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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 13, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. here are the top stories develop impact ham. donald trump warns theresa may her brexit plan will kill any hopes of a trade deal with the us and says she ignored his advice on leaving the eu. i actually told theresa may how to do it but she didn't agree... she didn't listen to me. what did she say? she didn't listen. no, i told her how to do it. that will be up to her to say but i told her how to do it. she wanted to go a different route. i know she's looking forward to setting out to him how this brexit plan will work, what the detail is and how that will enable us to engage in a very positive way with the us. anti—trump protesters are already gathering in central london for a day of marches. there were loud cheers as the trump baby blimp was raised earlier. here at chequers, theresa may is
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facing a crunch news conference with the american president after his criticism of her brexit. will she go toe to toe with the donald or will it be softly softly? more to come later from it be softly softly? more to come laterfrom norman. the other headlines this hour... the british divers who were part of the rescue mission in thailand arrive back in the uk. one of the divers insists he's not a hero. at least 200 people injapan are reported to have been killed in the worst flooding to affect the country in nearly a0 years. i'm annita mcveigh live at westminster today, the heart of british democracy for the second day of president donald trump's visits to the uk. just over my shoulder, peaking above the tree tops is the trump baby balloon, the trump baby blimp which has become an image, a very striking image of the protests that await the president today. he
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would be close to any of those protests. locations where he will be well away from them. nonetheless, thousands of people, it is thought maybe as many as 100,000 people will ta ke to maybe as many as 100,000 people will take to the streets here in london and other parts of the uk to give voice to their objections to his visit here. myriad groups, lots of different groups coming together in a coalition of protest. meanwhile, president trump will be getting on with his engagements today including, ina with his engagements today including, in a short while, a meeting with the uk prime minister theresa may residents at chequers. to bea theresa may residents at chequers. to be a fly on the wall during those conversations they will be having. the trump had an interview with a newspaper where he poured water on the idea of a uk— eu trade deal where he poured water on those plans. also commenting on the fact that he thought borisjohnson, the
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former foreign secretary, would make a good prime minister. he said yesterday, just to remind you, that he thought the sort of brexit that britain was talking about was not what people had voted for. undoubtedly an eventful day ahead. it will be fascinating to hear what the two leaders say in their news conference at chequers later. so let's ta ke conference at chequers later. so let's take stock of events so far with this report. theresa may might have been hoping the special relationship would provide some solidarity and support at a difficult time. but, in a remarkable interview, president trump said he told the prime minister, on brexit, she had got it wrong. i would have done it much differently. i actually told theresa may how to do it but she didn't agree... she didn't listen to me. she didn't listen. no, i told her how to do it. that would be up to her to say. but i told her how to do it, she wanted to go a different route. not exactly hand—in—hand.
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the president said the prime minister's vision of a brexit deal would kill any possible trade agreement with the united states. well, if they do a deal like that it would most likely — because we will be dealing with the european union instead of dealing with the uk — so it will probably kill the deal... if they do that, that trade deal with the us will probably be not be made. absent from the pomp and ceremony at blenheim palace, the former foreign secretary boris johnson, a thorn in the side of theresa may, who the president would like to see make a return. let me tell you, he is a very talented guy. i was very saddened to see that he was leaving government. well, i'm not pitting one against the other, i'm just saying i think he would be a great prime minister. hardly music to the ears of the actual prime minister. and, while there were warm words for the former mayor of london, not so much for the current one, sadiq khan.
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you have a mayor who has done a terriblejob in london, he has done a terrible job. i think he has done a very bad job in london. at tourism, i think he has done a very bad job in crime, if you look. if you take a look at your hospital in london, you know what i'm talking about. it was sadiq khan who signed off on the trump baby blimp that protesters will float over london today. what do we want? trump out. when do we want it? now. the demonstrations against his visit have made him feel unwelcome, the president said. these people don't like anything mr trump has to say. after his latest comments, theresa may might share some of their pain. that controversial interview from donald trump which has attracted so much criticism was given to the sun
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newspaper's tom newton dunn. let's hear what he has to say about the interview. i think they're bit fed up, a bit depressed by it all. 0bviously her political situation is incredibly vulnerable at the moment, very, very brittle. and it is probably the last thing she needed. that said though, it is going to be very fascinating how this plays out today. it may work for her. if you like donald trump and you're a big fan of the us then you want a trade deal with the us. and if you're a pretty hard—core brexiteer then you will be very concerned by what he says and you will be ever angrier with theresa may by what people say is a soft brexit sell—out. however, if you don't think donald trump is up to much good, then it is quite possible this could help theresa may. nobody likes to see a us president tell a british prime minister what to do. and this is without a shadow of a doubt a us president telling a british prime minister what to do. so it is entirely possible that it will engender a bit of sympathy for her amongst her backbenchers which is not huge at the moment. and they may run it behind her. today's meeting between the uk prime
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minister theresa may and the us president donald trump at theresa may mark's residence chequers is due to start shortly. norman smith is at chequers for us. 0ne one wonders what theresa may is going to say the donald trump following that interview he gave to the sun newspaper and one wonders what they are going to say in the news conference. that is eclectic ta ke news conference. that is eclectic take place afterwards. we are facing a fascinating piece of political theatre. donald trump arrived short time ago to the lovely buckinghamshire countryside, miles away from the protests in london. a fleet of huge helicopters bringing in donald trump's entourage. you just wonder, after last night, when tea m just wonder, after last night, when team may came out thinking
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everything had gone well and things we re everything had gone well and things were quite cheery, she made that speech about the transatlantic ties and the long—standing historical relationships, citing winston churchill. then to pick up the sun newspaper and read what donald trump has said about her approach to brexit, in effect that she has got it all wrong, she is mishandling the negotiation, she should be much tougher with brussels, she is not going to the deliver the kind of brexit that people really voted for and crucially saying, "look, you're not going to get a trade deal with us not going to get a trade deal with us if you go ahead with this sort of white paper you outlined yesterday." as if all of that wasn't enough, he then goes out of his way again to very publicly endorse borisjohnson, theresa may's rival. he said he would make a good prime minister. it is hard to think of anything more likely to have downing street tearing out their hair wondering what on earth do we do? in private,
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there may be some frank talking but in public, i would be very surprised if theresa may stood up to donald trump. it is not in her political make—up. she signed the lease find these news conferences will quit as difficult anyway and the idea that she would be willing to take on a bruiser like donald trump who just loves the sort of fisticuffs of verbal combat in the spotlight, they high risk danger that she is eaten alive. more likely that it will be a much more muted, gentle rebuff in public. stating her convictions that this is a practical brexit. that was the message we heard this morning from the chancellor philip hammond when he was asked about the comments by donald trump. let's have a listen to him. the prime minister has a working meeting scheduled with the president later today.
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i know she is looking forward to setting out to him how this brexit plan will work, what the detail is and how that will enable us to engage in a very positive way with the us in the future. i am sure that as a result of that discussion, we will have a way forward both with the united states and with our partners in the european union. so you're suggesting at the moment that the president doesn't quite understand what the deal is that is on the table? well, the president hasn't yet had a chance, i think, to discuss with the prime minister the white paper which was, after all, only published yesterday. i know she is looking forward to the opportunity to discuss with the president how we can take forward the big opportunities for increasing trade and investment between the uk and the us. she mentioned that last night during the dinner at blenheim palace and i saw that the president was nodding furiously as she was speaking last night. i'm sure there will be a very positive discussion between them today. of course this is notjust about
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brexit, it is also about mrs may's leadership because the president's comments, i think many people would say show an element of this regard, almost dismissing the prime minister. knowing full well the difficulties that she is in. we are actually quite a distance away from chequers here, very heavy security. we have a camera just down the road you can probably get a better look at chequers where those talks will actually be going on. it is interesting, the dynamic, because it is not just interesting, the dynamic, because it is notjust viewers who will be watching this with interest, tory mps are also watching this very closely. because his comments have emboldened tory brexiteers. we can see donald trump arriving here. his comments have just given them that sense that, "0k, comments have just given them that sense that, "ok, the president is
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with them, he is on our side." that has made them more comment the back confident about challenging mrs may. we may be seeking to scupper two bits of crucial brexit legislation that will be voted on monday and tuesday. the customs and trade bill and they could decide with labour. there is a sense of a snowball building up against mrs may. resignations last week, we had the uproarfrom tory resignations last week, we had the uproar from tory brexiteers over the white paper. then we had donald trump's comments overnight. i am looking ahead to next week where she faces potentially a very damaging revolt in the house of commons. you get a sense of things beginning to step away from mrs may on brexit front. never mind of course that she has still got to get brussels to engage with her plan. the task facing the prime minister is absolutely enormous. none of which she can actually focus on at the moment because she has got to get
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her game face on for dealing with the donald. she has got to stand there, stand her ground and also be prepared to defend her approach to brexit. it is going to be a very big moment for theresa may. anita, back to you. welcome back to westminster, the heart of democracy, overlooking parliament square here. we can show you some images of the trump baby balloon, quite an arresting sight, isn't it? from where i am standing, it is just peeking above the tree tops behind me. this is the balloon thatis tops behind me. this is the balloon that is going to be brought through london today, ending up at the big protest later on today in trafalgar square, right in the centre of london. really a correlation of
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protests, that is what we have got today. we have this trump baby campaign, we have got the bring the noise campaign. we also have the belief that other campaigns. various human rights groups, lgbt queue groups and so on coming together to voice their objections to the us president being here in the united kingdom. remember last year over 1.8 million people signed a petition asking for any offer of a visit to be cancelled. but of course the visit has gone ahead. joining me now in westminster is an environmentalist and activist behind the baby trump campaign. i think it is worthwhile today reminding eve ryo ne is worthwhile today reminding everyone how this particular campaign started. 50 a group of campaign started. so a group of friends and i realised needed we needed to protest trump's visit. it
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is inappropriate and wrong for many reasons. we felt that moral outrage doesn't seem to work on donald trump. we can't really reason with him. what he is is very vulnerable to personal insults. because he is tremendously insecure about his own personal shortcomings so we felt this would be a very good form of protest against a famously thin—skinned president. what might you think this is the kind of imagery that he understands basically? we have effectively run him out of town. we have heard the complaint before since he arrived yesterday that what you are doing here is disrespecting the office of president of the united states. what do you say to that? this is very respectful to the office of the president of the united states. donald trump is bringing the office into disrepute. deeper and deeper into disrepute. deeper and deeper into disrepute. deeper and deeper into disrepute with each passing day. people who say this is childish
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and offensive, donald trump is a childish and offensive president. therefore this is a very appropriate form of protest. i would also say thatis form of protest. i would also say that is a very british form of protest against a tyrant. we are just seeing some shots of donald trump arriving at chequers right 110w. trump arriving at chequers right now. the uk prime minister's country residence for talks. goodness knows what those talks are going to consist of today given that interview. 0ne consist of today given that interview. one would love to be a fly on the wall. given what donald trump has said to theresa may about the possibility of a future us— uk trade deal post brexit, pouring cold water on that because of her particular brexit plans. given the comments he has made since arriving here, do you think that gives the protest the protest is here great vindication? it certainly does. he is out there and to the sun is
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convicted par—4 donald trump. this is what he does. he goes around destroying diplomatic discrete... he goes around destroying democratic institutions. people who had been holding on to the idea that trump's visit could possibly yield a favourable trade deal for the uk post brexit, i think that was always delusional. and this only serves to illustrate quite how delusional that was. the crowdfunding campaign you started to literally get this balloon off the ground raised far more than you needed. what are you going to do with the extra money? that was very generous, it was far more money than we needed. to the first thing we are doing is boarding a train tonight to scotland. we have suddenly buses and some helium and we are going to try to fly it over the president's golf course at turnberry. permission has been
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turned down, hasn't it? we are not going to do anything that breaks the law or that anybody in danger. we are still speaking with the officers who manage the airspace in ayrshire to see if we are able to meet their conditions forflight to see if we are able to meet their conditions for flight safety. we have been invited there. we received hundreds and hundreds of messages from the scottish people asking us to come. there's a petition signed by 15,000 people this morning asking us by 15,000 people this morning asking us to fly it over the golf course. leo from the trump baby campaign, thank you very much. let's go back to chequers and norman smith. those private talks will now be going on inside chequers. they will just be about brexit that they will be about security and about russia. the big issue from the british government's point of view is to try to get into a situation where hopefully we can get some sort of
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trade deal after brexit. let's just listen into the conversation. things are coming along rapidly, i think. it was a very productive two days. we arrived here last night and i think we properly never developed a better relationship. we spoke for an hour or better relationship. we spoke for an houroran hourand a better relationship. we spoke for an hour or an hour and a half. better relationship. we spoke for an hour oran hourand a half. it better relationship. we spoke for an hour or an hour and a half. it was really something. today we are talking trade. we are talking military. we are living at some incredible anti—terrorism things in conjunction with the united states. the incredible feedback rated ship is increased wrong. i think we are going to do a news conference and we will answer your questions then. right now we will be talking about other things that will be going on in the middle east. thank you all for coming. so there is donald trump inside
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chequers. he is a man who is not shy of talking to the media and he does it on his own terms. i suppose that is one of the things that causes downing street a degree of trepidation and nervousness. you just don't know what donald trump is going to do. it seems that interview with the sun came from a clear blue sky as far as number ten was concerned. in their response so far, people around mrs may have been saying that things have been going a lot better in private. donald trump hadn't had a chance to see the white paper. theresa may will be able to give him a full briefing on it. i don't think any of that detracts from the pretty brutal way he seemed ready to criticise the prime minister in public. let's get a view
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now from the conservative mp sarah wollaston. sarah, what do you make of president trump's remarks, not in terms of brexit, but in terms of how he views our prime minister?” terms of brexit, but in terms of how he views our prime minister? i think he views our prime minister? i think he has been deeply insulting. talking about boris johnson for example. even worse than that, the dog whistle politics about immigration are entirely inappropriate. 0f immigration are entirely inappropriate. of course theresa may will continue to extend a polite welcome to him in his capacity as the president of the united states but i think she should pretty much tell him where he can stick his dog whistle. it is appalling. should she, i mean, it is going to be a difficult news conference for her. should she actually decides this is a moment where she has to pretty much but her beliefs on the line and articulate very clear candid terms why she disagrees with the
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president? absolutely and i think that she has shown, as always, great statesmanship in her approach to this. actually the best way to handle this is to be very clear and consistent about what she is trying to achieve. i think also the hard brexiteers need to realise that any deal with donald trump will be conducted on his terms and there would be very uncomfortable strings attached. therefore we shouldn't be throwing away a deep and special trading partnership with the european union, thinking that we are going to have something that would exceed that with the united states. we have to proceed with caution. just before we move on to brexit, let me ask you this. he was pretty brutal towards angela merkel, he has been brutal towards theresa may, do you think it is because they women? well, i think he has a very bullying approach. and i think evenjust looking at the imagery, the sort of infantilising imagery around holding her hand and the way he shakes men's
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hands, he takes a very bullying approach. the right response to that is to show great statesmanship and thatis is to show great statesmanship and that is what theresa may has done andl that is what theresa may has done and i expect her to continue that. just briefly, in terms of the whole brexit process, how far do you think the president's comments have galvanised, emboldened the brexiteers to push even harder?” just think it would be really unfortunate. i think what we should all be doing now is uniting behind the prime minister and trying to get this deal work. it is a pragmatic deal and for them to then be undermining herat deal and for them to then be undermining her at this point or seizing on the comments from the president's interview with the sun, i don't think, frankly, having endorsement of donald trump is going to do borisjohnson endorsement of donald trump is going to do boris johnson any favours. sarah wollaston, thank you very much for your time. that's news conference will take place after a
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working lunch. i imagine the downing street are going through the phrases, the arden is that theresa may knows she's going to have to make. of course, she will be asked about it and what compounds the challenge for mrs may is this is not her natural arena. she is more of a whitehall warrior, good at the detail, good at pushing through legislation but in the public arena, she can struggle more. and she is alongside someone who absolutely arrives in that environment. it is going to be, i think, compulsive viewing. that is all from chequers now so back to london. norman, thank you very much. back here at westminster, the protest as are gathering for what is the main day of protest on this working visit by donald trump to the uk. 0ne day of protest on this working visit by donald trump to the uk. one of the groups that is protest ink and
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it isa the groups that is protest ink and it is a group the back coalition of groups, it is called bring the noise. give us a sense of the numbers there that are starting to gather and tell us about the groups that are coming together under this banner. well, as you say, it is a coalition of groups. we have different groups, stonewall, liberty, amnesty. many have clubbed together to come to this march. we can see a couple of hundred but they are expecting them to march towards you in their thousands. this protest has been a year and a half in the planning. i have with me to organisers. why did you think it was important to organisers. why did you think it was im porta nt to protest organisers. why did you think it was important to protest on this day? we see this as a glorious opportunity to stand in solidarity on the very values that we hold dear. we are protesting against the divisive,
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inhumane, misogynistic and this woman a tree policies of the trump administration. bring the noise is to dismantle the political rhetoric of hate, fear and discolouration and divisiveness. i understand that you have asked the protest is to bring pots and pans and musical instrument. tel is the significance of why you have done that. the pots and pans came out of latin american protests. it was a way of bringing tools associated with domestic space, the home space, out into the space, the home space, out into the space of the city. it is a way of claiming your political voice and being heard. fantastic, ladies, thank you very much. basically, this protest will start with a massive wall of noise. it should start processing towards parliament square just after 12:30pm. processing towards parliament square just after12:30pm. find processing towards parliament square just after 12:30pm. find you very much. the bring the noise process.
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throughout the day, we will be bringing you coverage of those protests as they gather and grow in size. they will head towards trafalgar square for the main demonstration later on today. right now let's take a look at the weather forecast. beautiful and sunny at westminster at the moment. let's get the latest with simon king. pretty nice and sunny elsewhere across southern england at the moment after this morning's cloudy skies. in the city, we have got those blue skies as well. but there's still more cloud across northern areas. some rain affecting north—western areas of inward at the moment. into the afternoon, some heavy and thundery showers develop ink across parts of wales through north—west england, the midlands in the central and southern parts of inman. these will be and miss. forsome southern parts of inman. these will be and miss. for some you can see torrential rain. elsewhere it is largely dry with that temperatures.
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those are showers rumbling on for awhile but into the early hours of saturday that will clear the way. more cloud spilling into scotland and northern ireland into the hours of saturday morning. as we go through the weekend, for scotland and northern ireland it will remain quite cloudy. some output of rain in the far north—west. for most of us though, over the weekend, the far north—west. for most of us though, overthe weekend, it the far north—west. for most of us though, over the weekend, it will be a dry, it will be dry and it will be sunny. temperatures in the south—east up to 31 celsius. hello this is bbc news. it's day two of president trump's visit to the uk. he's just arrived at chequers where he's meeting the prime minister. he said the relationship with the uk was ‘very very strong'. this is despite an interview in the sun in which the president warned theresa may her brexit plan may kill future trade deals with the us. he also says she ignored his advice on leaving the eu. the trump blimp is flying
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and thousands of people are gathering in central london to protest donald trump's visit to the uk. extra security has been arranged for demonstrations planned across the country. a group of british divers have arrived home, after the successful rescue of 12 boys and their coach from a flooded cave in thailand. the very humble men say they're not heroes, just a group of people with unique skills. and, at least 200 people injapan have died in the worst flooding to affect the country in nearly a0 years. torrential rain has triggered landslides and floods in central and western areas. more than 8 million people have been ordered to evacuate. sport now, here's holly hamilton. it's the worst—kept secret in football but chelsea have officially confirmed the departure of antonio conte. he leaves after just two years
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at the club having won the premier league in 2017 and the fa cup in may — but failed to repeat that success in the league last season with the blues slipping to fifth. and failing to qualify for the champions league. in a brief statement chelsea say they wish him every success in his future career. that news will be far from the minds of the england squad as the prepare for their third—place playoff match against belgium tomorrow. all 23 players of gareth southgate's squad were back in training this morning but there are expected to be some changes to the team who face belgium which kicks off at 3pm tomorrow in st petersburg. serena williams in into her tenth wimbledon final, just ten months after giving birth. she came through her semi—final againstjulia goerges in straight sets as she looks to win her 24th grand slam title and tie margaret court's all—time record. it's quite an achievement
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considering the health problems she had after giving birth to her daughter last september. i had a really tough delivery and i had to have multiple surgeries and almost didn't make it to be honest. so i remember i couldn't even walk to my mailbox so it's definitely not normal for me to be in a wimbledon final. i'm taking everything as it is and just enjoying every moment. she'll face angelique kerber in the final tomorrow after she beat jelena 0stapenko in straight sets. and, at number 11, she's the highest seed left in the tournament after so many of the top seeds were knocked out in the opening week. 0ver at wimbledon, it's men's semi— finals day where all eyes will be on rafael nadal and novak djokovic. it will be the 52nd time they have played each other in all competitions — that is more than any other men in the open era.
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nadal will be looking to cement his place as the best player in the world — while djokovic is attempting to show everyone that despite a rather slow return from injury, he's truly back in top form. former british number one tim henman is backing nadal. for me, nadal is the favourite. djokovic has had problems on and off the court over the last couple of years, he is back playing some really good tennis. physically he looks good, technically he looks good. mentally, he has the fire in his belly but i feel that dealing with adversity is the challenge when things are not mentally, he has the fire in his belly but i first up on centre court — it's the battle of the big servers asjohn isnerfaces kevin anderson for a place in sunday's final. on wednesday, anderson stunned the tennis world when he knocked eight—time champion roger federer, out of the tournament in their quarter—final clash. ? in doing so he joined an exclusive club coming back from two sets down
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to win in five sets. plenty of british interest in the final of the mixed doubles later. jamie murray and partner victoria azarenka take on britain's harriet dart and jay clarke in the last four. murray and azarenka, from belarus, fought back from a set down to beat jean—julien rojer and demi schuurs in their semi final yesterday. murray won the mixed doubles title at wimbledon last year with martina hingis and will be looking to repeat that success with his new partner. that's all the sport for now. more on the bbc news channel throughout the day. lets go back to donald trump's visit to the uk. annita mcveigh is at westminster back here overlooking parliament square. the trump baby bloom is back
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on the ground. i was just glancing through the trees. it has been peeking above the tree tops just a little shy of the 30 metre height restriction. it is down on the ground again. let's see if it goes back up. it is attracting so much attention as you can imagine. it is not that one that is going to be at trafalgar square on it is a half size version. the restrictions means this large one has tuesday in parliament square. 0bviously that is the most visible sign of the protest against the us president's visit to the uk. meanwhile, he is getting on with his agenda today well away from anything to protest. he is meeting the prime minister theresa may at her country residence chequers. they arejust been her country residence chequers. they are just been speaking. donald trump said that he and theresa may have never developed a better
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relationship than during last night's dinner at blenheim palace. perhaps an exercise in trying to deal with the controversy raised by his interview with the sun newspaper, which he said poured cold water on the prospects of a post—brexit uk us trade deal because of the nature of the brexit. theresa may is talking about. anyway, it is certainly an interesting meeting between the two leaders. 0ne certainly an interesting meeting between the two leaders. one would love to hear exactly what they are saying to each other in private. this is what they had to say to each other in public. the united states is our long—standing... the prime minister and i work very
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well together. it has never been more united. it is coming along rapidly. it was a very productive day. last night we had dinner. it was one of our work, one hour and a half. the relationship is very very
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strong, very good. we have another news co nfe re nce strong, very good. we have another news conference in a little while so we will answer your questions then. thank you all very much. that was a brief opening statement from donald trump when he arrived there. we are expecting a lengthy news co nfe re nce there. we are expecting a lengthy news conference after he and theresa
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may have that discussion at chequers which we will be bringing to you live here on bbc news. that is the scene at chequers for you now. meanwhile, before those latest comment by donald trump, has been a huge amount of vertical reaction to what he had to say in his interview in the sun newspaper. a great deal of consternation caused by what he had to say. many people calling it undiplomatic and that is just putting it a very mildly. some comment much stronger. let's get a sense from some of political reaction. he's insulted us, he has insulted us and we are his host. he has come to our country and before he arrived to see theresa may, he has that interview with the sun where he basically slapped us off. basically slagged us off.
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and he had a go at her and he said that the brexit negotiations weren't going the right way and that boris johnson would make a great prime minister. just imagine, just imagine what theresa may was thinking as she stood outside the birthplace of winston churchill, blenheim palace, with all of the grenadier guards and red carpet and everything being done to get on the right side of him and he has said all of that. how appalling. you know, did his mother teach him nothing? the rules are, aren't they, that you don't turn up and insult your host in their home? i think it is not unexpected to have colourful comments from president trump. but what we will be able to have today is the prime minister and the president sitting down at chequers to discuss the detail of what we want to see. and our position as a government is absolutely clear that we want a deal with the eu which is good for trade but in a way which gives us the ability also to strike free—trade deals elsewhere. particularly with the united states. one of the things that americans love about our city are the rights we have here — the rights to protest, the right to have free speech,
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the right to freedom of assembly. and the idea that we would curtail those rights because it may cause offence to president trump or something else, i think americans would find objectionable. why? because their own constitution has enshrined in it the rights of freedom of speech, freedom to protest, freedom to assemble. in fact, the founding fathers, you read some of the speeches from franklin tojefferson talk about the importance of free speech and freedom to protest. and you know what? our own constitution, look at common law. it has these rights enshrined as well. and it is not for me to be the arbiter of good taste, to be the sensor. what is important is i try to make sure the protests today and tomorrow are peaceful and are safe. yesterday i spoke to the chairperson of republicans abroad uk will coming the blizzard of donald trump to the uk. the blizzard of donald trump to the uk. i'm joined now by karin robinson from democrats abroad. you arejoining the you are joining the protest today.”
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will bejoining. we will be you are joining the protest today.” will be joining. we will be speaking up will be joining. we will be speaking up against the damaging policies of this donald trump. in the courts, the straight and at the ballot box. there are hundreds and thousands of them in the uk and they should all make their voices heard, if not that the protest then at the ballot box. this november's midterm election is going to be the difference. continuing down a very damaging path with donald trump. do you feel as a democrat that job uses with donald trump. do you feel as a democrat thatjob uses muted right now? we intend to bring the noise. we will be making some noise, making ourselves heard. this protest is just one of many that are happening. the voices of american citizens have been raised loudly and clearly around the country and around the
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world but yes, we're out of political power and that has allowed this administration and corrupt members of this administration to do: bold damage to the american people. president trump would argue that he is doing great people for the american, economy. that is one of the things talks about the most. do you think is put arsenal make any difference? it will make a difference? it will make a difference to the people protesting. there are hundreds and thousands of people around the world, millions of people around the world, millions of people who want to know that you can respectfully protest and disagree with policies that we feel are damaging, not only to america, but to the world. where you surprised by the news of 2—mac notification from the news of 2—mac notification from the us embassy warning americans to ta ke the us embassy warning americans to take care, given that many americans are protesting today?” take care, given that many americans are protesting today? i have to stay away from myself! every american in this country that i know is very
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excited to have the opportunity to do what our friends and family are doing back home, which is to raise our voices against harmful policies. we absolutely will not be heeding that advice of we the greatest respect for our colleagues in the state department. we have seen pictures of the protesters gathering just below where we are and of course, not just in just below where we are and of course, notjust in london, but in many parts of the uk today. ijust wonder what your thoughts are on what images americans back home will see. donald trump wants those images from last night, the images of him at blenheim palace and meeting the queen. he hopes the american people will see those images will do you think the images of protest will be broadcast as well? ultimately,
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whether they will be broadcast, they will be seen on social media. my message to the people back home is that the people of britain, my friends and colleagues, they are our friends, they love america. the people of britain are deeply concerned for america on behalf of its citizens, not anti—american sentiment. there is a view that donald trump should be here. many have objections to him but nonetheless he is the elected presidents of the united states and given the long relationship between the two countries, he should be here. that is not for me to say. surely it is! i am not here to see whether donald trump should come to the uk are not. wherever he shows up we will be there to raise our voices against the harmful policies he is pursuing. 0k, thank you very much
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for taking the time to talk to us today. we will be following those protests throughout the day. i think we can go to more shots of the protesters gathering below is here. we arejust protesters gathering below is here. we are just overlooking parliament square. we have got different estimates of how many people will be on the streets of london today. yesterday many people were talking about 100,000. let's see later on in the days we will try to get some officialfigures. certainly the days we will try to get some official figures. certainly the protest are going to be very sizeable, not just in protest are going to be very sizeable, notjust in london, but elsewhere in the uk. protests are planned in scotland as well especially as donald trump is heading there tonight for what will bea heading there tonight for what will be a private part of the visit as he goes to his golf course at turnberry. for the moment let's go back to the studio and to rachel. in a moment we'll have
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all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. a group of grip to buy british divers who assisted in the successful thai cave rescue have arrived home. they say they are not he was but just arrived home. they say they are not he was butjust a group of people with unique skills. at least 200 people in japan with unique skills. at least 200 people injapan have died in the worst flooding to affect the country in a0 years. more than 8 million people have been ordered to evacuate. a huge trade warning for the uk. us president donald trump warns that the uk may not get the trade deal it wants with the us if they go—ahead with their current brexit plan. in a moment we'll be getting
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reaction from the financial world. johnson and johnson faces a fine of £3.6 billion for allegdly using talc products which led to 22 women developing ovarian cancer. the case could be a landmark ruling, with 9,000 other cases still outstanding against the pharma giant. named and shamed — four of the uk's 30 biggest airports are accused of falling short in providing access for disabled travellers. that's according to the civil aviation authority. bottom of the list is manchester for the second year in a row, with birmingham, london stansted and gatwick also accused of falling below standards. donald trump says that if theresa may's brexit plan goes ahead there
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will not be a trade deal. it would probably... it would mean the us would be dealing with the european union instead of the uk. the markets have been reacting to the news with the sterling falling half a percent against the dollar this morning. banks forjoining us. how damaging are these comments? i know that the us president has said a lot of things that have caused a stir but when it comes to the uk and you this discussion it made a lot of sense. if the uk decided to stay aligned with the eu on trade in goods which we support, then the scope for the trade deal is much more limited. we support, then the scope for the trade deal is much more limitedm terms of the situation it puts theresa may end, it is very clear where his lines are on the uk and the us and where they stand. does it
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put her under pressure to choose? what he said reflects a general position. the us would love to do a content is free—trade agreement with the uk that includes goods and services. the uk is not any different. he has pretty much stated just that. of course for theresa may the situation is a very complex one because she is currently trying to keep the eu as close as possible to allow for frictionless trade between the uk and the eu and at the same time open up and the mac opportunities with the us. it is extremely challenging and we as a community are in the middle of it. lots of americans here and the uk who work here. how are they feeling about these comments and mr trump's stands when it comes to giving trade with you read? my job is to mainly reflect a view from the business community. it is hard for me to say
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what a million people who work for american companies think. of course right now we are in an extremely complex world where the uncertainty where we see on both sides of the atla ntic where we see on both sides of the atlantic certainly dampen how we feel about our life and economy. thank you very much forjoining us. the executive director of the british american business council. that is from businesses morning. some of the other activities around donald trump today. this is melania trump, the first lady, who is spending some of today with philip may. you can see she is visiting chelsea penn pensioners and local schoolchildren at the royal hospital at chelsea in central london. schoolchildren at the royal hospital at chelsea in central londonm schoolchildren at the royal hospital at chelsea in central london. it is at chelsea in central london. it is a retirement home for soldiers. chelsea pensioners famous for those
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distinctive scarlet coats and you can see a wonderful chest full of medals there is melania trump and philip may bite behind her come in to meet some of those who have gathered to welcome her to the royal hospital in chelsea. a mixture of generations. schoolchildren and older generations of chelsea patients. making some of the poppies that are so famous here in remembrance... 0n remembrance sunday. the children helping to put them together and the first lady getting a chance to meet some of the younger population as her husband holds talks with the prime minister at chequers. melania trump will rejoin her husband later today because both the president and the first lady are due to travel to windsor to meet the queen later this afternoon. after that the final leg
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of the tour, the couple are flying to scotland to spend the weekend at mr trump's turnberry golf course. that time in scotland is not counted as part of the working visit but as you can see, plenty is being crammed in and the first lady is turning her hand to making some of the poppies. those wonderful symbols of remembrance. two working day visit. the first lady and the president going their separate ways for the time being. we know of course that resident trump has not been in the heart of london very much as attem pts heart of london very much as attempts have been made to keep him away from protesters but melania trump in chelsea at the moment meeting with pensioners and local schoolchildren. plenty more to come on all of that. now gets a look at
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the best of the day ‘s news. a group of volunteer edition diverse trapped ina of volunteer edition diverse trapped in a cave in ireland thailand... they said they won't he was but just a group of people who had a unique set of skills. this is this is completely uncharted, unprecedented territory. nothing like this has been done. so of course there were doubts but i knew that we had a good team with good support from the thai authorities and the national caving community and rescue organisations. so we had the best that we could do to make a plan work. we arejust using we are just using a very unique skill set which we will normally use for our own interest and sometimes we like to give something back to the community, so that is what we did. that is certainly what they
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did. that is certainly what they did. great work. at least 200 people injapan did. great work. at least 200 people in japan have did. great work. at least 200 people injapan have reported to have been killed in the worst flooding in nearly a0 years. torrential rain has triggered landslides and floods in central and western areas with more than 8 million people ordered to leave their homes. western japan has been hit with around four months worth of rain in the first ten days ofjuly. here the chief inspector of prisons has described conditions in wandsworth jail as shocking. it is the most overcrowded in england and wales. the report questions security measures, support for prisoners and said that staff are putting inmates in danger by failing to answer an urgency alarms quickly enough. the ministry ofjustice has called the report disappointing. headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel but let's look at the weather brought the prospects. a bit of clout to start off this
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morning. it is mostly burning away. this is the scene in essex. underneath those cumulus clouds. we have had rain this morning. further north across england. we are still got some rain and showers moving further north and east would but for many of those, sunny spells developing. it will turn quite warm. however, there is a risk of heavy showers developing and the risk of some showers turning thundery with torrential downpours across the north west england, wales and the central and southern areas of england. the position of those... the chance of those areas getting scenes like this. the brisk of some flash flooding that they will be very hit and miss. away from those showers it will be dry, sunny. cabbages of 23 to 27 degrees.
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further north, 19 to 22 celsius. to night, the showers rumbling on for a time across the midlands and northern england before clearing away and then clear skies for many into saturday morning. cabbages nine to 15 degrees. starting to feel uncomfortable for sleeping over the next few nights. more cloud and rain moves in. that is associated with weather fronts moving moves in. that is associated with weatherfronts moving in. we have opened a door to the atlantic, particularly in northern parts of these weather fronts are pushing in and bringing more unsettled weather. high pressure in the south. wind being dragged in from the south—west it will be particularly hot across eastern areas of the weekend. saturday, dry and sunny weather. the chance of some showers in eastern areas. they can best though. further north and west, more cloud and rain. temperatures, even in scotland and northern ireland, getting up to low to mid 20s. cabbages in england and
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wales, mid to high 20s. those liberties will continue to rise on sunday. more sunshine for england and wales. benchley 3031 celsius. further cloud across scotland, northern ireland. rain in northern and western areas in particular and cabbages around 22 to 23 degrees. rain in the forecast, welcome rain for many. just watch out for those torrential downpours during this afternoon. there is a risk of some of those causing a few problems. stay tuned to the forecast throughout the. you're watching gmt on bbc world news. our top stories... donald trump meets the british prime minister at her country retreat amid a brexit diplomatic storm. donald trump has arrived at chequers
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warning that her plan will kill any hopes of the trade deal. the relationship is very, very strong. we have really had a very good relationship. i think we are going to do a news conference in a little while so we will answer your questions then. right now we are going to be talking about other things that are taking place in the middle east and elsewhere. we have had a lot to discuss. we are going to discuss our special relationship which is great. we are going to discuss the real opportunities we've got for a great trade deal coming up. for when we leave the european union.” trade deal coming up. for when we leave the european union. i am norman smith at chequers where theresa may faces a tense press conference with the president. will she go toe to toe with donald trump over brexit or will it be softly softly? and the trump protest are
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gathering in central london for a day of marchers. there were loud cheers as the trump baby blimp work the back was raised earlier.m cheers as the trump baby blimp work the back was raised earlier. it has been a year and a half in organising and as you can hear protesters have brought pots, pans and musical instruments to make themselves heard evenif instruments to make themselves heard even if trump would be seeing it. it isa it is a glorious day here at windsor. it is almost two months to the day since we were standing here outside the henry viii gate to
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welcome another american. meghan markle who was married in the grounds of windsor castle in st george ‘s chapel. but donald trump, of course, was not on the invitation list that day. he is on the list today, he will be in wins at five o'clock a0 with the queen. we will bring you live coverage of the event as it happens. right now he is in chequers with the prime minister for talks. it follows the release of this interview which the sun newspaper is carrying. he said that theresa may's plan for a trade deal would probably kill any hope of a deal with the united states. theresa may said the relationship was very strong. we have had a lot to discuss. we are going to discuss our special relationship, which is great, between the uk and the united states. we are going to discuss the real opportunities we have got five fantastic trade deal coming up for when we leave the european union. and of course we will discuss foreign policy, defence and security issues. we work very closely with
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the united states, they are our longest standing defence and security partner. the presidents did a very good job at nato, encouraging others to spend up to their commitment. we do, we both do, of course. but others are now, they now understand the importance of spending their2% understand the importance of spending their 2% commitment to nato. we have a lot to talk about. we do. the prime minister and i have worked very hard together on nato. those were an incredible two days, i think. we have never been more united. people have been paying... we are two the five who are totally paid up. 0thers we are two the five who are totally paid up. others are coming up rapidly. i think it was a very productive two days. we arrived here last night. i don't think we ever developed a stronger relationship than the last time we spoke. we
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spoke for one hour or one hour and a half. today we are talking trade, talking military. we are looking at some incredible anti—terrorism things which are being done here with the united states. the relationship is very, very strong. we have had a very good relationship. i think we are going to do relationship. i think we are going todoa relationship. i think we are going to do a news conference in a little while so we will answer your questions then. right now we are going to be talking about some other things that are taking place in the middle east and elsewhere. thank you all very much. yes, what we are learning about this president is that what he says when he is sitting next to world leaders is not necessarily what he thinks in private. about 12 hours after he arrived at blenheim palace, he arrived at blenheim palace, he arrived last night at 7pm. when he arrived last night at 7pm. when he arrived at blenheim palace he held the hand of the prime minister. in his speech he said this was an
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outstanding opportunity to forge a trade deal with the uk. at that moment, of course, the prime minister was properly being briefed about this story was in the sun newsletter. let's hear some of that interview with the political editor of the sun. in particular, those comments about trade. so they're the president is talking to the critical editor of the sun, tom newton dunn. he was at the bbc this morning talking about that interview. let's hear some of his thoughts. i think they're a bit fed up, which depressed by it all. 0bviously her political situation is incredibly vulnerable at the moment, very, very brittle. and it is probably the last thing she needed. that said though, it is going to be very fascinating how this plays out today. it may work for her. if you like donald trump and you're a big fan of the us then you want a trade deal with the us. and if you're a pretty hard—core brexiteer then you will be very concerned by what he says and you will be ever angrier with theresa may by what people say is a soft brexit sell—out. however, if you don't think donald trump is up to much good, then it is quite possible this
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could help theresa may. nobody likes to see a us president tell a british prime minister what to do. and this is without a shadow of a doubt a us president telling the british prime minister what to do. so it is entirely possible that it will engender a bit of sympathy for her amongst her backbenchers which is not huge at the moment. and they may run it behind her. you will remember the row which followed the intervention of barack 0bama ahead of the referendum when he was supporting david cameron. no outcry from the brexiteers this morning though. they were very upset with the prime minister's plan. they we re with the prime minister's plan. they were probably welcoming the president's intervention. some of them i may be talking to the president but he team and encouraging some of those thoughts that we heard from donald trump in that we heard from donald trump in that interview. let's talk to our political editor norman smith who is at chequers for us. another newspaper, the wall street journal, said in their comedy piece that mr
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trump had thrown nitroglycerin team over the divide is that there currently a re over the divide is that there currently are in the conservative party. they right? certainly emboldening the brexiteers who now think that basically the president is on their side. he has articulated all their arguments. he has reiterated that mrs may is being too soft in the negotiations. she is not going to deliver the kind of brexit that people voted for. she won't get a trade deal if she persists with this white paper. and then the capital, he has gone out of his way to lord yet more praise on boris johnson. a man which stokes much of the disquiet in her cabinet. even suggesting he would be a good prime minister. i mean, it is hard to think of a more explosive intervention, particularly given the timing. as we know, the president is a man who was quite willing to say what he thinks of the top of his head, never mind the consequences all the circumstances. it is interesting this morning that the
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president even was seeking just to pull back a bit saying what a terrific relationship he now had with theresa may. just trying to dampen things down. i sense that perhaps his team would try the fact quite aware how this might be reported and the sort of impact it might actually have. it has gone further than brexit because it has almost been seen as a direct criticism of theresa may as a leader. the fact is, he has been willing to make these expose and remarks shows a degree of this regard, dismissal, in difference to the prime minister. as if he is not really bothered if it causes her difficulty. that impact on her standing, her position, her leadership, herauthority, standing, her position, her leadership, her authority, and that has angered some tory backbenchers. 0ne minister tweeted this morning, "where are your manners, mr president?" it is notjust about brexit, it is about the standing of mrs may as a prime minister on the
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international stage. so at many levels, it is an extraordinary intervention by the president. however, the response we will get from downing street is where i suppose this story now goes. and the choice facing number ten is either to come out and basically to take on the president, unlikely i would think. that is not really mrs may's natural style. that is certainly not what we have been hearing from some ministers like the foreign office ministers like the foreign office minister and the chancellor. again, they have been saying that they were confident that they would be able to get a good deal. have a listen to the chancellor. i'm sure she is looking forward to
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explaining how we will give up that relationship. she will be looking to have a way forward with the united states and our partners in the european union. you are suggesting that the president doesn't quite understand the deal on the table? the president hasn't yet had a chance to discuss with the prime minister the white paper, which after all, was only published yesterday. i know she is looking forward to the opportunity to discuss with the present how we can ta ke discuss with the present how we can take forward the big opportunities for increasing trade and investment between the uk and the us. she mentioned last night during the dinnerand then empower mentioned last night during the dinner and then empower less, and i saw that the president was nodding furiously as she was speaking last night. i furiously as she was speaking last night. lam furiously as she was speaking last night. i am sure that there will be a positive discussion between them today. my guess, christian, is that when we do it, he may draw back from some of his comments. but, you know, it will leave people the impression that whatever he is saying now
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publicly, in private he gave his real views. yes, publicly, in private he gave his realviews. yes, that publicly, in private he gave his real views. yes, that is certainly one to watch, that press conference. norman smith, for the moment, thank you very much. it is certainly a very genteel day at the moment. the castle is not open to visit but there are many people here. people hoping to catch a glint of the present. no protest is here but many of them in central london. 0ver present. no protest is here but many of them in central london. over to you. it is about to get really noisy, in fact, this is quite dim. i don't know if you can hear the noise thatis don't know if you can hear the noise that is happening. there are pots and pans, musical instruments that the organisers of the bring the noise movement have asked protest to bring they want donald trump to hear them even if you can't see them. the organisers are part of a massive coalition, over 35 organisations have come together including stonewall, and others. they feel
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that his rhetoric has descended into normal society and they want to protest against the people that make them feel uncomfortable. in particular, as women. now, i don't know it you can see all the banners. they are getting ready to kick off. there are about 200 people. it started off with a serenade which we got to see earlier today. i really beautiful, operatic serenade to get eve ryo ne beautiful, operatic serenade to get everyone galvanised. now people are getting galvanised the march towards parliament square. when they get there, there will be speeches and conversations going on about president trump's present in the uk. thank you very much. you can see there in central london on the couple of thousand people in london. maybe those protests are going to get bigger through the course of the day. just an apology if you saw some
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of the bad language on some of the placards. the placards were on screen so we are sorry for that. really there are some high emotions in london today. even though the president can't see these demonstrations, they certainly want to make their voice heard. let's get some view then shall we about how this is going down stateside. i am joined now by the american author and republican strategist. i've also joined by a democratic strategist. let me start with you, what do you make with the president's intervention with matthew said he would be prepared to go somewhere that might be controversial and indeed he has lived up to that. he has the back is absolutely disrupted in chief. if you look at these comments. 0ne prime minister said
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that a diplomat thinks twice before saying nothing. that is not donald trump. he is a bombastic businessman who went to nato with the idea of shaking up the status quo. world leaders who are still reeling from the sort of blistering, scolding attacks. he went in that way but he went out with a softer tone. i think went out with a softer tone. i think we will see the same thing today after the meeting at chequers. because first of all, great britain and the uk and the united states are our strongest ally. we have shared world values, we have shared concerns, especially when it concerns, especially when it concerns international terrorism. we are each other‘s largest trading partners. i think we can withstand these family squabbles. i know that brits and backbenchers are reeling today from some of the rhetoric and the somewhat provocative interview in the sun. however, i do think that the two leaders will find more in common than in their differences.
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but it is important to look at the nuances too. president trump is sending a signal. he is a populist president and he is sending a signal that you need to listen to your people in the uk and support brexit. that is what they voted for. and the us would be interested in working with the uk on a harder brexit versus a soft brexit. but by the same token, they are not interested in dealing with global alliances when it comes to unilateral versus bilateral trade deals. when it comes to unilateral versus bilateraltrade deals. he when it comes to unilateral versus bilateral trade deals. he doesn't ta ke bilateral trade deals. he doesn't take kindly to people intervening in the politics of the united states and he has done more than intervene here. he has actually taken aside. aside against the prime minister, his host! i think that you have to understand that you can have a great relationship with the country, the special relationship is bigger than any president including this current
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president. what is very clear is that he doesn't have a great relationship with theresa may. even though he says he does. it is clear he got on the plane, talked about borisjohnson before he left, before he landed in the uk, he had an aggressive tone. it is clear that she is not the type of leader which donald trump has a tendency to embrace. he's much more into strong leaders, leaders which are on a sure footing. theresa may looks very weak right now and he has sent a very clear message to the other party that he would like to deal with a leader who was a strong footing. he is sending a message that he would prefer to do it with someone like borisjohnson. it is very prefer to do it with someone like boris johnson. it is very clear where he stands. yes, to put that into stronger terms, he is a nation state man. he doesn't believe in multilateralism. he certainly doesn't like the liberal progressives in the european union. in fact, would you even say, would you go as far as to say he was like
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the eu to collapse? i don't think so but what he is doing is rebranding the nato alliance into the 21st—century. it has metamorphic size from its original perspective and original mission which was to fight the cold war. he is also tired of the united states being the world's piggy bank and carrying 70% of the load with military defence funding. to be fair, the uk does pay its share. he has a great deal of respect for prime minister may, he knows she is in a weakened position. after all, he made a backhanded convent. he said she could be stronger and tougher to deal with than putin. that means that he does respect her as a strong ally and opponent. so i think that our alliance is not fragile. ifeel very strongly that they will be able to do productive work today. and get a dialogue in getting bilateral trade agreements for the future.”
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dialogue in getting bilateral trade agreements for the future. i think his actions speak louder than his words. certainly he wouldn't go to another country and make these comments. he wouldn't do it in russia. clearly he doesn't respect this by mr. to your question about the eu, donald trump is clearly focused on business. if you can't get the upper hand or gain an advantage, he was to renegotiate. that is what you see him doing to the eu and that is what you see him doing with trade relations around the world. he is renegotiating where he feels he can get a better deal for the american people. it isjust to be seen if that is going to happen but he feels bock and feels that he is a strong leader and negotiator to do that. goods to get your force, negotiator to do that. goods to get yourforce, thank negotiator to do that. goods to get your force, thank you very much. it is worth mentioning that the leaders in europe have five different ways to play donald trump. you have a
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stern way from angela merkel, at a different way from emmanuel macron and a different way from theresa may. they have all been rapped on the knuckles. he has kind words for kim jong—un the knuckles. he has kind words for kimjong—un in and vladimir putin who he goes to see in helsinki on monday. we are going over to westminster. a word of warning, there are plenty of banners and placards today in westminster and a bit of the language can be choice. we apologise for having that on the screen. quite a big protest? processors are out, the placards are out. i can hear voices shouting in protest. building up voices shouting in protest. building up to the main demonstrations today. of course, behind me in parliament square earlier today we had a rather striking image of the trump baby balloon. just one of the protests
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aimed at donald trump to get... together with bring the noise and this coalition of groups, various interest groups protest against donald trump bodywork presence in the uk. then the big demonstration, the uk. then the big demonstration, the melting pot, if you like, later on in trafalgar square. much to talk about with donald trump ultimate visit here today. the comments in his interview with the sun newspaper as he strides across the world stage and through the domestic politics of the countries he visits. with me to discuss that is a professor of international politics and the internet is that university of birmingham. this intervention by donald trump in the uk's blessing politics is extraordinary, isn't it? yes, we have had other presidents make comments, like 0bama urging people not to leave the eu. to not only come in and call for hard
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brexit but the challenge your host and say that she can't negotiate. to say that the foreign secretary might bea say that the foreign secretary might be a better prime minister, that is going into territory that no us president has gone into before. he said the relationship that he has with theresa may has not been better since the dinner last night at blenheim palace. what is going on there? is that purely damage control on his part? that his tactics because he bring the noise and brings the grenade. when he said that the germans were the bad people because they have business with russia. then one hour later he said that he had a good relationship with chancellor merkel, what he does is and stabilises, unsettles them like nothing happened. but he has already had his affect. the eu is unsettled, nato has been unsettled and now theresa may is unsettled. we know that he doesn't like the eu as a block, so is theresa may collateral
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damage in all of this? theresa may is either going to be the tool which helps take the eu out —— she is going to be the tool which takes the uk out of the eu or she is going to be under the bus. foods that benefit? the people that want the no deal. the people don't want to trade with the eu but with the us. we know, we were discussing yesterday how mercurial donald trump is. is it possible that he will turn around and decide that he does want a trade deal with theresa may on the basis of the agreement? it can't be done on the basis of the chequers agreement because, technically, the uk can't have one deal with the eu and one with the uk police act usa. donald trump, and, more importantly, his advisers around him, they have a lwa ys his advisers around him, they have always believed that you don't deal with multilateral groups. instead,
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deal with people want and one. trump picks of this is a win or lose relationship. "i can get what i want and take advantage of that." that means that if you think that a us— uk trade deal helps us have the brexit, donald trump might not be the man to trust. in your opinion is there anyone behind—the—scenes trying to maintain the special relationship? there are adults in the playground trying to maintain the playground trying to maintain the status quo. be that the pentagon and james mattis for example. donald trump, we are not his main relationship. his main relationship is the rear putin. thank you very much. right now from parliament square it is back to you. thank you very much. now it is time for sport.
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we can get the very latest from wimbledon. you join us on another beautiful day at these wimbledon championships on what is men's semifinals day. two very interesting contests to come. the standard one to be a final in its own right. it is novak djokovic against rafael nadal. interesting to note that no one has met more than these dust two in the modern era. it is the 52nd meeting between them. it brings back memories of the final backin brings back memories of the final back in 2011 when novak djokovic beat rafael nadal. it was the last time when these to face each other at wimbledon. 0ne time when these to face each other at wimbledon. one of the three wimbledon titles which novak djokovic us to his name. he shows signs of returning to his best. interesting to note hearing the thoughts of tim henman, a former wimbledon semifinalist himself and
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former british one. ears pipping rafael nadal to come through today despite the fact that novak djokovic has that fireback in his belly. for me, nadal is the favourite. djokovic has had problems on and off the court over the last couple of years, he is back playing some really good tennis. physically he looks good, technically he looks good. mentally, he has the fire in his belly but i feel that dealing with adversity is the challenge when things are not going his way, whether he will be able to do that today. they able to do that today. are second up on centre cou first up on centre court — it's the battle of the big servers asjohn isnerfaces kevin anderson for a place in sunday's final. on wednesday, anderson stunned the tennis world when he knocked eight—time champion roger federer, out of the tournament in their quarter—final clash. no one has fired down more aces than he has. up against kevin anderson, a former us open finalist. it is going
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to be an open contest and with the height of those two competitors, you are going to get a sense of what we are going to get a sense of what we are going to experience out on centre court later on. two semifinals to come, we could be seeing both of these going to a full five sets. as we know, no real british interest to tell you about, u nfortu nately, british interest to tell you about, unfortunately, in the singles. we can report some good news in the mixed doubles. jamie murray and partner victoria azarenka take on britain's harriet dart and jay clarke in the last four. the book their place in the semifinals yesterday with an impressive victory coming through their match on centre court. they will meetj clark. harriet dart went
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out in the first round of the singles, the losing to... the good news being that we will have a british person in the final, that would be the mixed doubles. it will be fascinating to come on men's semifinals day. john, thank you very much. let's look at the rest of the day ‘s news. a group of volunteer british divers who helped save 12 boys and their football coach who we re boys and their football coach who were trapped in a cave in thailand have arrived back in the uk. speaking to reporters at heathrow airport, they said they were just a group of people who had a unique set of skills. this is completely uncharted, unprecedented territory. nothing like this has been done. of course there were doubts but i knew that we had a good team with good support from the thai authorities and the national caving community
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and the national caving community and rescue organisations. so we have the best that we could do to make the best that we could do to make the plan work. are we here rose? no, we arejust using the plan work. are we here rose? no, we are just using a very unique skill set which we normally use for our own interest. sometimes we are able to use that to give something back to the community. that is what we did. good stuff from them. at least 200 people injapan are reported to have been killed in the worst flooding to affect the country in nearly a0 years. torrential rain has triggered landslides and floods in central and western areas. more than 8 million people have been ordered to leave their homes. parts of western japan have been hit with around four months worth of rain in just the worst ten days ofjuly. here, the chief inspector of prisons have the least that has described the conditions at wandsworth prison in london as shocking. he says it is still the most overcrowded in england and wales. the report
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questioned the security measures, support for prisoners and says that staff were putting inmates in danger by failing to answer emergency alarms quickly enough. johnson and johnson have been ordered to pay more than $a billion in damages to 22 women who claim its talcu m in damages to 22 women who claim its talcum powder caused them to develop a varying cancer. dizzy largest pay—out they have had to make so far over allegations that its talcum powder —based products contain asbestos. the company said it was deeply disappointed and plans to appeal. but returned to the second day of president trump's visit. a busy morning so far at chequers. melania trump was with philip may in chelsea. things are moving on to windsor castle where the president
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will meet the queen. we go live to windsor now. as you can see, he is not quite life for us. a blue screen. we will try to re—establish that lying to him but we are expecting the link to get the latest on donald trump's visit. let's think about where we might take you to next. let's go to donald trump's interview with the sun newspaper which caused so much controversy. i actually told theresa may she had to do it but she didn't listen to me. i told her how to do it. that will be up told her how to do it. that will be up to her. i told her how to do it. she wanted to go a different route. absolutely... i think what is going
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on is very unfortunate. a flavour of some of the president's comments that have been causing rather a lot of trouble this morning. while he was meeting with the prime minister this morning following on from that interview and dealing with the fallout, the first lady had a different agenda. let's give you a flavour of how she spent her money. shejoined give you a flavour of how she spent her money. she joined the may at the royal hospital chelsea in london. she was meeting chelsea pensioners and local children there. an interesting little fact, members of the press who were following her have been told to wear flat shoes because, before she went to make those lovely poppies, she was taking pa rt those lovely poppies, she was taking part ina those lovely poppies, she was taking part in a little rolling on the bowling green and she was actually wearing some towering heels but she
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did a good job with the bowling and spent the morning with the prime minister's husband. let mejoin christian fraser. welcome back. we lost pictures for a short while. apologies. the anticipation is growing at windsor. it is not fluttering at the moment but he is there in the grounds of windsor castle which indicates that the queen is in red residence. the president will be arriving here just before 5pm. he will be flown from the us ambassador's residents to the east lawn on the castle's eastern side and then they will inspect the coldstream. the anthems will be played in the quadrangle and then they will go in for tea. 30 minutes is down on the schedule for tea with
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the queen and the first lady will be with president trump and the queen has made many presidents. ten of the 11 presidents, the only she did not meet with lyndonjohnson 11 presidents, the only she did not meet with lyndon johnson and she 11 presidents, the only she did not meet with lyndonjohnson and she has had good relationships with many of those presidents, particularly ronald reagan, who was the first american president to stay here at windsor castle. in his memoirs later, he wrote that one of the highlights was riding horseback with the queen to the grounds of windsor. very shortly after that he invited her to his ranch outside the borough. you will remember president 0bama who was here towards the end of his presidency. the queen said it was one of his favourite people. this is president 0bama. 0n was one of his favourite people. this is president 0bama. on that occasion she gave him letters that
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had been exchanged through the years between the monarchs and us president and they were referencing the way that history had gone in the united states. there were blips along the way said president 0bama but he is very much enjoyed his time with the queen and she was one of his favourite people. there is always a certain protocol when a leader meets the queen. you wait for her to extend a hand. we know how vigorously he likes to shake hands with the people he meets. not on this occasion i would not expect. it will be good theatre when the president arrives here later. at the moment he is at chequers having a working lunch with the prime minister. he is probably reacting to the front page of the sun. it is
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focused on whether they confound ground for a trade deal. earlier these were the opening exchanges. we have a lot to discuss. 0ur these were the opening exchanges. we have a lot to discuss. our special relationship between the uk and the united states, the opportunities we have got when we leave the european union and foreign policy at and defence and security issues. we work really closely together. it is our longest standing security defence partner. the president did a very good job in encouraging. we both do of course. we understand the importance of commitment in nato. we got a lot to do. it was an
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incredible two days i think. people at... 0thers two days i think. people at... others are coming along rapidly. it isa very others are coming along rapidly. it is a very productive two days. we arrived here last night and had a dinnerwhere we arrived here last night and had a dinner where we probably have never developed a better relationship. we spoke for one hour and a half and it was really something. today we are talking trade, talking militarily. we just looked at some incredible and fight terrorism things that are being done here in conjunction with the united states. the relationship is very strong. we have a very good relationship and i think we're going to do relationship and i think we're going todoa relationship and i think we're going to do a news conference in a little while so we will answer your questions then and right now we're going to be talking about some other things that are taking place in middle east and elsewhere. 0k? thank
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you all very much. that did look like an exercise in damage limitation. interesting but earlier this morning the white house is secretary put out a hurriedly put together press statement saying that the president has said nothing bad about the prime minister ‘s but he certainly hasn't given her his support on this visit and this press conference which we are expecting in one hour's time will be something to watch. we will bring you that event live. by watching bbc news. let's talk a little bit more about the ramifications of what we have seen in the sun newspaper. this is the head of the us programme at chatham house. they sent the foreign minister out to bat for the
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parliament. you have to understand that the president is a controversialist. there is nothing more controversial than this? controversialist. there is nothing more controversial than this7m controversialist. there is nothing more controversial than this? it is not what we expected. we thought this might happen after he had left which is more customary of this president. to make it on prior and to take theresa may so hard and strong on such a fundamental issue right now. it is really trade and the prospect of the us uk trade deal which is at the top of the agenda and the president has come out and said very clearly that it is not happening. it is not the kind of brexit that i want. it will not make it easy for america. these conversations will be remarkably tough and that press conference will be something to watch. do you buy what he tells those about his
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emotional connection with the uk? his mother was born here, his golf course is here, he is fixated on what the uk is doing. is this america first, that there is something specific that he wants out of brecht brexit? it is both. i do believe this president has a deep fondness for the uk, especially ia north and scotland. as with america, the president is always finding his people. if you look at that piece he wrote in the sun, he is communicating with the same people he is aiming to communicate through his twitter feed, to his rallies. he is reaching out because he hasn't been able to do that. it has been very tightly controlled. very far removed from ordinary people and in that sun piece his message that matters to his base, his politics and he is making a statement. it is very easy for him to say to theresa
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may, i respect you, i respect the uk, but he has a very clear agenda when it comes to trade and dealing bilaterally with the uk. it doesn't wa nt bilaterally with the uk. it doesn't want to have to deal collectively with europe so he has found a way to make sure that his views are front and centre, that the british population knows where he stands was up population knows where he stands was up doesn't mean that it doesn't like the uk but he has a very clear view on which way he wants politics to move in this country. our dangerous you think that is estimate he could be in powerfor six years. the us economy is doing very well. it is perfectly possible he could be re—elected. is he an ex—essential threat to the european union?” think the donald trump would certainly like to chip away at the european union. the could peel off country by country to work bilaterally with each country, that is his preference. the uk is the first prospect because america has
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something that reza may once. it is going to be very difficult. she knows this. a soft brexit will make it more difficult to have that trade relationship. always with very particular elements within these countries. he is looking for the populace... the liberal element. that is what is so disturbing about him. with immigration... in that sun interviewee takes on immigration and it is interesting to note that he is not ina it is interesting to note that he is not in a place where the british public are. if you look at britain over the last 12 months, the british public has become more aware of the importance of immigration for employment, health sector, in hospitality, social services. the numbers have gone up. more brits believe immigration is important to the country. the president is not only same page. is taking a hard line on immigration in the united
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states and uk. here we are again. it is like a carbon copy of what we had with the g—7 summit. he goes off and shakes hands and talks favourably about kim jong—un. he shakes hands and talks favourably about kimjong—un. he hasjust ruffled all the feathers of his allies. he has come here and put a giant forbid all over brexit and then off he goes to helsinki to a man that he does not see as an enemy but a competitor. that is right. never mind the two days of golfing. this entire trip has been aimed at that meeting in helsinki. he has a fondness for putin. he is always wanted to transform that relationship but notice what has happened. he hasn't succeeded. america aligned very closely with great britain in response to the knobby torque attack —— the chemical attack. regardless of what donald
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trump has wanted to do on a personal level and beyond, he has not succeeded. the rhetoric, the words and policies are sometimes outlined, increasingly more, but not nearly as much as the president would like. ultimately he is still leading a democratic country and that is a fundamental constraint. that is what we have to remember.” fundamental constraint. that is what we have to remember. i know you are going to keep me company. we will talk more about the trump visit. the crowds at gathering here at windsor. there is plenty of interest but not many protesters, not yet at least. there are plenty in london. thousands are starting to proceed down from central london towards parliament square. i have two of the 35 organisations that banded together to march towards parliament square. i have some from the lawyer
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that represents stormy daniels. square. i have some from the lawyer that represents stormy danielsm is important to send a message to our brothers and sisters in the uk and around the world that not all americans bob is president. millions of americans are outraged by his conduct as it relates to reproductive rights and separating mothers from their children on our southern border. i am here to send a loud and clear message that there are millions of americans that want to make america america again. you are also representing mothers and children that have been separated which has been a big news story. that is correct. i represent iao mothers in the us that remain separated due to the draconian policies of president tom. this family separation has no place in the world, let alone in the united states of america. it is an absolute outrage. he is not going to see this
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protest. he is at chequers with the prime minister. still important to be here? i think it is because it is sending a message to our allies around the world that america still stands for something and millions of americans believe in these concepts with their heart and soul and they will not rest until america becomes america again. you are here... why do you feel it is important to be here? trump as a so-called leader of the so—called free world has unleashed a soon army of misogyny and racism and he has normalised the extremist forces in the world in europe and in the world. we also wa nt europe and in the world. we also want to make the link between his policies on what is going on in britain because, although we talk about the separation of mothers and children at the border in the us, it
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is also happening here. it may not be happening in the same dramatic fashion as at the borders, so we wa nt fashion as at the borders, so we want to make that connection that actually he is a really dangerous force for the whole world. trump isn't going to be seeing these protest. he is at chequers having lunch with the prime minister. why is it important to get your message and why is it important to be so loud? first of all we note that trump is both thin—skinned and thick skin and he follows everything on social media so today in this world come in this highly technological well, he doesn't have to be physically present. he's going to see the anger that is being expressed here and the noise is symbolic that it will reach him. it will reach him thanks to people like you. what are the things and angered you about him? michael talked about
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the separation of mothers and children. what are the other policies? the whole issue of abortion rights is in a very delicate situation right now. he is deliberately appointed a judge who is known to be anti—abortion so that is known to be anti—abortion so that isjust one of many things. as we know, his whole attitude towards women, his comments about pussy grabbing. he has developed a teflon exterior that no matter what he does, people in america still seem to be... he has a fairly strong support behind him. we want to show that we stand for women's rights that we stand for women's rights that could be demolished by a monster like trump. thank you very
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much. as you can hear, the organisers wanted them to make as much noise as possible, even though president won't see the protest they are hoping he will be able to hear it! thank you very much. plenty in the sun newspaper about the criticisms of theresa may's brexit plan. the may of london sadiq khan said... he said that he is not showing respect and handling crime well. i think he was referring to the trump baby blimp which has been flying above parliament square in westminster and that is where my colleague is. anita. thank you. sadiq khan gave permission for the trump baby bloom to flight here at parliament square. it was a lot
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behind me just picking over the trees at the 30 metre height restriction that the organisers of this particular protest were given. i spoke to the man behind the baby blue a little earlier. he said that the uk has a strong, noble tradition of protest and in response to those who argue that this was an insult to donald trump, an insult to the office of the president, he said it certainly wasn't intended to that office but, in terms of the individual, being encumbered donald trump he said insult is a sort of language that he understands and they felt that donald trump's comments in that newspaper interview published today indicate the protest thatis published today indicate the protest that is going on. the bring some noise protest that was reported
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earlier is going to end up here behind me in parliament square. then there is that second protest together against trump. that is going to lead from the portland place area and make its way along regent street towards piccadilly circus and eventually ending up via haymarket and pall mall in trafalgar square. both the baby blue campaign and bring the noise and together against trump, these are protest which i made up of coalitions of different interest groups. we have environmentalists, human rights groups, the gdb lgbt groups and lots of individuals who don't belong to a particular group but object to his presence in the uk. the president himself is well away from the scenes of protest against him. the 2nd of
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march will end up in trafalgar square and there will be a demonstration starting off around 5pm this evening. a big policing operation around this, the biggest policing operation in the uk for more than a decade. these officers have said with officers coming from many other forces to add to the metropolitan police effort in placing this protest and the general security around the locations of donald trump is visiting. i have to say that what is happening behind me with the trump blimp was incredibly peaceful and people with placards, there were some shouts of protest, but lots of people who weren't involved. they were involved on their way to work. it was all very calm and peaceful and the protesters
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do feel that even though this visit has gone ahead, they are making their point. back to you. sorry, we're not going back to christian, we're not going back to christian, we're going to the weather forecast. here is a scene in london. for others there are heavy thundery showers. cloud across north—western pa rt showers. cloud across north—western part of the country. here is a scene in cumbria. low cloud bringing drizzly outbreaks of rain and for some of us that rain is quite heavy. thunderstorms rattling through parts of wales into the midlands club to what southern scotland. these hit and miss showers will do their way eastwards. not all of us will catch one. many places avoiding those heavy showers, staying dry and the shower with ease away to the court tonight. always a bit more cloud to the far north—west with some spots
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of rain. dry elsewhere and quite a warm and muggy night. into the weekend, there is a chance of rain but some of us but not everywhere. strong sunshine in the south and east with temperatures on the rise through the course of the weekend. here is saturday. england and wales it is looking dry, sunny and warm. scotla nd it is looking dry, sunny and warm. scotland and ireland, critically out west will have more cloud. eastern scotla nd west will have more cloud. eastern scotland and eastern parts of northern ireland seen the warmest operators weather. the temeratures between 22 and 28 degrees on saturday. much warmer than recent days. into the weekend, the remnants of tropical storm chris will be sitting to the west of the uk but they will draw in a south—westerly flow stopped through the gate on sunday you can see the red colours returning to the map indicating that rising temperature up to possibly 31
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degrees in some spots. a one, humid day for many of those on sunday. the weather front will bring some rain to parts of northern ireland and western scotland. away from these regions, it looks dry and sunny. we are likely to see temperatures in the south—east of 30 31 degrees and further north west... not much rain in the far north—west but things will gradually turn a little bit cooler next week. a chance of rain later running the week goodbye for now. donald trump has blown a hole in theresa may's brexit plans, saying the uk probably wouldn't get a trade deal with america. in an interview with the sun newspaper, he said the prime minister ignored his advice over negotiations with the eu, and will end up with a bad deal. but the president seemed in a more
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conciliatory mood this morning, meeting mrs may at chequers for talks. we had a dinner where i think we probably never developed a better relationship than last night. we spoke for an hour, an hour and a half, and it was really something. but up and down the country there have been mass protests at mr trump's visit, with tens of thousands
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