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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 9, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy in westminster. today at 2. the government in crisis as brexit secretary david davis resigns, saying he no longer believes in the government's eu strategy. he tells the prime minister her brexit plan has left britain in a "weak" position. the point is, i was the person representing to parliament and the european union and to everybody else, and if i don't believe in it than i won't do as good a job as someone than i won't do as good a job as someone who does believe in it. prominent brexiteer dominic raab takes over from david davis to lead the uk through brexit negotiations. the key is, who will be doing bees negotiations? —— bees. numberten downing st or by dominick? if dominic dale stem, they will be much better negotiations. —— if dominick does them. reports say another four people may have been rescued from the cave
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complex in thailand where a youth football team and their coach have been trapped for over a fortnight. a murder investigation is launched in wiltshire after the death of a woman exposed to the novichok nerve agent. it is shocking and appalling that a british citizen has died after being exposed to a novichok nerve agent, but make no mistake we are determined to find out how dawn and her partner charlie rowley came into contact with such a dangerous substance. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with sarah mulkerrins. manic monday at wimbledon and the big names keep tumbling. the last top ten seed in the women's draw has been dubbed out. —— dumped. top ten seed in the women's draw has been dubbed out. -- dumped. what about the weather forecast? lovely warm and sunny in the south it is very warm in westminster, but things
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cooling down in the north. that is a sign of things to come for the next couple of days but then things are hotting up again in the south. thanks forjoining us. also this hour prince louis — the youngest child of the duke and duchess of cambridge — will be christened this afternoon at the chapel royal in st james's palace today. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — live from westminster where the prime minister has appointed former housing minister and leave supporter dominic raab as her new brexit secretary — after last night's dramatic resignation of david davis. mr davis said he couldn't support theresa may's latest brexit plan, agreed with her cabinet last week.
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he called the proposals ‘dangerous' and said they give away too much tonight the prime minister will face her backbench mps, with some of them openly calling for a leadership contest to oust her. theresa may said she was sorry david davis had chosen to leave the government after making so much progress towards brexit. it now falls to dominic raab to finalise the withdrawal agreement and the trade arrangements with the eu. ourfirst report
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is from our political correspondent jonathan blake. are you confident today, mr davis? for two years, david david has been the uk's man in brussels, leading the negotiations with the european union that would shape the uk's future outside it. but at the prime minister's country residence on friday, where theresa may's top team gathered to hear her final plan, he was, in his own words, the odd man out. it put the uk on a path to a relationship far too to close to the eu for his liking. the drive in the last week in this white paper was primarily number 10, rather than my department. that's fair enough, it's not the first time that's been a debate by a long margin. as you say, i lost the argument. the point being, it's notjust that i lose the argument in something which is in somebody else's department, orsomething that is general collective responsibility, the point is that i was the person who had to present it to parliament, to the european union, to everybody else. if i don't believe in it, i won't do as good a job at somebody
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that does believe in it. in his resignation letter, david davis said the current trend in policy and tactics was making it less and less likely that the uk would leave the customs union and single market — both things the government has committed to doing. theresa may wrote in her reply that she did not agree with his characterisation of the policy, but added she was sorry that he was leaving. her supporters say the right plan had to come with compromise. that means making the trade—offs that business can live with, trade—offs that will protectjobs in the country. but also, most importantly, preserve what the british people actually voted for, a brexit that gives us back control of our laws. this man, dominic raab, will be the new brexit secretary. a promotion for the former housing minister. but, to many, it is clear the prime minister is the one calling the shots. after reading david davis' resignation letter, you have to wonder if she needs
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a brexit secretary. should she still be the leader of the party? she is the leader of the party, she is the prime minister and i don't see any move to replace her. i think the issue is about policy. david davis has a simple message for those thinking of using his resignation to challenge the prime minister's leadership — don't. but there are many conservative mps who dislike theresa may's brexit strategy as much as he does, and what they do in the coming hours and days will be crucial for her. in the meantime, david davis's departure allows the government's critics to pile in. there has been this division between those in the cabinet who want to stay economically close to the eu and those that want to rip up the economic model. that tension has been there all the way through. now it's really broken out into the open. david davis was an obvious choice for brexit secretary in 2016, a keen brexiteer and experienced minister. now stepping back from front line politics with a warning — that the government has given away
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too much, too easily. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. david davis was the public face of negotiating britain's withdrawal from the eu, regularly appearing alongside the eu's brexit negotiator michel barnier. so, how will these latest developments at westminster be viewed in brussels? christian fraser reports. the contrast between david davis and michel barnier could hardly have been starker. davis, with the breezy air of self—confidence, optimistic it would turn out well, in spite of the growing evidence to the contrary, versus barnier, a sticklerfor detail, methodical, irritated at the lack of british progress. it is clear that the uk does not feel legally obliged to honour its obligations after departure. how can we build trust and start discussing our future relationship? there were criticisms of the brexit secretary's apparent lack of preparedness.
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last year, he appeared for a meeting with mr barnier with no notes or documents at all. but last month, it emerged last month that davis had spentjust four hours with michel barnier this year. to those paying close attention, the nitty—gritty of the job was being passed to a man in the background, senior civil servant olly robbins. once part of david davis' team, he now reports directly to the prime minister. what david davis did was he kept the conservative party together in the sense that, as long as he was in the cabinet, conservative brexiters could think, "well, he's a principled eurosceptic, he has been for decades, and if he thinks this is going to work out 0k, then we can be relatively happy". now, i think his resignation means that there will be a lot of soul—searching amongst that wing of the parliamentary party, that's a problem for the prime minister. so, with robbins still in place, the davis resignation might not have a material impact on the negotiations at all. in fact, judging by today's responses, it might even help the prime minister.
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there is good will towards mrs may in brussels, recognition that were she replaced, the negotiation, as fraught as it is, would be in even greater peril. so you trust that she will be able to get her party together? i was always trusting the british prime minister. but will they trust in the pick and choose model she has put down on the table, or press for more concessions, potentially risking a leadership challenge and no deal? for now, the powers in europe say they are prepared to look at it. we are working for a deal, and we are available 24—7 to contribute to one. theresa may has been touring europe looking for compromise. at some point, the 27 leaders could weigh in, perhaps at the october summit, late in the process, and right now, amid this febrile domestic politics, october seems an awful long way away. our political correspondent chris mason is here.
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see bridal gully —— febrile is the word used, and the other question, where is boris johnson? word used, and the other question, where is boris johnson? that is right. he is likely to be here to discuss the balkans, he is supposed to be, but he hasn't turned up. there is no sign of mrjohnson. it is plausible bears a good reason for that which doesn't involve him leaving the government —— there is a good reason. but on a day where the word febrile has been used and come out to play yet again, inevitable there are questions, and for as long as he is in that building or not where he should be, those questions will continue. positions have become entrenched over the last 2a hours
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and this decision of theresa may to approach labour and lib dem mps to see if she has the numbers, that will alienate a few people? yes, it is similarly defined by also weak, because if you have to rely on the votes of opposition parties, by definition you are weak —— defiant but also weak. we know from the likes of jacob rees—mogg, but also weak. we know from the likes ofjacob rees—mogg, they but also weak. we know from the likes of jacob rees—mogg, they won't ta ke likes of jacob rees—mogg, they won't take the deal as it were set out the other day, there is no majority for that, and we know gavin barwell, the chief of staff to theresa may, it is briefing opposition mps and peers this afternoon starting very shortly on the details of this plan. in the hope they can assemble a ragtag rainbow majority for this kind of outlook on brexit, even if a good number of conservative brexiteers
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don't want to wear it, but the problem is it deeply irritates some conservative mps who see this as the opposite of what the governing conservative party should be all about. how much pressure is there on theresa may? is there a sense that confidence is draining by the hour? the word is febrile and the number is 48. yes, there is but i think most of those who are the most irritated today are calculating at the moment... i would say at the moment, they probable you don't have the votes to topple theresa may, and thatis the votes to topple theresa may, and that is to say they do not have the 48. 48 is the number singe is that needs to be on a letter? yes, to trigger a vote of no—confidence. needs to be on a letter? yes, to trigger a vote of no-confidence. -- the number of signatures.|j
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trigger a vote of no-confidence. -- the number of signatures. i don't think there would be a sufficient number conservative mps who would like to see her completely toppled and defeated in a boat of confidence for the leader to change, but so you get the period of turmoil but no change in the end —— vote of confidence. but the number 48 is in the airand confidence. but the number 48 is in the air and that is not a question any of us can the air and that is not a question any of us can answer the air and that is not a question any of us can answer definitively because we don't know. at 330 the prime ministerial is going to address the house of commons. yes, she will be talking about brexit. -- prime minister is. she will be conscious of the noises over her shoulder rather than directly in front of her, i imagine. you are off to boris johnson's foreign secretary residents? —— residents. our europe reporter gavin lee has been gauging the reaction of eu
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leaders in brussels. not one of the other 27 leaders have commented publicly or social media, and one said to me at the commission they are watching the show play out and if they were to say something right now, any of those country's leaders, it might destabilise things even more and it won'tjust harm the british prime minister but also upset the deal for them as well because they want something out of this that helps europe. i spoke to the head of the european council donald tusk and asked his reaction, but no comment. the sense we are getting from the european commission, from their chief press officer, they believe this is no problem and they will go ahead as planned, but for the uk the new appointment of dominic raab as the brexit secretary, that could be an issue, depending on how he deals with michel barnier. he is in the us this week meeting officials, very active usually on social media but
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com pletely active usually on social media but completely empty his account today, but he will be expecting the week after this when brexit talks begin again, that the new man in thejob dominic raab will be there. well, the irish foreign affairs minister who has responsibility for brexit in the irish government has been giving his reaction to david davis' resignation. from our perspective we need to keep focusing on how we protect irish interests and the interests of irish people and how we work with the british government and the michel barnier task force to find a way forward that can give certainty. but the internal challenges within the conservative party and within the government are a matter for the prime minister. with me is ian blackford, westminster leader for the scottish national party. what you make of the last 12 hours? it isa what you make of the last 12 hours? it is a shambles. it has taken the government two years to come up with a set of proposals and it has taken two days for the cabinet to fall apart, it really is a shambles. what is important, the prime minister is
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trying to reconcile herself with a ha rd trying to reconcile herself with a hard brexiteers and she can't do it. there's a real economic threat to the uk if we are not in the single market and the customs union, and many people are talking about the possibility of a no deal scenario, that would be a disaster for business here. for the likes of jaguar land rover and bmw and so on. i put that to john redwood, jaguar land rover and bmw and so on. i put that tojohn redwood, he said we would go to wto rawls. —— rules. that is fantasy, they don't recognise the harsh reality that thousands of jobs recognise the harsh reality that thousands ofjobs would be at risk and living standards would be at risk and we have a responsibility to look after the interests of our constituents. i would say that there isa constituents. i would say that there is a majority in the house of commons to stay in the single market and the customs union, you will never reach an accommodation with
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the likes ofjohn redwood, so you have got to work with others across parliament if you are prepared to recognise their interests. some people said what about those in the north—east of england who voted out, who is speaking for us? there was a democratic vote, and the constituents, the majority of them voted to leave. not in scotland, we voted to leave. not in scotland, we voted to leave. not in scotland, we voted to stay. i recognise that we will be leaving the eu in march, 2019, but there wasn't a question about staying in the single market and the customs union, and the responsibility we have two all voters is to make sure that we recognise the economic interests of the country. i don't think the diouf will accept this plan because it is cherry picking. —— i don't
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will accept this plan because it is cherry picking. —— i don‘t think will accept this plan because it is cherry picking. —— i don't think the eu will accept. i don't want to see us eu will accept. i don't want to see us in eu will accept. i don't want to see usina eu will accept. i don't want to see us in a scenario with jobs under threat, and i believe the best way of doing that is by staying in the single market and the customs union, andi single market and the customs union, and i think that is what the commons wa nts and i think that is what the commons wants and she has got to stop kowtowi ng to wants and she has got to stop kowtowing to the likes ofjohn redwood and recognise the national interest. a lot of people say, the heaven's sake, just get on with it. there is real frustration out there. do you get the sense that party politics is making political points out what is a national crisis?|j will out what is a national crisis?” will work collaboratively to make sure that we can protect the interests of all of us but the fact of the matter is, we are two years from the brexit vote and people are clearly frustrated but the factories may has come up with a plan the week after there was a summit in europe
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is breathtaking —— the fact theresa may. it has taken too long to get to this point. let's work together to represent our interests but she has got to stop and reverse the power grab against the scottish parliament that went through over the course of the last two years. we will work collaboratively but we will work for all of our constituents to get the best deal we can. is she still the conservative party leader that you would rather deal with? conservative party leader that you would rather dealwith? it conservative party leader that you would rather deal with? it makes no difference, but whoever the leader is as got to recognise that we can't expose the economy to risk and the government's own analysis shows that ano government's own analysis shows that a no deal scenario would have a negative impact on gdp of 8.5% over a number of years and it would crash the economy. we have a responsibility to protect the economy and that is why we have got to work across parliament and protect the interests of workers and make sure that we don't endanger jobs and prosperity and we need to do this by staying in the single market and the customs union. thanks
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for joining market and the customs union. thanks forjoining us. febrile is the word. a lot of strong emotions in westminster. the prime minister is expected to face mps at 330. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the brexit secretary, david davis, has resigned saying the government was pursuing a dangerous strategy in negotiations with the european union. reports that eight people have been rescued from the cave complex in thailand where a youth football team and their coach have been trapped for over a fortnight a murder investigation is launched in wiltshire after the death of a woman exposed to the novichok nerve agent. all of the top ten women's seeds are out at wimbledon. pliskova has gone up. roger federer is on court and he is leading 2—0 against adrian mannarino. and the complete england
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squad of 23 train today including jamie vardy, who was an injury concern, head of their semifinal against croatia on wednesday —— trained. another four people are reported to have been rescued from the flooded cave in thailand. four were brought out alive yesterday and they're being kept in quarantine in hospital before they can be reunited with their parents. heavy rains are forecast, which may cause more flooding in the cave system, as richard galpin reports. day two of the operation bringing the boys out of the cave, and ambulances move into place once again, ready to take any children who emerge straight to hospital. the bbc has been told another four people have come out today. even before the latest good news, officials running the massive rescue operation were being upbeat. translation: we have sent the same team to the cave again. hopefully, we will hear good news.
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the weather conditions and other factors today are as good as yesterday. the route out is long and difficult, but water levels in the cave complex have dropped sufficiently to make it possible to wade through some passages, rather than having to dive. there are, though, places where diving underwater is the only option. an international team of 18 diving experts is getting the boys out after they have had medical checks. each boy is attached to an expert diver in front, and another behind checks for any problems. there are some points which are extremely narrow, and none of the boys has ever dived before. so far, the operation appears to have gone smoothly, despite the dangers. this is one of the four boys brought out of the cave on sunday being carried on to a helicopter and flown to hospital. but at the hospital,
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the families of those that have been rescued have still not been able to meet their loved ones. today, there has been an explanation. translation: the children are well, this morning saying they are hungry and asking for minced pork and fried rice. but they still need to be kept away from their parents and others due to fear of infection. meanwhile, inside the cave, many of the boys and their coach are still trapped on this ledge, waiting to be rescued. they have been here for more than two weeks. and they need to get out soon, because more monsoon rains are forecast, threatening to flood the cave complex. richard galpin, bbc news.
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let's get the latest from our correspondent martin patience — he's at the hospital in chiang rai where the rescued boys were taken. a source has told the bbc that four boys have been rescued today and they will bejoining boys have been rescued today and they will be joining the four boys in the hospital behind me, and in the last half and now we have seen several ambulances heading into that building —— half an several ambulances heading into that building —— halfan hour. it several ambulances heading into that building —— half an hour. it looks like a reunion between these team—mates will be happening at the moment and there is a sense of good news. there is delight in thailand that eight out of the 12 boys have so far been rescued but that means four along with their coach are still in the cave and the rescue operation will continue tomorrow. everyone will be hoping that those four young boys and their coach will be brought out alive. a sense of good news, that the rescue operation on its second day has progressed
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very successfully. we have seen how protective the authorities have been of the boys and their identities. even some of the parents don't know that their sons have come out? that is the suggestion. it is extraordinary when you think about it, but maybe you can understand why the boys names have not been made public, so the general public doesn't know, but you would have thought the parents and families would have been informed. the families have not been reunited as far as we understand although there is as ingestion they will be able to see their boys later on tonight —— there is a suggestion. martin, thanks forjoining us. back to the main news about the resignation of david davis. i'm joined by political commentator lance price, and former director of communications
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for the labour party. how damaging is the resignation? how damaging is the resignation7m often how damaging is the resignation7m ofte n loo ks how damaging is the resignation7m often looks worse on the outside, and in that time i was at an estate there were a number of resignations and you can prepare for them most of the time —— in the time i was at downing street. david davis has threatened to resign many times before and they would have had a plan for replacing him and they even have a plan for replacing boris johnson if he decides to go, as well. it is all about the numbers, as well. the government are now talking to labour and lib dem mps to see if they have the numbers to keep theresa may on this track. it is all about the numbers and it often is in politics, and nobody has the numbers in truth. the hardline brexiteers don't have the numbers to get rid of theresa may and they don't have the numbers to force through the kind of brexit they want. theresa may doesn't have the numbers to get the deal that was agreed through cabinet
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on friday through parliament. so there will be changes, everyone knows it, and we still haven't come across the reality of negotiating this package with the european union, they will need to be further concessions. that will be interesting as that might bring more labour people closer to the government's position. do you have some sympathy for any government faced with what seems from the outside an impossible task?” faced with what seems from the outside an impossible task? i have a degree of sympathy, they are trying to reconcile the irreconcilable, trying to make their red lines which cannot be reconciled with each other, that was all was going to be an impossible task. that is also true for labour. it is. i don't think labour are true for labour. it is. i don't think labourare in true for labour. it is. i don't think labour are in a good position on this either. it will build the sense that some people have as to what is the point of all this, what are we going to achieve at the end
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of it, that is better than the position we have at the moment within the eu? those of us who voted differently in the referendum would like to see the public given another chance and they will be more positive today that the damage that might be done to the british economy by leaving, need not happen. brexit in name only is going around, the acronym for that. and for some people this whitewash. that is david davis's perspective, it is brexit in name only, but it isn't. it is worse than staying within the eu, and there are elements that will still do damage and create uncertainty for business and lose people theirjobs and opportunities to travel and work and opportunities to travel and work and study elsewhere in the eu, if the government doesn't get it right. but that sense that it is brexit in
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name only, i think we'll leave people to think, why be going through this? —— will. people to think, why be going through this? -- will. should we have a rethink? let's have a look at what is there at the end of the day because the package at the moment will not be the package that confronts people at the end of the process which is only eight few months away. it might be that at that point that people start to look at this and think, this wasn't what we voted for, whether we were voted leave or remain, so we have a right to have a say on it. people are wondering where boris johnson to have a say on it. people are wondering where borisjohnson is.” think number ten will be concerned about this, and they will be watching it very closely. with boris johnson, he is so unpredictable. david davis has put him in a difficult position this morning. thanks forjoining us. lots more to come, the prime
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minister in the commons at half past three. now, the weather. good afternoon. some pretty big contrasts in weather today, northern areas, rain and cloud, a bit cooler. further south, another warm and sunny day, temperatures climbing into the high 20s. it is a hot and sunny afternoon, whereas further north, particularly north—east, misty and murky conditions, quite cool with the breeze off the north sea and spots of light rain and drizzle. some sunshine across central parts of scotland, the best of it across wales, the midlands and southwards. cloud bubbling up into the afternoon. still a very warm day, not quite as hot as the weekend, highs of 28, 29 as opposed to low 30s. cooler across the north, high teens at best. fine end to the
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day for wimbledon, it looks like there will be further play, temperatures falling into the evening, and a breeze picking up. could be quite strong. that breeze will be quite noticeable across much of eastern scotland, through the course of the night. that cooler, fresh air driven by a northerly breeze will spread to all areas by the end of the night. for many of us, particularly across the north, it will be a more comfortable night for sleeping. this is the pressure chart. the cold from there, slipping southwards. a tangle of whether funds across the north west of scotla nd funds across the north west of scotland winning thicker cloud and spots of light rain. elsewhere, apart from the shower for wales, it's going to be a dry one. noticeably cooler, more cloud, some sunny spells. through the midlands and south, top temperatures around 24 or 25. you will notice that further north under the cloud and around the high teens, 17 or 18 for
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norwich and newcastle, that keen breeze off the north north sea. into wednesday, perhaps some patchy rain to northern ireland, western scotland. high pressure building again for thursday and friday. temperatures on the rise with winds feeling. light across the south, turning hot towards the end of the week again. otherwise, around the norm. some heavy showers into the weekend, but another hot one across the south. cooler for a time, weekend, but another hot one across the south. coolerfor a time, mostly dry apart from light rain and drizzle. sunny spells, then that he will be building again across southern areas later in the week. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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david davis has announced his resignation as brexit secretary, saying he no longer believes in the government's eu strategy. mr davis told the prime minister her plan has left britain in a "weak" position. meanwhile, prominent brexiteer and formerjustice minister, dominic raab has taken over mr davis's position, and will lead the uk through brexit negotiations. eight people have now been rescued from the flooded cave in thailand. 12 boys and their football coach were trapped underground in the caves more than a fortnight ago. the home secretary is chairing a meeting of the government's emergency cobra committee to discuss the death of a woman who was exposed to the nerve agent, novichok, in wiltshire. the police say the woman and her partner must have received a high dose of the agent. an electric car—charging station for every home. it's a government proposal for all new—build properties in england in a bid to cut pollution. sport now on afternoon live with sarah.
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good afternoon. they call it manic monday at wimbledon and there's no sign of the shocks stopping in the women's draw. last week nine of the top ten women's seeds were dumped out. the last remaining was karolina pliskova. but she's been dumped out by kiki bertens. watching at wimbledon for us, wasjohn watson. this is really remarkable? it is an ha rd of this is really remarkable? it is an hard of these wimbledon championships, the story of the opening week, a number of those top seeds in the women's draw tumbling out. today on manic monday which sees all of the fourth—round matches played, we will reach a conclusion. it was another manic moment as karolina pliskova was knocked out which means we have none of the top
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ten seeds remaining in the women's draw. she lost a kiki bertens, six i 7-6. draw. she lost a kiki bertens, six i 7—6. pliskova being a top seed remaining, never passed the second round previously at wimbledon, into the fourth round. she said she was starting to feel at home on grass. well, not any more having lost that match today. you wonder if this all plays into serena williams‘s hand. elaine ostapenko is through, 7—6, 6— zero. sepang go will now play dominika cibulkova next. if she comes through that, that could pave the way for a possible meeting with angelique kerber, another grand slam champion. in the semifinals. another upset with pliskova going out, it has been a manic monday already.” wonder about the men's draw. roger federer in action now, does it seem like there will be a shock that? no,
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he doesn't need much help. but the performance of adrian mannarino in the opening set certainly helped him on his way, he took it 6—0. mannarino only managed to win five points in an opening set. federer wrapped it up injust 16 minutes. hugely impressive from roger federer, chasing a ninth wimbledon title here, currently 3—3 in the second. mannarino has got his game together a little more in centre court at the moment in that second, sorry, third set. federer having taken the second, 7—5 will stop roger federer looking to close this one out. he has not dropped a set yet, looking in superb form, you would not bet against him to go through, but his place in the quarterfinals where i think the only test you will get is the semis where he is on course to play milos raonic. going well at the moment. thank you. the full england team of 23 trained
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today at their base in repino — including jamie vardy, who was an injury concern ahead of their world cup semifinal against croatia on wednesday. in the last hour we've heard from defender ashley young who's said the campaign so far has felt like a holiday. notjust not just the notjust the players in the squad and the staff, it's the stuff behind the scenes as well, making the hotel feel like you are at home. pictures of families on the rooms, things there to do, in the hotel. i think if you said to any player that there was going —— they were going to be together for seven weeks, lots of them would think they would be bored but has not felt like that, it's felt like a good holiday we've been on. we are enjoying every moment of. following spain's poor performance at the world cup, they've already started to rebuild. they've named the former barcelona head coach, luis enrique as the national team's new manager. it's been quite a chaotic few weeks.
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enrique replaces fernando hierro — who led the team in russia — after they had sacked julen lopetegui, just days before the tournament started — after he had been announced as new real madrid coach. that's all the sport for now. other news now. the home secretary is chairing a meeting of the government's emergency cobra committee to discuss the death of a woman who was exposed to the nerve agent, novichok, in wiltshire. the police say the woman and her partner must have received a high dose of the agent. duncan kennedy has been in salisbury for us the death of dawn sturgess has come asa the death of dawn sturgess has come as a terrible shock to many, i don't just mean family and friends but also the hospital staff who looked after her and the police involved in this. this lunchtime, the police
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have formally launched their murder enquiry, crucially they don't yet seem to appear to have found the novichok nerve agent responsible for dawn's death. dawn sturgess was 44 and the mother of three children. her murder has taken this incident to a new level of disbelief and tragedy. the news came from salisbury district hospital, where dawn had been taken just over a week ago. the hospital said... this afternoon, the head of the uk's counterterrorism policing says they have now launched a murder enquiry. it is both shocking and utterly appalling that a british citizen has died having been exposed to a novichok nerve agent. but make no mistake, we are determined to find out how dawn and her partner charlie rowley came into contact with such a deadly substance, and we will do everything we possibly can to bring those responsible to justice. dawn sturgess and charlie rowley
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were poisoned by novichok somewhere in salisbury or amesbury. local leaders say dawn's death is an unprecedented test for everyone involved. this is really testing that resilience now, and all we can do is ask people to be calm, to be patient, and let the professionals from the met and from our own police force do what they have to do, and to keep us safe. police were back again today at the park in salisbury where dawn or charlie may have picked up a discarded container with the novichok in it. but the park alone is 25 acres in size. that container, which will potentially contain micro quantities of this material, it would appear it may well have been discarded. this is the principal theory that people are working on, so it may still be out there and it will be essential for the police investigation
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to try and find, not only for the safety of the public, but also to take forward the investigation, because if it as a container, then there might be other vital evidence on there that can take the police investigation forward. but with all the possibilities now involved, that evidence may also be here in the centre of salisbury. dawn had been staying in the hostel here behind me, and specialists in protective clothing have now been in there for several days looking for the source of this novichok. but police have already said that that search could take months. with the police operations continuing at five sites, the russian government said today that accusations of its involvement are absurd. in the shadow of what became dawn's home, this shaken community has started to express what it feels about the loss of a woman caught up in events many find incomphrehensible. there are at least 100 detectives
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working on this case, though the police have warned the public not to expect any quick results when it comes to finding that novichok. back to our top story this afternoon — and it's been a dramatic day at westminster so far following the late night resignation of david davis as brexit secretary. he said the prime minister's chequers plan had "given away too much too easily". he's been speaking to our political editor laura kuenssberg. i'm joined by the leader of the uk independence party, gerard batten. also with me is femi oluwole, who is co—founder of the pro—eu group our future, our choice. gerard, you have just gerard, you havejust delivered gerard, you have just delivered a letter to the prime minister? basically saying she is no good at thejob, she has no intention of delivering a proper brexit, she told us delivering a proper brexit, she told us two years ago she wanted not to be half in half out, now she has delivered a proposal for an agreement where we are more in than out. i said, agreement where we are more in than out. isaid, please resign, do agreement where we are more in than out. i said, please resign, do the honourable thing and handed over to a genuine brexiteer who really wants to leave so we can get on with the job. the check is agreement on
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friday, where does it fall in your view, short of a full brexit? —— the chequers agreement. on the economic relationship, it means we will continue to have to produce goods according to eu rules and regulations. we don't make those rules and the european court of justice will continue to have oversight, though they say they don't, it well. it will impede our industry and ability to do trade deals. sorry to interrupt, but haven't we moved on a bit? we are now faced with brexit one way or another. people, whether they work for big companies are in the north of england, are concerned that no one seems to know what brexit really is. i have said this from the start, brexit, which should mean exit from the european union, what does it mean to be outside the eu? it means to be like every other country in the world that isn't a member. 90%
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of our economy is not concerned with exporting to the european union. roughly 10% is concerned with that. they are all bound 100% by eu rules and regulations. critics of that would say, it works. it impedes our trade now because if we were freed from unnecessary eu regulation, we could have... if we were outside the common external tariff, we could have cheaper goods around the world in terms of food, clothes, shoes, we could get our agricultural industry back on planet the way we want. we could get ourfishing industry back, which has been destroyed by the common fisheries policy. we could regenerate that as well as all the ancillary businesses imports around the country that support that industry. where are we now, following a resignation? right now, we have three months left to negotiate an 18 month negotiation. we don't have the time to lose our chief brexit negotiator, this is a
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shambles. even before this, on only 1196 shambles. even before this, on only 11% of people for this was going well. i can only imagine how many people still think this is going well. my friend here is right, this isn't what people voted for in 2016. the brexit fudge leaves us copying the rules of the eu but having given up the rules of the eu but having given up oursay in the rules of the eu but having given up our say in the eu. right now as a member, we have 10% of the european parliament's voting weight despite being one of 28 countries, which is disproportionately large. now we plan to give it up. we have a common rule book but we no longer get a pen. it is a loss of sovereignty relatives eu members and the only way we can get out of that is a vote ona way we can get out of that is a vote on a deal, a pupil's. people need to join our boat, our choice. —— a pupil's vote. it's great we can agree on one word, shambles. if you think the european parliament is democratic, please spend a week in
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strasbourg. that will change your illusions about it being democratic, it's not. it is a shambles because what we should have done, the week after the referendum, if we had had after the referendum, if we had had a prime minister that really wanted to leave, they would have repealed the 1972 communities act as the first step, the law will remain in place but when i going to repeal it according to our own priorities and timescale... we have heard these arguments many times. we are months away now from some sort of major step. nothing we are seeing is correct. the reason we are looking ata correct. the reason we are looking at a bad deal, why everyone says we will get a bad deal, is not because the eu is trying to punish us all because remainers won't shut up, it's because the red lines created by the hard—core brexiteers with the cabinet mean we ultimately get a bad deal. if the deal we get at the end of this process is something that would make those hard—core brexiteers happy, or the remainers happy, or people like my friend here
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happy, or people like my friend here happy, then the only logical outcome is for people to vote on the deal. if we get a deal that people don't want, it's not the word of the people. if people vote on the terms of brexit, that's the only democratic way forward. we are out of time! thank you both of you. a good note on which to end. in a moment we'll have the business news with mariam — first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the brexit secretary, david davis, has resigned saying the government was pursuing a dangerous strategy in negotiations with the european union. reports that eight people have been rescued from the cave complex in thailand where a youth football team and their coach have been trapped for over a fortnight. the metropolitan police say it's ‘shocking and utterly appaling' that a woman from wiltshire has died after being exposed to the novichok nerve agent. the home secretary will update mps on the investigation in the commons later. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. financial markets are shaking off worries over brexit,
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despite the departure of david davis as the uk's brexit secretary. he'll be replaced by dominic raab. sterling was half a percent higher nad the ftse100 was also trading in positive territory. car giant nissan says it falsified emission tests in japan. it hasn't yet said how many cars are involved in the scandal, but shareholders are worried — the firm's shares are down 4.5%. it follows the recall of more than a million vehicles last year, over incorrect inspection procedures. and sleepless nights for the management of mothercare, after the baby retailer announces it will be closing 60 stores by nextjune. as a result, 900 jobs will be at risk with most of the losses expected from the childrens world division. starbucks says it will eliminate plastic straws from its coffee shops world wide by 2020. plastic straws are to be replaced with a new recyclable strawless lid, as well as straws made from alternative—materials. the move could eliminate over
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a billion plastic straws a year from its stores. our new york business reporter paul blake is at the new york stock exhancge for us. what do we make of the timing? it is certainly interesting, starbucks and other global brands have faced scrutiny and pressure from environmental activist groups, we have seen those pictures of wildlife in the ocean is getting entangled or ingesting bits of plastic, starbucks and other brands have faced pressure over that. starbucks this morning saying they will move away from plastic straws by2020, will move away from plastic straws by 2020, that might seem far away but you must think about the fact starbucks has 28,000 stores around the world. it's not something that can be changed overnight. they are looking for alternatives, right now they say they are using about 1 billion straws a year because even though we think of starbucks in
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terms of hot coffee, over 50% of their beverage sales are cold beverages, typically served with a straw. it will require the massive change at the counter. you have your fragment chinos and ice coffee is and what not. what are fragment chinos and ice coffee is and whatnot. what are the alternatives to the plastic straw? starbucks is not the only one trying to figure out what the best alternative is, mcdonald's, another massive global brand has said they have not found a viable alternative for plastic straws yet, they are looking into that, starbucks and may have, they will be switching to a sip lead, it was likeable, reusable set lead. they are planning to roll that out in us and canada over the next year. for customers who prefer a straw, they will look at alternatives to plastic, some kind of combustible straw. they are looking at options to how they can serve their drinks without these straws. thank you.
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a quick look at the markets. the pound soared earlier on today, the ftse currently up a quarter of a percent at 76 35. that's all the business news. time for a look at the weather... some subtle changes to the weather forecast for the next few days, slightly cooler air moving down from the north. it will be noticeable across the board tomorrow with temperatures reaching highs around the mid—20s, as opposed to the low 30s we had over the weekend. into this evening and overnight, that cooler air across northern areas
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will filter south, introducing more cloud, a bit more of breeze across north sea coasts. generally speaking, a more comfortable night to sleep. on tuesday, more cloud to start with, a fresher feel. further south, bar the odd shower, it will be another dry on, variable cloud and sunny spells. temperatures between 17 and 25. noticeably cooler. fairly fresh across northern areas but across the south it will be warming up once again. plenty more on the weather throughout the afternoon. the atmosphere here in westminster is, well, we keep using that word febrile and it is. the big question is, what on earth is borisjohnson up is, what on earth is borisjohnson ? is, what on earth is borisjohnson up to? he was supposed to be at an event discussing balkan security and he has not turned up, he is supposed
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to bea he has not turned up, he is supposed to be a takeover meeting, not sure he will turn up on that. the intrigue amounts by the moment. chris mason is headed to the foreign secretary's london residence where we might get a clearer picture on that. let's talk now to a former labour party adviser. febrile is the word wiki using. fast is not far off when borisjohnson word wiki using. fast is not far off when boris johnson is word wiki using. fast is not far off when borisjohnson is involved. everybody going, where is he? the thick of it was not meant to be a how—to manual to government but it is fast looking that way. it really is fast looking that way. it really is extraordinary, when the news came through a david davis's resignation, my jaw hit the floor and that through a david davis's resignation, myjaw hit the floor and that does not happen often in politics. the thing was, he had threatened to do it so many times, and then they had had the chequers deal, with michael gove and james cleverly, saying they had come to a consensus, then he
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blows it open. it shows you how difficult brexit and europe continues to be for the conservative party. it's notjust a conservative party. it's notjust a conservative party issue, this is a national moment, people want leadership and politicians to see this through. they do not seem to have that.l politicians to see this through. they do not seem to have that. a lot of people in the country feel there isa of people in the country feel there is a genuine political crisis happening in this country right now. there is brexit, the entire country divided, labour and conservatives are divided. but we need leadership right now. as well as brexit falling apart, there are other big issues in the country, health service, education, so many big things. it's almost like this government has ground to an absolute halt, we are in this brexistential crisis.” ground to an absolute halt, we are in this brexistential crisis. i am getting tweets about that speech at lancaster house, when theresa may
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made it quite clear that brexit means leaving, the single market and the customs union. now, that's no longer on her agenda. the problem is, brexit is proving almost impossible to execute because everybody has a different view of what brexit is. for some its sovereignty, others its immigration, the single market, its hard to define what brexit is. what theresa may tried to do was do that this weekend. but she is still ultimately negotiating with her party and her backbenchers. how can she go to europe with a straight face and negotiate when her entire cabinet is literally falling apart around her. labour have a similar problem and the government is asking labour and lib dem mps to back the chequers plan, some will? a small number of labour mps will, but i think the majority of labour mps are not quite happy with the deal. the difference between the labour party is, the
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leadership of the labour party is in a much stronger position than of the conservatives. that's why theresa may has been buffeted about. jeremy corbyn has always been clear that he wa nts to corbyn has always been clear that he wants to abide by the referendum. he not up for this second referendum, you might not agree with his position but he has been quite clear on it. his party are not going to try and get rid of him, the sharks are already circling, the jockeying for position has already begun. you look at what's going on and you think forjeremy corbyn, maybe this is something where you must be careful what you wish for. this is an impossible time for anybody. this is the only reason why theresa may has lasted as long as she has, brexit is a poisoned chalice for whomever takes it on now, whether it's the next leader of the conservatives or if we have a future labour prime minister. it's an impossible circle to square. brexit at the end is a thing that will do
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in theresa may but it is weirdly her lifeline until she gets some kind of deal done. then she will be out the door. thank you very much. boris johnson, where is he, everybody asking that question. including his host a a book on this summit. this isa host a a book on this summit. this is a tweet from michael roth, we are still waiting for our host. our political editor has treated in response, this is very embarrassing for borisjohnson. response, this is very embarrassing for boris johnson. he response, this is very embarrassing for borisjohnson. he is up to something that nobody knows what. as chris mason was saying earlier, the outriders for his government car are outside carlton house terrace, that's his london residence. there is now a huge press pack waiting for him as well. what is boris's next move following the departure of the brexit secretary david davis. that may become apparent while we are on
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airup until5pm, but may become apparent while we are on air up until 5pm, but in the meantime, we will be back in westminster with all the latest in a couple of moments. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy live at westminster. today at 3. the government in crisis as brexit secretary, david davis, resigns — saying he no longer believes in the government's eu strategy. borisjohnson has boris johnson has resigned. borisjohnson has resigned. plenty on that in a moment. davis tells the prime minister her brexit plan has left britain in a "weak" position. the point is, i was the person presenting to parliament and the european union and to everybody else, and if i don't believe in it then i won't do as good a job as someone who does believe in it. prominent brexiteer dominic raab takes over from david davis to lead the uk through brexit negotiations. we will have the latest in
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westminster, but the breaking news from downing street. borisjohnson has resigned from the government. the foreign secretary, of course, brexiteer, and not hold from —— not heard from since the announcement of david davis's resignation last night as the brexit secretary. the prime minister has appointed the former housing minister and leave supporter, dominic raab, as her new brexit secretary — after last night's dramatic resignation of david davis. mr davis said he did not believe in the prime minister's brexit strategy, which he said left britain in a ‘weak‘ bargaining position. the resignation was announced just before midnight after mr davis sent a letter to theresa may saying during his time as brexit secretary ‘there have been a significant number of occassions in the last year on which i have
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disagreed with number 10 policy.‘ in his letter he went on to say that the "the current trend of policy and tactics" was making it "look less and less likely" that the uk would leave the customs union and single market. the resignation comes just days after the prime minister appeared to secure the cabinet‘s backing for her brexit plan, during an away—day at chequers on friday. theresa may responded to david davis‘ resignation in her own letter overnight. she told him that she was "sorry you have chosen to leave the government, when we have already made so much progress towards delivering a smooth and successful brexit. " everything now overshadowed by the news that borisjohnson the foreign secretary has also resigned from theresa may‘s cabinet. there were mutterings in westminster because no one had heard from him. it was well known he had objected to certain parts of theresa may‘s proposals
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after the chequers summit, using some rather choice language to describe the deal on offer. but after david davis‘s resignation last night, there was no sign of boris johnson, and people were beginning to think that something was afoot. he was scheduled to appear at a ball can ‘s meeting hosted in london —— a balkans. we can talk to our correspondent norman smith. where does this leave theresa may? correspondent norman smith. where does this leave theresa may7m changes the nature of today. we had a high—profile resignations of david davis and that raised questions about her brexit strategy. boris johnson‘s resignation raises questions about the survival of theresa may and this becomes a leadership story rather than just a
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brexit story because talking to brexiteers this lunchtime and i was asking if there was going to be a challenge against theresa may, they we re wary challenge against theresa may, they were wary of going down that road because they were not sure they have the numbers but they did not have a candidate and they had no one credible to challenge theresa may, but now they do. speaking to jacob rees—mogg, he said what boris johnson decided to do was going to be crucial, so i imagine this totally changes the dynamic and the real fear now from number ten will not be whether there is going to be a stand off fight over the plans but whether there will be a concerted move to unseat theresa may by the brexiteers with borisjohnson in the lead and that is where this story is now going. i want to speak to our political editor. laura hasjust
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been talking. i'm hoping you can see this. reporters arrived at carlton house gardens, the foreign secretary‘s official residence, it felt like something was up this borisjohnson did felt like something was up this boris johnson did not felt like something was up this borisjohnson did not turn up to work. in the last few minutes after warnings from friends that he might quit, downing street has confirmed that he has. that is one of his team on the phone, maybe we can find out the reasons. borisjohnson‘s departure is hugely significant, not just another grumpy member of the cabinet, he was the biggest face and voice of brexit. people said if he wasn‘t involved, the vote might have gone the other way. we know he has been unhappy with the course trees in may has chosen for this policy —— theresa may. but this had not transformed into much apart from off—colour remarks. now it matters.
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in the last 24 hours theresa may has lost two of her most senior figures are rejecting —— who are rejecting the compromise proposal she put together to find a way of moving the uk forward and being able to move the tory party forward in these very difficult times. this turns this into potentially something about the conservative leadership. boris johnson has made no secret of his ambition to become the prime minister. two years ago he ran for thejob and minister. two years ago he ran for the job and then pulled out. minister. two years ago he ran for thejob and then pulled out. it shall not be me, my friends, remember that bombshell? what will he say this afternoon if we hear from him on the record? what was an embarrassing and difficult time for the prime minister has turned into potentially a full—blown crisis and potentially a full—blown crisis and potentially a full—blown crisis and potentially a leadership challenge. very quickly. was his hand forced by
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the departure of david davis because this might be something he did not necessarily want to do today?” don‘t think his hand was forced by two presented him with an agonising choice. —— but it presented him. one of his allies said to me it was a problem for boris because if he stays in and backs something which is not ready brexit, that looks bad for him, but they said this could be an opportunity, maybe his moment to act. if this were six months ago he was seen as a more popular party >> studio: -- politician but his stock has taken a beating in recent months, but this could be a moment where he launches a dramatic bid to ta ke where he launches a dramatic bid to take over or he decides this is a moment to go to the backbenches and campaignfor moment to go to the backbenches and campaign for the kind of brexit that he envisaged. this is a day that the
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country will notice. often brexit seems complex and marginal and obscure people fighting about it in the house of commons, but boris johnson resigning from government makes it not one of those days. thanks forjoining us. norman, boris johnson on the backbenches? very alarming for theresa may. they had planned for the possibility of resignations after the summit at chequers and they were thinking maybe boris johnson chequers and they were thinking maybe borisjohnson would go and their assumption was they could live with that, that he was discredited after he bottled it over the heathrow vote, when he was out of the country in afghanistan. the sense he was damaged goods. that followed three when he did not actually walk after the weekender at chequers —— that followed three when he did lag she walked after the
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weekend. david davis has given him the now or never moment. this moment would not come round for him again. you are in michael portillo land, he dithered at the critical moment about whether to challenge john major and that moment never came back. he lost his opportunity. boris johnson has concluded that this is his last serious chance and he has to go for it. how much support he will garner... there are a number of middle brexiteer tories who are no fa ns middle brexiteer tories who are no fans of boris johnson, middle brexiteer tories who are no fans of borisjohnson, and there may bea fans of borisjohnson, and there may be a vocal borisjohnson fanclub on the tory backbenches but equally there are a lot of tory mps who loathe him, so it is not a banker that if he were to run against theresa may that he could force her out, and if you look at the numbers.
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again talking to brexiteers this morning the numbers range between 50 and 150, so the best outcome, they could mass 150 votes and at the worst 50. there is an element of uncertainty. all of which is to say that we haven‘t got there yet and we haven‘t had the letter sent to graham brady demanding a leadership contest but it is very hard to see how this ends any other way because theresa may has made clear that she is not changing her plans and she thinks it is a good plan, the final plan, it was a plan career list. talking to those at downing street, they think theresa may has got to do what is right for the country, it is no longer a case of doing what is politically convenient and i read that as her being determined to
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stick with this plan. she is now reaching out to labour and labour mps —— reaching out to labour and labour mps -- snp mps, reaching out to labour and labour mps —— snp mps, and it is hard to see how the brexiteers will ever be co mforta ble see how the brexiteers will ever be comfortable with it, and therefore i think the roads lead to a leadership contest. we are with grant shapps, we are heading for a leadership contest question not i hope not. we physically don‘t have the time to do that now. why has boris johnson gone? it was convicted with his view that he has said about the european union and our relationship going forward. ina union and our relationship going forward. in a sense he could not be true to himself and stay but i think the truth is this country needs to get a deal or if there will be no
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deal, we need to get there, but there‘s no time to do anything else in the meantime. theresa may has lost her brexit secretary and her foreign secretary in the last 24 hours. last year, ithought it foreign secretary in the last 24 hours. last year, i thought it would bea hours. last year, i thought it would be a good idea to have a leadership election at that time, but now i do not think there is time to do a digital election and i think she would have to do what any prime minister does —— leadership election. she will just minister does —— leadership election. she willjust have to replace them. people are perfectly replaceable and that will have to happen on this occasion. do we have time? the leadership battle would be three months and that would not be helpful for the country and for these negotiations, and unless you understand why the agreement at chequers, they felt it was difficult to support personally, david davis and boris johnson, to support personally, david davis and borisjohnson, buti
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to support personally, david davis and borisjohnson, but i spent a few hours studying the agreement, it is pretty much the kind of thing that most of the country would say, yes, we can control most of... it keeps the uk in the single market and the customs union? no, it doesn't. you are outside the services, 100%, and thatis are outside the services, 100%, and that is most of our economy, the biggest part of it. i think it delivers most of what people want. you will never get everything but i understand why the david davis and borisjohnson understand why the david davis and boris johnson that understand why the david davis and borisjohnson that is difficult but we should not be distracted as a country to think i‘m a my goodness, we need to go into a leadership election —— oh my goodness. i said when i thought we should have won and that is not now. theresa may would not have been surprised presumably by the resignations of david davis but maybe more so by borisjohnson. david davis but maybe more so by
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boris johnson. shouldn‘t she david davis but maybe more so by borisjohnson. shouldn‘t she have seen this coming? it is always a high risk strategy, getting people together, it was almost a private meeting which happened in public. you knew they were locked in for 12 hours. it was almost too public. these things should have been organised sooner and maybe we spent too long guessing to friday‘s agreement but that is the agreement nevertheless that is in place. you can‘t use a word like agreement? nevertheless that is in place. you can't use a word like agreement? you can. even though a couple of cabinet ministers have said they won‘t live with it. they want the freedom to be able to say what they want. they will be replaced, that will happen, one of them has already been replaced. it is possible for the government to carry on from people resigning but the central question this afternoon that the viewers and eve ryo ne this afternoon that the viewers and everyone is asking, does this mean there has to be a leadership
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election? i‘m saying there is not time to do that and to finish off these negotiations with europe. borisjohnson will go to the backbenches? he will say what he thinks about this, and i‘ve no idea about his plans, but ijust don‘t see how using three months in combination to negotiate the most important negotiation britain has had for decades and to fight the leadership election, i don‘t see how that can work. the prime minister called the meeting in chequers to get unity, she said this was the moment for cabinet unity and within three days that has been shattered. politically she is damaged. she should have done this much sooner, then you could have had the battle and if people wanted to leave, they could have done. by clicking the can down the road it has not worked out best in the long run —— kicking.
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nevertheless, you can go back to looking at the strategy, but we are where we are now, and in the interests of the country on encouraged and i‘m also encouraging my colleagues do not send in letters and to not go down that route because the timing is the worst possible thing for the uk. grant shapps, thanks for joining possible thing for the uk. grant shapps, thanks forjoining us. boris johnson we think is about to leave carlton house. the bikes are ready. yes, they are about to come out. the outriders and the security detail have been here for the foreign secretary since 730 this morning. we asked what was going on and they simply shrug their shoulders. they no longer have a foreign secretary to protect so theirjob is done until a replacement is announced. nothing is happening very quickly,
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as with everything at carlton gardens. no one is manhandling the gates. no one is volunteering to help open the gates. we assume the police officers will leave. the prime minister prepares to give the statement in the commons. quite extraordinary scenes, really. we have had plenty on twitter for ministers around europe... inaudible a few problems with the line. there isa a few problems with the line. there is a lot of security and also bikes with radios as well, but you said earlier there was a sense that johnson was up to something? i think
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we have lost chris. we will keep an eye on what is happening at carlton house gardens. we are now with our next guest. with me is alison mcgovern — who is co—chair of labour campaign for the single market. what does this all mean? it is chaos. the prime minister was right to face down those people who had supported the hardest of hard brexits but to be honest i don‘t how british —— boris johnson brexits but to be honest i don‘t how british —— borisjohnson remained in hisjob after he british —— borisjohnson remained in his job after he faced british business and used four letter words. we had an agreement coming out of chequers which was an agreement within the tory party but not with europe. there will still be problems, the rules and regulations
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affecting the service sector, the government are not prepared to engage in laters fashions, but it is a good thing to see the prime minister facing a good thing to see the prime ministerfacing down a good thing to see the prime minister facing down those who wa nted minister facing down those who wanted the hardest of hard brexits. will labour back her? if you look at the six tests set out by keir starmer which will design protection forjobs and starmer which will design protection for jobs and rights, starmer which will design protection forjobs and rights, i don‘t think you can say that the proposals from chequers fulfils those tests and so the prime minister has some way to 90, the prime minister has some way to go, i‘m afraid. people in manufacturing will be wondering what this means for jobs manufacturing will be wondering what this means forjobs and people‘s rights that works we have some way to go but it is a good thing that the prime minister has faced down the prime minister has faced down the foreign secretary. if boris johnson was the leader of the conservative party, would that be
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someone who would bring more feared to labour politicians question up absolutely not. absolutely not. borisjohnson has delivered very little and has been more of a hindrance than a help through the brexit process. it is a good thing he is no longer in hisjob, and i hope he takes a period of reflection about what he has done to our country‘s reputation. about what he has done to our country's reputation. but he's not going to. he is boris.” country's reputation. but he's not going to. he is boris. i can live in hope. it is quite possible he will arrive in the house of commons this afternoon and say something. quite possible. clearly the prime minister has set out her stall and the labour party has also set out our policy to protect jobs and party has also set out our policy to protectjobs and people‘s rights at work. we need to find a way to this brexit process that can work and if we can‘t do that because of the primers to having a general election that produced a hung parliament
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which makes the situation difficult —— the prime minister. then we have got to have a vote on the deal the prime minister comes up with, but in the end this is about people keeping in mind what is at stake here, the money in their pockets and their jobs, and borisjohnson and david davis did too little on that and it is right therefore that they have gone. thanks forjoining us. we can gone. thanks forjoining us. we can go back to the london residence of the foreign secretary. borisjohnson no longer lives there, really. he doesn‘t. although he is still in there. he‘s making the most of the last moments of the extras they get bolted onto the job of foreign secretary. —— that get. his outriders left, theirjob complete until a new foreign secretary is
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appointed, and he has been here all day. suspicions were growing. there was the beginnings of a sense of, where is he? there was a report that the chief whip simply did not know where borisjohnson was and then he missed a meeting inaudible chris, i‘m sorry, breaking up is ha rd to chris, i‘m sorry, breaking up is hard to do, but you are doing that, and we have got to leave you. norman smith, our chief political editor, you get a sense that there is a sense of shock in the air. because borisjohnson sense of shock in the air. because boris johnson appeared to sense of shock in the air. because borisjohnson appeared to have decided not to quit. you think of the briefings given by his team to the briefings given by his team to the sunday papers yesterday where he
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said he was staying in to get a better brexit but now he is out the door. we should not be under any illusions, the idea he will sit meekly on the backbenches while theresa may legation it‘s a brexit deal which he and other tory mps regard as not acceptable —— theresa may negotiates. unless theresa may is going to revisit her plan and look again at abiding by the eu rule book, i suspect there will be a leadership challenge and the obvious candidate is boris johnson. leadership challenge and the obvious candidate is borisjohnson. he was the person that leading brexiteer ‘s we re the person that leading brexiteer ‘s were looking at to see what he was going to do, and now he has the sided and i think this will be a matter of time before those letters go in to graham brady —— he has decided. and they move against theresa may, because the many brexiteers, this is a defining
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issue, what they came into politics for, and so the idea they are going to a cce pt for, and so the idea they are going to accept it is a nonstarter. even though a leadership contest can drag on over three months, that i imagine will almost certainly mean we would ask for an extension to article 50 to give the british government more time to get a deal together, at the very least get a deal, and who knows, maybe it might make no deal even more the possibility. we have a series of events unfolding and we really don‘t know where they are going to end up on who will be prime minister and who will be negotiating brexit and what kind of deal we might get. there is a pandora‘s box of possibilities that have now opened up. we have heard from nigel farage. he has said, bravo boris
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johnson, now time to get rid of the terrible theresa may and get brexit back on track, a view shared by many brexiteers. we seem to be facing a showdown between the hard brexiteers led by boris johnson showdown between the hard brexiteers led by borisjohnson and those pushing for a softer brexit led by theresa may. these are shots of carlton house gardens, the foreign secretary‘s official residence in central london. the thing about borisjohnson was, the relationship he has had with michael gove, and michael gove came out in defence of theresa may. if we are looking at a leadership election, his would be the only name on the list? —— his won‘t. the only name on the list? —— his won't. no, many brexiteers will say
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that michael gove has been found on the wrong side of the line, on that of theresa may, after he gave a very fulsome defence of the agreement from chequers, very loyal to theresa may, so it would be difficult for him to want to backtrack. he now finds himself on the side of theresa may, although he‘s not a big fan of the chequers deal. it was also michael gove who stabbed boris johnson in the back when he was his leadership manager in the last leadership manager in the last leadership contest so there is history. these two have gone toe to toe and taken each out to nick —— taken each toe and taken each out to nick —— ta ken each other out toe and taken each out to nick —— taken each other out before. what is interesting about theresa may, she seems to have decided that she has to go for it, there is no more time to go for it, there is no more time to kick the can down the road, there
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won‘t be a miracle plan which somehow resolve the problems of avoiding the frictionless board or the northern ireland problem, this is it from her perspective, this is as good a plan as there is and we have got to move quickly. it is in effect now or never and she has forced the pace and force the likes of david davis and borisjohnson to decide and it seems to me we are shaping up for decide and it seems to me we are shaping upfora decide and it seems to me we are shaping up for a very clear choice about the sort of brexit we go for, the theresa may model where we remain pretty close with the customs union and the single market, and who knows there might be further concessions on freedom of movement, or the borisjohnson concessions on freedom of movement, or the boris johnson brexiteer approach where we have nothing to be frightened about walking out of the room and we have been offered a canada world trade deal, let‘s just go with that. this clash has been
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put off since the referendum and now it is happening. on a practical note, grant shapps making the point that if there is a leadership battle it is going to take three months which will take us past the crucial moment in october. yes, that is a perfectly good point. the only thing, brexit is for a generation and a few months for most people is neither here nor there, although it is profoundly destabilising and damaging at this critical stage in the negotiations but far more important for most people is to get the right deal, which ever side. although it is the case that people will think a leadership deal is borderline self—indulgent, chaotic, but nevertheless given the stakes i think people would be prepared to wear this on the view that actually
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theissues wear this on the view that actually the issues are so profound that they are willing to go down the road of a leadership contest. i cannot see however one sits on their hands and carries on as if nothing has happened and as if borisjohnson has resigned and it is perfectly ok for theresa may to continue without the challenge, that seems extremely unlikely, even given the amount of chaosit unlikely, even given the amount of chaos it would cause, i think it is ha rd to chaos it would cause, i think it is hard to see how theresa may can avoid a leadership challenge now. we are about to hear from her avoid a leadership challenge now. we are about to hearfrom her in avoid a leadership challenge now. we are about to hear from her in the house of commons. she has arrived. this can‘t have come as a surprise given that we have talked about the problems in the tory party around europe over decades. has this burst open? yes. maybe there has been a missed tackle asian for theresa may, because they have seen the brexiteer
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—— there has been a miss calculation from theresa may, because they have seen all of this unfold, the brexiteer position has been pushed back, and maybe they took the view that this last agreement from chequers, they will take this, as well because their view was that what the brexiteers what they wanted above all else was to be out in march next year and they did not wa nt march next year and they did not want anything to compare my is that and so they would back the agreement at chequers, but the risk for the brexiteers, do they threaten brexit itself, because you might see a slurry where theresa may comes back with some sort of deal and it is rejected by the brexiteers —— you might seea rejected by the brexiteers —— you might see a situation. would it be tempting forjeremy corbyn to bring down the government? the temptation
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for labour to bring down theresa may is almost overwhelming and then we‘re into a potential general election and brexit will be the big issue. the stakes go be on this brexit deal and beyond tease —— theresa may, and you can see how these steps do now potentially follow—through after the resignation of borisjohnson. we are looking at the house of commons. theresa may has been sitting there for a fewer minutes. she is perhaps about to make one of the most important speeches of her life. it's a massive moment, particularly because of events have happened so swiftly in the last hour or so. there has not been much time to get her head round how she should respond to this. i can only imagine she must convey a sense of self—confidence, purpose, and she has to articulate why she believes
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this deal is right for the country, not the conservative party but the country. talking to folk in downing street, they say that is where she is out now. she is not putting the chequers plan forward as some way of bridging holding the cabinet together, she thinks this is last chance saloon. this is a deal which we might be able to sell to the eu. there is no mystery deal coming over the horizon that is somehow going to resolve all the different problems involved in brexit. this is it. mrs may seemingly believes there to go for this would be in the best interest of the country. the very fa ct interest of the country. the very fact that a chief of staff, the moment borisjohnson fact that a chief of staff, the moment boris johnson resigned, fact that a chief of staff, the moment borisjohnson resigned, was briefing labour and snp mps about the deal indicates that pretty clearly, if it comes to it, yes, they are prepared to rely on the votes of opposition mps to get mr. in that sense, mrs may is making
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this a country before party issue. it's this a country before party issue. it‘s absolutely massive. before chequers, one cabinet minister said to me that if mrs may went down this road, she would rupture the tory party. that now appears to be potentially coming true. i thought it was an exaggeration at the time, it was an exaggeration at the time, it may well not be, because you will get a it may well not be, because you will geta rump it may well not be, because you will get a rump of brexiteers, maybe up to 100 voting against mrs may‘s package. the rest i presume will support it, and the tory party will be profoundly split. maybe it is a split which has been coming for 20, 30 years. almost from the day we joined the common market, as it then was, in 1973. that inherent tension within tory party which is the devil successive prime minister ‘s, and then to the full of conservative prime minister is going all the way back tojohn prime minister is going all the way back to john major and prime minister is going all the way back tojohn major and before then,
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let‘s see how mrs may now handles this absolutely crucial moment in the commons. mr speaker, mrspeaker, i mrspeaker, lam mr speaker, i am sure the house will join me in sending our deepest condolences to the family and friends of dawn sturgess who passed away last night. the police and security services are working urgently to establish the full facts in what is now a murder investigation. i want is pay tribute to the dedication of staff at salisbury district hospital for their tireless work in responding to this appalling crime. our thoughts are with the people of salisbury and amesbury, and the home secretary will make a statement shortly including on the support we will continue to provide to the local community throughout this difficult time. turning to brexit, i want to pay tribute to my right honourable
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friend 's, the members... the members for horton price and howden, and uxbridge and south ruislip and their work over the last two years. we do... we do not agree about the best way of delivering our shared commitment to honour the results of the referendum but i want to recognise the work of the former secretary of state exiting the european union, for the work he did to establish a new departments, and steer through parliament some of the most important legislation for generations. similarly, to recognise the passion that the former foreign secretary demonstrated in remote thing... in promoting... order, order. there is an awfully unseemly atmosphere. i want to hear about these important matters. i do. i
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think the house shed. the prime minister. thank you. that the former foreign secretary demonstrated in promoting a global britain to the world as we leave the eu. i am pleased to welcome the member fiche embleton as the new secretary of state for exiting the european union. on friday at chequers, the cabinet agreed an ambitious proposal that provides a credible basis for addressing negotiations with the eu towards a new relationship after we leave on the 29th of march next year. it is a proposal that will ta ke year. it is a proposal that will take back control of our borders, our money and our laws. but do so in a way that protects jobs, allows us to strike new trade deals there an independent trade policy and keeps our people safe and our union together. before i set out the details of this proposal, i want to start by explaining why we're putting it forward. the negotiations
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so putting it forward. the negotiations so far have settled virtually all of the withdrawal agreement and we have agreed and limitation period which will provide businesses and governments the time to prepare for our future relationship with the eu. on the nature of that future relationship, two models that are on offer from the eu are simply not acceptable. first there is what is provided for in the european council's guidelines, this amounts toa council's guidelines, this amounts to a standard free trade agreement for great britain with northern ireland calved off in the eu's customs union and parts of the single market. separated through a border in the irish sea from the uk's own internal market. no prime minister of uk's own internal market. no prime ministerof our uk's own internal market. no prime minister of our united kingdom could ever except this. it would be a profound betrayal of our union. —— our precious union. some might propose a free trade agreement for the uk as a whole but this is not on the uk as a whole but this is not on the table because it would not allow us the table because it would not allow us to meet our commitments under the belfast agreement that there should be no hard border between northern
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ireland and ireland. secondly there is what is on from the eu, some say, a model that is effectually membership of the economic european area but going further and remaining in the customs union for the whole of the uk. this would mean continued free movement, continued payment of our sums every year to the eu for market access, a continued obligation to follow the vast bulk of eu law, no independent trade policy with no ability to strike our own trade deals around the world. i firmly believe this would not honour the referendum result. if the eu continues on this course, there is a serious risk it could lead to no deal. this would most likely be a disorderly no deal, for without an agreement on our future relationship, i cannot see this parliament would approve the withdrawal agreement with a northern ireland protocol and financial commitments, and without these commitments, and without these commitments the eu would not sign a withdrawal agreement. a responsible
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government must prepare for a range of potential outcomes, including the possibility of no deal. given the short period remaining before the conclusion of negotiations, the cabinet agreed on friday that he preparations should be stepped up. at the same time, we should recognise such a disorderly no deal would have profound consequences for both the uk and the eu and i believe the uk deserves better. the cabinet agreed that we need to present the eu witha agreed that we need to present the eu with a new model, involving the position i had set out a house speech so we could accelerate negotiations negotiations over the summer, secure that new relationship in the autumn, pass the withdrawal and implementation bill and leave the eu on the 29th of march 2019. the friction free movement of goods is the only way to avoid a hard
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border between northern ireland and ireland. and between northern ireland. and between northern ireland and great britain. it is the only way to protect the uniquely integrated supply chain is and just in time processes on which millions ofjobs and livelihoods depend. at the heart of our proposal is a uk, eu free trade area which will avoid the need for customs and regulatory checks at the border and protect those supply chains. to achieve this requires four steps. first, a commitment to maintaining a common rule book for industrial goods and agricultural products. to deliver this, the uk would make an upfront sovereign choice to commit to ongoing harmonisation with eu rules ongoing harmonisation with eu rules on goods, covering only those necessary to provide for frictionless trade at the border. this would not cover services because this is not necessary to ensure free fellow at the border. it would not include the common agricultural policy, agricultural and fisheries policies which the uk
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will leave me leave the. the regulations covered are relatively sta ble regulations covered are relatively stable and are supported by a large share of our manufacturing businesses. we will continue to play a strong role in the international standards that underpin them. there will be a parliamentary lock on new rules and regulations because mummy leave the eu, we will end the direct effect of eu law in the uk, or laws in the uk will be passed in westminster, edinburgh, cardiffand belfast. our parliament would have the sovereign ability to reject any proposals if it so chose, recognising there would be consequences including for market access if we chose a different approach from the eu. second, we will ensure a approach from the eu. second, we willensure a fair approach from the eu. second, we will ensure a fair trading environment. under our proposal, the eu and the uk would have strong reciprocal arrangements relating to state aid. corporative arrangements between competitions and we will commit to maintaining high regulatory standards for the
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environment, climate change, social and employment and human protection. third, we begin a joint institutional framework to provide for the consistent interpretation and application of uk eu agreement by both parties. this would be done in the uk by uk courts and in the eu by eu courts. with due regard paid to uk store in areas where the uk continued to apply a common rule book. this framework would provide a robust and appropriate means for the resolution of disputes, including through the establishment of a joint committee of representatives from the uk and the. it would respect the autonomy of the uk and the eu's legal orders and be based on the fundamental principle that the court of one party cannot resolve disputes between the two. fourth, the cabinet also agreed to put forward a business friendly customs model, and facilitated customs arrangement which would remove the need customs checks and controls between the uk and the eu. we would operate as if a
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combined customs territory. it would also allow the uk to pursue an independent trade policy. the uk would apply the uk's tariffs for goods intended for the uk and eu's tariffs for goods intended for the eu. 96% of businesses would be able to pay the the correct tariff or no tariff at the uk border, said there would be no additional burdens for them compared to the status quo and they would be able to benefit from they would be able to benefit from the new trade deals will strike. in addition we will also bring forward new technology to make our customs systems as smooth as possible for those businesses who trade with the re st of those businesses who trade with the rest of the world. some have suggested that under this arrangement, the uk would not be able to do trade deals. they are wrong. when we have left the eu, the uk will have our own independent trade policy with our own seat of the world trade organisation and the ability to set tariffs for our trade with the rest of the world. we will be able to pursue trade arrangements
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with key partners and on friday, the cabinet agreed that we would consider seeking accession to the comprehensive and progressive agreement for transpacific partnerships. al brexit plan for britain respects what we have heard from businesses about how they want trade with the eu after we leave, and will ensure we are best placed to capitalise on the industries of the future in line with our modern industrial strategy. finally, our proposal also includes a far— reaching proposal also includes a far—reaching security partnership that will ensure continued close cooperation with our allies across europe while enabling us to operate an independent and foreign and defence policy. not just an independent and foreign and defence policy. notjust a plan good for britishjobs but good defence policy. notjust a plan good for british jobs but good for the safety and security of our people at home and in europe, too. some have asked whether this proposal is consistent with the promises made in the conservative manifesto. it is. the manifesto said, as we leave the
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eu, we will no longer be members of the single market or customs union, but we will seek a deep and special partnership including a comprehensive free trade and customs agreement and that is exactly what the proposal agreed by the cabinet seeks to achieve. what we are proposing is challenging for the eu. it requires them... yes. it requires them to think again, to look beyond them to think again, to look beyond the additions they have taken so far and agree a new and fair balance of rights and obligations. that is the only way to meet our commitments to avoid a hard border between northern ireland and ireland without damaging the constitutional integrity of the uk and while respecting the result of the referendum. it is a balance that reflects the links we have established over the last 40 years as some of the world's largest economies and security partners. it's a bold proposal that we will
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set out more fully in a white paper on thursday. we now expect eu to engage seriously with the detail and to intensify negotiations over the summer so we can get the future relationship i firmly believe is in all our interests will stop in the two years since the referendum, we have had a spirited national debate. with robust to echoing around the cabinet table as they have an breakfast tables up and down the country. over that time i have listened to every possible idea and every possible version of brexit. this is the right brexit. leaving the eu on the 29th of march 2000 and 19. a complete end to free movement, taking back control of our borders. and end to jurisdiction taking back control of our borders. and end tojurisdiction in the uk, restoring the supremacy of british courts, no more sending vast sums of
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money each year to the eu, instead brexit dividend to spend on domestic priorities like a long—term plan for the nhs. flexibility on services whether the uk as world bleeding. no ha rd whether the uk as world bleeding. no hard border between northern ireland and ireland or northern ireland and great britain, a parliamentary lock on all rules and the galatians. leaving the common agricultural policy and the common fisheries policy. the freedom to strike new trade deals around the world. an independent foreign and defence policy. but not the most distant relationship possible with our neighbours and friends, a new deep and special partnership. frictionless trade in goods, shared commitments to high standards so that together we can continue to promote open and fair trade and continued security cooperation to keep our people safe. this is the brexit that is in our national interest. it is the brexit that will deliver the democratic decision of the british people, it is the right brexit deal for britain and i
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commend this statement to the house. jeremy corbyn. i want to thank the prime minister for an advance copy of this statement and to share her condolences to the friends and family of dawn sturgess. we are over two years on from the referendum, two years on from the referendum, two years on from the referendum, two years of sound bites, indecision and cabinet infighting. culminating ina series and cabinet infighting. culminating in a series of wasted opportunities with more and more people losing faith that this government is capable of delivering a good brexit deal and that is just capable of delivering a good brexit deal and that isjust within her own cabinet. two years on from the referendum, 16 months on from article 50 being triggered, it is only this weekend that the cabinet managed to agree a negotiating position among itself. that illusion lasted 48 hours. there are now only
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a few months left until these negotiations are supposed to conclude. we have a crisis in government, two secretaries of state have resigned and still we are now clearer on what future relationship with our nearest neighbours and biggest partners will look like. workers and businesses deserve better than less. —— we are no clearer on what a future relationship will look like. it is clear this government is not capable of securing a deal to protect the economy, jobs and living standards. it is clear this government cannot secure a good deal for britain. on friday, the prime minister was so proud of her brexit deal, she wrote to her mps to declare collective cabinet responsibility is now fully restored. while the... order. while the
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environment secretary added his own words and said one of the things about this compromise is that it unites the cabinet. the chequers compromise took two years to reach and just two days to unravel. mr speaker, how can anyone have faith in the prime minister getting a good deal with 27 european union governments when she can't even broker a deal within her own cabinet? to be fair, and i want to be fairto the cabinet? to be fair, and i want to be fair to the former brexit secretary, and the former foreign secretary, i think they would have resigned on the spot on friday, but they were faced with a very long
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walk, no phone, and is due to government cuts, no bus either. so, ithink so, i think they were probably wise to hang on for a couple of days so they can get a lift home in a government car. i also want to congratulate the honourable member for esher and walton on his appointment as the secretary of state. he now becomes our chief negotiator on an issue which could not be more important or more urgent. this new secretary of state is on record as wanting to tear up people'swrites. he said and i quote, i don't support the human rights act, leaving the european union would present enormous opportunities to ease the regulatory burden on
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employers. and he is the one negotiating apparently on behalf at government in europe. this mess is all of the prime minister's own making. for too long she has spent more time negotiating the divisions and her party than she has putting any focus on the needs of our economy. ‘— any focus on the needs of our economy. —— divisions in her party. bpm postured with red line after red line and is now as reality bites, she is backsliding on every one of them. —— the prime minister 's. we were guaranteed this government would receive the exact same benefits and free and frictionless tray with the eu, now there's red lines are fading and the team the prime minister appointed secured this deal for our country have jumped the sinking ship. far from strong and stable,
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there are ministers overboard and there are ministers overboard and the ship is listing, all at the worst possible time. if we look at the prime minister's proposals for the prime minister's proposals for the long delayed white paper, this is not a comprehensive plan forjobs in britain and the economy this people of —— the people of this country deserve. these proposals stand well short of a conference of customs union, something trade unions and manufacturers have been demanding. instead, they float a complex plan that has already been derided by her own cabinet members as bureaucratic and unwieldy. the agreement contains no plan to protect our service industry, now plan to prevent a hard border in northern ireland, and also put forward the idea of regulatory
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flexibility which we all know, regulatory flexibility is a code for deregulation of our economy. —— no plan to prevent a hard border. the government's proposals will lead to british workplace rights, consumer rights, food safety standards and environmental protections falling behind eu standards over time. none of this has even been tested in negotiations. the check is now stands as a shattered truce, a sticking plaster over the cabinet's cracks in this government. the future of jobs cracks in this government. the future ofjobs and investment are now at stake. those jobs and that investment are not a subplot in the tory party civil war. at such a crucial time for our country, in
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these vital negotiations, we need a government that is capable of governing and negotiating for britain. for the good of this country and its people, the government needs to get its act together and do it quickly. if it can't, make way for those who can. i know the right honourable gentleman has been in this house for quite a long time and he will have heard many statements, the normal response to a statement is actually to ask some questions. i didn‘t think there were any questions anywhere in hand but nevertheless, i will... order. members on both sides should try to calm down, there is a long way to go and as is my usual custom, i would long way to go and as is my usual custom, iwould hope long way to go and as is my usual custom, i would hope to be able to call everybody who wants to ask a question. people don't need to chums
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from their seats when they can speak on their feet. on a few of the points the right honourable made, i will comment. he talked about removing standards and lower standards in a number of areas including employment. as i said in my statement, we will commit to maintaining high regulatory standards for the environment, climate change, social and employment and consumer protection. he said there was no plan in what i had said to ensure there was no hard border between northern ireland and ireland, in fact the very opposite. this plan delivers the commitment and no hard border between northern ireland and ireland, and at the very beginning of his response, the right honourable gentleman thanked me for early sight of my statement. it‘s a pity he obviously didn‘t bother to read it. can i also say, he says that this is two years on, this is
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the right honourable gentleman who said immediately after the referendum decision in 2000 that we should have triggered article 50 and immediately with no preparation whatsoever. —— the referendum decision in 2016. he talks about delivery, i might remind him we delivery, i might remind him we deliver the drug report in december, the limitation plan in march, and now we stand ready to deliver an brexit for the people with a negotiation we are about to enter into. he talks about resignations. cani into. he talks about resignations. can i remind him, ithink he into. he talks about resignations. can i remind him, i think he has had 100 resignations from his front bench, so i will take... i will take no lectures from the right honourable gentleman. when it comes to delivering on a strong economy, onjobs for the future, to delivering on a strong economy, on jobs for the future, the one party that would never deliver a strong economy is the labour party
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whose economic policies would lead toa run whose economic policies would lead to a run on the pounds, capital flight to a run on the pounds, capital flight and the loss ofjobs for working people up and down this country. iain duncan smith. whatever else one's view on this particular plan, my right honourable friend has been talking about, i urged her not to accept any single recommendations from the leader opposite. as nobody else in his party does... can i however coach her to answer this particular question. as she lays this plan in front of the eu commission and proceeds on negotiations, can she tell me whether she believes there will be any concessions offered to them or not? i say to my right honourable friend, this is the plan we believe is going to deliver an brexit for the british people but do so in brexit for the british people but do soina brexit for the british people but do so in a way that gives us a smooth
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and orderly brexit and ensures that we can actually do all the things we wa nt to we can actually do all the things we want to do in terms of trade policies around the rest of the world and the commitment we made to northern ireland. when the white paper is published on thursday, he will see there are a number of areas such as importers in certain agencies are where we are proposing agencies are where we are proposing a way forward. there will need to be negotiations on that. this is the plan i believe both delivers an brexit for the british people, but also ina brexit for the british people, but also in a way that protects jobs and makes sure we have a smooth smooth and orderly brexit. ian blackford. cani and orderly brexit. ian blackford. can i thank the prime minister for an advanced copy of her statement and can! an advanced copy of her statement and can i share with her deep remarks she has made regarding dawn sturgess. she knows the commitment we have on the side of the chamber to work with her but it important to match that on national security. i should start by congratulating the departing cabinet secretary believing the eu —— leaving the eu, for the four whole hours he spent
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negotiating, and i wish all the luck in the world to his replacement, he's going to need it. then there's the departing brine secretary. he should not have been allowed to resign. —— departing foreign secretary. the proposals represent a cherry picking starting point and it is ha rd picking starting point and it is hard to believe it has taken the prime minister to use to put together a proposal and a couple of days for her cabinet to fall apart. there is i believe a majority in the house of commons for staying in the single market and the customs union. will the prime minister work with the rest of us to make sure we can deliver on staying in the customs union and the single market to deliver what is in the best interests of the people? will she's topcoat owing to the hard
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brexiteers? —— she stop kowtowing. she has got to take them on and work in the national interests of all the nations of the uk. the prime minister's proposal for a facility ofa minister's proposal for a facility of a customs arrangement has been called by one senior eu official as the phage of the century. the response of eu negotiators is to see if the proposals are workable and realistic, but i would not hold my breath. the prime minister has again today in her piece in the daily telegraph noted that the uk government prepares to prepare for a no deal. that is simply outrageous. to put the economy and jobs in such peril is a complete failure of leadership. the absolute crisis which has engulfed the conservative party over the last 17 hours is a national embarrassment. as the uk
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inches closer to the cliff edge scenario we see a government in chaos and a prime minister struggling to lead her party never mind her government and seven resignations since the elections a year ago. the prime minister must see sense and accept the mounting evidence against a hard brexit, raised by the business community. will she worked to stay in the customs union and the single market to protectjobs customs union and the single market to protect jobs and to customs union and the single market to protectjobs and to make sure of prosperity? —— she worked. to protectjobs and to make sure of prosperity? -- she worked. it is entirely right and proper for this government to make preparations for every eventuality because we are going into a negotiation and it is right that we step up our preparations for no deal to make sure that we are able to deal with what ever comes out at the end of these negotiations, but the key question which the honourable
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gentleman arsenal would i work with people across the house to stay in the single market —— asked. the a nswer the single market —— asked. the answer is a unequivocal no, we are leaving the singles market —— the single market and the customs union. how does my honourable friend reconcile the statement from place will with the recent repeal of the 1972 act on the withdrawal act —— the statement from place will. —— chequers. can i say to my honourable friend, we have indeed repealed the european committees act and we have also made sure that we will take into uk law at the point at which we leave the eu, such that we see a smooth and orderly brexit. in the future the european court ofjustice
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will not have jurisdiction over the uk and this parliament will make sovereign decisions, it will make a sovereign decisions, it will make a sovereign decisions, it will make a sovereign decision when the meaningful vote and the withdrawal and implementation bills are brought before this house as to whether this parliament is winning to accept the deal that has been negotiated and there after it is up to this parliament to decide whether it agrees with any changes or any laws that this parliament wants to pass, that this parliament wants to pass, thatis that this parliament wants to pass, that is the sovereignty taken back laws and control and that is what people want and that is what we will do. —— taking back. people want and that is what we will do. -- taking back. i congratulate the prime ministerfor do. -- taking back. i congratulate the prime minister for effectively killing off the united states uk trade agreement by agreeing to retain eu regulatory convergence which the americans cannot accept. cani which the americans cannot accept. can i also echo the calls she has
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heard that now that she has lost the support of her brexit fundamentalists, now is the time to have a national consensus and the majority in the house who do support our retaining membership of the customs union and the single market and the original common market, whatever name and label she wants to attach to it. can i say, he refers as the leader of the snp to aid to staying in the single market —— staying in the civil market and the customs union, but we will not be staying in the customs union and the single market. to do so would mean losing our control of freedom of movement, and that would be not recognising the will of the british people. can i commend the prime minister for this people. can i commend the prime ministerfor this plan people. can i commend the prime minister for this plan and people. can i commend the prime ministerfor this plan and in particular can i congratulate her on
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her leadership. the prime minister said she would listen to business and she clearly has listened to business, but there are concerns that there are no details about the government‘s plan for services. what more detail can we expect to hear in the forthcoming white paper? there will be more detail in the forthcoming white paper but the point about services is that for a variety of reasons not least because this is an important sector for the uk, we believe it is important to maintain more flexibility in how we are dealing with services and on the goods side, industrial goods, businesses are very clear that they would continue to meet those eu rules regardless of the position of the government because they want to continue to export into the european union. on services we want to be free to make sure that we are able to put in place what we believe is
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necessary to maintain our key position in services, not least on the financial services, where the globalfinancial the financial services, where the global financial centre of the city of london needs to be maintained into the future and we will continue to do that. mr hilary benn. the prime minister welcomed the new secretary of state to his post, and cani secretary of state to his post, and can ijoin her secretary of state to his post, and can i join her doing secretary of state to his post, and can ijoin her doing so, we look forward to seeing him appearing before the select mitzi very soon —— select committee. the government has indicated that the facilitated customs arrangement even assuming that the unit macro was to agree to it, a question about which there must be doubts, would only be fully operational by the time of the next general election —— eu was to agree to it. will the prime minister confirmed that in the light of that the current transitional arrangement
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which expires in december 2020, is inevitably going to have to be extended? no. mrjohn redwood. the prime minister is right to reaffirm that we are taking back control of our laws and our money and borders andi our laws and our money and borders and i support that, but will she clear away the ambiguity and contradictions in the statement which implies we would give the ecj powers and we might pay money to trade and we might accept their laws and we might have their migration policy? can i say, i'm sure he has read the statement very carefully, but the statement did not say that, we will be ending free movement and as in any free trade agreement which we would strike with any country, there will be provisions on mobility and investors and businesses but we will be able to set our own
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immigration laws for people coming here from the european union and we will be able to continue to set our own laws in the future. as regards the european court ofjustice it is not the case that the european court ofjustice will have jurisdiction in the uk, it won‘t, and businesses and individuals will not be able to take cases to the european court of justice. matters in the uk will be determined by the uk courts. yvette cooper. the prime minister's plan is a fudge on immigration and the court of justice and a fudge on immigration and the court ofjustice and the customs facilitated partnership maximum arrangements which nobody understands. she has kept trying to pander to different parts of the conservative party and today has shown it just isn‘t conservative party and today has shown itjust isn‘t working. will she instead look at her plan for negotiations and bring it to the whole house of commons for approval
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because she cannotjust keep standing there saying, nothing has changed, nothing has changed? it has. actually, i didn't say nothing has. actually, i didn't say nothing has changed. i said our position had evolved and we have set out more details in our position and i believe that this is the position thatis believe that this is the position that is absolutely right for the uk. the best brexit deal for britain that gives us delivery on brexit and protects jobs and makes sure that we maintain our commitment to northern ireland in relation to the border and that we can have a smooth and orderly brexit. the prime minister is not dealing with the theory of leaving the eu, she‘s dealing with the practice of leaving the eu. can she assure me that the agreement from chequers allows the situation to continue with uk getting more
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inward investment over the last 30 yea rs, inward investment over the last 30 years, with both parties, then we could have anticipated, and that is good news for the future of the engineering industry as well as all those other jobs engineering industry as well as all those otherjobs that are reliant on those otherjobs that are reliant on those industries? we have seen good figures for direct investment into the uk, supporting jobs in the uk, and that will continue in the future, and i believe that the plan which i have set out with its clear momentum for frictionless trade with the european union while giving us the european union while giving us the freedom to strike trade deals around the world will be one that is welcomed by businesses and investors and we will see more investment and morejobs in the uk. and we will see more investment and more jobs in the uk. among the matters agreed in the chequers communique there was reference to the continuing obligation of the government to the backstop arrangement so called, can the prime minister make it clear about the
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deal as far as the union is concerned, and can she make it very clear as far as the backstop is concerned, she stands by her rejection of the eu legal interpretation and there will be no constitutional political differences between northern ireland and the rest of the uk in the backstop? as he has invited me to do, i will be happy to say that i continue to reject the protocol proposal of the so—called backstop that was put forward by the european union, by the european commission earlier this year, and the fact that would have effectively carved northern ireland away from the rest of the uk and kept northern ireland in the customs union and most of the single market, would have meant the border and the irish sea, that is an accept of all to the government of the uk. —— down the irish sea. delivering the referendum was always going to involve comprises and trade—offs and i want to support the position of
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the prime minister achieved with the cabinet on friday at chequers which puts business and jobs at the heart of any brexit deal. that is in the national interest. i think the prime minister has the vast majority of the country behind her in delivering a brexit in the national interest. is she able to stay where we expect to hear the initial reaction from the european union after publication of the white paper on thursday? i've had conversations in recent days and the indication is that they feel that this is a proposal that can make sure that we move the negotiations forward and at place, andi negotiations forward and at place, and i will be seeing a number of other european leaders in the next couple of days, we are hosting a summit tomorrow, for example, and there is the nato summit, as well. this is a plan which is good for the uk and! this is a plan which is good for the uk and i believe it is a plan which the european union will see will
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lead to a special partnership that will be in both our interests.” believe the prime minister to be a rational human being so why doesn‘t she save herself and the country a great deal of misery and grief and put the option which has been ruled out at chequers, the a+ option to this house in a free vote? as i indicated in a statement, the reason ido indicated in a statement, the reason i do not think that that option is right for the uk is because it doesn‘t deliver on the vote of the british people and that is our duty and ourjob as a government to deliver the brexit that the british people voted for. the announcement that the government is preparing for a new deal which is a inaccurate term for moving to wto terms is very welcome and sensible, but given the intransigence with which the eu has
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welcomed her generous offer so far, what is the date by which she judges it isa what is the date by which she judges it is a drop—dead moment to state that the talks are not progressing and that we will definitely be going too well trade terms? —— going to world trade terms vladimir it is not sensible to put a date on it, and we have received a positive reaction so far to the proposals we have put forward and we will go into intense and pacey negotiations with the european union and what i‘m clear about is that when this house comes to look at the withdrawal agreement in needs to have sufficient detail about the future relationship to be able to make that properjudgment. angela eagle. the oddly named chequers agreement fell apart oddly named chequers agreement fell a pa rt after oddly named chequers agreement fell apart after a weekend and it is now the chequers disagreement, as the cabinet disintegrates before our
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eyes. can she tell this house how she will persuade the european union to agree to her disagreement when her own cabinet don‘t agree with it? cani her own cabinet don‘t agree with it? can i say, we have put forward the position of the uk government, that has been received by the european union as something on which there can be negotiations and we would go into those determined to deliver the best dealfor britain. into those determined to deliver the best deal for britain. what matters even more than the agreement reached at beard is the —— what matters even more than the agreement reached at beard is the eventual agreement it will be itwillbea it will be a clear commitment to free trade as much as possible across the borders to the eu to
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preserve the jobs and prosperity for the future of this country?” preserve the jobs and prosperity for the future of this country? i can assure my honourable friend that maintaining this prosperity is important and that is why we have said we want as frictionless trade as possible with the eu and the plan i have put forward that the government will set out in the white paper later this week, it will show how we can do exactly that, maintaining thosejobs how we can do exactly that, maintaining those jobs but also have the freedom to increase our prosperity with trade deals around the rest of the world. have any european leaders agreed to let the uk collect tariffs on their behalf? we are putting forward the facilitated customs arrangement for the future we are putting forward as pa rt the future we are putting forward as part of the negotiations for the plan for the future relationship. cani plan for the future relationship. can i say to my honourable friend that we are looking forward to the publication of the white paper on
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thursday. can she also undertake to publish the white paper that was set aside, months in drafting? can i say to my honourable friend that the white paper will be published on thursday and it will be based on the work that has been done over recent weeks and will of course reflect the decision taken by the cabinet on friday? the prime minister has said we won‘t be subject to the jurisdiction of the court ofjustice but the chequers statement says we will pay regard to its caseload and makejoint will pay regard to its caseload and make joint references for dealings which will presumably be binding, and the difference is that there will be no scottish judge and now in thisjudge of the will be no scottish judge and now in this judge of the court ofjustice, —— and no englishjudge will.
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this judge of the court ofjustice, -- and no englishjudge will. can i say, and i understand that the duchy of lancaster has commented on this, question she asked in another meeting, we will not be under the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice jurisdiction of the european court of justice and that jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice and that is one of the things that people voted for and we will deliver. the prime minister said that we would not be hindered from doing trade deals but in a briefing given by ten downing st it was explained that in signing the transpacific partnership they would need to be a carve out because of our obligation to follow the common rule but, will she explain what obstacles there will be to trade and how this will work? —— rule book. there are issues that we will look at in any second stances as the uk in relation to standards and the way in which we wish to operate which
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could lead to us not being able to undertake all the commitments that somebody might want in a free—trade deal and we could terror or the regulatory standards but i don‘t think that is what we should do —— we could tear up all the regulatory standards. as we go forward we will be making those trade deals and we specifically looked at whether the plan we were putting forward would enable us to exceed to the tpp and it would. may i thank the prime minister for it would. may i thank the prime ministerfor her it would. may i thank the prime minister for her statement. it would. may i thank the prime ministerfor her statement. and i‘m welcoming the brexit secretary to his place. may they find time to visit the elected political leaders of europe, to six support for this plan, rather than just depend of europe, to six support for this plan, rather thanjust depend on of europe, to six support for this plan, rather than just depend on the bureaucrats in brussels stash to seek support. the the honourable gentleman is right, we will be speaking to leaders across europe,
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and the incoming brexit secretary will be out and around europe, talking to leaders and politicians across europe and in the european parliament about the plan that we propose. the eu says they won't tolerate cherry picking but what i fear is that we have picked the wrong cherry for this reason. that way by accepting the common rule book includes are locking ourselves into a structure where the eu has an overwhelming trading surplus, will this not severely constrain our ability to make our business more competitive and to undertake free—trade deals so that brexit will no longer mean brexit, it will mean the commission where we have no vote, regulating our business wherever? the position he has set out is not the position for the future, i‘ve been very clear that
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parliament will be able to take these decisions about rules in future but the reality is and someone said i‘m dealing not with the theory but the reality brexit, and the practicality of brexit is that our businesses who want to export to the eu will continue to do that to the eu rule book in industrial goods, just as when we will need to make sure that both sides are able to operate to the rules that are appropriate their around the world, say businesses will continue to apply these rules regardless —— so. we are able to make sure the frictionless border between the uk and the eu, frictionless border which is important to deliver our commitments for northern ireland and maintaining the constitutional integrity of the uk and important in making sure that we maintain thejobs uk and important in making sure that we maintain the jobs that rely on the integrated supply chain that have grown up over decades. the
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prime minister has proposed a free—trade area but the fact is our services sectors have been left out and left behind by this government. we represent seven firms who employ over 700,000 workers in the technology sector and they have said a deal such as that which she has proposed we would choose access to the eu markets and will be confusing for consumers and add to the complexity the business, why is she ignoring these services? this is not about ignoring services businesses, but this is seeing an services is one of the areas where we have great opportunities in our trade deals around the rest of the world. it is about recognising the importance of financial services of the city of london and making sure that we are able to have regulatory cooperation that the freedom to be flexible in these areas. on saturday mornings i
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lead a listening team in well in britain we have an hour ‘s meeting where we talk about national and local politics and then we go out and campaignfora local politics and then we go out and campaign for a couple of hours. this week the activists were so disappointed about what had happened at chequers, they were betrayed and they asked why do we go out each and every saturday to support the conservative party, get mps elected, and for the first time in over ten yea rs and for the first time in over ten years that group refused to go out and campaign. what would the prime minister said to them? —— say. and campaign. what would the prime minister said to them? -- say. can i say to my honourable friend, i‘m very sorry that his activists did not feel able to campaign and i
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would hope they would campaign for the excellent member of parliament, and this is not a betrayal. we will end free movement and the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice jurisdiction of the european court of justice and jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice and we. sending vast sums ofjustice and we. sending vast sums of money to the european union —— we will stop. we will come out of the common agricultural policy and the common fisheries policy and i believe that is what people voted for when they voted to leave and we will deliver in faith with the british people. my constituents who worked at airbus and vauxhall motors and many other parts of our modern manufacturing supply chain have had their voice heard but they need to be heard more, because it is not just what was in the chequers statement that they need, so we‘ll be priming is to say when will she go further and accept that we need to include more in the steel and we need to be part of the internal market? —— will the prime minister
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say when she will go further and accept that we need to include more in the deal. we will not be part of the single market because of the free movement aspect. we have safeguarded 1400 jobs in luton and there have been other positive announcements from the automotive sector but we have recognised the integrated supply chains and we have recognised the need for that frictionless trade across the board and that is what this plan delivers. —— the border. and that is what this plan delivers. -- the border. may i give the prime minister a message from mid sussex, to this end, despite the slings and arrows inevitable, will she stick to her guns to deliver a brexit that is in line with the aims of the people and their prosperity and their security? can i say that that is
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exactly the aim of myself and this government, to deliver a brexit that is smooth and orderly and that maintains the prosperity of this country and indeed enables it to be enhanced in the future but also maintains our important security cooperation for the safety and security of citizens. when the prime minister took office she said she wa nted minister took office she said she wanted to bring the country back together and i believe that she had the will of most people in this house and the country. 69% of british people now think brexit is going badly. her cabinet is horribly split, the government is split, the nation is more divided than ever. our people will be poorer as a consequence of this deal that leaves out services, will she now commit to give the people a second vote on this deal? no, iwill not
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give the people a second vote on this deal? no, i will not commit to do that, and the reason i won‘t is because the british people voted, this parliament gave the british people the vote and they made their choice and they want their government to deliver on that choice andi government to deliver on that choice and i think given that 80% of people at the last election voted for parties which were committed to delivering brexit, it is time the labour party ruled out a second referendum. my constituency vote is 60% to leave the eu and within 48 hours of the priming is the‘s statement i received over 300 e—mails disheartened and dismayed and saying that democracy is dead, can be priming is to tell the house how she plans to restore public faith and that this is not a sell—out? —— can the subject ——
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prime minister tell the house.” understand she has received notjust on local goods which runs on this matter, and people from across the country, they wanted to see an end to free movement and we will deliver on that —— received notjust from local areas. they wanted to end the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in the uk and we will deliver that they wanted to come out of the common agricultural policy and we over that, and they wanted to come out of the common fisheries policy and we will deliver that. we will deliver the brexit that people voted for but we will do so in a way that protects jobs and maintains our commitment to the pressures —— precious uk and also make sure that we can do deals around the world which bringsjobs to her constituency and others. the brexit secretary has advocated no deal claiming we would thrive and he said
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we might have to abandon the common travel with ireland and he also suggested scrapping the time directive and he also voted against crucial police and security cooperation across europe, are those now government policy? government policy is very clear, further details will be seen in the white paper and the brexit secretary looks forward to delivering on that policy. will she assure me that we will not charge the eu for access to our markets? any more than we would expect to be charged. can i save to my right honourable friend that i think one of the key features of the customs arrangement which people may not have seen is that we would of course recognise that the eu would be taking tariffs for uk goods that would enter other european union countries to come to the united
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kingdom, and we would make sure that was reflected in the arrangements that are made in relation to the facilitated customs arrangement. welsh affairs select committee today published a report recommending continued membership of the single market and the customs union on the basis of evidence received about agriculture. if whoever is in government doesn‘t come to the same conclusion, we will wake up on march the 30th without a functioning government and without a functioning deal. for all our sakes, when will the prime minister push for an extension to article 50? this is a negotiation with people‘slivelihoods, not a game against the clock. this is a negotiation which is of vital importance to the united kingdom, to our future as importance to the united kingdom, to ourfuture as global importance to the united kingdom, to our future as global britain, and which will with the plan we have put forward comedy about protecting jobs and livelihoods for people across the whole of the united kingdom. we
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are not extending article 50, we have a negotiation, we have a plan for that negotiation, and we will go to it at pace. one of the reasons that companies have come to this country and also that british companies have become involved in integrated manufacturing is because we have had a separate rule book for more than 30 years about trade in goods. does she agree, i would like to thank the cabinet for agreeing to this, that the proposal is right to protect at business and to ensure we keep those jobs. he is absolutely right. they rule book in relation to industrial goods has been broadly settled over a number of decades. it's settled over a number of decades. it‘s not expected to change significantly in the future. it is one to which businesses continue to
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work too, and would do so after we have left the european union. i think the position we have taken which protects jobs is absolutely right. can i beg the prime minister to think again? it‘s obvious all her ha rd to think again? it‘s obvious all her hard work at chequers, she is still imprisoned by a group of hard brexit ideologues. would she change her mind, speakto ideologues. would she change her mind, speak to those who have a real desire for the national interest in withdrawing from the eu, and take it rather different view but for having a vote in parliament on the chequers agreement. he talks about operating in the national interest, that‘s exactly what the government is doing, it‘s why we are putting this proposal forward, we will negotiate with the eu on the basis of this proposal and in due course, parliament will have its opportunity to vote through the meaningful vote and on the withdrawal agreement and argumentation bill. my right
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honourable friend refers to negotiations and of course negotiations and of course negotiations are about give and take and some people may think we have given rather too much. i‘m not sure the eu will take it. i think they wa nt the eu will take it. i think they want us to give a little more and a little more. she will call parliament over the summer if in those deep and patient negotiations we are asked to bid even more. —— cani we are asked to bid even more. —— can i ask that she will be call parliament. although i recognise the good intentions with which she asked that question, i suspected it is not quite receive the full approval of the entire house. the prime minister should have sacked foreign secretary some time ago. as someone who put himself before his party. she now risks putting her party before her country. how can she possibly persuade us that she can negotiate
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with strength with brussels when it is clear she leads a divided house and she is struggling to take back control of her cabinet is never mind anything else. the cabinet has agreed the position the government is taking forward. he asks about the ability to achieve in negotiations, i point out that is exactly what we‘ve been doing every stage. i point out that is exactly what we've been doing every stage.” i point out that is exactly what we've been doing every stage. i note with approval that the bright shirt he is wearing is more reminiscent of arsenal than of west ham. thank you for that endorsement. my constituency contributes roughly half a to the gdp of this nation to mainly small and medium enterprise manufacturing. indeed, the most important thing we must achieve is that there is small, medium enterprises who are the lifeblood of this are able to supply the big
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companies no matter where they are able to trade and actually, this deal allows them to expand and all other parts of the world as well. this is exactly what this deal does. by this is exactly what this deal does. by ensuring we will have that fiction this trade across the border with the european union and in the facilitated customs arrangement we have put forward, we are ensuring those businesses that currently only trade with the eu will have no extra requirements in terms of customers. we are ensuring we are not increasing the burden on those businesses. in her initial letter to donald tusk notifying the european commission that she wanted to trigger article 50, she said that if there was no deal, there would be no deal on security. i don‘t think she was making a threat, she was stating the truth, the fact that since then the truth, the fact that since then the eu has made it clear they are not sure they want precisely the same version of security cooperation we have talked about. they now say we have talked about. they now say we will not be able to be members of
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the european arrest warrant. isn‘t this issue of national security as important as it was the day she wrote that letter, and isn‘t it most important that we do get a deal therefore? of course the issue of national security is important. we wa nt to national security is important. we want to maintain operational capabilities. as he will see when the white paper comes out, in the security partnership by outlined in my munich speech, we want to ensure those operational capabilities through instruments and programmes and agencies are still available to the uk. that will be part of the negotiations that we take forward and a security partnership is an important part of our future relationship. could she say what distinction she would draw between the combined customs territory which the combined customs territory which the cabinet appears to consider desirable and a customs union which it doesn‘t? desirable and a customs union which it doesn't? i'm happy to answer that question. in a customs union, it will be necessary to be part of the common commercial policy which would
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not enable us to sign trade deals with other countries around the world. in our arrangement, with other countries around the world. in ourarrangement, we with other countries around the world. in our arrangement, we will be free to do so. the government's proposals seem to have effectively sought to reproduce parts of the backstop proposal for the whole of the uk, but with a swiss style dispute settlement system. could she a nswer dispute settlement system. could she answer this question: what will her proposals mean for mutual recognition of health professionals, qualifications, in orderfor recognition of health professionals, qualifications, in order for health professionals to be able to operate across that is one of the areas where of course we will be entering negotiations with the european union. we want to ensure that we are able to see recognition in a number of areas in relation to professionals and professional services. of course that is something we have to agree with the european union. the prime minister
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knows my constituency of wimbledon well and they know her to be a lady of integrity and putting the national interest first. she has done that in this deal and i commend herfor it. done that in this deal and i commend her for it. many of the businesses in my constituency are concerned about nontariff barriers, can she confirm this agreement overcomes their concerns and they will be free to trade over those non—tariff barriers? the point of the deal we have put out and the proposal we will be presenting to the eu is that we can have that ability for free trade between the united kingdom and the remaining eu 27. that‘s partly about the frictionless borders but it‘s of course about the standards and regulations that those businesses will continue to operate two. there is obviously disagreement in her own party as there is in the labour party as to what the beach people actually voted for. is it time to clarify with the people
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themselves rather than always guessing. i do not with respect except as is being said, that the people have spoken. this will be a further question to the people, once they have the final deal, and they should have the final say on the deal. she talks about this agreement, the visitors disagreement is between the liberal democrats and the people of this country who voted to leave the european union. —— the biggest disagreement. may i congratulate my prime minister on the progress she made at the weekend at chequers and wish her well in the difficult few days that will no doubt my ahead before we see further details in the white paper. is she now confident that the leaders of the other 27 european governments involved will accept this as a reasonable starting position for negotiations based on the realities of business and trade in the modern world and ask them to speed up as
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far as possible the serious negotiations that must now begin with no doubt some modest combo rises on both sides before we reach successful conclusion. can i reassure my learned friend that the responses i have received so far from other european european leaders are that they have responded positively to the responses we have put forward, at the june council, the european council at 27 agreed we needed to increase the pace of negotiations in future. on the 18th of december, the prime minister told the house and i quote, we will be going in and negotiating for services and for bids. we trade at an annual surplus of £28 billion in services with the european union. why is it other than the reasons of
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internal politics and ideology within the conservative party that she is taking the profit making trade part of the uk economy and throwing it under the brexit bus? that is not correct. what we are doing is ensuring we have the flexibility and relations to services. as we look around the rest of the world, it will be services that will be a significant element of our trade agreements with the rest of the world, then we will be able to benefit. we want the flexibility and that‘s precisely what we are now for. the prime minister has always been clear she seeks a bespoke relationship between the uk and eu. there are only nine meetings left of the european parliament in strasbourg before we will have left. can i urge the prime minister and members of the cabinet to keep focused on the timetable and deliver that deal. can i thank my
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honourable friend for pointing that out. we will be focused on the timetable in negotiations with the eu and in recognising the role the european parliament will play because they will need to agree and the withdrawal agreement when it has been finalised. the prime minister has been struggling quite cleverly within the constraints of a self—imposed chains and red lines. wouldn‘t it be easier for her if she acted, as was the case in the 1941 crisis, the way that clement attlee acted and we worked in the national interest together to deal with this crisis, because carrying on as we are will not succeed and she knows it. the government has put forward a proposal in the national interest
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but there are differences across this house. it‘s been obvious from members of the opposition benches who want us to say in a customs union and single market which in my view would not be keeping faith with the vote of the british people. it's generally accepted that the eu has a poor track record on trade deals. because in large part, of its protectionist rules and regulations. does the prime minister except that in pursuing a common rule book and promising harmonisation, we would be obliging imports from third countries to abide by those same regulations therefore make trade deals more difficult to achieve. as isaid deals more difficult to achieve. as i said earlier, of course we could tearup i said earlier, of course we could tear up regulatory standards that we have here in the uk but i don‘t believe that would be the right thing to do and i don‘t believe that would be something that this house would be something that this house would support. when we look at trade deals around the world, as in any
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trade deal, there will be decisions to be taken about the basis on which that trade can go forward, and the sort of standards that both sides will apply in those trade deals. i believe it‘s right the united kingdom maintains a high regulatory standard in a number of areas. the customs and trade bill were both drafted several months ago, in the chequers agreement the prime minister has set out a complicated new customs arrangement. will this need any changes to the legislation at the house is going to be considering next week? no, i don't believe it will. it's just over considering next week? no, i don't believe it will. it'sjust over 16 months since the foreign affairs committee unanimously, leavis and reminisce together, concluded that injuly 2016 reminisce together, concluded that in july 2016 the reminisce together, concluded that injuly 2016 the previous government‘s decision not to instruct departments to prepare for a leave vote amounted to gross
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negligence. making an mistake would constitute a serious dereliction of duty by the present administration. does she understand the relief now that the no deal preparations are going to be over and will she ensure that the resources and commitments that the resources and commitments that may have been absent from these preparations are now given to this very important task to show the steel in our position. we have of course as he will now allocated a significant amount of money, £3 billion, over two years, significant amount of money, £3 billion, overtwo years, one significant amount of money, £3 billion, over two years, one billion of which has been allocated to departments to do their work on preparing for leaving the eu. some of that work will relate to what might be necessary in getting a deal, others will relate to what is going to be necessary with a no deal. we are now stepping up the pace of that work and the intensity of it. after the chequers meeting,
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she announced unanimous cabinet report and it now looks like she could have a hat—trick by close of play. has she appointed a new foreign secretary and if so, who is it? i have actually been in the chamber for quite a time since the resignation of the foreign secretary, i will be appointing a new foreign secretary in due course. in south west bedfordshire, small businesses are the lifeblood of our economy. my constituents started his four years ago, in terms of the four million and moves high—value equipment across eu uk borders at short notice ona across eu uk borders at short notice on a daily basis. before friday he feared for the future of this business, friday‘s agreement gives some hope. i ask you to maintain her resolve to help him and men and women like him across our united
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kingdom. he is absolutely right, small businesses form the backbone of our economy and it‘s right we have heard from businesses large and small about their interest in maintaining the fiction this trade across our uk— eu borders. that‘s exactly what we will be delivering in this proposal. there is an air of com plete in this proposal. there is an air of complete unreality this afternoon. it should be blindingly obvious from the resignations of the foreign secretary and the brexit secretary and the constituency of opinion they represent in the government benches that there is no majority in this house for the chequers deal. it is dead. no european leader ought to ta ke dead. no european leader ought to take it seriously because it went past the house. the question is, when will she finally accept that trying to appease the hard brexiteers on her own benches will never work, to reach across but also accept that on these benches we will never vote for a deal that delivers a softer brexit on goods but a hard
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brexit on services. through all these decisions, i have people complaining that i have taken the view of this side of the argument or the absolute opposite side. what i have done is put forward what is in the national interest for the best brexit dealfor britain. the national interest for the best brexit deal for britain. will the prime minister explain to the house how the new uk eu free trade agreement will ensure that london retains its status as the global trading capital of europe, to do that, isn‘t it best that the rule book is made in britain? if wheeler at the two areas of goods and services, what is clear is that those who will be trading with the european union will continue to operate according to that will work in the eu. where we do need to ensure we have that flexibility and particularly to protect one of the key areas for london which is the
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city of london as a global financial centre, providing significant proportions of the debt and equity that underpins business across the eu with the risks that entails here in the united kingdom, it‘s right we have regulatory cooperation with others, but that we are able to have rather more flexibility on services, and that will be good for london. the prime minister today has presented a position in relation to the negotiating position arrived at in chequers as an evolution of her mansion house statement. most members of this house believes there will have to be further evolution of that position before the house will agree a deal. on that basis, will the prime minister agree it‘s crucial to keep business in all parts of the economy, services and manufacturing, at the heart of the negotiating process? what is important to keep... studio: we are going to pull away from the house of commons. we have a
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helicopter above the official residence of the foreign secretary. that was until a view few hours ago, one borisjohnson. that was until a view few hours ago, one boris johnson. but that was until a view few hours ago, one borisjohnson. but he has resigned. that is no longer an official car and we awaiting his departure. we will see him go who knows where? there is a meeting of the 1922 committee later on. it‘s thought he might want to see what‘s coming on there. we are also hearing that his resignation had not in fact been finished. before downing street announced he was resigning, he warned them he would be making the announcement and they decided to release that news before he had offered it. let‘s talk more about these events. i‘m joined now by the shadow foreign secretary — emily thornberry. today exceeds that excitement. the announcement of two cabinet ministers resigning, what does that mean? they are notjust two senior
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members, this is brexit, the foreign secretary and the brexit secretary have resigned. this is because, for the last two years, we have been seeing a soap opera playing out in the tory party. we have not seen the party that is supposed to be in government in this country thinking about the country, but only about themselves. throughout the time and borisjohnson has themselves. throughout the time and boris johnson has been themselves. throughout the time and borisjohnson has been foreign secretary, i‘ve been saying to him, concentrate on the dayjob, think about yemen, think about peace in the middle east, think about what you are saying about nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, a woman now languishing injail zaghari—ratcliffe, a woman now languishing in jail because zaghari—ratcliffe, a woman now languishing injail because of zaghari—ratcliffe, a woman now languishing in jail because of what you said in parliament because you have not bothered to read your breathe properly. stop thinking about your leadership ambitions and get on with your dayjob. this today is about boris johnson get on with your dayjob. this today is about borisjohnson going for the leadership because he is worried that someone else has gone for it first and he feels he must catch up. whilst i take everything that you say, brexit is overwhelmingly
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overriding anything else that goes on in this building behind you and has done for some time. the british public are looking for leadership, for someone to take them through this process. theresa may has made it clear in the last couple of hours, this is her plan and she is going to see it through. let's pause and look at this plan. let‘s look at what was on the table in chequers. it makes no sense, it is full of red tape, full of delay and wasted money. what she should be doing is saying, we need a continued relationship with europe which means being ina relationship with europe which means being in a customs union. she has edged a bit towards us but she is not prepared to go the whole way. that is the only thing that‘s going to work when it comes to jobs. what we have said since day one, since the referendum is, except the result of the referendum but looked after jobs over and above everything else. they have not been doing that. the onlyjobs they have not been doing that. the only jobs they
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they have not been doing that. the onlyjobs they have been thinking about their ownjobs onlyjobs they have been thinking about their own jobs and who will be the next leader of the tory party. have you and jeremy corbyn at any stage today said this is the moment we need to try and push this government out? we are always wanting to push this government out, we are the government in waiting. have you today had a discussion and said this is the moment?” have you today had a discussion and said this is the moment? i was sitting next to jeremy said this is the moment? i was sitting next tojeremy on the said this is the moment? i was sitting next to jeremy on the front bench and suddenly we were saying, what is going on? they are falling to pieces before our eyes. we don‘t know what‘s going to happen in the next hour or two, jaime moore government ministers are about to resign. we have an example of the government once again not caring about this country but only themselves. what is labour going to do? we are in opposition, what we will do is continue to push for us being ina will do is continue to push for us being in a customs union, we will push that when it comes to the votes next week on monday and tuesday if we still have a prime minister, the same prime minister as we have today. who knows what will happen?
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the difficulty is when you are in opposition that there very little little one can do. especially when you are as late as the conservatives are. we are not split in that what we wa nt are. we are not split in that what we want to do is abide by the results of the referendum, we want to leave the eu but be in a customs union with a proper interim period during which time we negotiate an ongoing relationship with the eu which means being as close as we can be to the single market whilst allowing for there to be a british style deal, that‘s what we have said for two years. that‘s what we would have been doing but this lot have been fighting among themselves. you have said there is a weak prime minister, there‘s never been a week at may than the one today with two senior cabinet ministers, yet he don‘t seem to be saying we can do anything with. in the end, you know as well as i do, they have more votes in the house of commons than we do. so long as they stay together, who knows whether they will not, they will have more votes because they did a deal with the dup, they had a general election, she lost her majority but she has
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given them a lot of money and kept on the right side. therefore she think she continues to have the majority, let‘s see what happens in the next 24 hours and see if she keeps that majority together. in the meantime, we remain focused on where we should be going with brexit and we should be going with brexit and we will continue to argue it. thank you. the question being asked around here was, where on earth is boris? we now know where he was. he has resigned. our political correspondent, ben wright has been looking back at boris‘ cabinet career. 200 million year old life form... a showman never short of an opinion. borisjohnson made showman never short of an opinion. boris johnson made for a showman never short of an opinion. borisjohnson made for a surprising foreign secretary but as he travelled the world batting from britain, there was always a question mark over how comfortable he felt in theresa may‘s team. why? because of brexit, of course. this is a once chance... during the eu referendum, borisjohnson chance... during the eu referendum, boris johnson became the
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chance... during the eu referendum, borisjohnson became the face of chance... during the eu referendum, boris johnson became the face of the league campaign. after agonising over which side to back, he then embraced the case or leaving the eu. ina embraced the case or leaving the eu. in a political turmoil that followed the vote in the summer of 2016, his old university friend david cameron quit, they kicked in the role mr johnson had. but his hope of becoming prime minister then crumbled when michael gove dramatically pulled his support. having consulted colleagues and in view of the circumstances in parliament, i have concluded that person cannot be me. it was a huge blow, but borisjohnson then found himself appointed to one of the biggestjobs in government by the new prime minister, theresa may. what do you say about those... leading to show she was listening to the victorious brexiteers, boris johnson became the most powerful flag carrier the belief campaign around the table and he was always ready to make his opinion known. the
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sums that i have seen that they propose to demand from this country seem to me to be extortionate and i think to go whistle is an entirely appropriate expression. the former journalist never far from the papers, writing about his vision for brexit. some former cabinet collea g u es brexit. some former cabinet colleagues not impressed.” brexit. some former cabinet colleagues not impressed. i don't wa nt colleagues not impressed. i don't want him managing the brexit process. this is back-seat driving. borisjohnson continued process. this is back-seat driving. boris johnson continued to process. this is back-seat driving. borisjohnson continued to argue for the sharpest break from the eu and invited questions about his loyalty. are you as one? a nest of singing birds. mrjohnson even dismissed one of the customs plans being considered by his government as crazy, a sign his patience with brexit was running out. not long ago it would have been easy, too easy, to see borisjohnson as little more than a gag cracking, cameron erving figure of fun. it's very well
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organised. a former london mayor with a flairfor organised. a former london mayor with a flair for attention. but he has always been ambitious. and about brexit, he is serious, even though he is now out of government, few would bet against borisjohnson being back. an in the today at five — we‘re at westminster — where the foreign secretary has resigned in protest at the prime minister‘s approach to brexit strategy. borisjohnson is the second senior minister to resign from theresa may‘s cabinet in the space of under 24 hours. on and onjo on and on jo johnson on and onjojohnson in the next hour. his departure follows the resignation of the brexit secretary, david davis, late last night he said the prime minister‘s brexit plan left britain in a ‘weak‘ position.
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i was the person who had two presented to parliament and the european union and everyone else and ifi european union and everyone else and if i don‘t believe in it, i would rather give the job to someone who does believe in
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