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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  July 16, 2018 9:00am-11:01am BST

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hello, it's monday. it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. another blow for theresa may's brexit plan. her former education secretary, justine greening, joins calls for a further referendum. my my view is you are probably in or you are out, but what we cannot be is one foot in either camp. but what we cannot be is one foot in either camp. tell us what you think. do you want a second referendum? a british model, who was kidnapped and drugged after being lured to a fake modelling assignment last year, tells us exclusively that she made her captor "fall in love with her" to try to secure her release. why would you be off with a person who is starting to have feelings for you and you are relying on that to release you. i had to do everything i could to make him fall in love with me in the way. is that what you we re with me in the way. is that what you were trying to do? make him fall in love with you? yes. you can hear that full interview at around 9:15am.
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and we'll ask you whether this man should still be an mp after it was reported he sent more than 2,000 explicit messages to two female constituents. he's already resigned from his post as a government minister. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. do you want a second referendum on leaving the eu? it would ask you one of three questions. it would ask you one of three questions. theresa may's former education secretary, justine greening, is calling forjust that. would you back the prime minister's negotiated deal, staying in the eu? a clean break with no deal, or remaining in the eu? a clean break with no deal, or remaining in the eu? what do you think of the idea? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtage victoria live and, if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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our top story today: theresa may's plans for brexit are being challenged again. the former education secretary justine greening has called for a second referendum on leaving the eu. in an article for the times, the putney mp, who voted to remain, describes the government's current approach as "a fudge". it comes ahead of a crucial vote on the strategy in parliament this week. justine greening explains why she thinks the public should get the chance to vote on the government's brexit deal. i think the problem is that parliament will vote against it. i think parliament will also vote against a no deal scenario and if it is this, it is stalemate, it is gridlock, we have reached an impasse and whatever the option is, parliament will vote it down and the only way through this now is to take that decision away from the hands of politicians and put it back into the hands of the public for them to be able to decide. for them to be able to decide. let's speak to our political guru norman smith. she is the first senior conservative
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to call for a second referendum and that a significant? yes, it is and it is significant it isjustine greening. since she left the cabinet she has not gone board to reason may with a meat cleaver, she has kept a fairly low profile. when she comes out and says parliament cannot resolve this, we have to hand it back to the people, it does carry more cloud. you get the sense the idea of a second vote is beginning, just beginning, to come back into focus. labour are now saying, we are not in favour of the idea, but we are not closing the door to it. we know the liberal democrats and the snp have championed the idea. the key thing is whether those tories who by and large cap their head down and begin to think maybe a second vote would be a way out of this parliamentary gridlock. and it could
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bea parliamentary gridlock. and it could be a way of avoiding splitting the tory party asunder. at the moment that seems to be where it is going. if theresa may continues to press ahead with her checkers plan, it is quite clear there will be an almighty car crash within the conservative party because the hardline brexiteers are determined it shall not pass. if the bulk of the tory party starts to think how do we avoid this? the referendum option does begin to come back into focus. cheers, norman. we definitely wa nt to focus. cheers, norman. we definitely want to know what you think wherever you are in the uk. mike and canterbury is annoyed withjustine greening. he begins, iam canterbury is annoyed withjustine greening. he begins, i am very annoyed with justine greening. he begins, i am very annoyed withjustine greening. any stupid attempt at a second referendum will result with the british people increasing their resolve to break away from the eu. it is about all these people, including the labour party, got behind the prime minister and stop being disrupted against the best
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interests of the uk. is he right? let me know. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. us president donald trump will meet the russian leader vladimir putin in helsinki today. although the two leaders have met before, this is their first official summit. it's thought they could talk about the war in syria and russia's alleged meddling in the us presidential election. joining me from helsinki is gary 0'donoghue. it is their first formal one—on—one meeting. what had the expectations of it? the expectations are pretty low, certainly from both sides who are playing down any hope of some big agreement from today's meeting. bearin big agreement from today's meeting. bear in mind relations are pretty poon bear in mind relations are pretty poor. donald trump has been on twitter already this morning blaming those poor relations on the foolishness and the stupidity of previous us administrations. that
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may be a play to try and soften up vladimir putin ahead of their discussion. i do not think the former kgb operative will see that as anything than a ploy. the president is in his hotel and is waiting vladimir putin's arrival and they will meet in about an hour or two time. they will meet alone with their translators to begin with alone. that is causing people concerned. they do not know what the president will offer or agreed to or say to vladimir putin in private. they are concerned he may give too much away. the expectations are low, but the risks are high at this summitand but the risks are high at this summit and they will be waiting to see later on today when the come together at a press conference side by side what they have agreed and what they look like standing next to one another and what the chemistry is between the two men. back to you. thank you very much, gary. the rail operator govia thameslink says its latest timetable will be more "robust and reliable" — it's the third in two months.
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gtr, which oversees thameslink, southern and great northern routes, changed the time of every service on may 20th. it meant some were withdrawn and cancelled without warning. the operator says the changes will mean an increase in services across the network. drivers could soon be allowed to go faster through motorway roadworks. highways england say it's considering raising the current speed limit from 50 miles per hour to 60 on quiet days when there are fewer workers nearby. but the union unite says any increase in speeds would endanger lives. model chloe ayling, who was held captive in italy for six days last year, has described how she tried to win over her captor. after two days of being chained to a chest of drawers, she agreed to share a bed with lukasz herba and discussed building a relationship with him. when he realised a ransom was not going to be paid, he released chloe, and drove her to the british consulate in milan. when i started sharing a bed with him, we would talk more, and i would ask him questions. he answered all my questions. he would talk about his life and then, the more we
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started talking, i think the more the bond was sort of forming. and once i realised that he was starting to like me, i knew i had to use that to my advantage. you can see that full interview in just a few moments. you can see that full interview in just a few moments. theresa may will promise more than £340 million to the aerospace industry when she opens the farnborough airshow today. the money will support projects such as the development of environmentally friendly aircraft. last month, airbus threatened to reduce its presence in the uk because of brexit disruption. a remote stretch of the north coast of scotland may become the uk's first spaceport. the a'mhoine peninsula in sutherland has been chosen as the most suitable place in the uk from which to launch satellites into orbit. the uk space agency is providing two point five million pounds towards the development of the facility. the russian protest performance group pussy riot have claimed responsibility for a pitch invasion in the second half of yesterday's world cup final. two women and a man dressed
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in police—style uniforms managed to get on the pitch before being dragged off by security staff. the group said the protest was meant to draw attention to what it said were human rights abuses in russia. kensington palace has released a set of photographs to mark the christening of prince louis. they were taken in the garden and morning room of clarence house following the service last week. photographer matt holyoak, who also took portraits to celebrate the 70th wedding anniversary of the queen and prince philip, said he hoped the images captured the joy of the occasion. an underground station in north london has been temporarily renamed gareth southgate. it follows england's best result at a world cup since 1990. southgate station in enfield has had its signs changed until tomorrow night. we should all be proud. he did a good job. fantastic. really good. i am proud of them. fourth place, no—one expected them to be fourth place. i think he should stay forever.
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i think he is good and should be rewarded. he has done well. it is good. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9:30am. your messages youi’ messages are your messages are flooding in about this call from a senior conservative, justine greening, former education secretary, about a further referendum. you would be asked three questions. would you back the prime minister's negotiated deal? do you want to stay in the eu, oi’ deal? do you want to stay in the eu, or would you want a clean break with no deal? someone says a hard brexit is the choice i made. we do not need another. this one says remain in the eu, we cannot afford brexit. this one says i voted to leave and theresa may is not delivering and we need jacob rees mogg as prime minister. this one says, let's have another referendum, but only when we know what the final deal is. this one says the people who want to
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remain would still say people did not know what they wanted to vote for if they voted to leave. keep those coming in, we will hear from justine greening later on. let's get some sport. tim hague is at the bbc sport centre. the video assistant referee was used when the ball hits a croatian player on the arm and france were given a penalty. it was scored by antoine griezmann and they never looked back after that. paul pogba got that third goal. and then mbappe got the
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last goal, i9 third goal. and then mbappe got the last goal, 19 years of age, he looks like that likely successor to ronaldo and lionel messi. they have never won a world cup. plenty by mbappe and his team—mates to celebrate and just as they did back heavens opened. it reminds me of a few uk summers in the past. didier deschamps becomes the first player in history to win the world cup as a player and as a coach. and if he was not soaked and up by the downpour, his players invaded his post—match press c0 nfe re nce his players invaded his post—match press conference and ensured another change of clothing was in order. didier deschamps, didier deschamps! iam not didier deschamps, didier deschamps! i am not jealous didier deschamps, didier deschamps! i am notjealous at all. and england are back and it was a low—key arrival. yes, when the final was
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being played they were landing back at the airport. they finished fourth after losing the third—place play—off to belgium on saturday. but harry kane got the golden boot, he scored six, but the exceeded people's expectations. gareth southgate has said he had seen enough from the players in the last month to be excited about the future. amazing, an amazing group to work with. really tight, everybody connected, the players and the staff. we did have a few drinks last night and everybody was singing and it was very special. that gives you a chance of being a successful team. that means it is not all about science and what happens on the pitch. sometimes those little moments that you shared together and those relationships and friendships are with you forever and that is an important part of sport. they built up important part of sport. they built upa important part of sport. they built up a close bond. and it is number
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fourfor novak up a close bond. and it is number four for novak djokovic. yes, the wimbledon champion after all his injury problems for the fourth time. he won back—to—back titles in 2000 and yesterday he completely overwhelmed kevin anderson in straight sets. both men had come through really tiring, long semifinals, but he cruised to his 13th grand slam final and there he is with his son, the star of the show yesterday. i had surgery and was absent from the tour for six months and faced for the first time this kind of severe injury and i didn't really know what was expected of me. i had many moments of doubt andl of me. i had many moments of doubt and i did not know really if i could come back to the level to compete. this was my first pile after a couple of years and there is no better place in the world to make a comeback. i 13th
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better place in the world to make a comeback. i13th grand better place in the world to make a comeback. i 13th grand slam title for novak djokovic. see you after half past. good morning, it is quarter past nine. welcome to our programme. "i had to make my kidnapper fall in love with me" — the words of model chloe ayling exclusively to this programme. lastjuly, the mum of one was at the centre of a six—day kidnap ordeal in italy. her story dominated the front pages of every website after it was revealed she was lured to a fake modelling assignment in milan, then drugged, kidnapped, and held hostage. her captors concocted a lie that she was to be sold as a sex slave in an internet auction. eventually she was released. she thought because they'd discovered she was a mother — and the rules of the mafia gang meant they weren't supposed to adbuct mums. once back in the uk, some people didn't believe her story. she was called a liar, she tells us mainly by women, and had every detail of her story picked apart by the media. her kidnapper, lukasz herba, 30, a polish national
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from the west midlands, was recently convicted and jailed forjust over 16 years. another man is awaiting trial. chloe ayling describes her ordeal as "horrendous" and explains to us what it's like not to be believed. i think it's ridiculous that people still doubt after the court has convicted him. i think the media has brainwashed people so much into believing that i was lying. 0nce they've realised that someone is controversial, theyjust try and dig deeper and deeper to try and make the public hate that person even more, because that is at the end of the day what will get the viewers. that means getting stories from irrelevant people just to make the public hate them. and that's what it's done to a lot of people, so they still don't believe me. and that hurt? it is hurtful because i didn't expect to go through something so bad and be disbelieved by your own country but there's nothing i could do until the verdict.
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i want to take you back to when you had been released. you were back in this country and you spoke to tv reporters for the first time. let's just have a look. i've been through a terrifying experience. i feared for my life second by second, minute by minute, hour by hour. i'm incredibly grateful to the italian and uk authorities for all they have done to secure my safe release. do you think some doubted you because of the way you looked there and because of the way you sounded there? i guess so. i was happy to be there because i'd just come home after a month of not seeing family and thinking i wouldn't see them again. i was really happy to be home. i just got off the plane in shorts and a top. people didn't like my outfit there. but i was just being me. i went to reporters because i thought that would make them go away so i could have privacy with my family but it didn't really work. what do you think the image is of what a kidnap victim should look like? people expect me to be crying
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all the time and shutting myself from the world and not facing any cameras. i could have done that and choose to do that but i thought was that going to make me recover? by talking about it, by being around people, i think that was my way of getting over it and moving on, but if ijust shut myself in my house and didn't talk to anyone, it would probably haunt me for a lot longer than it has. in the book you describe yourself as cold. when you were reading that statement, when you look back at it, what do you think of it? the statement outside my house? that was just a brief thing after... i was so happy to be home ijust wanted to get rid of the reporters, to be honest. that was the reason i did it. what in fact had happened to you was you turned up for a modelling assignment in milan, you had been injected with a tranquiliser called ketamine. you didn't know it was that at the time, obviously. you were stuffed into a holdall, put in the boot of a car, and driven 120 miles to a remote farmhouse. when you came round from the drugging in the holdall, and realised you were in the boot
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of a car being driven at speed somewhere, what were your thoughts? when i wasjust waking up, i was just too drowsy to even realise. am i on a plane? a boat? a car? i didn't know where i was. it took me a while to realise i was in a car. hearing the handbrake and the engine and also the radio was on really loud. it took me a while to wake up and then i started to wonder where am i? i felt restriction on my face. i felt that i was in an enclosed area. i was just trying to gather where i am. as i was waking up more, i tried to figure myself how to get out. that's what i was trying to do. what were your emotions? you must have been absolutely petrified. i was but i was so drugged it didn't have a straight effect on me. you were more concentrating
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on trying to get some air? when we got to the house and i was more conscious, that's when it really hit me the most. how did it hit you? when he said why i had been taken. when i was in the car i didn't know what the reason was. they wouldn't speak to me. i didn't know. was i going to be raped or killed? i didn't know why. when i was at the house, that's when i found out. to hear that you've been taken for sex trafficking, it's just horrendous. what did you think was going to happen to you? i thought what he was saying was all true and i never doubted him for a minute because he wasjust so detailed in all his responses to my questions. i never doubted what he was saying so i believed everything to be true. just to fill our audience in, what your kidnapper had said to you was effectively you're going to be auctioned several days later to the highest bidder unless a ransom was paid. i knew i couldn't pay that because he was asking what my family has, what phil has. that was your then agent. my mum couldn't do that and neither could phil.
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so then he asked me to give three names. so i thought about that and gave them three names. you're talking about this in a really matter—of—fact way. is that the way you deal now with what happened then? i do tend to look at it from an outside point of view in order to detach myself from the emotions i felt at the time. it's an indescribable feeling of not ever knowing if you're going to have your freedom back. i don't like to think about that. when i talk about it, i try to stay to the facts, to the point, so i don't have to go back to how i was feeling at the time. you describe the association with your kidnapper and it became unusual, didn't it? i'm not going to describe it as friends obviously. how would you describe that relationship? at the start it was very formal, obviously. he was just talking the facts to me. and at this point you were handcuffed to a chest of drawers. yes. from when i started sharing a bed with him, we would talk more.
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i would ask him questions and he would answer all my questions. he would talk about his life. the more we started talking, the more the bond was kind of forming. once i realised that he was starting to like me, i knew i had to use that to my advantage, because he told me the rule of black death was not enough to get me out because they are was not flexible on that. i thought i have to do something else. black death was the mafia organisation that he said he worked for. he had organised this kidnapping. when you say sharing a bed, could you explain to our audience what you mean by that? 0n the second day, he would let me go to go to the toilet. so i went to go back to the sleeping bag that i was on and that is when he suggested sharing a bed. obviously i am not going to turn that down when i am trying to be on his good side. i am basically treading on eggshells around him to not upset him in any way. he wanted to kiss you, he told you, at one point. you felt you could use that
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to try and get yourself out of this situation. what were you thinking when he said things like that? i was just thinking straightaway this was my chance to get out. obviously i didn't want to do that so i was putting it off to the future. that's how i would play it. once i saw his reaction to what i was saying about how things could happen in the future, he was acting really excited and looking forward to it and always talking about it. it was that response which made me realise i could keep doing that. whereas if he'd had a response that he would pressurise me to do it now, i probably would have done that. when he was excited about it, i thought this was the right way to go. in the end, he drove you to the consulate. this is lukasz herba, the man who was convicted last month. he drove you to the consulate in milan and the plan was to drop you a short walk away. he was going to escape. it was a couple of hours until the consulate opened so you decided to have breakfast together. and witnesses later told reporters you were seen laughing and joking in a cafe. we weren't laughing and joking. that cafe discussion was basically he gave me his business card that
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had an e—mail on the dark web, and that was how i would contact him about the bitcoin payment i would have to make to him. still i was needing him to be with me. i was so paranoid about what if something else? everyone from black death in my mind wanted me to be sold, but he was the one who was against that. so i was still really reliant on him. so i had to keep making him smile and happy. if i was miserable and sad, it wouldn't get me anywhere. you got to speak to officials and police told you they had footage of you and him shoe shopping and holding hands. how did that make you feel? they didn't tell me that straightaway. that was after a very, very long interview when you described what had happened to you. 12 hours, yes. then they said that they spoke to the shoe lady and that we had been to the shoe shop and again i didn't deny that. i said it straightaway. do you understand that people find it difficult to get their heads round that? you were holding
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hands with this guy. yes, but just think about it. why would you be offish with the person that is starting to have feelings for you and is relying on that to release you? i had to do everything i could to make him fall in love with me, in a way. is that what you were trying to do, make him fall in love with you? yes. you, of course, have now discovered that black death never existed. that lukasz herba was lying to you about pretty much everything. what are your feelings towards him now? i still don't fully understand his motivation behind it because it can'tjust be money. why me and why did he add me on facebook two years ago? it's like he's been stalking me for that long. it must be kind of an obsession as well. i will never really understand what goes through the mind of a person like that. i know you don't want to talk about your son and i completely understand that but i want to ask you when you were trapped in that farmhouse, not knowing how this was going to end, and fearing for your life effectively, did you think you would see your little boy again?
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no. not at the start, no. but when it was progressing somewhere, my hopes were getting up, but then i was still thinking what if he changes his mind? it is never definite with someone like that. he could have easily been told by his boss that they can't release me. it was always not knowing and it was terrible. itjust makes you realise that that's all that's important in life, really. all you want to be is at home with your family and before you think maybe it's a bit boring and you want to go out but it doesn't matter. you know that you've been accused of exploiting what happened to you in some kind of search for further fame and notoriety or money or whatever it is. what do you say about that? i just say that's my way of recovering in a way. it helps to talk to people and keep myself busy. obviously it is a big change for me to leave my then model agent and not do thejobs i was doing before. so i had to keep myself occupied.
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i spent the past year just travelling to try and take my mind off it and put it as much in the past as possible. are you not going to do glamour modelling in the future? i would like to continue doing modelling but not stuff like page three that i used to do. what are your plans? what are your ambitions? i'm not sure at the moment. i spent the past year just living in the moment, really, not thinking about the future too much. and what do you say, finally, to those people who, despite everything, despite the conviction, despite a man being jailed for 16 years, still don't think your story rings true? i think it's just ignorance really because it's such a complex case, to the point where even i don't fully understand his motivation behind it. people are questioning me for his actions and this is a complete psychopath, crazy person. itjust doesn't make sense that people are believing the media over the court. do you think it's partly because you're a woman?
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is it misogynistic, some of the trolling that you have had? a lot of it comes from other women. does it? that's interesting. what kind of comments? just calling me a liar, that it doesn't make sense. i lost my instagram account because of all the hate i was getting. why do you think most of that trolling has come from women? i don't really know. i think it says more about the person than it does about me. i would never sit there and hate about them on online that i don't even know. thank you very much, chloe. thank you for talking to us. we really appreciate it. thank you. chloe's book, kidnapped, is out now thank you for your many messages about the suggestion from the small—business minister about
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backing the brexit deal, do you want to stay in the eu or want a clean break come out and forget a deal? ron says i hope do get a vote. the choices sounded good but i do think we need to vote on a final deal. if mps respected that, we would not have the turmoil. what if it comes back the same question i voted to leave the eu and so did the majority and our views are not half—hearted. suzanne says, i voted to leave stupidly thinking it meant to leave not that we would be attached in some way. dave said i voted to remain but there should be no second vote because that is an abuse of democracy. still to come. we ll be asking whether the small business minister, andrew griffiths, who resigned for sending sexual texts to two women in his constituency, should still be an mp. he is not a small—business minister anymore he. he resigned that
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position overnight. an 18—year—old boy from glamorgan has died at a resort in magaluf after falling off a balcony. thomas channon is the third british teenager in three months to die at the resort. i'll be talking to the association of british travel agents to find out how they are responding to the recent deaths abroad. time for the latest news, here'sjoanna. theresa may's plans for brexit are being challenged again. the former education secretary justine greening has called for a second referendum on leaving the eu. in an article for the times, the putney mp, who voted to remain, describes the government's current approach as "a fudge". it comes ahead of a crucial vote on the strategy in parliament this week. us president donald trump will meet the russian leader vladimir putin in helsinki today. although the two leaders have met before, this is their first official summit. it's thought they could talk about the war in syria and russia's alleged meddling in the us presidential election. model chloe ayling, who was held captive in italy for six days last year,
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has described how she tried to win over her captor in an attempt to secure her release. after two days of being chained to a chest of drawers, she agreed to share a bed with lukasz herba and discussed building a relationship with him. when he realised a ransom was not going to be paid, he released chloe, and drove her to the british consulate in milan. the rail operator govia thameslink says its latest timetable will be more " robust and reliable". it's the third in two months. gtr, which oversees thameslink, southern and great northern routes, changed the time of every service on may 20th. it meant some were withdrawn and cancelled without warning. the operator says the changes will mean an increase in services across the network. theresa may will promise more than £340 million to the aerospace industry when she opens the farnborough airshow today. the money will support projects such as the development of environmentally friendly aircraft. last month, airbus threatened to reduce its presence in the uk because of brexit disruption. that's a summary of
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the latest bbc news. here's some sport now. france have done it for a second time after beating croatia 4—2 in a great world cup final in moscow. paul pogba got the third, before kylian mbappe made it 4—1. he's the first teenager to score in a world cup final since pele in 1958, and, at only 19 years old, looks the likely successor to ronaldo and messi. both of those men have never won a world cup remember. the french manager didier deschamps captained the 1998 winning team, and becomes just the third man in history to win the world cup as a player and a coach. (pres) novak djokovic is the wimbledon champion for the fourth time.
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and after all his injury problems and a loss of form — this was like the djokovic of old... the constituency of burton and uttoxeter is working out what to do about their mp, conservative andrew griffiths who's resigned as a minister after being caught sending explicit messages to two of his female constituents. he reportedly sent more than 2,000 messages to the women over facebook, snapchat, instagram and whatsapp. the messages are salacious and excruciatingly embarrassing. some are too explicit to read out. i'm am going to read a couple of others so if you or your children don't want to hear them, turn down the volume now. "i'm going to need something filthy to put a smile on my face. i want to see you both naked. can she take a beating? i have to be slightly careful in myjob. the mp, who campagined for upskirting to be made illegal also sent a message saying, "i want to be able to lift your skirts over dinner and show my friends." one of the women who mr griffiths
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sent messages to, imogen treharne, told the sunday mirror he always turned the conversation "back to sex". she said some of the messages he sent were "vile", "disgusting". i put the story and snapchat. at first i spoke to him because i did not believe it was him. i asked him about his interests and his work and it always turned back to sex and what he wanted to do to me and what the situation between me and him was going to end up to be, never about anything else. i tried a few times
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to talk to him about his work on his interests, where he was. he was telling me about a few bars, i worked in a bar. it came back to sex all the time and the things he said we re all the time and the things he said were vile. i think he was trying to impress me with the things he was saying. it got to the point where it was co nsta nt saying. it got to the point where it was constant messaging. it was interfering with my life, it was obsessive nose. he was obviously watching me and my social media and saying things to me that were disgusting. it made me feel like a piece of meat. he calls women things in conversations. that is basically what i was. that is basically what i was. the mp resigned as small business minister on friday night and apologised in a statement saying, "i am deeply ashamed at my behaviour which has caused untold distress to my wife and family to whom i owe everything,
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and deep embarrassment to he pm and the government i am so proud to serve. we wanted to talk to mr griffiths on our programme today but he hasn't responded to our request. nor has imogen treharnem, one of the women who recevied the messages. he's the latest politician to quit after inappropriate behaviour. mark garnier resigned as international trade minister in january after being accused of using derogatory language to his secretary and asking her to buy sex toys in 2010. he was cleared of breaking the ministerial code but told the mail on sunday, "i m not going to deny it because i m not going to be dishonest." damien green was sacked from his job as first secretary of state in december after making "inaccurate and misleading" statements over what he knew about claims that pornography was found on his office computer ten years ago. he also apologised for making writer kate maltby feel uncomfortable in 2015. sir michael fallon resigned as defence secretary last november, saying his behaviour may have "fallen short" of standards
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expected by the military. he told the bbc that what had been acceptable 15, 10 years ago is clearly not acceptable now. stephen crabb stepped down as work and pensions secretary injuly 2016 after newspaper allegations he sent suggestive texts to a woman who applied for a job in his office in 2013. he was later cleared of wrongdoing by a conservative party investigation. simon danczuk was suspended by labour in december 2015 after sending sex texts to a teenager. he lost his seat in last year's general election. and former conservative mp brooks newmark resigned as a minister in 2014, after sending explicit photos of himself to a reporter posing as a young woman. so, what next for andrew griffiths? let's talk to sebastian payne, who writes about politics for the financial times newspaper, and two constituents of mr griffiths, john finch and ed stayner. we wa nted
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we wanted to talk to female constituents as well, but that has not been possible so far. ed, what do you think of these messages? very disappointed and very shocked to be honest. me and my wife had dealings with andrew griffiths, he helped us through a visa problem. my wife is from the philippines. we a lwa ys wife is from the philippines. we always thought him to be a good man, very helpful, so to obviously hear these messages and see what he has been doing is extremely disappointing to say the least. what sort of a husband, a new dad, sends m essa 9 es sort of a husband, a new dad, sends messages like this? exactly. that makes it even worse, the fact that his wife has not long given birth. and the nature of the messages in particular, it was notjust a casual innocent thing. it was the polar opposite of that. it was obviously a
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prolonged thing as well, over 2000 sent. clearly he knew exactly what he was doing and it tells us a lot about his character. me and my wife are both extremely disappointed about him. what does it tell you about him. what does it tell you about his character? it shows his lack of moral compass. some of the things he said and him abusing his position of power as well to take advantage of women, i think that sums up advantage of women, i think that sums up a advantage of women, i think that sums up a lot about his character and perhaps it questions whether someone like that should certainly not be a minister, but even be an mp. is that someone suitable to be ina mp. is that someone suitable to be in a position as an mp? i think not. really? absolutely. i think a lot of people from what i have read on social media are saying the same thing. it is one thing for him to
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step down as a minister, but someone of that character, and he has said it was a moment of madness, but to me it seems like a lot more than that. it was notjust a couple of messages. we are talking a couple of thousand messages, so it was quite calculated. he knew what he was doing and it does question if someone of that nature should be an mp, should be in that kind of opposition, someone who is in a political position dealing with british law and british politics. let me bring injohn french, also represented by andrew griffiths mp. did you vote for him at the last election? i think i did did you vote for him at the last election? i thinki did and did you vote for him at the last election? i think i did and the reason being is he is quite prominent in burton and when there is an election campaign his posters are everywhere and you see very little opposition in burton. there are other people up for election but you do not hear of them and he is
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the easiest one to vote for in that respect. what did you think of these messages? i was shocked at the brazenness of it, somebody in that position and that power festival thought he could text two ladies with those messages and get away with those messages and get away with it. i do not understand what he was thinking. i do not think it is right, there is no excuse for it, i don't understand what he was thinking. how we you describe the nature of some of these messages? he has been a big advocate of women in the government and that would suggest he is trying to portray an image of equality, but they were just disgusting, they were cringeworthy if i am perfectly honest. they were disgusting.” mention in the introduction that he campaigned forup mention in the introduction that he campaigned for up skirting to be made illegal and he sent a message
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to one of the women saying, i want to one of the women saying, i want to be able to lift your skirt over dinnerand to be able to lift your skirt over dinner and show my friends. what do you think of that? it is cringeworthy. he is trying to portray one image in his professional life and clearly believes in another. there cannot be any other reason for it really. do you think he is a hypocrite?” any other reason for it really. do you think he is a hypocrite? i would say so, yes, absolutely, a hypocrite. do you want him to carry on as yourmp? hypocrite. do you want him to carry on as your mp? to be an mp you have to have the respect of your constituents and if you have not got the respect, you cannot be an mp. unfortunately he will have lost that respect, whether they were a loyal fan or supporter. he has said he is deeply ashamed at his behaviour and has acknowledged the distress caused to his wife, his family, the prime minister. he talks about his constituents as well and says he wishes to apologise to his
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constituency association and the people burton he is honoured to represent. he does not seek to excuse his behaviour and is seeking professional help to ensure it never happens again and in time he hopes to earn your forgiveness. it is a difficult one because of the nature of the messages. that is what troubles most people. if he wasjust texting and he was flirting or maybe having an affair, that is not excusable, but it is more understandable. but the nature of the messages make this a bit of a unique case. he has said all the right words, he has admitted it and left hisjob in the government, but i don't think he will gain the trust of his constituents after this. jones says, as a female constituents of andrew griffiths i do not want
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this man representing us. he is a slimeball. sebastien pain is sitting beside me and writes about politics for the financial times. if enough constituents decide they do not want andrew griffiths to represent them, what can they do? they can sign a petition, there is a system on the parliament website where they can say they do not have confidence in their mp. if thousands of constituents sign that, something will have to be done and they will bea will have to be done and they will be a huge amount of pressure on the conservative party. but there is no binding, formal mechanism to get rid ofan mp. binding, formal mechanism to get rid of an mp. total recall would mean there will be various mechanisms and constituents would be able to say we do not have confidence and that could trigger a motion in westminster and he could be removed, but there is no formal way to do that. that is a bad thing in our political system at the moment. constituents are engaged with their mps and they have strong views and
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yet they have to wait until the next ballot box. if you rememberjarrod 0'mara, a labourmp, ballot box. if you rememberjarrod 0'mara, a labour mp, who has had a lot of personal issues since he was elected last june, lot of personal issues since he was elected lastjune, he has left the party and has still not made his maiden speech in the house of commons and a lot of people in sheffield hallam might say, ifeel bad for his situation, but is he doing hisjob as bad for his situation, but is he doing his job as an bad for his situation, but is he doing hisjob as an mp? for andrew griffiths a lot of people will think, is your moral compass up to being an mp? you have acted so consistently in a dreadful way over so many months and westminster needs to realise they have to do constituents the power to choose to get rid of their mp if they are not up get rid of their mp if they are not up to the task. the conservative party could withdraw the whip if they say you have not met the moral character wig spectre of a conservative parliamentarian. he resigned so quickly over the text messages. it
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shows how much attitudes have changed in westminster. in the past a lot of these things have been drawn out over days and there would have been an apology. he was giving quite short shrift by the prime minister, who essentially said, you have to go, that is it. this is the end of the line, i think, for him. louise says he should go if there is a feeling he has dropped below the standard for a minister ben he has dropped below the standard for an mp. his behaviour is totally unacceptable and putting a pathetic apology in the local paper does not remove what he has done. vulnerable women will need his help. how does he think these women will feel? the local conservative group at st paul's square needs to remove him. that is from louise. peter says, he should resign as an mp. he is supposed to be an upstanding
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citizen. that is why he was voted in. he has let his wife and child down and his constituents down that way should we fund this man and his career via our taxes? 0ne way should we fund this man and his career via our taxes? one more. this one on twitter. i am torn. people are entitled to their private, consenting life but this guy seems to have crossed our moral line and read the situation very poorly. not fairon his read the situation very poorly. not fair on his female constituents. thank you very much. thank you for coming on the programme. your views are welcome, particularly if you are in the constituency of burton and uttoxeter. thanks for the e—mails. please do get in touch and we can talk to you on base time or skype.
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coming up... the south african township where one in three men admit to being rapists, we ll bring you an exclusive report by the bbc. three young british people have died falling from the same apartment complex in magaluf. 18—year—old thomas channon was celebrating finishing his a—levels with friends at the spanish resort town. police there say he fell 70 feet at the eden roc apartment block. in june, 20—year—old tom hughes from wrexham fell from a balcony there, and in april 19—year—old natalie cormack from ayrshire fell when she tried to climb to her balcony after locking herself out of her apartment. figures compiled from members of the association of british travel agents, abta, show that in 2017 there were 12 balcony related accidents which resulted in one death and 11 serious injuries. let's speak now to sean tipton from abta,
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which is the association of british travel agents. they have a campaign aimed at reducing balcony deaths. and to ben clatworthy, who is a travel reporter at the times, who has written about magaluf. juan jose segura sampedro is a surgeon at the son espases hospital in mallorca one of the authors of a study into balcony falls. he is working with the british council to try to prevent more deaths from happening in mallorca. thank you no much all of you for talking to us. first of all, sean, what is it about young british people in these kind of incidents?” would say it is exclusively an issue for young brits but it is overwhelmingly the case that most of these incidents to involve young british holiday—makers. there are a few things. when you are young you think you will live forever and will indulge in sight you more risky behaviour. a lot of these are people going on theirfirst
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behaviour. a lot of these are people going on their first holiday away from their parents at the ages of 18, 19. if from their parents at the ages of 18,19. if you're from their parents at the ages of 18, 19. if you're with from their parents at the ages of 18,19. if you're with a group of lads, you don't tend to look out each other. some of the incidents of all people who have had maybe too much to drink and problems occur when they become separated from theirfriends. it is when they become separated from their friends. it is a whole range of things. they all alcohol—related? not all but the majority are. if you think travelling to places like spain or greece go if you order a vodka and orange in the uk, how much is vodka ? vodka and orange in the uk, how much is vodka? 0n the continent the measures are much larger if you are not used to travelling you may not be aware of that. you will be drinking a lot more alcohol than you think you are. magaluf is really popular with young british people when they finish their a—levels. hugely popular. post a—level groups and post—university exams will stop this is the season when people go to magaluf is every year they introduce new measures to try to protect
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holiday— makers. every year we new measures to try to protect holiday—makers. every year we see this, every single summer there are cases of people falling off balconies, drowning, getting into trouble on holiday. when people go they seem to leave their brains at they seem to leave their brains at the airport, think they are going on holiday and do not think they are going to be in a huge amount of danger. would you do at school? no. in terms of the authorities be able to do anything about alcohol—related problems, what could they do? it is a holiday resort and lots of young people go there. the local gutman has been working to try to address the issue. they have put restrictions on bar calls, organised by calls. they have tried to prevent them from happening. last year they introduced noise limits on premises to try to curb the atmosphere of excess. i spoke to a club, —— club
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promoter who said it does seem like the government is trying to stop all the government is trying to stop all the fun. there does seem to be a british epidemic are people going on holiday, falling off a balcony when they are drunk. tel is a bit about your research. thank you for having me. “— your research. thank you for having me. —— tell us a bit. we have been told about this problem. there were too many british between our patients, more british than we should expect by the number of tourists from the united kingdom we have. that made us contact the british consulate. what we found was that most of them were males, most of them had high alcohol blood and most of them fell from balconies instead of jumping. most
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most of them fell from balconies instead ofjumping. most of the cases, about 85%, where cases of people trying to go from one balcony to another. what, to try to get. . . ? you mean because of the craze balconyjumping you mean because of the craze balcony jumping or trying to you mean because of the craze balconyjumping or trying to access an apartment because they have lost keys? those who do jump to the pool intentionally, were about 15% of that most of them were trying to climb onto the balcony because of keys or because they thought it would be funny and they wanted to try it because it was risky.” would be funny and they wanted to try it because it was risky. i think this is what we are seeing as well. 0ne basic advice we are giving is do not climb from one balcony to another. you're a group of lads, which is what we are talking about and there are cute girls you fancy across the way, it is bravado to do that. if you have been drinking it is very easy to slip. jumping from balconies into hotel pools, luckily that craze seems to have gone. 0ur
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advice is, do not climb one balcony to another foot if you have lost keys, go and see the receptionist. usual balcony safely and responsibly. if you have had too much to drink, do not go out there in the first place. you are working with the british council to try to prevent these incidents. what are you doing? we are trying to get the m essa g es you doing? we are trying to get the messages across. here the main issue is alcohol. the main issue is that young people and bridges —— in britain come here to have fun and ta ke britain come here to have fun and take alcohol in high doses. drinking is the main problem. the problems here arejust balconies. is the main problem. the problems here are just balconies. another problem is fighting in a bar. there
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are problem is fighting in a bar. there a re lots of problem is fighting in a bar. there are lots of issues. more than just balconies. thank you all very much. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you. thank you for your messages. you are constituents of andrew griffiths. this from paula. i live in burton and andrew griffiths is my mp although i did not vote for him. i do not know what was in the texts or who he sent them to foot i guess is struggling with his work and his marriage or both. it would depend on whether people getting the texts would want to get them. probably something to avoid public life. he needs to find another way of dealing with stress. more to read out in the next hour of the programme. living in a place where one in three men by the women of diepsloot —
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one of south africa's most notorious townships. this extraordinary statistic was uncovered for a new bbc documentary looking into rape culture in the country. pumza fihlani travelled to diepsloot, to meet the man behind the film — and some of the women who face the daily threat of rape. a warning, her report does contain some upsetting scenes including violence and graphic descriptions of rape. the film lasts just over five minutes. diepsloot, a township where danger is never far away. 0n the fringes ofjohannesburg's northern suburbs, here poverty and crime jostle for prominence. it's home to hundreds of thousands of people from across the southern africa region. a launch pad into something better. but one that is seldom successful. these are the conditions the people of diepsloot live under. unemployment is incredibly high here. poverty too. but it's not the only problem. it's an incredibly dangerous place, especially for women.
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i come across sarah, a shopkeeper. she tells me this township is a no—go area at night. sarah says she knows a lot of women who have been raped and the only way to stay safe here is to lock yourself indoors. although for many women in diepsloot, being in their own homes offers no protection. maria was raped twice by the same man, as her four—year—old daughter slept next door. no one is counting how many women are raped in diepsloot but one study found a third of men admitted to having raped someone. it's something golden mtika, a local journalist, has been investigating
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for a bbc documentary. for you to get help here at night is very difficult. if a person is killed around ten or 11, they would have to collect the dead body tomorrow morning. only the next morning? only the next morning. because of how narrow the roads are and how difficult it is? yes. how difficult it is. the situation you are describing, that opens the place up to lawlessness. there is no law here, it seems. criminals are safe, safer than those who don't commit crimes here, because it's a hunting ground for them. this is where they know that no one will disturb us, especially at night. he tracks down two men happy to admit on camera to being rapists. as soon as the door is opened, she's going to scream obviously. as we walk in, we tell her to shut up, we pull out our knives, then we put her in her own bed and rape her. have you ever thought how bad it is for the person that you raped? it never comes to mind.
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mostly never comes to mind. i can't understand it. where is your conscience? no conscience. in some ways it's not surprising these men are so brazen. the odds are stacked in their favour. 500 rapes were reported to police in diepsloot over a three—year period. just one resulted in a conviction. this is the place where three suspects were brought by the residents. he says the consequence has been vigilante killings. he took me to the place where he witnessed one. when they brought them here they used paraffin, tyres. a lot of people were here. some were dumped into the stagnant waters. you can see they throw them inside here. you say there were a lot of people
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on that dayjust standing around and watching. some people even participating. how common are vigilante killings here? it is very common because it happens almost like every weekend. diepsloot means "deep ditch" and the people here really feel that they've been forgotten, that they've been thrown away. and while poverty is the root cause of this community's problems, its rape culture has become its most brutal consequence. many parents like golden just want a place safe enough to raise their children in, a place they can be proud to call home. let's get the latest weather with
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matt. there is rain in the forecast but not for everyone. for parts in south—west england, wales, northern england and north—west scotland, these areas have the best chance of some rain today. a showery weather front is with us. into the afternoons of those downpours could be heavy and thundery. either side of that will be dry, but a big temperature contrast from the south—east and east anglia where we can see highs of up to 30 degrees, to western scotland and northern ireland where we are seeing high teens and low 20s at best. still some downpours for a time across parts of north—east england, the
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midlands and the far north—east of scotla nd midlands and the far north—east of scotland but most into the morning temperatures will drop away. not quite as humid as it has been, still muqqy quite as humid as it has been, still muggy in the south—east corner but he temperatures will take a notable drop. high pressure building back in for wednesday and thursday, as more dry weather and more warm weather to come. thank you. hello. it's monday. it's 10 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. another blow for theresa may's brexit plan. her former education secretary, justine greening, joins calls for a further referendum. we have reached an impasse and i think whatever option on the table, parliament will vote it down and that's why the only way through this now is to take the decision away from the hands of politicians and put it back into the hands of the public for them to be able to decide. tell us what you think. do you want a second referendum? a british model who was kidnapped and drugged after being lured to a fake modelling assignment last
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year tells us exculsively that she made her captorfall in love with her to try to secure her release. why would you be offish with the person who is starting to have feelings for you, i needed to do whatever i could to make him fall in love with me in a way. is that what you were trying to do, make him fall in love with you? yes. the family of three—year—old stuart nelson, who was killed on a farm in fork lift accident, call for more awareness about safety on farms. good morning. it's 10 o'clock. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. the former education secretary justine greening has called for a second referendum on leaving the eu. the putney mp, who voted to remain,
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describes theresa may's brexit plans as "the worst of both worlds". it comes ahead of a crucial vote on the strategy in parliament this week. us president donald trump will meet the russian leader vladimir putin in helsinki today. although the two leaders have met before, this is their first official summit. it's thought they could talk about the war in syria and russia's alleged meddling in the us presidential election. gary 0'donoghue has more from helsinki. the expectations, joanna, are pretty low — certainly from both sides, who are playing down any hope of some big agreement from today's meeting. bearing in mind relations are pretty poor. indeed, donald trump has been on twitter already this morning, blaming those poor relations on the "foolishness and the stupidity", as he puts it, of previous us administrations. that may be a play to try and soften up vladimir putin ahead of their discussion. i don't think the former kgb operative will see that as anything more than a bit of a ploy. but the president is now back at his hotel, he's awaiting vladimir putin's arrival here in helsinki. they will meet in about
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an hour or two's time. they will meet in a room alone with their translators to begin with. that's causing america's allies in europe some concern. they don't know what the president will offer, will agree to, will say to vladimir putin in private like that and they're concerned that he may give too much away. so the expectations are low but the risks are high at this summit, and everyone will be waiting to see later on today, when they come together in a press conference side by side, what they've agreed and what they look like standing next to one another, what the chemistry is between the two men. the number of eu immigrants to britain fell to a five—year low last year, according to the office for national statistics. figures showed fewer people came without a firm job offer during the first full calendar year since the 2016 brexit vote. net immigration of eu citizens dropped from 133,000 to 101,000 last year. the constituency of burton and uttoxeter is working
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out what to do about their mp, conservative andrew griffiths, who's resigned as a minister after being caught sending explicit messages to two of his female constituents. he reportedly sent more than 2,000 messages to the women over facebook, snapchat, instagram and whatsapp. one of his constituents gave us his opinion on the scandal. i was shocked at the brazenness of it. somebody in that position and that power, firstly he thought he could text two ladies those messages and get away with it, i don't understand what he was thinking. theresa may will promise more than £3110 million to the aerospace industry when she opens the farnborough airshow today. the money will support projects such as the development of environmentally friendly aircraft. last month, airbus threatened to reduce its presence in the uk because of brexit disruption. an underground station in north london has been temporarily renamed gareth southgate. it follows england's best result
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at a world cup since 1990. southgate station in enfield has had its signs changed until tomorrow night. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10:30am. thanks for your messages this morning. this e—mail from thanks for your messages this morning. this e—mailfrom anna, a student from burton, andrew griffiths is currently my mp and in my view he should step down. as a woman i don't feel comfortable with him representing me after this scandal. it will be difficult for women to go to him with his concerns and issues mps often deal with. the scandal also shows griffiths has breached his trust with constituents which would suggest he cannot represent them in parliament fairly. he's also showed he's used his power ina he's also showed he's used his power in a disgusting way and boasted about his behaviour. as a woman i feel sorry for his wife and baby girl. when his little girl is older,
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she may find out what her father has been up to. this scandal shows griffiths has a lack of respect for women, especially his wife, which represents he does not respect moral values in society and he should not be an mp any more. thank you for that, if you are a constituent of andrew griffiths let me know your views. i have so many replies about whether you want a second referendum. this text says, second referendum. this text says, second referendum. this text says, second referendum please victoria, many people feel duped by the drive to leave, especially by boris johnson and his bus. we don't believe a lot will change for the better and much will change for the worse. simon says, a clean break with no deal. we had a referendum converted out. second referendum would be an affront to democracy. this text says we need a clean break, let's get out and start getting on with the commonwealth
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like we used to. this says those who propose a second referendum are obnoxious to those who voted to leave with control over immigration and trade, simples. thank you, keep them coming in. let's get some sport now. tim is at the bbc sport centre. good morning. france have done it for a second time, after beating croatia 11—2 in a great world cup final in moscow. the score was 1—1 when a controversial decision changed everything at the luzhniki stadium. the video assistant referee was used when the ball hit ivan perisic on the arm, and after looking at the replays france were given a penalty. it was scored by antoine griezmann and they never really looked back after that. paul pogba of manchester united got the third, before kylian mbappe made it 4—1.
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he's the first teenager to score in a world cup final since pele in 1958. plenty for mbappe and his team—mates to celebrate then, and just as they did, the heavens opened. the french manager, didier deschamps, captained the 1998 winning team, and becomes just the third man in history to win the world cup as a player and a coach. while the final was kicking off, the england team were landing back at birmingham airport, after their best finish at a world cup since 1990. they finished fourth after losing the third place play—off to belgium on saturday, but they did exceed most people's expectations. world cup winnerjurgen klinsmann believes gareth southgate's team will learn a lot from the experience and use it to go onto bigger things. you now go back after the tournament and obviously you reflect and you maybe have the chance to watch some games again. then you see, you know, where other nations have a bit of an edge still, you know, but you are learning.
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you are learning and you know now — the next time i see you, i can kind of predict what you're going to do. you're not going to unbalance me, i'm going to stay cool and go my path. this team will mature and they will be capable to do big things in the upcoming years. novak djokovic is the wimbledon champion for the fourth time. and after all his injury problems and a loss of form, this was the djokovic of old, when he won back—to—back titles in 2014 and 2015. yesterday he completely outplayed south africa's kevin anderson in straight sets. both men had come through long semi—finals, but the serbian cruised to his 13th grand slam title. i had surgery and i was absent from
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the tour for i had surgery and i was absent from the tourfor six months i had surgery and i was absent from the tour for six months and faced for the first time this kind of severe injury. i didn't really know what's expected of me. i had many moments of doubt and didn't know if i could come back to the level to compete. this was my first grand slam final after a couple of years. there's no better place in a world to make a comeback. chris froome is still in the hunt to win a fifth tour de france, after recovering from a crash on the cobbled roads of northern france. the briton's former teammate richie porte wasn't as fortunate though. he's had to withdraw from the race with a suspected broken collarbone. froome crashed out on the cobbles four years ago and, while he came off yesterday, he got back up and is up to eighth overall. team—mate geraint thomas is still second, behind belgium's greg van avamart. that's all the sport for now. theresa may's brexit plans are
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being challenged again, this time by the former education secretaryjustine greening. the mp who voted remain says the government's current approach is "the worst of all worlds." it comes ahead of a crucial vote on the strategy in parliament this week. she explained she would vote against the pm's current brexit plan. i don't think it's possible for me to support it because in the end it's the worst of all worlds, i think. if you are a remainer, you are looking at it thinking, "well, if we have to take all the rules, why notjust be sat round the table influencing them?" but equally i think if you are a leaver, people voted for a proper clean break from the european union and this doesn't deliver that. so, whichever way you look at it, i don't think it's a workable proposition. doesn't the plan reflect how absolutely difficult this is, and perhaps this is the most realistic plan that mrs may can deliver? i think the problem is that parliament will vote against it. i think parliament will also vote against a no deal scenario,
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and effectively what i'm saying is parliament is stalemated and we have reached an impasse. i think, whatever the option on the table, parliament will vote it down. that's why the only way through this now is to take that decision away from the hands of politicians and put it back into the hands of the public for them to be able to decide. and what question would you ask people? i think they need to be given the choice between the three options that in practice are on the table, which is either hard or soft brexit, or of course staying in the eu, and i'm saying the way you do that is by allowing people to vote. so they can vote for their best option they prefer, but also for the second best — the one, if they don't get the top one, what's the one they would have after that. it's how we elect mayors around the country so it's perfectly possible, but i do think it gives us a better chance of finding some kind
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of consensus on the route forward on brexit, which is what we now need. by including the option of remaining in the eu, your suggestion gives the people the option then of overturning the brexit vote ofjust two years ago. we live in a democracy obviously and people will be able to have their say in this referendum. what i'm saying is that ijust don't think it's right anyway that even if we had a free vote in parliament, and i had to choose where i put my vote, i know i'd be disenfranchising a lot of people in my local community. i'd probably be voting for some sort of remain approach but that would really disenfranchise leave voters in my community, many of which have been in touch with me saying they think this deal is not what they wanted when they voted leave. i don't think it's acceptable that i should disenfranchise those voters. they should be able to have their say. britain should be able to decide if it wants
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a clean breakfrom brexit. i have a lot of sympathy for my leave mp colleagues who say this doesn't deliver that clean break, and i think they should be able to have a route through to delivering that for the country but it's clear to me that parliament won't support it so the only other way through then is to put that decision back in the hands of the british people. you say the only other way is to put in the hands of the british people through a referendum. of course it's not the only way. mrs may could break the parliamentary impasse by putting the deals to the people through a general election. why not choose that idea? because that's part of the problem, is that the way westminster works is on party politics lines. of course brexit is above party politics, and so in a way you've got this manual that knows how to drive a car which is westminster having to deal with something a totally different form of transport, a plane, whatever. so that's why having a party political general election is also not the way to fix this. what you have to do is give people the clear options, recognise parliament is in a stalemate, it's gridlocked,
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it's reached an impasse, and ask people what they want. 0r give someone else a chance, some people will say who are watching right now. if britain... if people voted for a clean break, does that mean britain rushes —— crashes out without a deal — what sort of damage would that cause the economy, across britain and across europe? i think it would be damaging to the economy but at the end of the day, if people prioritise having a clean break from the european union, then they should be able to have that direction ahead of them. at the moment i don't think in practice that is there with the prime minister's deal. my view is you are in or you're out, but we can't the is one foot in either camp.
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i think that won't work, i think the first time we need to update this common rule book. i think parliament will probably vote it down or have huge debates about that and it just doesn't seem like a pragmatic, sensible way of going forward. it feels very fragile, and what britain needs is to have a clear direction to be able to draw a line under that and get on with it, and then get onto the other big debates facing our country, which are things i'm campaigning on like social mobility, housing, social care and how we look after vulnerable people our society. i feel like all of that cannot be got on to, we cannot have the proper debates britain needs for what kind of country we want to be in the 21st century until we have resolved the brexit question and that's why you have to put that back to the people to be able to get a direction, draw a line under it and then be able to get onto the rest of the challenges facing our country. let me ask you this, the brexiteers in your party, in the conservative party now, seem to resemble a party within a party. should they now go their own way? split from the conservatives and form their own new political party? i hope not because i think
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at the end of the day we all have to recognise that brexit isn't about party politics and that's why it's not only put a strain on my own party but a string of course on the labour party as well. we have a party political system in westminster that simply has proved unable to deal with such a big nonparty political issue, brexit. so you fix that by having a vote, that gives you a clear direction, and then i hope that actually politics again can start delivering for people on these big other issues that face our country. what about the eu giving britain more time? i don't think it's about having more time, victoria. i think we've had a lot of time, i think we've had two years, i think people have seen a parliament that has being unable to make progress. that's why they now need to have that decision put back in their hands. what we need is a clear direction, a clear decision. dawn e—mailed, please will the
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government get on with it? i knew exactly what i was voting for. the great britain perfectly able to go it alone. the eu needs us and we need to go in hard. if we don't get that deal, then walk away. no messing. neal says kerrjustine greening giving two options to leave and only one to remain is designed to split the leave vote so that remain wins. do they think are stupid? we are going to speak to a conservative mp john stupid? we are going to speak to a conservative mpjohn penrose in a moment or to foot and she absolutely disagrees with what she is saying. in the meantime, let's speak to norman smith. what we are beginning to see is that mrs may's brexit band really has very few friends at westminster, not just really has very few friends at westminster, notjustjustine greening saying it will never get
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through parliament. the brexiteers had pretty much said the same, there is no way this will fly. this morning we heard from david davis on his way to work as a backbencher being pressed about what he was going to do this afternoon in the house of commons. we have two bills to debate today and tomorrow. i will be doing my new job of being an ordinary backbencher. are you going to say anything when you make a resignation speech? no, my name is not geoffrey howe. do you think the prime minister can survive another week? of course. she is a good prime minister. that we have a difference of opinion does not change that.” assumed away your boat today without saying. -- your vote. i am going to probably support one of the
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amendments on ensuring that northern ireland is not separated from great britain. in any event that is government policy but it will do no harm putting it in today. do you regret resigning? no, not fora moment. mrs may facing a potential revolt, a show of strength by tory brexiteers. there are signs that the government is about to back off from a clash with its brexiteers. we are hearing they may accept these amendments tabled by tory brexiteers to the customs plan because of their fear that may be that brexiteers could get together with labour and actually defeat the legislation. that, i would actually defeat the legislation. that, iwould imagine, would incense many remainers. the first sign of
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their being tough opposition and mrs may crumbling. it gives the sense of how fragile relations are in the tory party and underlines why justine greening are suggesting maybe there has to be another referendum because otherwise there are all the signs that the tory party is facing at the very least an absolutely devastating internal clash and maybe even splitting.” absolutely devastating internal clash and maybe even splitting. i am just going to explain the noises of a little girl called hannah, who we are going to speak to in a moment if you can hear some crying and screaming, it is just because she is not used to this kind of scenario. there was a reference that david davis made about geoffrey howe. geoffrey howe began the catalogue of events that led to the fall of mrs thatcher. he went into the house of commons after resigning from the cabinet and gave a speech which basically signalled to all the other
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tory mps that he, who had been alongside misses that chip through all her years in government, no longer had faith in her. —— mrs thatcher. mrs thatcher sent him in with a broken cricket bat. you heard david davis saying i am no geoffrey howe. he will not make that sort of resignation statement but we await borisjohnson. could resignation statement but we await boris johnson. could he resignation statement but we await borisjohnson. could he make a geoffrey howe resignation statement? we are told it will not be today but, who knows, maybe later in the week? let's speak to john penrose. what do you think ofjustine greening suggesting a further referendum with three options and we have a second preference vote as well. i have a lot of time for justineo. she and i were elected on the same day was in this case i disagree with her. it is complicated and we have voted on a lot of this
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already. we have already had one referendum. i guess i am sort of channelling brenda from bristol. the la st channelling brenda from bristol. the last time they called either a referendum general election, she turned round to the camera and said, oh, god, not another one! that was about the calling of another general election after promising there would not be another one. people have made a decision and i now want politicians to get on and deliver it. they know it is difficult but they want us to get on and solve the difficulties. justineo greening is right to say that parliament is a febrile place at the moment. the country is expecting us to fix it. will you do that? i think through the process which parliament is there for, through debate, reason, discussion. if necessary, i hope no one will end up threatening each other but the whole point about parliament is it is supposed to be there for exchanging views on
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getting to the bottom of things. there for exchanging views on getting to the bottom of thingsm does not always work. do you accept that there is a stalemate, an impasse question if mrs may presented her blueprint to parliament when she would struggle to get it through? i do not think we are at all. she is absolutely right to say it is difficult and there are entrenched views on either side. it is not a stalemate. she does not like what mrs may has come up with, we are leaving but not really leaving. as a former remainer, who is now a leader, i have reservations about it. the real question is, not what we want to agree amongst ourselves. the real question is what the eu 27 will agree with us. that is me get a question which we all need to be comfortable winner know what the final proposal is on the table. at the moment we have not had
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reaction from the eu. even if the eu agreed to everything mrs may has put forward in this plan, you do have enough people who would vote for it in parliament. we do not know that yet. you are right, there is a huge amount of debate going on. there is uncertainty. no labour mp would vote for it, preserving their career. you would have to ask labour mps. for it, preserving their career. you would have to ask labour mp5. i am not up with the labour mps will do my point is, this has been launched. it would be out there for a week. i believe a lot of it is good now are serious questions which need to be answered on a couple of points. we will have to see what the reaction from the eu is. deearmay say, we do not want to do this, we can do something out. 18 months ago, the nelson family's world changed forever after their three—year—old son stuart was killed on their farm. his dad richard accidentally ran him over with a forklift truck. now, in their first interview,
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richard and his wife linzi are here to talk about their loss. their baby girl, hannah, is here too. it comes as the farm safety foundation is claiming the industry is one of the most dangerous in the uk. new figures from the health and safety executive show 29 farm workers were killed from agriculture activities between 2017 and 2018. let's talk to linzi and richard nelson, the parents of stuart. thank you for coming on the programme, could you tell our audience about your little boy? stuart was outgoing, loved being on the farm. that was his happy place.
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when he wasn't on the farm, he was a shy boy, very much a mummy ‘s boy, but on the farm he was... that was him. he loved playing with the grain, being out with cows, just in general being with dad on the farm. that was his happy place. and farming isa that was his happy place. and farming is a 24/7job that was his happy place. and farming is a 24/7 job so how is that was his happy place. and farming is a 24/7job so how is it trying tojuggle a farming is a 24/7job so how is it trying to juggle a young family and doing the work? it's not very easy at all. in today's climate, and everything going on today, i know this year is quite extreme but most summers we maybe only have to or three hours to do the harvest. we can't be going all night, and being a young family, the wife is at home,
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when i'm coming in for my dinner, i say i'm coming in 20 minutes but it could be several hours. it isjust a very ha rd could be several hours. it isjust a very hard job but we try to fill in as much time as possible with family, which everything was going great the time when stuart was running about. what can you tell our audience about that day, richard? i know it is incredibly difficult for you. it was a very painful day, that was a you. it was a very painful day, that was a typical, normal day. it was a nice dry late winter, early spring day. i wasjust doing the usual work on the farm, day to day stuff. linzi came home from work and the first thing stuart did was and his wellies to his mum and say, "i want out" so
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he was running about, i was doing some general maintenance and livestock trailer. i said, come on now, we will feed the cows and his eyes lit up. he grabbed the bucket, we we re eyes lit up. he grabbed the bucket, we were feeding the cows. i said, you go over there and make sure you keep out of the way. at the time i was keep out of the way. at the time i was operating the forklift, and when i was operating the forklift i always had my eyes open, kept looking, making sure i knew it was safe, he was out of the way, and when the accident happened he was in the blindspot of the forklift. there was no the blindspot of the forklift. there was no blame on it, it wasjust i could not see him for love nor money where he was. when the accident happened, i was like, please god, don't let that the stuart lying
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there. when! don't let that the stuart lying there. when i moved the machine further back, he wasjust there. when i moved the machine further back, he was just lying there lifeless. i'm so sorry. the only saving grace was that he was in no pain. the accident was quick so he didn't suffer, didn't have to make any life choices for him. we we re make any life choices for him. we were lucky enough that he was taken to the edinburgh sick kids hospital and they looked after him as if he was one of their own. they cleaned him up, they got him changed into his own clothes and they created memory boxes for us. not only did they create it for richard and i, they create it for richard and i, they created one for both grandparents as well which they wouldn't normally do. and at this
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point you were pregnant with hannah? yes, 21 weeks pregnant with hannah, not knowing what we were going to get. both pregnancies were a surprise, we didn't want to find out what we were having, but the hospital was amazing. i cannot thank the staff enough. they allowed us to go over the following day and spend as much time as we wanted with stuart. then they made sure that he was dressed how will wanted for him to come home. you were questioned by the health and safety executive, how did you feel about that? at the time when they came in... they kind of said how deeply sorry of what happened, then as the investigation carried on i was treated like a
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criminal, which then started to affect me mentally, wondering what was affect me mentally, wondering what was going to happen. i wasn't really having much time to think about my son and grieve his loss though that was son and grieve his loss though that was quite a long period of uncertainty of what was going to be happening. did you feel there was finger—pointing? happening. did you feel there was finger-pointing? yes, once they had been in, they did the initial check, the machine got taken away, everything was checked around the farm and things like that. we were told a report would be sent to the procreative fiscal. thankfully i had an amazingly —— amazing liaison officer and without him i don't think we would be here as much as we
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are. he took us through each step and kept us informed of what was happening. but the report that went in very much pointed the blame...- you? at us, yes. was that unfair in your view? there were several things they brought up which was children shouldn't be on machinery until the age of 13 and things like that. yes, there's laws with regards to children on farms but stuart wasn't in the machine and i still say that if he had been in the machine he would be here today. he was on the farm which was his home. we were basically told that he should be pennedin
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basically told that he should be penned in and shouldn't be on the farm even though it is his home. and that's possibly what people who don't work in this world realise, the farm is your workplace but it is also where you live. you bring children up, you socialise. we cannot do what people do in an office job, go to work, finish at five or six and come home and spend time with the family. there's always stuff going on at the farm, there's always time where we can get the phone call or somebody will come out and say there's cattle on the road and say there's cattle on the road and we have to drop everything to attend. we have to get the children into the car because we have nobody else... we don't have next—door neighbours like you would have in your normal street so rural life is very ha rd
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your normal street so rural life is very hard for us young people because there are times we could have been in places when the shop is five miles down the road. at the same time, i am not from a rural background, i would have stuart's life over and over again, the freedom he had... although hannah's life is not the same as it would have been. what have you changed? you are more cautious about what you are doing, you take the extra five minutes to evaluate how you are going to do something or you try to work out, can i do something differently? but at the same point you have the difficulties of you are putting her into a vehicle to keep her safe. that's maybe not where she would want to be, she wants to be with you. so there's a lot of
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changes to get used to. richard, can i ask you a question which you will have considered day after day i'm sure, how you process what happened and your responsibility for what happened and the fact you were stua rt‘s happened and the fact you were stuart's dad? i don't really know how to answer that. i talk about stuart everyday because that's what really keeps me going. certainly when linzi comes on the farm with hannah we make sure we do everything correctly, that they are a safe distance away from any other working machine and things like that. it's just... how safe can you make stuff? because no matter how hard you try,
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there's always something else that will make it harder to work and stuff. i don't really know. you find this time of the year harder because stuart should be with you. yes. this was the time of year stuart could go away with his dad and i could have a couple of hours to get things done. house work. so this time of the year is the hardest, but also the busiest time of the year which is strange. but there is the time you would be able to say, right, he can go and spend time with his dad so i would say this time of the year is probably the hardest, and it isjust seeing other things that are going on. the farm safety foundation, the charity behind farm safety week... is hannah all right? do you want me to get her or is she 0k? shall we
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just grabbed her? i would to get her or is she 0k? shall we just grabbed her? iwould happily to get her or is she 0k? shall we just grabbed her? i would happily do it but she might not take to me. how was it going? you are a delicious girl. the farm safety foundation says farm machinery can be attempting playground for children but they can fall, cut themselves or worse. a little disappointment and inconvenience in exchange for a safer environment for your child is worth it. what would you say to that? we have to change the way we think about farms. you don't want to stop children growing up on a farm. it's the only way you are going to get the future farmers coming in. so banning children from farms is definitely not the answer? we already have the oldest industry... hannah, mind your head, darling. you
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stopped her. you stopped her doing exactly what she wanted to do. i think hannah may have decided it is the end of the interview so i'm going to thank you so much for talking to us. linzi, thank you so much. i'm going to bring you this raking news... conservative mp scott mann has resignation his position as parliamentary private secretary to the treasury over the brexit white paper which he disagrees with. in a statement he said, "i fear that elements of the brexit white paper will put me in direct conflict with the views by a large section of my constituents. i am not prepared to compromise their wishes to deliver a watered down brexit." so scott mann mp has resigned.
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all eyes will be on the finnish capital of helsinki today as america's president trump meets russian president vladimir putin. the two controversial world leaders are expected to discuss a wide range of issues including the ongoing civil war in syria and the attempted denuclearisation of north korea. the meeting is part of president trump's trip to europe, which included four days in the uk. widespread protests took place across the country, while he met the prime minister and the queen. ahead of his meeting with mr putin, president trump spoke of his commitment to nato and said that his russian counterpart has to respect everything he's done. you don't want to dismantle nato. you want people to pay their dues. do you believe in nato? i don't even know why you're asking the question. we have now a much more solid nato than we have had for years. last year, since i was elected, we picked up $34 billion extra, additional. i'm not talking about 34, i'm talking about 34 additional.
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you add that into all the other things i've done, president putin has to respect what we've done. i don't know him. i met him a couple of times. i met him at the 620. i think we could probably get on very well. somebody said, "are you friends or enemies? " isaid, "well, it's too early to say." right now, i say, "we are competitors. " but, for russia and the united states and, frankly, the uk and other places to get along with russia and china and all these other places... piers, that is a good thing, not a bad thing. that was donald trump talking to good morning britain's piers morgan on itv. to look ahead at what might be on the agenda for the two leaders when they meet today, we have some of the best russia watchers in the business. dr patricia lewis from the foreign affairs think tank chatham house, also with us dr eleanor bindman is a russia specialist at liverpool university. and in the moment we will speak to a
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former us ambassador to what was then the ussr. patricia lewis, how significant is this meeting? very significant. it is something that president trump has wanted since he took office. they will be alone except for their interpreters. no one is sure what they will say. john bolton has been ahead of time, the national—security expert. he will be making sure, i'd think, that security is very high on the agenda. i wonder if the indictment of the 12 russian nationals as part of the fbi investigation of russian interference in the election changes the tone of this meeting.” interference in the election changes the tone of this meeting. i think it does to some extent. it is very embarrassing for president trump because a number of his aides and people close to his campaign had been indicated in that. however,
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because it is embarrassing for him, it may make it less likely to be on the agenda. they did not pre—release the agenda. they did not pre—release the agenda. they did not pre—release the agenda so it is quite difficult to guess what they will be talking about. shall we have a guess? syria, novichok in wiltshire, for example. definitely iran and syria and the behaviour of iran in syria and iran nuclear deal on whether or not president trump and putin can form a deal over that. the theory is that crimea might be the sacrifice. what do you mean? 0bviously, crimea might be the sacrifice. what do you mean? obviously, the invasion of crimea by russia was an illegal act. there is essentially a done dealfor donald act. there is essentially a done deal for donald trump act. there is essentially a done dealfor donald trump in act. there is essentially a done deal for donald trump in the way he sees that he might try to let the mossberg in exchange for more effo rts mossberg in exchange for more efforts in syria to keep iran and a cheque. the intermediate into forces treaty, the breaking of that in the
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late 80s, whether that can be sorted out in this would be great. and then theissue out in this would be great. and then the issue of chemical weapons, not only novichok, but the use of chemical weapons in syria. we can talk to william courtney, a former us ambassador who has worked on arms reduction with the former ussr. i don't know if you heard what patricia lewis was saying. perhaps president trump will say, ok, you can have crimea as long as you give me concessions in syria and elsewhere. is that possible?m me concessions in syria and elsewhere. is that possible? it is not really possible. congress has very strong views about russia's annexation of crimea and its ongoing war in eastern ukraine where 10,000 war in eastern ukraine where10,000 people had been killed. the us congress and its allies would not accept the notion that president trump could accept the annexation of crimea as legitimate. 0k. the two
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will have a one—to—one conversation. no one in the room apart from translators. is that wise? it is not unwise. normally presidents do have a small session as well as the larger session. what is different this time is that president trump's use appear to be different of those of his senior advisers than those of the bipartisan consensus in congress. some members of congress have urged for him not to have this small eating but it is not really inappropriate for a president to do. —— small meeting. he has to reflect the views. president trump should not just ask about election interference, he should make a strong representation about election interference. with what consequences? the consequences would be that there could be increased sanctions or pressure continues to interfere. last saturday the
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secretary of homeland security in the united states said that, thus far, at this point, before the mid—term elections in november, russian interference is at a lesser scale and scope than it was in 2016. that may be a positive sign but, if russia continues to interfere in 2018, the mid—term elections, the congressional elections in the united states, that will probably cause the us congress to force more sweeping sanctions, if you will, on russia. speaking ahead of this trip, president trump said his easiest meeting might be a sit down with president putin. he said to cbs yesterday, one of his those was the eu. what does that tell you about how he thinks about president putin? he has made a number of fairly positive statements about president putin in the past. we can see from his meeting, his summit a few weeks
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ago in north korea —— with the north korean leader in singapore, you seems to get on better with non—democratically elected world leaders and some of the democratically elected ones in europe, which makes it very unusual asa us europe, which makes it very unusual as a us president and marks a significant shift in us foreign policy. thank you all very much will to thank you for coming onto the programme. thank you. lets go back to one of our main stories this morning, the conservative mp andrew griffiths who's resigned as a minister after being caught sending explicit messages to two of his female constituents. he reportedly sent more than 2,000 messages to the women over facebook, snapchat, instagram and whatsapp. some of messages were gross and embarrassing. he apologised to his wife and prime
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minister and also his constituents. he said over time he hopes to seek their forgiveness and was looking to get professional help to make sure such behaviour never happens again. we can speak to anna watson, she's a 21—year—old student. she is a constituent. i wonder how you feel? i think he has breached his trust with other constituents. i think it will be hard for constituents to go to him about their issues and concerns because of these messages. it shows he has a lack of respect for women and apple prevented from doing his mp duties effectively. -- that will prevent him. if you had an issue, would you go and see your mp at his constituency surgery, having read some of these messages?” constituency surgery, having read some of these messages? i think i would feel pretty uncomfortable
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around him after seeing what m essa g es around him after seeing what messages have been said about these women and what his fantasies and things like that. not acceptable at all. what do you want to see happen? i think he should resign of mp —— as mp because i do not think you will be other to work to the best of his ability with constituents not being able to go to him about concerns. it would mean another person would be able to do the job better, in would mean another person would be able to do thejob better, in my opinion. so, you want him to resign. you don't want constituents to have to go through signing an online petition, getting some kind of recall and then a by—election.” don't so, no. even though he has apologised and seeks forgiveness and will seek professional help soap it will seek professional help soap it will not happen again.” will seek professional help soap it will not happen again. i think it is embarrassment on his heart. —— his behalf. these messages have come out
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quite recently to suggest to the very recent thing. so, no. thank you for talking to us. thank you very much. we spoke to two other constituents earlier who said they also wanted him to resign. lastjuly, model chloe ayling was at the centre of a terrifying six day kidnap ordeal in italy. she was lured to a fake modelling assignment in milan then drugged, kidnapped, and held hostage. her captors concocted a lie that she was to be sold a sex slave in an internet auction. eventually she was released, but once back in the uk, some people began to doubt her story. her kidnapper lukasz herba, 30, a polish national from the west midlands, has been convicted and jailed for almost 17 years. another is awaiting trial, yet still some people still accuse of her of making it all up.
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i started by asking chloe what she remembers about when she was kidnapped. when i wasjust waking up, i was just too drowsy to even realise. am i on a plane? a boat? a car? i didn't know where i was. it took me a while to realise i was in a car. hearing the handbrake and the engine and also the radio was on really loud. it took me a while to wake up and then i started to wonder, "where am i?" i felt restriction on my face. i felt that i was in an enclosed area. i was just trying to gather where i am. as i was waking up more, i tried to figure myself like how to get out. that's what i was trying to do. while i was in the car i didn't know what the reason was. they wouldn't speak to me. i didn't know. was i going to be raped or killed? i didn't know why. when i was at the house, that's when i found out. to hear that you've been taken for sex trafficking, it's just horrendous. what did you think was going to happen to you? i thought what he was saying was all true and i never doubted him for a minute because he wasjust so detailed in all his
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responses to my questions. i never doubted what he was saying so i believed everything to be true. just to fill our audience in, what your kidnapper had said to you was effectively you were going to be auctioned several days later to the highest bidder unless a ransom was paid. i knew i couldn't pay that. you describe the association with your kidnapper and it became unusual, didn't it? i'm not going to describe it as "friends" obviously. how would you describe that relationship? at the start it was very formal, obviously. he was just talking the facts to me. and at this point you were handcuffed to a chest of drawers. yes. from when i started sharing a bed with him, we would talk more. i would ask him questions and he would answer all my questions. he would talk about his life. the more we started talking, the more the bond was kind of forming. once i realised that he was starting to like me, i knew i had to use that to my advantage. when you say sharing a bed, could you explain to our audience
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what you mean by that? 0n the second day, he would let me go to go to the toilet. so i went to go back to the sleeping bag that i was on and that is when he suggested sharing a bed. obviously i am not going to turn that down when i am trying to be on his good side. i am basically treading on eggshells around him to not upset him in any way. in the end, he drove you to the consulate. this is lukasz herba, the man who was convicted last month. he drove you to the consulate in milan. the initial plan was to drop you a short walk away. he was going to escape. it was a couple of hours till the consulate opened, so you decided to have breakfast together. and witnesses later told reporters you were seen laughing and joking in a cafe. we weren't laughing and joking. that cafe discussion was basically... he gave me his business card that had an e—mail on the dark web, and that was how i would contact him about the bitcoin payment that i would have to make to him. still i was needing him to be with me. i was so paranoid that, what if something else...?
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everyone from black death in my mind wanted me to be sold, but he was the one who was against that. so i was still really reliant on him. so i had to keep making him smile and happy. if i was miserable and sad, it wouldn't get me anywhere. thank you for your many messages about that suggestion byjustine greening of a second referendum, do wa nt to greening of a second referendum, do want to stay in the eu, d1 a clean break or do you want to vote for the deal that mrs may comes back eventually from brussels with? terence says, have the last eu vote gone the other when there were calls for the rerun, what the chances —— what would justine greening have been saying? would there be another vote ? been saying? would there be another vote? british politicians should
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respect democracy and the first vote. good luck today to the stu d e nts vote. good luck today to the students at brunel university in london who are graduating. thanks for watching. bbc newsroom live is next. have a lovely day. hello. good morning. some welcome rain in the forecast. for many of us it has been so dry recently. rain spreading its way east. still a lot of dry weather at the moment for that this is in nottinghamshire where our sunny spells. we will keep the sunshine in the east. tanning hotter into the afternoon. a fresher feel further north and west. some sunnier spells coming from scotland and northern ireland. temperatures about the low 20s were up into the
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high 20s across the south east. a few showers breaking up this evening in norfolk and fabric. generally this showers clearing away in the north sea except one or to coming into the far west of scotland. —— norfolk and suffolk. still uncomfortable sleeping in the south—east of england. a fresher feel tomorrow. lots of dry weather with a few showers here and there. temperatures creep up a little bit by the end of the week. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at 11am: president trump meets vladimir putin in finland for talks, and says relations between the us and russia have "never been worse".
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former education secretary justine greening backs calls for a second brexit referendum, describing the prime minster‘s current approach as "the worst of both worlds". the only way through this now is to take that decision away from the hands of politicians and put it back into the hands of the public, for them to be able to decide. net migration from the eu reaches its lowest level for five years. but migration from elsewhere is on the increase. and, will it be third time lucky for train passengers? govia thameslink launches its third timetable in the space of two months. this one, it claims, will be more "robust and reliable".
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