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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  July 10, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's tuesday, it's nine o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. after the incredible turmoil in westminster over the past 2a hours, theresa may meets her new—look cabinet in the next half hour. so what happens next? voters tell us what they want to happen now. theresa may's brexit plan seems like a compromise. she had to get on and deliver it. i think she should tear up deliver it. i think she should tear up the chequers agreement and start over. wherever you are in the uk, tell us. feed into our conversation. what do you want to happen next? just over a year after we revealed 800 women were suing the nhs and manufcturers over mesh implants, there's going to be an immediate stop on such precedures in england. i was in my car and i phoned my husband and i said... ijust can't... i can't live any more. i can't go through this. i actually do think, i'm believing the doctors, i think it's in my head. yeah. i didn't know where else to turn. if you have had this mesh
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procedure, let us know how you react to this news. and we'll bring you the very latest on the rescue mission of those boys and their coach from the cave in thailand. there are four boys left and the final part of this rescue mission is under way. danjohnson is there for us. up up that road under the hills the tea m up that road under the hills the team is five hours into the final phase of this daring mission. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until ”am this morning. brexit. tell us, what you want to happen next. tell us what you want to see. do you want theresa may to resign and preparations to be made for no deal with the eu? do you want a second referendum?
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or even another general election? there are so many options. are you happy to see theresa may seeing off the rebels for the meantime? get in touch. you can e—mail, message us. use the hashtage victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... brexit and the surrounding crisis. following the resignations of borisjohnson and david davis, theresa may's new—look cabinet is gathering at 10 downing street in the next half hour. alex forsyth reports. leaving his official residence last night, the former foreign secretary. borisjohnson‘s resignation caused turmoil in westminster, the second cabinet member to quit over the government's brexit policy in less than 2a hours. and giving his reasons why, he pulled no punches. in his letter to the prime minister, he said the brexit dream is: her response:
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theresa may defended her brexit plan in the commons yesterday, saying it would deliver on the referendum result but protectjobs and business. in the two years since the referendum, we have had a spirited national debate. but plenty in her own party are concerned, although some brexiteers do seem supportive. the prime minister has shown she's determined that she's going to get us out of the eu and, at the same time, she's going to meet the eu's own red lines, thereby ensuring they are going to have to take the negotiations seriously. so it's out with the old, in with the new. dominic raab, a leaver, is the new brexit secratary. jeremy hunt, who backed remain, takes over as foreign secretary. matthew hancock takes his job as health secretary, and jeremy wright, the former attorney general, is promoted
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to culture secretary. today in downing street, the new—look cabinet will meet for the first time. some might hope it will prove more united but, for the prime minister, the fight to keep her party on side is far from over. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. norman smith is in westminster. how stronger or otherwise is theresa may this morning? we are in a brief lull after the craziness of yesterday. a brief respite for mrs may because what is striking, when you talk to brexiteers at the moment, that are not coming for her. they are not poised to prompt a vote of no—confidence the reason is partly they are not sure they have the numbers to topple her. also because their focus now is on trying
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to get this chequers plan either ditched or significantly rewritten. on top of all that, mrs may has some things in her favour. on top of all that, mrs may has some things in herfavour. she is shot of two potential troublemakers, boris johnson and david davis. the remaining cabinet brexiteers are pretty much locked into the plan and her leadership. you talk to her remainer rebels on the other side of the party and they are much more supportive of the because they do not want to help the brexiteers so they are going to do nothing that might make life difficult for her. she is sort of the original duracell politician, she goes on and on, and although other cabinet ministers might walk out or fall on their swords, she keeps surviving. and one should not underestimate just how resilient she is. when you look at the threat to her, borisjohnson, we
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don't know what he will do yet, but he isa don't know what he will do yet, but he is a politician who is standing has been tarnished, i would suggest, in recent months, particularly in the conservative party. his decision to, as it were, run away on the crucial heathrow vote, has significantly damaged how he is viewed and sometimes in politics you are on the crest of a wave and sometimes betide begins to run out on you. —— the tide. i would suggest borisjohnson is on you. —— the tide. i would suggest boris johnson is more on you. —— the tide. i would suggest borisjohnson is more on the latter side where things are beginning to run against him. i would not expect him to do anything now. of course, if mrs may get into difficulties with the chequers deal, if it gets rejected by brussels, if more compromises have to be offered, he could move in on that. thank you for the moment. wherever you are and however you voted in the referendum, what do you want to see happen next?
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let us know and we will talk more about it. joanna gosling is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. divers in northern thailand have restarted their high—risk rescue operation to free the last five members of a group who became trapped in a vast cave system last month. eight boys have been brought out of the caves over the past two days. joining us now is danjohnson, he's near the cave entrance in thang luam. are they hoping they will all come out today? that seems to be the plan. four boys and their coach had to be rescued and after the success of the last two days they seem confident they can repeat the operation and conclude the mission to. but they are not the only people who have to come out, there is the doctor who has been treating them in and three deila navy divers who have a p pa re ntly and three deila navy divers who have apparently been with the boys since they were discovered deep in the cave “— they were discovered deep in the cave —— thai navy divers. there is still a lot of work to do here. the
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final phase of the operation has been going on for five final phase of the operation has been going on forfive hours now but it sounds like it will be another hour before the first boys appear at the surface today. thank you. nhs england is putting an immediate curb on vaginal mesh operations after safety concerns. it's accepted the advice of a new review looking at harm reported by women. many said the implants caused agony and even life—changing injuries by cutting into tissue. the review‘s chair, baroness julia cumberlege, said she was "appalled at the seriousness and scale" of the problem. thousands of prisoners will be able to make telephone calls from their cells under plans announced by the government. the phones will be installed in 20 prisons as part of a drive to improve safety in jails across england and wales and stem the trade in illicit mobiles. oakwood prison in wolverhampton already permits calls from cells. its director welcomed the announcement. anything that enhances the contact between a prisoner and his family or his loved ones is vital.
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i've worked in prisons where telephony has been available on the landings, it creates a queueing system, prisoners can't get in contact with their loved ones at the right time of day. so when it's in a cell they have privacy and have the ability to have lengthy conversations, make family decisions and feel like part of the family. the introduction of extra services on eight different railway lines has been delayed because of the chaos caused by timetable changes earlier this year. the chairman of network rail says "painful lessons" meant that ambitions had to be scaled back. tom burridge reports. feel familiar? train travel across britain is all too often a crowded affair. so plans were in the pipeline for new timetables with many more trains from december. but this was the scene in may — thousands of trains were cancelled or delayed when northern and govia thameslink considerably changed their timetables and passengers were left stranded.
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cancellations all the time, just waiting on the platform probably for, like, 30 minutes and all of a sudden theyjust cancel it. so now timetable changes planned for much of the network in december have been postponed. in fact, all of these operators will make no change in december at all. passengers in other places will see minor changes. the body which represents rail companies said reliability must come first. but in places like leeds, there's already been criticism that passengers and local politicians haven't been consulted. tom burridge, bbc news. donald trump has confirmed he is nominating brett kavanaugh as his pick for the us supreme court. he's a 53—year—old conservative justice who serves on the us court of appeals in washington. judge kavanaugh worked as a white house aide under president george w bush. film producer harvey weinstein has pleaded not guilty at a court in new york to charges of sexually assaulting a woman in 2006.
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it's the third criminal sexual assault case brought against him. more than 70 women have accused him of sexual misconduct, including rape. his lawyer says he's innocent and that all sexual encounters were consensual. the raf will celebrate its centenary this afternoon with a parade on the streets of london and a huge fly—past over buckingham palace. aircraft representing the raf across the decades will be involved in the fly—past over london at lunchtime. the queen will be among members of the royal family attending the events. westminster abbey will host a special service and more than a thousand servicemen and women will take part in the parade. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30. thank you and thank you for your m essa 9 es thank you and thank you for your messages already. we are talking to people around the country. we are asking what you want to happen next when it comes to brexit. patricia says theresa may is to deliver on
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the conservative manifesto pledge or stand out in favour of someone who will. the referendum result was a clear win for leave. bill says theresa may has to go, a step too far, get into jacob rees—mogg to save democracy. there is some chuckling from a labour politician to that message! lizzie says the eu commission will reject the deal. we should leave on wto rules as we jadhav than two years ago. i want to leave the eu —— as we should have done. i did know what i was voting for. david says we should stop this self—destructive madness and abandon brexit. and john says, i voted leave, i know i was misled, i think leaving is a huge mistake and it will cost us dearly. mrs may should go and the country should be given another vote. alexander says the majority of the referendum was 4%, it was a bad idea from the beginning, cancel it now. he said
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that in capital letters and underlined! do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtage victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. you can e—mailand you can e—mail and there is facebook and twitter. let's get some sport. tim is at the bbc sport centre. the three lions will be off to moscow in the next few hours. the countdown is on, the england players have been training in the last hour ahead of the biggest match of their lives as they take on croatia at 7pm tomorrow for a place in the world cup final. as if you didn't know by now! it is their first world cup semifinal in 28 yea rs first world cup semifinal in 28 years and the players have surpassed all expectations in russia and yet they remain in incredibly relaxed mood as you can see. this was them playing with a rubber chicken this morning! not often you say those words. ingenious warm up routine but
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most importantly, they look very relaxed. and what about this? fair to say england supporters have fallen in love with the team again. one man loves harry maguire so much he has had him tattooed on his chest! harry replied. he has given him a signed shirt. he says you must have a big chest! he is renowned for the size of his head and also very good at heading, as we saw against sweden. i wonder if any of the french or belgian supporters have a tattoo of their favourite players? probably not but those two countries contest the first semifinal tonight in st petersburg. it has been billed asa in st petersburg. it has been billed as a friendly derby but with a place in the final on offer, i'm not sure. kylian mbappe will hope to continue his good form, scoring three goals already. but neighbours belgium have romelu lu ka ku who already. but neighbours belgium have romelu lukaku who has four goals. belgian beat brazil on friday and
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they believe this could be their time. france's thierry henry is also a coach for belgium so it might be a strange night for him in st petersburg. that is live on bbc one tonight. did you get your hair appointment for the england sweden match? i moved forward, i know you we re match? i moved forward, i know you were worried that i got back in time for the game! no dark bits on the top any more! and wimbledon, all top ten women's seeds are out so who is the favourite? been about 25 seed from america, also known as serena williams. she has been so impressive so farand williams. she has been so impressive so far and has not dropped a set. evgeniya rodina was the latest player to fall by the wayside. with the last of the seeds, karolina pliskova, knocked out, the top ten, williams is favourite to win her 24th grand slam title. camila giorgi
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of italy is a opponent today. serena says she is working hard on and off the court. it is cool, you can be a itiuiti the court. it is cool, you can be a mum and still play tennis and be great and be in the quarterfinals at wimbledon. you can be a working mum. that is what you choose. stay at home mums is a full—time job, kids are so home mums is a full—time job, kids are so hard! either way, women are empowering each other. absolutely. roger federer is through to the quarterfinals without dropping a set and he is the favourite again and continues to show exactly why that is the case. he dispatched adrian mannarino in ominous fashion and if he lives the trophy on sunday, he will equal the record of martina navratilova of nine wimbledon titles. but remember who is on the other side, world than the one
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rafael nadal who is into the quarterfinals for the first time since 2011 with eight straight sets win overjiri vesely. the dream final remains on, ten years after they last played each other in the final although novak djokovic is also on nadal‘s side and will definitely have a say, the three—time champion. that is it for now, i will be back after half—past. thank you. what an astonishing 2a hours in british politics. a real what the heck moment. or possibly stronger language than that. theresa may had hoped that whatever the doubts expressed by cabinet ministers last friday at chequers that her brexit plan would hold. instead she's lost two of her most senior ministers — borisjohnson and david davis. and she's clinging onto power only because mps can't agree on a successor, say some. over the next 45 minutes, we're asking you whereever you are in the uk what do you want to happen next? here they are. a mixture of leave and remain supporters from around britain.
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and also we've got conservative, labourand lib dem politicians here too. but, can you remember how we got here? watch this then. and i will go to parliament and propose that the british people decide ourfuture in europe. anyway, have a leaflet. i'm all right, thanks. all right, 0k. i'm campaigning to remain in the european union to protect workers' rights. the british people have spoken and the answer is we are out. i do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination. what do we want? leadsom for leader! when do we want it? now! her majesty the queen has asked me to form a new government
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and i accepted. brexit means brexit. means brexit. and we are going to make a success of it. do we have a plan for brexit? we do. there's no reason to pretend that this is a happy day. neither in brussels nor in london. it is an enormous decision. i think it's a very exciting one. what has happened today is the biggest diminution in british power and sovereignty in my lifetime. over the moon, happy. today for me, after 25 years of campaigning, the impossible dream came true. # look what you made me do. i will not allow scotland's interests to be steam—rollered. no one in this country has any idea what the deal the prime minister will negotiate
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with europe will be. if the people of this country think that they're going to be cheated... parliament alone is sovereign. we will reject any attempt to undo the referendum result. we're not leaving the continent. the uk is leaving the eu. we're not turning our back. where is the government's mandate for its negotiations? this country's future should rest with parliament. i'm not going to be calling a snap election. i've been very clear that i think we need that period of time and stability to be able to deal with the issues that the country is facing and and have that election in 2020. # you're changed... i have just chaired a meeting with the cabinet where we agreed that the government should call a general election to be held on the 8th ofjune. general election. you'rejoking?! not another one?! i've called an election
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because of brexit. strong... strong and stable leadership. to ensure that we have a strong and stable leadership. # i'm not that innocent. what we're saying is the conservatives are the largest party. they don't have an overall majority at this stage. but i think it's pretty clear that there is going to be a hung parliament. strong and stable, prime minister?! music plays you can be sure there will be a deal. we're working for a deal. and i think to go whistle is an entirely appropriate... in the two years since
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the referendum, we've had a spirited national debate. for the good of this country and its people, the government needs to get its act together, and do it quickly. and if it can't, make way for those who can! i have been making compromises for years. music plays unsurprisingly for such dramatic political upheaval, the twittersphere has been awash with reaction, speculation and, of course, plenty of cross—party political digs. all in good humour, of course. we start off with an endorsement of the resigning ministers by conservative brexiteerjohn whittingdale. he believes the 17.4 million people who also backed leave at the ballot box will be behind them as well. borisjohnson, david davis and steve
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baker. a somewhat less supprtive tweet from john mcendrick qc, attonrey general for the british overseas territory of anguilla. that has been retweeted nearly 6000 times and liked 15,000 times. a similarly unsympathetic response from labour mp jess phillips, and a little translation needed here. firstly tldr is internet slang for too long, didn't read. the rest of course, carpe diem — seize the day, sola fide which means justification by faith alone, the rest you can probably guess. next, vote leave donor arron banks says he has the inside track on a potential return to front line politics for nigel farage. he is basically saying he might come
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back. and finally buzzfeed's alex spence has bemoaned the lack of diversity amongst the seven new appointees. seven ministerial appointments, seven white men. i think it might have been eight in the end. the new cabinet is meeting right now. with us here this morning conservative mp and brexiteer sir bill cash, lib dem mp layla moran — her party is trying to stop brexit and labour mp ben bradshaw — labour's official position is to get a deal that maintains the benefits of single market, end freedom of movement and work out being in a new customs union, not the one we're in now but another one. we also have a group of voters are some who wanted to stay in and some who voted to leave. welcome to all
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of you and thank you forjoining us. the big question, what you think of what is going on? my name is amy, i am chief operating officer of the youth engagement charity. i think the chequers plan is necessary compromise, we are leaving but there are agreements around free trade movement which is what young people want. ultimately they don't have a lot of faith in politicians to deliver. we talked to a lot of people and they do not think they are being listened to. these vaccinations are not helping that. young people do not believe that politicians can deliver —— these resignations. if they cannot stay unified, no wonderful so what do you think, linda? .iwas . i was encouraged to see these resignations because david davis
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particular, he had ajob resignations because david davis particular, he had a job to do, he could not do that. it seems that mrs may is the one who has gone out and try to do negotiations with people like angela merkel. i think it is a good thing they have resigned, it shows the public and the people who voted to leave that some people are trying to stand up for what we want. hello, norman, what do you think?” think the real problem is... mrs may as decided to stay exactly where we are in terms of our relationship with the european union. it does not feel like a proper brexit to you? as farasi feel like a proper brexit to you? as faras i am feel like a proper brexit to you? as far as i am concerned, those are my words, it does not feel like a proper brexit, we're not leaving the eu. who agrees and disagrees? under these plans it is still a hard
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brexit. the definition in lot of the referendum campaign was a norway and style soft brexit. this is still ha rd style soft brexit. this is still hard brexit. bill cash is smiling. i am because we have been through several months of the withdrawal act in the first line of it, which is the law of the land, passed by parliament despite hundreds of amendments, the house of lords attacking it and the rest, plus some conservative remainers, the fact is the repeal of the 19th of the two act is the first line in the act and the repeal of the 1972 act means we leaving. what norman is saying is it does not feel like a proper brexit. can you define what a proper brexit is for you? for me a proper brexit is for you? for me a proper brexit is to have total control of our own destinies in terms of immigration, finances and exactly the control of
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our own government so finances and exactly the control of our own government so that we, the british public, can elect or dismiss the government of the day. let me askjeremy lefroy, the government of the day. let me ask jeremy lefroy, you the government of the day. let me askjeremy lefroy, you support this chequers blueprint, what do you say? i would repeat what sir bill cash said, that we're leaving, this is the european withdrawal bill that has gone through and secondly, and the prime minister made it clear yesterday... can you deal with the specific... parliament will have sovereignty over all these matters was if we take the common trade rule book, if at some point parliament says we're not going to have this particular rule, parliament has the right to say we're not that habit. as the prime minister said, there will be consequences for that but parliament can evaluate those consequences and say if it is worth it. and can you clear it up because
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iam it. and can you clear it up because i am confused depending on who you are here speaking, but having a common rule book, a single market for goods, does it mean britain can have third—party trade deals with the likes of the usa or not? theresa may says yes, boris johnson the likes of the usa or not? theresa may says yes, borisjohnson says it will be difficult. who do we believe? i believe we can have free trade deals. i think a large proportion of our trade and our economy, 80% of its services, and this is not included. i'm talking about goods. when we come to goods it is important we are able to trade freely in goods across borders without hindrance, either tariff or nontariff barriers and having a common rule book, it is about things like safety of goods and food can the things we want. these are not bureaucratic hindrances, they are the things we expect. brussels says you cannot pick and choose and if you cannot pick and choose and if you want you have to pay more money or allow freedom of movement, theresa may says what? she has said that it will come down to parliament
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and sir bill cash has stood up for the sovereignty of parliament and quite rightly. we are now saying that there will be the opportunity for parliament to say, i wouldn't take this? this is a cobbled together compromise to hold the conservative party in the government together rather than being for the best of the country. i don't think it can wina the country. i don't think it can win a majority in parliament. she will have to compromise again, and when she does that people like bill cash will not vote for this, nor will labour. the only way out i can see is a general election or a vote on the deal. give it back to the people, they started the process. on the deal. give it back to the people, they started the processm is not that dissimilar to labour's offering, why would they not vote for it? about keir starmer, our brexit spokesperson, has made clear that unless the deal, the final deal struck by theresa may delivers the exact same benefits, which are staying in the single market and
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customs union, in my view, slightly different from the front bench position, we will vote against it. selma is in edinburgh, what do you think of the last 2a hours? selma is in edinburgh, what do you think of the last 24 hours?” selma is in edinburgh, what do you think of the last 24 hours? i would like to say i am shocked, but i am not really in view of the complete shambles which is this tory government in the first instance. they have had two years, as far as i understand the only document that davis has written and produced is his resignation letter. as far as i can understand it, our uk government has spent two years negotiating with itself before it even begins to negotiate with the eu. however, if i heard you correctly, and i don't have a visual connection, we have three mps, none of whom represent scotland, and politics in scotland are not defined by binary in and out brexit the way they are in england. scotland voted to remain within the
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eu, that is part of the dialogue and discussion taking place here. iwas very excited to hear one of your contributors earlier talk about how young people have been disenfranchised... i was very upset. if you came to scotland now, in civic society you could take part in a debate with younger people about what art the energy policies and politics required to get young people and first—time voters into politics and voting. without the referendum we lowered the age so that young people could vote in something that could determine future —— something that could determine future — — with something that could determine future —— with our referendum. that has been denied to young people here and they are the very generation that will be affected. civic society here has a much broader perspective of the term political situation. ian, how are you? very well, thank you. i can't hear you well enough, i don't know if that is our fault, or
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your microphone. i will speak up. perfect, let's persist as always. what do you think of what has happened in the last 24 hours?” wa nt to happened in the last 24 hours?” want to get behind the prime minister, we need a pragmatic solution to the brexit puzzle. has she come up with one or not?” solution to the brexit puzzle. has she come up with one or not? i think she come up with one or not? i think she is trying and we should support but at that. we need to compromise on all sides. i voted and campaigned to remain, i have a european road freight business so my business is trading with europe. my customers absolutely need frictionless trade, they need simplicity of doing business. it is vital we have a deal, no deal is not good enough for us. we have to find a way through this. it is time for the politicians to stop politicking, stop trying to find political advantage for themselves and find a way through this, cooperating with the eu as
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well. does that mean you back the blueprint of mrs may?” well. does that mean you back the blueprint of mrs may? i am supported in broad terms, it is the beginning of the process of compromise, finding a way through. but my priority is simplicity of trading with what is, after all, easily our biggest trading partner. 44% of exports go to the eu, we simply can't just fall out of that trading market without a deal, without an arrangement. it is not on. we need frictionless trade and simplicity of passing goods across our borders. the british people did not vote two herds big companies like bmw, abbas and so on, they did not vote to hurt... harm jobs. —— and so on, they did not vote to hurt... harmjobs. —— big companies like bmw and serve. they wanted to protect jobs, it is like bmw and serve. they wanted to protectjobs, it is the job of the prime minister and the government to get behind that. i was a
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conservative leave voter and now i am with the liberal democrats, which seems like a strange ship tojump on. why did you change? i felt that i represented a significant proportion of leave voters who thought i want to leave and get something that countries like norway and switzerland have, which are really successful, who do reasonably well. i don't want anything too radical, i want to make sure we can trade with europe but are not within europe in the sense we are not governed by the european union but can trade smoothly and easily. but the lib dems want to stop brexit. they are a broad church and they are the only party right now that is proposing anything relatively easy. labour is proposing five or six different brexit is depending on which faction of the party you are talking to. the official position of the lib dems as they want to stop it. frankly, i don't think being stopped will happen any time soon. i
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think the debate needs a reset button. we need to look at what is going on. if one of the options is to stop brexit, so be it, but i think the vast majority of the british public voted to leave and probably will leave again. however we leave and which type of brexit readopted up for debate. frankly, the discussion we are having now was one we should have had two years ago. it is the sort of brexit we are having right now... isn't that the failure of politicians across the board, that specific point?“ failure of politicians across the board, that specific point? if i could be quite clear, we are in the middle of a white paper due to be produced next week... it has taken two years. the reality is we have gone out of the 1972 act on the 29th of march 2000 and 19. it has taken your government two years. that is what the treaty said it would take,
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and can! what the treaty said it would take, and can i make a very serious point, what we need as answers to very serious questions and a 3—page document has been put out already, we propose a proper analysis. we as in the conservative rebels? we are backing the outcome of the result and the withdrawal act. one viewer says mrs may should have the full support of her party. the alternative is jeremy support of her party. the alternative isjeremy corbyn, who will turn this country into venezuelan without the sun. we are not rebels, we are backing the outcome of the referendum result and the withdrawal act. i am going to... go on. mervin mae says -- mervin says mrs may should have the full support of her party. she hasn't. she hasn't. it says we have to respect the eu autonomy and the sovereignty of the uk parliament. i
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have fought for the sovereignty of the uk parliament for 30 years, and the uk parliament for 30 years, and the bottom line is there a very serious questions coming up in this paper. it is part of the democratic debate that we have a proper discussion and we will present an analysis of where we think in relation to the jurisdiction of the european court there are some u na nswered european court there are some unanswered questions that have to be answered. that is fairly reasonable. we still don't know if the commission and the eu will accept this deal. they should have been where we started two years ago, it should not have taken two years for the tory party to sort itself out. it isa the tory party to sort itself out. it is a complete mess and new information is coming to light, albeit we are in it probably knew some of this before, the vast majority of the public, some knew what they were voting for but lots felt misled. now the information is out and we are having a proper debate, fantastic, we should have had to wait longer than. the hard
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brexiteers like borisjohnson and david davis have not come up with an alternative plan and they are still not coming up with it. if they have one, where is it? where is their alternative plan? you support what you described as principal resignations, do they have a plan and will they get it through?” resignations, do they have a plan and will they get it through? i do not know, i read yesterday that david davis' department has been working on something. he hasjust spent four i was negotiating this year. they have a white paper, that is now being substituted by the current white paper which was presented to chequers. we have not seen it yet. it is white because it is basically blank! that is nonsense. i have been sitting on the european exit committee for the last best pa rt of exit committee for the last best part of two years and i can say that an awful lot of work has gone on by
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the department, led by david davis. i don't accept that not a lot has gone on. it has come to nothing. there have been fundamental differences to get through. the european union itself has said we are the 27, we have the rules. i have met mr barnier on a couple of occasions and seen this, he said the rules are the rules are the rules. when you come up against that it is very difficult. the prime minister, david davis and her team have made considerable progress, but i think the point about whether the eu will acce pt the point about whether the eu will accept what is put forward is very important. i would urge the eu to engage, as someone who wanted to stay in the european union but who accepts the referendum result, i believe it is in the best interest of the european union now to engage fully in a way i do not think they have done until now. i will bring in richard in guildford, who would like another referendum. hello. how are
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you? very well. what do you want a referendum on? i think the initial referendum, people did not know what they were getting into. i think the question itself is too simple, and the politicians now are acting... they are saying they are acting on our behalf but they do not really know what the public wants. there needs to be more detailed analysis of what the public voted for and what they are voting for now. the information about northern ireland, the single market, the customs union, it was naturally discussed in the build—up to the original vote. do the british public want to stay in the single market, the customs union? would anybody else here supports another referendum ? union? would anybody else here supports another referendum? not another one as comprehensive as
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that, but a simple choice, if she can't get any of these deals through parliament, which looks increasingly likely, what other option. she is a rational human being, what other option is there apart from a general election? i don't think the tories would want one all votes 41. as the gentleman in guildford hasjust said, ithink gentleman in guildford hasjust said, i think there should be a vote on the deal, give that back to the public, they started it, let them finish it. you disagree? i am apprehensive about the negotiations. as someone who works for youth engagement charity i can speak on behalf of young people. when we have asked them if they believe the government is delivering? no. do you feel like you have a voice in the negotiations? no. do you want a second vote, a people's vote? lots of them are not convinced that that is the answer, and i am not convinced that having a second referendum would solve anything. we
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need to unified, the government needs to get its act together and deliver a brexit with young people at the centre and make sure it works for them. olga? i don't agree, as you said before we did not have the information, people were voting without knowing. now we have the information, now they are deciding what they want and i feel now is the time people can speak about it and decide with knowledge, i think that is really important. i think we need extra time. pause article 50, it is entirely possible. we can negotiate that with the eu. what worries me is we have so little time left that we will go off a cliff edge, thelma and louise style, and instead we need a real choice, either we have a deal thatis real choice, either we have a deal that is plausible to many people or
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remain in, those are real choices. norman is at downing street, i think the new cabinet with new members has just broken up its meeting. some of the cabinet ministers are coming out, not very loquacious this morning. sajid javid is just coming out, earlier we saw karen bradley and gavin williams. i suppose it will be an awkward cabinet meeting where nobody wants to mention departed friends. it is all change coming with have a new foreign secretary and health secretary and a new culture secretary, that people will be wondering how long is theresa may going to stay safe and secure as prime minister. there are conflicting views. something her ca rd conflicting views. something her card has been marked and it is difficult for her to sustain her position. others take with you it is not nearly so bleak, largely because it is not clear that her opponents,
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the brexiteers, have a clear plan on what to do next. they seem to have decided they can try to alistair because they do not have the numbers and want to concentrate on trying to crank up the pressure on her to rewrite the chequers plan. likewise borisjohnson, it rewrite the chequers plan. likewise boris johnson, it is rewrite the chequers plan. likewise borisjohnson, it is not altogether clear, talking to his friends and colleagues, that he has a clear plan. the speculation is he will sit back for a while before deciding on his next move. in the short—term it looks like may will be able to carry on and try to sell her chequers plan to brussels. that is when i think the next real danger moments will erupt, if brussels give the big thumbs down to the chequers plan then tory mps will be thinking, ok, what is the alternative? if you're thinking alternative, you will be thinking alternative, you will be thinking is there an alternative person to leaders in the negotiations? that is where maybe borisjohnson will decide to
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re—enter the frame, but for now, it is only a guess, but i think mrs may has breathing space before the next hiatus. once that is over, do you wa nt to hiatus. once that is over, do you want to see a leadership contest? know. i think we would be in complete agreement, we will at a meeting of the 22 committee yesterday and there was no sense of one, but if you were to ask the question were we to stay in the european union as a result of the failure of brexit, in the council of ministers where all our laws come from to the european communities act of 1972, which we are repealing, the decisions were taken without transcripts, without anybody really knowing the reasons why they are doing it, i am knowing the reasons why they are doing it, lam chairman knowing the reasons why they are doing it, i am chairman of the european scrutiny committee and i can tell you that the system is deliberately and democratic.“ there is no deal, we are coming out
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with no deal? we will get back to a democratic system. that would do so much damage to this country. decent, sensible conservative mps like geoffrey would never allowed no deal. jeremy. i do not think there is any appetite, even of the 48 or whatever matters going, i think the vast majority of conservative mps would back mrs may, as sir bill said. or even if there is a leadership contest she would win? yes. but i think the prospect of falling over a cliff is something we should not contemplate. we need a deal, it is absolutely vital. to come back what amy said earlier, and i raise this with the prime minister, it has every opportunity to be something of the government says to young people in this country, everybody including young people, this is what it means, this is the future and these are the
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positive things. there will be real challenges but also positives. we will have to live with this —— you will have to live with this —— you will have to live with this —— you will have to live with this much longer than people like bill and i. one viewer says mrs may must go, she is not delivering on the referendum, she's pandering to big business in the eu. she needs to man up, she is weak. this text says i will never vote conservative again, mrs may has fooled everyone. jill says we need a second referendum, people were swept up second referendum, people were swept up with misinformation and the pack mentality. lots regret it now, and we need an honest answer once and for all. paul said may has got rid of the chuckle brothers, now we have a deliverable plan with cross—party consensus. richard says politicians are trying to further their own career. borisjohnson are trying to further their own career. boris johnson is are trying to further their own career. borisjohnson is not doing it for the country. i voted remain but i want to stay in the customs union and take power back from the
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eu,i union and take power back from the eu, iwant union and take power back from the eu, i want another votes. another viewer says the country knows it is a disastrous decision they should have a right to correct it. is it impossible to correct a referendum mistake in the constitutional framework? there must be a way out, stop brexit! norman, what you think? my stop brexit! norman, what you think? my senses that mrs may will not change this chequers plan, whatever pressure is put on her. she seems to have convinced herself that this is the only deal in town, there are no other options. all the other scenarios, from her point of view, are unacceptable and go for some sort of free trade deal, she is worried about a border in northern ireland, if we go from no deal she is worried about the impact on the business community. she has locked herself into this mindset and will go for it. herface, it herself into this mindset and will go for it. her face, it seems to herself into this mindset and will go for it. herface, it seems to me, is pretty much tied up with the
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chequers plan. what happens if it hits the buffers? —— herfaith, it seems to me. will brussels be prepared to negotiate on this basis? at the moment, they say it looks a bit like cherry picking, if you want have bits and pieces of the single market you have to accept the whole package. when you get down into the thick grass of the negotiations, i wonder whether there will be some flexibility. if she has to sell it, the fact she was prepared for her chief of staff to brief opposition mps yesterday afternoon in the middle of this whole crisis suggests to me that cometh the hour, she will need labour mps to back her and she will do that. one of her own said to me that the herd was about doing the right thing. i think she has decided on her own mind that this is the right thing to do for the country, and if that means really testing the
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balance of unity and keeping her party together she is prepared to risk that. ben bradshaw, where you at that briefing yesterday? yes, it was extraordinary. i have never been briefed by deputy prime minister pleading with labour mps to save the government. i don't think we will. she could have reached at ewe years ago the cross—party consensus when she had the opportunity. if she gave parliament a free vote on a norway option, i think she would get it through, i don't know why she doesn't do it. it would save her premiership, it would result in brexit, not the kind of brexit i would want but it is a way out for her. i know you wanted to make a point, jeremy, then i will ask what you all want to happen next. in her letter the prime minister has said this will be an association. the eu has plenty of association agreements of various kinds with other countries, such as the ukraine. going back to the question about the
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european union, they have been very flexible with other countries with which they have significantly less trade and association with us. there is absolutely no reason why an association agreement should not be formed. this is what guy verhofstadt, who leads the european parliament negotiators, said, let's have an association agreement. the pm is engaging very much on the terms of the european parliament, perhaps less so at the moment but in the future it will hopefully commit to the european commission.” the future it will hopefully commit to the european commission. i would like to ask the other norman what he wa nts to like to ask the other norman what he wants to happen next?” like to ask the other norman what he wants to happen next? i would like to see us get much tougher with the european union. what does that mean, practically? for me personally, there are loads of issues which are perfectly acceptable. in practice, what we really need to do is say to
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the european union that we are going to go to world trade organisation rules unless you come back with some proposals. and i think under those situations, just let me finish... of course. under those situations i am sure that people like mercedes, bmw, audi, volkswagen arena is other people in europe will be knocking on the door of angela merkel, as would the door of angela merkel, as would the french, like peugeot, citroen, renault, they would be knocking on the door of the president of france. serve as a consequence i think we really need to put lots of pressure on europe and let's see how they come back and what their reaction is to walking away. in a sentence, what does pressure from the uk look like? what do you mean? to simply say we
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will move to world trade organisation rules and that is it,., we are right. selma, what do you wa nt to we are right. selma, what do you want to happen next? i am almost gobsmacked, with no disrespect to whoever is sitting wherever. ——” gobsmacked, with no disrespect to whoever is sitting wherever. -- i am almost gobsmacked, with no disrespect to whoever is sitting wherever. this discussion is london—centric it is astonishing. wherever. this discussion is london-centric it is astonishing. we have photos from all over the uk. that you have no particular voice speaking for scotland, either from the government perspective all the major parties sitting in westminster. somebody, ithink major parties sitting in westminster. somebody, i think bill cash, casually use the word sovereignty, no regard is being paid to the wider implications of this brexit programme on the devolved countries. the eu withdrawal bill
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was passed with no regard to the continuity bill that was approved in scotland, we are waiting for the supreme court to hear this case this month and then bring forward a decision in october, in the autumn, which will produce a constitutional crisis if the uk government continues to disregard the voice of the people and the parliament in scotland. selma, what would you want to happen? there is no point in having an affair referendum. the chances of the majority of people of scotland is looking at the debacle that has come out of london to say no, we willjoin the leave campaign, this is ridiculous. it demonstrates the fragility of the united kingdom in relation to how it governs itself and how it relates to the rest of the world. what would you like to
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happen next? what i want to find out next is the detail of this plan, as opposed to what appears to be the back of a fag packet, just to keep some people happy in chequers. and see how this can be progress. what i don't want to see is if there will be special conditions put out the northern ireland, i want to know how that will impact on what the scottish people voted for and what the scottish parliament put forward, with cooperation from the other parties in our parliament. maybe you will get that detail when the white paper is published. i doubt it very much, because i am convinced the detail of that white paper is being changed as it is being rewritten to try to hold the tory party together. thank you, selma in edinburgh, before that we heard from norman in exeter. ian nottingham? no deal is a threat we
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cannot carry out and it is against one of my principles and business of not issuing threats are not prepared to carry out. deal would be a catastrophe for british business. we need frictionless trade, simple agreement the trading with the eu, and we need to solve problems around immigration and so one that people we re immigration and so one that people were interested in in the referendum. i want politicians to come together and find the solution. ian has just a come together and find the solution. ian hasjust a politician come together and find the solution. ian has just a politician should come together. richard and guilt that, in a sentence, what do you wa nt that, in a sentence, what do you want happen next? about another referendum. —— richard in guildford. another referendum. we are sitting ona another referendum. we are sitting on a ticking time bomb. what he want to happen next? i would rather we start from square one and let's just realise we are in the single market, the eu at the moment, which bits do we wa nt the eu at the moment, which bits do we want to leave out? rather than trying to reinvent the wheel and start from scratch, which is what we
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seem to be doing. i am a remainer macro through and through, but brexit is happening and the uncertainty of the toing and froing is having a negative effect on young people and economy. we need to deliver a brexit that works are young people. do not talk over her. i sort of agree with the first gentleman, we need to get tougher with europe. we are just tiptoeing around because we are afraid we will upset them and they are holding all the cards, that is what it feels like. ithink the cards, that is what it feels like. i think the country has voted to leave and we need to get tough. very quickly, do you want to happen next, in a sentence? the european union engages with the prime minister and we get an association based on what she has put forward. i want is to be absolutely clear about the repeal of the 72 act, and the questions in the chequers statement answered, and i
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wa nt chequers statement answered, and i want to remind people that people all over europe, and immigration and other matters, are voting with their feet against the current european union. don't go back in, it is a nightmare. all politicians from all parties need to come together, it is a crisis, we need to pause article 50, geta a crisis, we need to pause article 50, get a deal that is possibly workable, put it back to the people, where i will campaign vigorously to remain in the eu. if we cannot remain in the eu. if we cannot remain in the customs union and the single market then we need a people's vote. thank you everybody, keep your comments coming in. i will read more in the next hour. at 10am we will bring you the latest news and sport, but now the weather. yesterday temperatures got up to 30 celsius in the london area. some changes today. it will break the run we have had of temperatures of above 30 degrees since the 4th ofjuly. one thing you will notice, it is
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much cloudier this morning. this is one of our weather watchers in warwickshire, you can see the clouds streaming in from the north and the east, it is coming from the north sea, losing further south and west. there is sunshine at the moment, it is particularly across the north—west of wales, down to the midlands and into central and southern parts of england. in west sussex we have sunnier skies. through the day, if you have some clout it will thin and break to get some bright sunny spells. across the farfar north of some bright sunny spells. across the far far north of scotland remains quite cloudy, there will be outbreaks of rain affecting the north of scotland into the afternoon. for wimbledon, quite north of scotland into the afternoon. forwimbledon, quite a bit more clouds compared to the last few days. 30 degrees yesterday, 22 or 23 today, more of a breezy. that is the general theme for many parts of england and wales, temperatures taking a significant drop. 23, 20
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four celsius, perhaps 26 degrees in the cardiff area. 17 to about 20 further north. this evening at an icon is unclear spells across england and wales, for scotla nd spells across england and wales, for scotland remains quite cloudy and there will be heavy bursts of rain moving into western scotland, eventually beast of northern ireland by the early hours of wednesday. quite a comfortable night for sleeping again, quite fresh in the countryside, ten to 15 degrees in towns and cities. for most of us on wednesday it is dry, to the east of northern ireland you could see the most significant rainfor you could see the most significant rain for about three weeks, some other quite heavy at times, heavy rain in the west of scotland. temperatures creeping up slightly on wednesday, by a degree also, 21 to 25 or 26 celsius. the rain you have had all will have in the north—west of scotland, east of northern ireland, that will clear away and pressure is slipping away to the
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south—west, introducing fresh conditions to northern areas. temperatures remaining around 19 to 20 celsius. temperatures and southern areas rising towards the end of the week, high just about holding on by the time we get to the weekend, there will be showers around, temperatures across southern parts going into the high 20s and perhaps low 30s. hello, it's tuesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. our top story today. after an extraordinary 36 hours in politics and a new brexit secretary, voters tell us they want the government to get its act together on brexit. i'm not convinced that having a second referendum would actually solve anything. i think what we need to do it actually unify. i think the government needs to get its act together and actually deliver brexit with young people at the centre and actually making sure it works for them. i would like to say i am shocked but lam not
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i would like to say i am shocked but i am not really in view of the complete shambles that is this tory government in the first instance. they have had to years and as far as they can understand and as far as i can see, the only document david davis has produced is his resignation letter. we'll have the latest from downing street as theresa may's new look cabinet met for the very first time. the nhs has announced an immediate halt to mesh procedures just over a year after this programme revealed 800 women were suing the nhs and manufacturers over mesh implants. the burning is so intense, that's how it feels, to the point where i couldn't even use a tampon during my periods because the burning, that would exacerbate the burning, but also that would send shooting pains down my legs. and then, interestingly, once i had had the mesh removed, within three days of removal all that burning has gone. we will hear from some women whose health has been severely affected by the mesh implant. if you have had one, let me know
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your own experience. and we'll bring you the latest on the efforts to rescue the remaining boys and their football coach from the flooded cave in thailand. one of the divers helping the rescue effort has described the risk of getting the children out safely. very scared, because when i saw the diver and the kid on the horizon, we can't see that far but maybe about 50 metres, i still didn't know if it was a casualty or a kid. so i was very scared. we'll be live from the hospital where some of the boys are being treated. good morning, it's ten o'clock. here's joanna gosling is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. in the last few minutes, theresa may's new—look cabinet has been leaving 10 downing street after meeting for the first time since the resignations of borisjohnson and david davis. dominic raab, the new brexit secretary, was one of the first to arrive. mrs may was forced into the reshuffle when her brexit
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negotiating position was rejected by his predecessor and the foreign secretary. meanwhile jeremy hunt, who replaces mrjohnson, says he's "four square" behind her. will you hold firm on the brexit plan? absolutely. is the government in crisis? norman smith is in downing street. it was a tumultuous day yesterday but what is in store today? the new look cabinet has just finished its first meeting. no more resignations, we counted them in and out and as
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liam fox left on a colic shuddered, are you resigning and he shook his head and said no —— a colleague shouted. mrs may left a short time later wearing a fairly eye—catching fascinator, perhaps a demonstration of self—confidence, i suspect her media team might applaud it would be a show of bravado after her difficulties but the signs are she might now have some breathing space because the brexiteers seem determined to concentrate their effo rts determined to concentrate their efforts on trying to get the controversial chequers plan remit rather than trying to muster the names to prompt a confidence motion against her. for now it seems mrs may has a bit of time to regroup but her troubles are far from over of course. thank you. divers in northern thailand have restarted their high—risk rescue operation to free the last five members of a group who became trapped in a vast cave system last month. eight boys have been brought out
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of the caves over the past two days in the most difficult conditions. it's thought those conditions could worsen with more rainfall predicted tomorrow. the boys who are already out are said to be in good health, although two have had to be treated for lung inflammation. danjohnson dan johnson gave us danjohnson gave us this update. there are four boys and their coach to be rescued and after the success of the last two days they seem confident they can repeat that rescue operation and conclude this mission today. but they are not the only people who have to come out. they have to bring the doctor out who has been in there treating them and three thai navy divers who apparently have been with the boys since they were discovered deep in the cave in that hillside more than a week ago now. it looks like this ordeal is close to coming to an end but there is still a lot of work to do here. this final phase of the operation has been going on forfive hours now but it sounds like it will be an hour or more before we see the first boys appearing at the surface today. nhs england is putting an immediate curb on vaginal mesh
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operations after safety concerns. it's accepted the advice of a new review looking at harm reported by women. an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme had found that many said the implants caused agony and even life—changing injuries by cutting into tissue. the review‘s chair, baroness julia cumberlege, said she was "appalled at the seriousness and scale" of the problem. we'll have more on this with victoria very shortly. the introduction of extra services on eight different railway lines across the country has been delayed because of the chaos caused by timetable changes earlier this year. the chairman of network rail has said that "recent painful lessons" meant that ambitions had to be scaled back. thousands of prisoners will be able to make telephone calls from their cells under plans announced by the government. the phones will be installed in 20 prisons as part of a drive to improve safety and privacy in jails across england and wales and with the hope of stemming the trade in illicit mobiles. donald trump has confirmed he is nominating brett kavanaugh as his pick for the us supreme court.
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he's a 53—year—old conservative justice who serves on the us court of appeals in washington. judge kavanaugh worked as a white house aide under president george w bush. film producer harvey weinstein has pleaded not guilty at a court in new york to charges of sexually assaulting a woman in 2006. it's the third criminal sexual assault case brought against him. more than 70 women have accused him of sexual misconduct, including rape. his lawyer says he's innocent and that all sexual encounters were consensual. the raf will celebrate its centenary this afternoon with a parade on the streets of london and a huge fly—past over buckingham palace. aircraft representing the raf across the decades will be involved in the fly—past over london at lunchtime. the queen will be among members of the royal family attending the events. westminster abbey will host a special service and more than a thousand servicemen and women will take part in the parade. that's a summary of the latest bbc news.
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more at 10.30am. thank you for your e—mails. we are going to talk about mesh more in the next half hour. julie says she experienced and is still experiencing problems as a result of mesh. she had one incident and then removed because of being in agony, only to be persuaded to have another inserted and subsequently removed. five operations later and i'm still suffering. i have had to go down to part—time work. i have tried contacting a solicitor but to no avail. she says it is not only women suffering following surgery, my husband had a hernia repair eight yea rs husband had a hernia repair eight years ago using mesh. we did a piece on this comedy hernia mesh. after excruciating pain he had to another urgent repair —— on this, hernia mesh. that was three weeks ago and already he is feeling and having
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relief from the pain. more men need to come forward and threatened legal action for the health authorities to look into action so men don't need to suffer as well. if you have had a mesh implant, do get in touch as we will be talking about it in the next few minutes. let's get some sport now. tim is at the bbc sport centre. their biggest match of the england players‘ lives is 36 hours away as they take on croatia tomorrow night for a place in the world cup finals but they have been training this morning and continue to look in remarkably relaxed mood. this was then warming up with a rubber chicken! not often you say that. it is their first world cup semifinal in 28 years and while the players have surpassed all expectations in russia, they are still trying not to look too far ahead. it is one of them things as a kid, you always
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dream of playing in the world cup, and of winning the world cup. we're not going to get too far ahead of ourselves and get carried away. everybody's feet are on the ground and pulling the right way and we're going to prepare in the same way we have for every other game. it is another game coming have for every other game. it is anothergame coming up have for every other game. it is another game coming up and that is how we have to see it. before that we have the first semifinal tonight, front against belgium which is in st petersburg. the two strikers chasing harry kane for the golden boot, france‘s kylian mbappe has three goals while belgium‘s romelu lukaku has four also the belgian manager is afamiliar has four also the belgian manager is a familiarface has four also the belgian manager is a familiar face to english fans and is not underestimating the french. when you face a team like france you know that you need to concentrate for 90 minutes. there are some special individuals who can decide the scoreline in one action and it is not the type of game you can think you can walk onto the pitch and think you can perform in a way
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that what you did against brazil will help you. not at all. that match is live on bbc one and it kicks off at 7pm and there is also commentary on radio 5 live and full coverage on the bbc sport website. it is the women quarter finals at wimbledon and the title favourite is now serena williams. she is not dropped a set yet. evgeniya rodina with the latest player to fall by the wayside and with the last of the top ten seeds, karolina pliskova, knocked out yesterday, williams is on course for a the 24th grand slam title. and like serena williams, roger federer is through to be finals without dropping a set he dispatched adrian mannarino of france on centre court. and if you lift the trophy on sunday he will equal the record of martina navratilova of nine wimbledon singles titles. —— if he lists. there could be a final against
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rafael nadal as the made it to the last eight for the first time since 2011, straight sets for him as well as he beatjiri vesely. novak djokovic also won and is in nadal‘s side of the draw also and they treat for the centre court crowd who had an equitable comeback from jamie murray and victoria azarenka in the second round of the mixed doubles as they recovered from 5—1 down in the final set to beat robert farah and anna—lena groenefeld after two and three quarters hours on court and no wonder the home fans looked so happy. no british players left in the singles. thank you very much. i can tell you that according to an official with knowledge of the thai rescue operation, a nice person has been rescued, we are not clear if it isa been rescued, we are not clear if it is a boy or the coach. one would imagine it might be the ninth boy to be rescued. a ninth person has been
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rested, that is from an official with knowledge of the operation and that has been reported by reuters. eight boys are out, incredibly successful so far, and they are being treated in local hospitals. what is hoped to be the final rescue mission is under way right now to bring out the remaining four boys and their coach but a ninth person has been carried out of the cave on a stretcher. we will talk lift our correspondent in the next half hour to bring you up—to—date on that story because i know so many of you wa nt to story because i know so many of you want to know what is going on with the operation. just over a year ago, we brought the mesh scandal to the nation‘s attention. women who‘d been silent about their pain told us about how having a medical mesh implant, often to treat bladder incontinence or prolapse after giving birth, had ruined their lives. they couldn‘t walk properly, work, they couldn‘t have sex,
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and they were in constant, debilitating pain. here‘s a reminder of three women we spoke to in april last year who had a mesh implant. my reality was absolutely fantastic for the first three years. and then i began to have what felt like period pains but very intense period pains that would go on for days and weeks and weeks. and i was re—referred back to my gynaecologist who said it must be your womb. i had a full abdominal hysterectomy to try and rectify my pain. and of course i still had it there after that. so i lost my womb for no reason when i was 39. so what did you think it was then? i went to see my gp after i had my hysterectomy and i said that i was still in pain. and he looked at me square
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in the face and he said, "we‘ve had you out on an operating table, there is nothing there to see. you are depressed." wow. how did that make you feel? i got back in my car and i phoned my husband and i said... ijust can‘t, i can‘t live any more. i can‘t go through this. i actually do think... i‘m believing the doctors, i think it‘s in my head. yeah. i didn‘t know where else to turn. did you, can i ask, did you have any suicidal thoughts? you did? yeah. gosh. i planned it. i mapped it out. and... you know, having children there... something i thinkjust kicked in. i‘m very lucky that something kicked in. i've had over 53 admissions. over the last five years, i counted actually. because you were in pain?
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because of agonising pain. i can feel like something really sharp every time i walk. it almost feels like something sharp is inside me and i couldn't understand what it was. so i went back, i had an appointment coming up to see a surgeon anyway. he examined me and he could actually see the tape had through my vagina so it was actually protruding through. so they said... and when you say tape, we‘re talking about the mesh implants? yes. a piece of that had actually worked its way, which was this erosion thing, it had worked its way through and come out the other way of the thigh. gosh. what was the reality then? my husband has turned into my carer and he is so much less of my husband. we can‘t have sex. we haven‘t had sex for four and a half years. we can attempt it at times because, you know, he‘s a 45—year—old man. this stuff breaks up marriages. why wouldn‘t it? it is cause for divorce, not having sexual relations with your partner. imagine a hedgehog covered in chilli sauce, is as bad as it is.
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when people say, why can't you have sex after a mesh implant? the burning is so intense, that is how it feels, to the point where i couldn't even use a tampon during my periods. because the burning, that would exacerbate the burning but also that would then send shooting pains down my legs. and then, interestingly, once i had had the mesh removed, within three days of removal all that burning has gone. it is like being mutilated. it is barbaric. that is the only way to describe it really. it slices through the wall. so when women are having sex, sometimes their partners are being injured during sex because it is cutting through the wall. it is that severe. and there were many more. in fact we revealed that 800 women were taking legal action against the nhs and the manufacturer. that has gone up since then. well, from today there will be an immediate stop to nhs mesh
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operations for bladder problems. nhs england is halting mesh operations after safety concerns. it‘s accepted the advice of a new review looking at the harm reported by women. with us is the chair of that review, baroness julia cumberlege. labour mp owen smith, chair of the all party parliamentary group on surgical mesh implants. dr suzy elneil — a consultant surgeon who‘s carried out more than 250 operations to remove mesh implants, one of the women you saw in our original report. the founder of the sling the mesh campaign kath sansom; and debbie waine, who has lost her mobility since having a mesh implant. an immediate halt to nhs england mesh operations for bladder incontinence, what does it mean to
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you? i can't tell you, there was absolute joy on the facebook support group, with more than 6100 members, there was about a thousand when we came on the show a year ago. we are so delighted and grateful it has been put in place but it is tinged with sadness because it has taken so long for the government to realise the problems. it is a mixture of emotions. what about you? i was over the moon, it felt like almost we had won the lottery. it has been amazing to get this far, i did not think we would, this soon. i am delighted. but also, it is too late for a lot of people which is not fair. it is barbaric and i'm glad it is going to be stopped and things crossed it will be permanently banned. that is a good point because it is temporarily until certain conditions are met. your reaction to the news?
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really surprised it has come so soon and delighted because i think one of the things we have always been pushing for was to stop and see where we are at the moment and then work out how much we need to do and how much we have to help the people who are already implanted so it is crucial we have stopped any further implants. your reaction? delighted and surprised, it is almost a year to the day that we were on your programme calling for this suspension, before we could find out how problematic mesh was full i commend julia for her review being so decisive and persuading the government to do the right thing and ban it. why have you recommended this? because we had been so concerned about the amount of stories we have heard. we have talked to a lot of people, decided with the review, the first thing was to listen and to meet people and
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talk to them. we have met clinicians, all sorts of academics, other people, but principally we have been concentrating on meeting women. and notjust through e—mails but face to face and hearing the stories that have been so, so terrible. they have been life changing and, in some cases, life—threatening. changing and, in some cases, life-threatening. i want to go back to debbie. it is too little, too late for you. it is. you had a mesh implant for prolapse rather than bladder incontinence. it was for both. fair enough. since implant, it is difficult for you to walk, you have to use crutches as you did today. i did, i use a wheelchair or a mobility scooter and my life has changed an awful lot. it is not simple any more, it is difficult.
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every time i get ill with some sort of illness like pneumonia or whatever, it weakens me it takes its toll on me. this year so far i have had re—occurring utis and i'm on antibiotics for three months. no one should have to go through what we we nt should have to go through what we went through but i am just so pleased that hopefully no one else will get injured. you were told it was effectively a 20 minute procedure, kind of a formality. were you warned of any potential risks? no, iwas you warned of any potential risks? no, i was told the usual, could be some blood loss or problems with the anaesthetic and all that but nothing else. idid anaesthetic and all that but nothing else. i did not know there was alternatives to mesh. and the mesh in you had snapped and it was stuck to your bladder? yes. it is a
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flexible material. it is extremely painful. i have lost sensation in my bladder, i cannot tell if it is full orempty and bladder, i cannot tell if it is full or empty and have to... remind myself to go to the toilet every few hours though i don't get utis. —— so i don't get. it is a horrible way to live. the thought of having to live the rest of my life in continuous pain is really scary, absolutely scary. as i say, my mobility is getting worse as i get older now. how many operations have you had? five altogether. to try to get it out? yes. hopefully ms o'neill can help me in the future. she has been amazing. she never gives up on us, never. i have been seeing her for
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four years and she has not given up on me, she is trying to help me get through all this. is it accurate you we re through all this. is it accurate you were diagnosed with ptsd? yes, last yearl were diagnosed with ptsd? yes, last year i had a little breakdown, finding things hard to cope with. mentally, every time you have an operation to remove that mesh, it takes it out of you mentally. it is so harrowing that it is hard to cope with sometimes. to go through each operation. it is hard to explain but it is traumatic. every operation i haveis it is traumatic. every operation i have is traumatic and i feel like it takes something away from me. can i ask if you have had suicidal thoughts? yes, i have. i have them ona thoughts? yes, i have. i have them on a regular basis. i am on antidepressants for that. i am now
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trying to live my life the best way ican. i trying to live my life the best way i can. i want to start living. for five years i have a lot of appointments and operations and now i have to try and move on the best i can. this is a devastating example of how it can wreck somebody‘s life. and we see it every day on the page for the deadbeat was doing a photography course, had ambitions and dreams and they have been cut short —— everyday on the facebook page. everyday we have women coming on who cannot walk, they are in pain, they have lost their sex lives, worried their husband might be having an affair, having to give up be having an affair, having to give up theirjobs be having an affair, having to give up their jobs and be having an affair, having to give up theirjobs and these are life changing complications. to so many all the time, throughout the day, awful things happening to women who
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genuinely believed they were getting this little fix and getting on with their lives. some women have lost everything and it is so upsetting. it is not a ban, everything and it is so upsetting. it is nota ban, it everything and it is so upsetting. it is not a ban, it is an immediate halt until and unless certain conditions are met. they are basic conditions, like a surgeon carried out the procedure should be appropriately trained. that is correct but we are very anxious to have a proper register so we know exactly what is going on, which surgeon did what operation to which a woman. we have to link this up so we know what is going on, where the competitions are. the competitions should then be on the register and it should go to the regulator —— the complications. we are very clear we need centres of excellence, accredited, so we know where they should go and it should not be anybody having a go, this should be
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proper expertise in proper places that we can keep an eye on ulcer would you like to see a full and?” think the reality is that mesh has had its day —— a full ban. it is said in one of the reports that it should only be considered as a last line and fora should only be considered as a last line and for a limited cohort of women for whom there is no other option. wales decided that would be their policy a couple of months ago. i would be amazed if the new review does not come to a similar conclusion and the doctors are already voting with their feet, they note this is a massive problem and they are stopping using it. the nhs has sent out at midnight last night to all medical directors to say to stop using it. in truth, they will not get these things in place so in effect it is dead and buried. do you agree? i do, it is clear that the steps that have to be taken that have been outlined by baroness
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cumberlege are laudable and important. but absolutely, that most of my colleagues will probably not be implanting any mesh for a long time. you have been campaigning for however long forced up until the review was launched, we were told repeatedly by nhs england, the benefits outweigh the risks for the majority of women and this is a procedure that works.” majority of women and this is a procedure that works. i think there are massive questions for the regulators. why is it that when problems emerge, the institutions at the nhs are so defensive? in particular the regulators and they gave the go—ahead to these devices, they are essentially circling the wagons as they do so many other occasions and that is one of the things that has to challenged after this decision. why aren‘t you recommending an immediate halt to using mesh for
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hernia procedures and prolapse? the prolapse issue has really been dealt with and it has been ruled out now for that particular operation through nice and other measures. hernias, we are not told it is an area we need to examine. i am sure it will come later. we have done an investigation, it happened to be mostly men we spoke to who said i have had this, it is a problem. ehmer in southampton says it has been eight years today since having a mesh implant for stress incontinence. i am going to the incontinence. i am going to the incontinence nurse to seek help for co nsta nt incontinence nurse to seek help for constant leaking. why is this fight so hard? i am pleased the suspension will stop any more be unharmed, but what about those of us in pain and struggling with day—to—day life? michael says i have been put on a three—year waiting list for a hernia surgical repair and have discovered
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this mesh can be used in this procedure. when i queried it i was told it was up to the surgeon concerned. when i queried further i was told it has been known to cause a bit of pain. surely this also needs to be investigated for men? there is a trial going on in the uk, randomising men who have had prostate cancer to have a mesh sling and the old —fashioned prostate cancer to have a mesh sling and the old—fashioned repair four continents. i would really like to get the message across but notjust hernias, but the male slings are out there, be warned if you‘re offered this it is mesh, the same plastic. fiona says thank you for all the help in highlighting the dangers of vaginal mesh. i had this done in 2008 my health has deteriorated badly sense, autoimmune issues and thyroid issues which i blame on the mesh. it is so hard to get doctors to understand and the long waits for appointments. the nhs but this mesh
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poison in my body, why should i fight bred to be removed? chris says i had fight bred to be removed? chris says ihada fight bred to be removed? chris says i had a hernia up ten years ago and have had discomfort and pulling ever since. iam not have had discomfort and pulling ever since. i am not in agony but it has affected my ability to run or cycle andi affected my ability to run or cycle and i am currently constantly aware of the discomfort. what to expect in the future? what is your advice as a consultant neuro gynaecologist? many women who are currently suffering need to get help. in practical terms? currently suffering need to get help. in practicalterms? come back to you, go to their original consultant? having seen so many women having difficulty getting access to care, they need to be looking, and this is one of the recommendations, proper pathways of kaaya setup. we have tried to work with colleagues in the pain society and the imaging societies to try to
quote
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get information out to all the regions in the uk, to try to improve access to replace the starting point. we need to look at surgery and get patients access to that. lots of people are referred to me, but there are other opportunities. quick final thought? i think compensation needs to be thought about, i know the baroness will probably say something at some point. many women have suffered terribly, loss of six life but in ability to work for many years. these are operations which were carried out on the nhs in many cases, at some point the system needs to be held accountable and compensation ought to be looked at. do you agree? we are putting out our terms of reference very shortly and one of the things we will look at is compensation. we cannot compensate individuals, we do not have the skills or anything else to do that.
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i cannot say what compensation you should need. it is not for individuals, but we will look at having a system of compensation, thatis having a system of compensation, that is an alternative reference. presumably it could run into the millions? it will be up to the government to fund whatever we decide, it is not for us to do that. it needs a lot of careful thought. owen is right, we are still at the very beginning of the review. there are lots of issues that will come up during the course of the review and we have to do a lot more work and research, working with all sorts of people, in order to come up with some conclusions. well done to you. i would like a different mesh to be added to the suspension, and if i could add in about hernia mesh, until recently there was not even in ayes guideline and i asked why an
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bit sad because nobody has asked us. thank you all so much. we will continue to follow all of you, but well done and thank you very much for coming in. just to say we were first alerted to the mesh issue by one of our viewers. anne—marie conley, who lives in ayrshire, got on a train and came to see me, gave me loads of documentation and that was the start of our investigations into mesh. if you have a story, an issue, something you think we should cover — do get in touch — send us an email to victoria@bbc.co.uk. thanks to ann—marie and all the women who spoke to us so openly about mesh complications. time for the latest news — here‘s joanna gosling. the bbc news headlines this morning... theresa may‘s new—look cabinet met at 10 downing street this morning, after the resignations of borisjohnson and david davis. mrs may was forced into the reshuffle when her brexit negotiating position was rejected by the brexit secretary and the foreign secretary. jeremy hunt, who replaces mrjohnson, said he would be "four square" behind the prime minister. she has warned conservatives they must unite if they don‘t want to seejeremy corbyn in power.
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in the last half hour, a ninth person has been brought out of the cave system in northern thailand, after over two weeks underground. —— in the last half—hour, we have heard that two more people have been brought out of the cave system in northern thailand, meaning ten in total. the dangerous rescue mission resumed about six hours ago for the last boys still trapped with their coach. also to come out, are a doctor and at least two thai navy seals who‘ve stayed with the group since they were first discovered over a week ago. the hope is that every one will be brought out before heavy rainfall that‘s predicted for tomorrow. we‘ll bring you the very latest in just a moment. nhs england is putting an immediate curb on vaginal mesh operations after safety concerns. it‘s accepted the advice of a new review looking at harm caused to women. an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme had found that many reported the implants caused agony and even life changing injuries by cutting into tissue. the review‘s chair, baroness julia cumberlege, said she was "appalled at the seriousness and scale" of the problem.
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thousands of prisoners will be able to make telephone calls from their cells under plans announced by the government. the phones will be installed in 20 prisons as part of a drive to improve safety and privacy in jails across england and wales and with the hope of stemming the trade in illicit mobiles. the introduction of extra services on eight different railway lines across the country has been delayed because of the chaos caused by timetable changes earlier this year. the chairman of network rail has said that "recent painful lessons" meant that ambitions had to be scaled back. the raf will celebrate its centenary this afternoon with a parade on the streets of london and a huge fly—past over buckingham palace. aircraft representing the raf across the decades will be involved in the fly—past over london at lunchtime. the queen will be among members of the royal family attending the events. westminster abbey will host a special service and more than a thousand servicemen and women will take part in the parade. that‘s a summary of
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the latest bbc news. we will be live to thailand after the sport from tim. the countdown is on, england post my players have been training this morning ahead of the biggest match of their lives. they take on croatia at 7pm tomorrow for a place in the world cup final. before that, france take on belgian in the first semifinal in st petersburg. with two strikers chasing harry kane for the golden boot ‘s, kylian mbappe france has four goals and romelu lukaku has three. it is women‘s quarterfinal day in wimbledon, serena williams is now favourite to win for the eighth time. the ryan thomas britain is third in the tour de france after tea m third in the tour de france after team sky was second—fastest —— geraint thomas of britain. more
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sport on the news channel throughout the day, see you tomorrow. studio: thank you, tim. we‘re just getting reports from the reuters news agency that divers have rescued a tenth person from the flooded cave in thailand. our correspondent martin patience is at the hospital in chiang rai where those who have been rescued from the cave are being taken. martin, what can you tell us about the latest reports? we are getting reports that a ninth and potentially tense boy was brought out of the cave. the divers went into the cave seven hours ago, that would tally with what we have seen over the last couple of days —— a ninth and potentially tense boy. eight boys have been rescued already, pape suggestions of another two today. that is the main objective. this is being seen by many as the final day of the operation, where these divers will bring up the four remaining boys plus their coach in the next few hours. in terms of the latest
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rescues , few hours. in terms of the latest rescues, the boys are normally brought to the hospital behind me. we have not seen any activity that we could see a helicopter overhead and then ambulances coming into the buildings where the boys are checked over and where hopefully they will be reunited with team—mates. reports but no confirmation yet. thank you for that. let our audience know about the condition of the eight who have been rescued ? about the condition of the eight who have been rescued? generally speaking, despite everything they have been through, they are in pretty good health according to thai officials. none are suffering from fevers, but they have undergone a of tests to see if they have infections. for example, there are bats and many of these caves which can lead to nasty diseases. they are being kept in medical quarantine so most have not been reunited with their parents because there is a glass wall. the first four boys
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rescued on sunday saw their parents late last night, it could be a while before the boys get to hug their mothers. caution is the word. the thai authorities want to make absolutely sure that the boys do not pass on any infections, or because they are weak because of what they have endured over the past two weeks, they could be infected themselves. i think what everybody hopes is that the entire football team, along with their coach, is reunited in the hospital behind me in the next few hours. it would be a remarkable conclusion to a story which has trips not only thailand but the entire world. thank you so much, martin patience. one of the divers working with the international rescue team has described the complexities and dangers of this mission. ivan karadzi is stationed at a notoriously difficult stretch of cave about half—way along. his job is to replace air tanks, check everyone is okay and help guide the teams through. ? he‘s also ready to step in to guide the kids
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out if a diver falls ill or can‘t continue.? they have been forced to do something that no kid has ever done before. it is not in any way normal for kids to do cave diving at age 11. they are diving in something that is considered an extremely hazardous environment. zero visibility. the only light that is in there are the torches, the lights we bring ourselves. so i am obviously very afraid of any kind of panic from the divers. there are multiple equipment malfunctions you can imagine. so we have a contingency plan for if this breaks, ok, what are we going to do? ok, we‘ll do this. if this breaks, then we have this one as a back—up. and so on and so forth. i cannot understand how cool these small kids are, you know? thinking about them being kept in a small cave for two weeks, they haven‘t seen their mums. incredibly strong kids. unbelievable, almost. what was your reaction when you saw
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the first one coming towards you? i was very scared. because when i saw the diver, and the kid on the horizon, we can‘t see that far, maybe about 50 metres, i still didn‘t know if it was a casualty, or if it was a kid. so, i was very scared. it didn‘t feel good. but when i saw that he was alive, and breathing, and seemed to be all right, it felt very good. it felt very good. when i then saw the second, and the third, yes. after that, when i was the last person to exit the cave, cleaning up, i did about one and a half hours diving around, all by myself. yeah, i was incredibly happy. but there is also the rescue teams. after the operation that happened yesterday, something changes in you. maybe you get a little bit more... what is it called, the english word? complacency?
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yes? i think that is probably the biggest challenge we have today, to go in there as nervous as we were yesterday. and it‘s hard when you‘ve just seen everything work so well. so i think that is probably the rescuers‘ biggest challenge today, to still understand or accept that this is an incredibly complex mission. an astonishing insight from one of the divers, ivan. today there are celebrations across the uk — including a huge fly—past — to mark 100 years of the royal air force. a special service is taking place right now at westminster abbey, attended by the queen, the prince of wales, the duke of cambridge and the duke and duchess of sussex. for 34,000 people the raf is a way of life, but it is still trying to improve the diversity of its personnel. radio 1‘s newsbeat has been given special access to some of the service men and women deployed in romania to take part in a nato air policing mission. yourfamily would be, like,
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being black, the army is not the place for you. joining up as a woman hasn't been any different... i guess it's like joining up as a guy, apart from i've got boobs. we are in quick reaction alert to assist our romanian allies with the protection of their skies. the typhoonjets use our equipment.
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they talk to each other, they talk to the pilots. we do all the computer systems, the radios, telephones, internet, all the good stuff. i was an it technician at a timber yard before ijoined up. but it wasn't really going anywhere. it was a bit boring. so i wanted, and i've never been out of widnes, as well. so i wanted to go and explore. so i thought i would join up. i heard there were lots of opportunities, to go and do fun things and go to cool places. my mum was really nervous about it, because obviously her little girl was going away from home. i'd never been anywhere. she's used to having me around to clean up after her. but my dad was really excited. he was telling everyone. he said, you know, "linda'sjoining the raf!" it's not something you'd normally think of as a female, "0h, i'll go and join the raf." but i thought it would be a good challenge for me, go and push my limits and stuff.
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this provides us a secret comms link back to the uk. so this is the equipment we use of the big systems go down. then we have a back—up system. so this is the back—up. if something goes down, we don't have a back—up at the minute. our task is basically keeping an eye on the aircraft. there‘s lots of parts of the aircraft that are pretty secretive, and british eyes only. so while you‘re here, ourjob is to make sure nobody else goes anywhere near the aircraft. all the members of my family, my uncles, my grandad and stuff, they probably never thought ofjoining the raf, let alone the whole infantry, to wherever the situation was back then. but the times have moved on. growing up, as a minority,
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there was a big disconnect between the normal infantry and the people. so when i was getting told, you know, you‘re crazy, you shouldn‘t do it, it motivated me more to do itjust to say, look, it‘s not what you guys think it is. we are looking for foreign object debris, things that shouldn‘t be here. maybe some of the stuff might have come off the aircraft. so that‘s the stuff i‘ll be looking for, really. scramble, scramble, scramble! when that call goes, we go from sitting down, reading a paper, within minutes we are in the jet, engines running, ready to go. ready engines! the typhoon jets are fully armed.
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we are trained for every eventuality, with regards to the capability in this region. during our mission here, we have never had to get close to the stage of deploying any weapons. this is a politically charged area, with crimea a couple of years ago. there a very heavy presence of russian activity to the east. since we have been here, the number of scrambles required by the romanians has dropped off. i believe that the more people like me join in, and actually set an example, it is notjust helping me, but it's helped change my friends and family's state of mind to the whole military lifestyle. i actually signed up first for the marines. but i soon found i couldn't swim.
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we had a massive storm yesterday and the rain was torrential. oh, yeah, this is soaking wet. ok, so this cable might be an issue. i think back in the day, women weren‘t considered to be kind of equal, like we are now. i remember my mum told it that she wanted to join the army. my grandad was, like, you‘re notjoining the army. now everyone is, like, "yeah, join the army!" or raf. i‘m sure there‘s loads of women that want to come and do fun and cool things in the sunshine. i went to afghan a few years ago, and my mum was, like, really stressing over it. but my dad was, like, "linda‘s going to afghan, linda‘s going to afghan!" i was, like, all right, dad, calm down. when i was in afghan, you had to be in uniform at all times. you couldn‘t go off camp, you couldn‘t go anywhere. you had to have your rifle at all times. so going to the gym with a rifle, going for a poo with a rifle. it was really weird.
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it‘s really weird when a mission ends. because someone‘s been your best friend and roommate for three months, and then they‘re gone. so you just keep in touch. i always like to meet up with my old friends and things, and go on nights out and things. it‘s good. radio1 newsbeat radio 1 newsbeat with that report. fans up and down the country are getting excited as the england team prepare for tomorrow‘s match — their first world cup semifinal in 28 years. just four teams remain, as you know. our correspondent rajini vaidyanathan is in russia to see how many fans of different nationalities are left. the world cup is a global event. people have travelled
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here from all corners of the world. but how many countries have fans here? i‘ve set myself a challenge to find out. have you come from belgium? we are from belgium. so, darius, dad, you support germany. lorla, you support germany? khushi, you actually support poland? so, which country are you guys from? nigeria! russia! what‘s been so surprising, as i‘ve been going around meeting fans, is how many i‘ve found who are from a country that‘s not even in the world cup. which country have you come from? we are from pakistan!
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pakistan, ok. but you don‘t even have a team in the world cup? yes, no, but we are here to support france. and where are you from? bangladesh. who are you supporting? brazil! germany! thailand! where have you come from? uzbekistan. who are you supporting? uzbekistan! they‘re not in the world cup! south africa! i like german. german? they are not in the world cup. so, no china, no german. who are you supporting? enjoy it. you‘rejust enjoying it? yes! your dad and your mum? so, by my count, i‘ve met people from 55 countries who come here to see the world cup. and all of them say they‘ve been
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extended a really warm welcome by the russians that they‘ve met. the people who govern them, well, there may be political tensions, but when it comes to football and football fans, none of that seems to matter. fans chant "seven nation army" but however excited england fans are, it‘s the winner of tonight‘s semi final, france or belgium, that will be favourites to lift the trophy on sunday. you can watch it on bbc one tonight or listen on 5 live. joining me now is sports journalist kristof terreur representing belgium, and julien laurens, representing france — both out in russia. they are both friends, i am told. we haven‘t got that much time, but, julien, can you describe the rivalry between france and belgian, is it like england against scotland or is it more like cousins? i would say it
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is more like cousins, a friendly rivalry, a friendly derby. the first football game that france ever played was belgian in 1904, belgium is the country they have played the most against in football, tonight is the 74th game between them. lots of players played together at club level in england. there will be a very friendly feeling. kristof, is this the generation in terms of belgium finally coming good, didn‘t ta ke belgium finally coming good, didn‘t take martin is to make it happen? —— did it take martinez? it is now one of for this generation, they have done what we thought they could achieve getting into the semifinals. brazil was the biggest game in our history, we have done it. now this france game... (inaudible) . while his skype is frozen, julien, how will your country feel if you
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are beaten by a team with thierry henry on the coaching staff? even for him, how will he feel when lamar seles is being played but he is standing in front of the bilge and bench. he will be playing against one of his former team—mates and he knows a lot of the french players. he always had a rocky relationship with france as a player, especially at the end of his career. france never offered him anything, but it will be strange for him tonight. kristof, finally briefly, can belgian beat france? kristof, finally briefly, can belgian beat france ?” kristof, finally briefly, can belgian beat france? i think so. in france they have a word for the way they play, they are a difficult team to break down, but i think we have the qualities to do it, but it will
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bea the qualities to do it, but it will be a difficult and tight game. thank you both so much, i am sorry we could not give its more time that we are looking forward to the game. as an england supporter, i would prefer belgian to beat france! thank you for your company today, back tomorrow at 9am. good morning. in what may come as a bit of a shocker today, we have some slight changes in the weather. lots more cloud at the moment, this is the scene in essex. it is feeling much cooler and fresher than in recent days. yesterday we got to 30 celsius in the south—east, today 23 or 24 at best in the south—east. we may be warmer towards south wales,
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some breaks in the cloud to give the sunshine, but the cloud across northern scotland is thick enough to bring more significant rain, which we have not seen for a long time. turning heavy across western scotla nd turning heavy across western scotland and into the east of northern ireland, significant rain for the first time in about three weeks in the east of northern ireland. temperatures down to about ten to 15 or 16, another comfortable night for sleeping for many. tomorrow, some brighter spells but mostly cloudy, turning warmer, temperatures creeping up a bit by the end of the week. this is bbc news. i‘m simon mccoy, live in westminster, where theresa may has been trying to reassert her authority after
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a tumultuous day here yesterday. the prime minister chaired her first cabinet with new foreign secretaryjeremy hunt and new brexit secretary dominic raab. she‘s warned the party must unite following the resignations of borisjohnson and david davis. michael gove says he‘s not going anywhere. ido i do fully behind theresa may‘s brexit plan? 100%. have i do fully behind theresa may‘s brexit plan? 10096. have you considered resigning yourself? absolutely not.

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