they cannot do that then
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they may just stop fashion. if they cannot do that then they mayjust stop working. and what is your message to mr barnier. there has been a shift in you have acknowledged that to a degree. you heard what the cbi said. should be eu now not acknowledge the fact that the prime minister seems to have a grip on this and therefore they should respond in kind? she has secured a collective agreement for just over one hour what. let's see if that survives the weekend. i think some progress has been made in terms of trying to unify the cabinet two years after the vote but, of course, some of the things that is in this package, i think things that the eu and michel barnier have said will not be acceptable to wait and see whether much progress will be made but i think at the end of the day, as i said at the beginning, this is something that leaves the eu -- uk this is something that leaves the eu —— uk worse off than our present arrangement with the european union. and that is why we think that
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perhaps people should have the final say on the deal so they can see whether or not this is something thatis whether or not this is something that is vaguely acceptable to most of the people in this country.” that is vaguely acceptable to most of the people in this country. i am just reading some other lines of reaction. the party whip, and julian smith says it has been a positive day with cabinet unity for the next stage of brexit. i will have a look at some other reactions in a moment. let me ring in the chair of the eu lacks it committee. what is your reaction to what has emerged? lacks it committee. what is your reaction to what has emerged7m lacks it committee. what is your reaction to what has emerged? it is an agreement among the members of the cabinet but it is not a deal to secure written‘s future after we leave the eu because as you have been discussing, it all remains to been discussing, it all remains to be seen whether the eu will accept the terms that are being put forward. what is significant about
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it is that finally, over two years since the referendum, the fantasies and the promises have been laid to one side because this is the moment when reality has intruded. those who very strongly supported brexit in the cabinet, judging by the reports this evening, have had to visit accept a significant move away in the proposal that the prime minister has put together from what they had hoped brexit would secure. it was never possible to achieve a frictionless trade that business wa nts frictionless trade that business wants and needs forjobs, investment and community, income, families depend on that. they have had to accept things that previously they would not have done so. however there is a long way to go. i do hope that the eu will look upon this favourably but that remains to be seen. if they have moved away from the position they occupy, to use your phrase, have they not also
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potentially moved away from the voters voted for two years ago?” potentially moved away from the voters voted for two years ago? i do not agree with our. 52% who voted to leave, voted to leave the eu. and we will leave the eu in march next year. we will then have a transition period. but the referendum did not decide what our future economic relationship was going to be. nobody i met on the campaign trail said that i really want to see a return of tariffs and customs declarations, rules of origin, certification, finding a different way of certifying approving new medicines and that sort of thing. i never met anyone who said they do not want to continue to co—operate with the eu on foreign policy, defence, the fight against terrorism and security. i do not accept the argument that this is moving away from what the referendum decision meant. the second significant thing about this evening is that even if
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the cabinet has reached agreement come at the eu still needs to agree to the proposal. and given their position, by their own admission the government has recognised that its scheme would not be ready by the end of the current transition period. the real significance of what has happened today is that the government has, in fact, accepted that there will need to be a further transition period beyond the end of december 2020 and, presumably, that will be on the same terms as the transition that is currently being proposed in the draft withdrawal agreement. and that is another reason why i say that there is a long way to go. returning to the point about what people voted for. within that you would acknowledge that freedom of movement and immigration was a key part in what people were deciding. on that, freedom of movement will come to an end but, i quote, a mobility
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framework will ensure that the uk and eu citizens can continue to travel to each other‘s territories. the eu also needs to agree upon this but isn't that freedom of movement by another name? isn't that significant? i think it depends on how it operates. there are a number of things that we could do with in the current rules. for example, if you live and work in belgium you have to register with the local community. we have not operated in that system. you are currently allowed to say to someone who is yet to find a job within three months, i am sorry, you will have to leave now because you have not found work. there are things we can do and then, secondly, clearly, there is an negotiation to have with the eu is this approach would be approved as a framework for the discussion that now has to take place on our future
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partnership about how exactly that will work. it is a significant that the paper today talks about this mobility framework. many employers have said, look, that source of labour is important along with the people who have been brought up here. many people in the referendum said that we are not arguing for immigration to end, we argue that we wa nt to immigration to end, we argue that we want to have control over the circumstances and a framework may provide that if the eu will agree. returning to the point i made at the beginning, this is not a deal. we have not had no breakthrough today with the eu. after two years we have brought the warring factions of the cabinet together and we have agreed toa cabinet together and we have agreed to a proposal to put to the eu will have to see, when the paper is published, what the detail is. and just on that last point is if there
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is now a ship and something more concrete coming from the uk government, isn't it now beholden on the eu to respond in kind and to be a little more constructive about their side of the negotiations?” a little more constructive about their side of the negotiations? i do agree with our. and i think i said that a moment ago when the answer to a previous question. because insofar as the eu has its redline, the prime minister has clearly moved on her red lines, there is no doubt about that and that is why i think the number of those who supported brexit will be pretty cross about what the cabinet has reached agreement on the day. i think it is incumbent on the eu to show flexibility in return because, after all, one person's cherry picking is another person's bespoke agreement. and the eu has shown in the past deals it has reached with the ukraine, norway, switzerland and canada, it has proved its capacity to agree to
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different arrangements do with countries that are not a member of the eu and therefore there is no principle why should not show sufficient plugs ability to do the same for the eu —— sufficient plugs ability to do the same forthe eu —— uk as sufficient plugs ability to do the same for the eu —— uk as we leave on how they respond to this will be important. that remains to be seen. thank you very much indeed. let me bring chris mason end, here for us at westminster. our political correspondent. well... whether we start? what has changed, do you think, as a result of today?” start? what has changed, do you think, as a result of today? i have turned my phone off... what we have here? the government describes it as a substantial abolition in its policy which is a subtle way of saying a substantial shift. the best way to characterise it is that this is as soft a hard brexit as theresa may felt she could pitch for. she
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began as somebody who campaigned quietly for remain. when she became prime minister she had to show that she meant to use that phrase that has become a cliche, brexit meant brexit. so she says the uk will leave the single market and the customs union. in this document, set out this evening, these following next thursday, she talks about... for instance, an idea of a common rulebook on all things goods including agro food. on the whole issue of customs, a thorny issue which is at the heart of the whole i’ow which is at the heart of the whole row about the border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland, the idea of having a new arrangement, the idea of a facilitated customs arrangement. keyline in this document here tonight says that this arrangement,
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we re tonight says that this arrangement, were it to be agreed, will remove the need for customs checks and controls as if in a combined customs territory. and when you read that paragraph you see in no place though the words customs and unions appear next to each other but if you want to describe it, and it was not politically awkward for you to do so, you may as what is called a customs union. i wanted to ask you about those on the right of the conservative party, the strong brexit voices who were beginning to perhaps show signs of being sceptical about what might emerge today. as a result of reading what has emerged today, what are we likely to hear from them, why have we not heard from them yet? there

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