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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 16, 2018 11:00am-12:59pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at ham: president trump meets vladimir putin in finland for talks, and says relations between the us and russia have "never been worse". former education secretary justine greening backs calls for a second brexit referendum, describing the prime minster‘s current approach as "the worst of both worlds". the only way through this now is to take that decision away from the hands of politicians and put it back into the hands of the public, for them to be able to decide. net migration from the eu reaches its lowest level for five years. but migration from elsewhere is on the increase. and, will it be third time lucky for train passengers? govia thameslink launches its third timetable in the space of two months. this one, it claims, will be more "robust and reliable". and it's the morning after the night before in paris. french football fans celebrated their world cup victory through the night.
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good morning. president trump is meeeting russian leader vladimir putin this morning for a landmark summit in helsinki. ahead of the talks, donald trump said he had "low expectations". the meeting between the two leaders comes after 12 russians were charged with hacking during the 2016 us presidential election. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, is in helsinki. that amir putin's plane has just touched down in helsinki —— vladimir putin's claim. lyse doucet is in helsinki for us.
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welcome to this capital that's just been described as a capital student in history. the big question this hour is, will history be made again in helsinki? it's long been a venue of choice for american, formerly soviet leaders, and now a russian president. we have live picked us, vladimir putin is at the airfield just outside the finnish capital helsinki. the russian leader is basking in the glory of having hosted the world cup. the world's premier sporting event. an event, of course, where one side wins the others all lose. will this be a summit between him and the american president, donald trump? —— will just be a win — win. the two presidents have met twice before, on the margins of other gatherings. american officials are saying, don't
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call it a summit, it's just a meeting. we know from president trump's comments, we —— he loves having a meeting. in the president trump administration, we can listen, we can hear about what he's thinking, what he wants to achieve, by reading his tweets. just before the arrival of vladimir putin, he said, our relationship with russia has never, never, in capital letters, the worst, thanks to many yea rs of letters, the worst, thanks to many years of us foolishness and stupidity. and now the red witch hunt. the witchhunt, of course, is a reference to the investigation in the united states, which has recently indicted, already indicted, dozens recently indicted, already indicted, d oze ns of recently indicted, already indicted, dozens of officials. 12 more russian officials, officials with the russian security agency did gigo, accused of meddling in the american presidential elections —— dg are you. there is the russian aircraft
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on the airfield. joining us for our special coverage is our state department correspondent barbara plett usher who flew in herself at that airfield just last night, flying in with the american secretary of state, mike brown pao. it's been said that there —— might pump a. it has been said that there is no fixed agenda and little preparation, is that your perspective? yes, is is. it's quite extraordinary. no clear agenda for a summit like this, with a long—time adversary. it is a good thing for the leaders of nuclear armed states to be talking to each other and trying to reduce tensions. but in normal times, if we can put it that way, there would have been a lot of preparations going into this, a lot of back and forth, the americans would have been quite clear with what outcomes they were looking for and with strong backing from the nato allies. president trump will have views that nato summit the kind of brolly the forces and come out with a strong message, and it hasn't been like that. he spent much of
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that summit bashing his allies, his national security adviser said this will be an unstructured meeting, there is no concrete outcomes that we are expecting. and yet mr trump himself has called it a loose meeting. as you said, he likes meetings. he has wanted to meet president putin for quite a long time, and this is what he has decided he wants to do. even the timing, we're not sure why it's happening now. well, it is happening. you can see the officials lined up right on the tarmac at the airport right outside helsinki. president putin has blundered. russians have flown in. —— has landed. whilst president trump doesn't seem to have done much preparation. we hear that president putin is very well briefed. he is just about to have a meeting with the fourth american president. he's met three others before him. he's been 18 years in power, meeting an american leader who's only been in power 18 months. joining us also for
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oui’ power 18 months. joining us also for our special coverage is a former pentagon official and member of the obama administration. and now with the germans. you have seen this time and time again, waiting for the official done to come down from the steps from the aircraft. president putin heading into talks with the american leader, and knowing that president trump is not blaming the americans for the bad state of relations. yes, lyse, it's as though that amir putin is riding donald trump's tweets. you know, blaming the united states for the state of the united states for the state of the us— russia relationship is going to sound quite bizarre to many american ears, particularly only a few days after the us justice department, donald trump's on justice ministry, has indicted 12 russians for trying to manipulate the us presidential election. so,
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this is quite an unprecedented moment in us — russian relations. and, frankly, in the history of us foreign policy. well, we do know that president putin prepares for a well. we know in fact that he has pulled up different tools in his tool box, different tricks when he deals with foreign leaders about to get the best of him. i mean, he's really a master at this. but barbara plett usher, president trump has his own tool box that he brings to these sort of spectacle that he seems to like so much. he's very confident about his tool box, which is himself, right?! he has a very strong ability —— belief in his ability to make policies, meeting in the same room with an adversary and using the power of his personality and what he believes is his deal—making and what he believes is his deal— making skills to and what he believes is his deal—making skills to get and what he believes is his deal— making skills to get what he wants. he likes to shake things up, and he'sa wants. he likes to shake things up, and he's a contrarian, if he is told
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that something is not a very good idea, he wants to do it. we are seeing all of those things with this meeting. and as you know, he has from the outset expressed this admiration from vladimir putin. he has really refrained from criticising him over the last... although that has been building, about russian meddling in the election, he continues to praise him and likes this strongman image, he has a curious fascination with vladimir putin, that is another element of this meeting. we waiting for president putin to alight from this aircraft. president trump is already in helsinki. you can hear the helicopters overhead. president trump may soon be heading over... their rigs president putin, the first of what will be many handshakes, accompanied by one of his officials. we should see sergey lavrov coming out there as well. he isa man lavrov coming out there as well. he is a man who likes to emphasise his athletic powers. he's got a confident strut as he comes out,
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fresh from the world cup, now being met by senior official dump here in helsinki —— senior officials. this country he knows very well, it is on the baltics, very close to russia, with a history of relations, politically, financially, two country is very much in point. there you go, getting —— two countries very much in point. he will soon be rolling up his sleeves as he heads into the heart of the finnish capital. they will be meeting at the presidential palace. one of three palaces used by the finnish presidency. this one will be right on the baltic sea. and right next to the iconic mark hix twerk, we yesterday there was talk of the spirit of helsinki —— market square. there were protests about president trump's arrival, both for and against. helsinki has notjust been the venue of choice for american and
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russian presidents to meet, it is also the place where the helsinki accord, the process of diplomacy which led to a landmark accord enshrining both human rights and respect for territorial sovereignty. so, while the limousines swish by, let's just assess what lies ahead. eric chorley is still with us in our studio. we have been emphasising that for both leaders, the mere fact of meeting is a success for them, to be seen to be standing together shoulder to shoulder. what else of substance do you think they could possibly want and be able to achieve here? well, it's clear what vladimir putin wants. i think he would love to see donald trump do something similarto to see donald trump do something similar to what he did in singapore just a few weeks ago with the north korean leader, where he suggested that the united states would halt its military exercises. i think vladimir putin would clearly want
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donald trump to talk about and agreed to work with the europeans to try to lift sanctions on russia. perhaps, and this is one area where i think they could both agree, nuclear weapons. both leaders have an interest in extending the new treaty. so i would expect actually thatis treaty. so i would expect actually that is one of the outcomes of the summit. buti that is one of the outcomes of the summit. but i think many americans and what many europeans are fearing in this summit is that this is something that donald trump's been desperate to have, and he will seek to do whatever it takes behind closed doors to make sure that it's a success. closed doors to make sure that it's a success. and right vladimir putin's definition, having a successful summit is agreeing to everything that vladimir putin wants. if you thinkjust the last week, it's hard to imagine a better week, it's hard to imagine a better week so far for week, it's hard to imagine a better week so farfoeradimir week, it's hard to imagine a better week so far for vladimir putin. what happens today could be the capstone of one of the best weeks of his presidency. it started with a nato summit that was defined by discord and argument, it driven by donald
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trump. a weekend in which the trump criticised the british by minister for not pursuing brexit hard enough, which will weaken the european union —— the british prime minister. the us president gave a press interview over the weekend which talked about the eu being one of america's most profound trade foes. and now a summit today in which there are high expectations in which donald trump could give vladimir putin everything that he wants. is their risk or even danger in this meeting, that when the two leaders are inside themselves just with interpreters, donald trump could give away too much, say too much? well, that is a concern. much, say too much? well, that is a concern. and, as you noted, vladimir putin is one of the most experienced world leaders today. he's been in power for almost 20 years. he has
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met with every world leader many, many times, and he's very well prepared. donald trump is one of the least experienced world leaders, and the fact he's almost bragged about the fact he's almost bragged about the fact he's almost bragged about the fact that he's not prepared very well for this meeting, that top advisers don't really seem to be that engaged in the preparation for this meeting, suggest that what happens behind closed doors could be of course freewheeling, but also end up of course freewheeling, but also end up in of course freewheeling, but also end upina of course freewheeling, but also end up in a place that many americans and many europeans would be concerned about. so, there certainly isa concerned about. so, there certainly is a risk there is also just a practical risk. you have two leaders who have both shown their willingness to stretch the truth to their own likings. so, if you have a meeting where it'sjust their own likings. so, if you have a meeting where it's just them their own likings. so, if you have a meeting where it'sjust them and interpreters, they could walk out of that meeting each saying different things, and who's to say who's telling the truth? the truth... there's even a battle for the truth, it seems, these days, don't we know it seems, these days, don't we know it well! what will be the truth of
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the day? well, we'll be talking about it for a long time to come. derek corlu, former pentagon official, thank you very much for joining us —— chorley. this is part of our special coverage of the helsinki summit, the first informal summit, call it a summit, call it a meeting, between the american president, donald trump, and the russian leader, vladimir putin. vladimir putin hasjust russian leader, vladimir putin. vladimir putin has just touched down in the finnish capital, and is making his way to the heart of this iconic city on the baltic sea to meet president trump, who's been here since yesterday. he's already had meetings with the finnish president. and we've been discussing what lies ahead in terms of the spectacle as well as substance. —— in terms of both spectacle. with us here is my colleague, our state department correspondence barbara plett usher. and joining us is the russian editor for the economist magazine. you are also the author of a book curiously called, the
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invention of russia, the rise and rise of putin and fake news. very tropical! as we watch the convoy of the miz scenes heading into the palace —— very topical. what do you think is on the president'smind was growing i think from president putin, this is a natural progression from the world cup, where macron was present yesterday and there was a parade of world leaders. so, from emmanuel macron to donald trump, this is part of putin's narrative of russia being at the centre of the world. it's a great year political power, and he is illegitimate leader, notjust in russia but in the world. and the way he's already got what he wanted out of it, you know, the theatre, the television pictures of it is what really actually matters both to putin and i think probably the trump as well. and putin has brought his new car.
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this is significant, because this is a russian—made limousine which has become a symbol of russia's researchers, it will dominate the news of putin's inauguration back in march —— it dominated. news of putin's inauguration back in march -- it dominated. it is bigger than the beast, oh, my god, my beast is bigger than yours! actually, we talk about what is going to come out, the important thing for putin has already happened, because absolutely the central message of his relationship with the united states over the years has been, russia is an equal partner. and this is what trump effectively has already given him. falling putin a competitor, so, this is a competition —— calling the region. they the two leaders have covered is like status if you like. —— starlike status. is it really enough for him
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to meet shoulder to shoulder with an american president, or has he come with some very specific asks that he wa nts, with some very specific asks that he wants, to leave here with deals done? i think putin probably wants trump to validate what he's been saying all along, which is essentially that russia has...fi includes ukraine and crimea? essentially that russia has...fi includes ukraine and crimea7m includes ukraine and crimea7m includes those, the former sobhi at union. trump tweeted this morning the most extraordinary statement, blaming the worsening of the laois and ship between russia and america on his predecessors of the white house —— the worsening of the relationship. what upset putin more than anything else in the previous administration was obama's statement that putin was a bored kid at the back of the classroom. he doesn't
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wa nt back of the classroom. he doesn't want to be referred to as a regional power, he wants to be seen as a global geopolitical power. and the fa ct global geopolitical power. and the fact that they are having this summit, the theatre of this summit, the fact that they are meeting in helsinki, this is neutral territory, this is the validation of that message. i think putin is a very professional man, he's been trained to work exactly with people like trump. i mean, he's a professional recruiter from the ex—kgb days, he will know how to play the trumpet's vanity, how to appeal to his resentment —— play to trump's vanity. he knows about the rule—based system. vanity. he knows about the rule-based system. apparently he has tricks, that may sound a little bit demeaning, but he has tactics and techniques he uses when he sees world leaders to sort of get the best of them. he wins people over, he tells them exactly what they want to hear. he will, i'm sure, appear quite charming to trump. putin is
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very good at finding common language with his interlocutors. and he doesn't mind, really, that, you know, if the result of this summit that america, you know, trump sounds tough, it doesn't matter how trump sounds, he doesn't mind if america is in the surrey. in fact, he needs america as an ad for suri. —— is an adversarial. it is a repeat of the cold war. of course, he will also wa nt cold war. of course, he will also want some practical things. he will wa nt want some practical things. he will want trump to recognise, maybe not in so many words, russia, he will wa nt in so many words, russia, he will want trump to undermine the idea of sanctions. putin is a realistic man, he doesn't expect trump to lift sanctions, and trump can't do that a nyway sanctions, and trump can't do that anyway because of the congressional will which trying it in a ball. but what trump says will be important, not least in europe —— the congressional bill enshrined it
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illegal. the european union is dependent on angela merkel. we have had a statement from victor orban, the president of hungary, saying that the sanctions are harmful and should be lifted and our relationship will progress much faster. italy is probably going to go the same way. if now the president of the united states is on good terms with putin, it will be all the easier than some european leaders to say, sanctions should be lifted. the russian editor of the economist but—macro helicopters are clattering overhead but they didn't totally drowned you out, the security preparations are under way as this historic helsinki summit is getting under way here in the finnish capital. lyse, thank you very much. we will have more reaction to what's going on that little bit later. the former education secretary justine greening has called for a second referendum on leaving the eu. the putney mp, who voted to remain, describes theresa may's brexit plans as "the worst of both worlds". meanwhile, another government minister has resigned over brexit. scott mann, an aide to the treasury,
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said the prime minister's chequers plan put him in direct conflict with the views of a large section of his constituents. we can cross now to westminster and speak to our assistant political editor, norman smith. there's that famous thing, you can't please all of the people all of the time. but it sounds like you can't these anyone, norman! that's very true, mrs may is being assailed on all sides over her brexit plan, not just from the labour party and the opposition parties, but within her own party. we saw over the past few days toure brexiteers saying, this deal is unacceptable. now, toure remainers like justine greening deal is unacceptable. now, toure remainers likejustine greening also coming out and saying, this is a fight and it doesn't suit anyone. it doesn't deliver this brexit that brexiteers want and it doesn't keep us brexiteers want and it doesn't keep us in the eu, which is what remainers want. mrs may is hunkering
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down and sticking to the plan, this morning at the farnborough airshow, where she says companies like aerospace, which are bad, these companies will benefit from her plan because it will ensure —— which are there. it will ensure frictionless trade with the eu and no interruptions in that crucial supply line. he was mrs may setting out the advantages of her plan. the frictionless free trade of goods and independent trade policy, the avoidance of the hardball —— hard border between northern ireland and great britain, these are conditions that we seek. did you anything else risks that integrity of the united kingdom, reneges on the belfast agreement and simply will not deliver for great britain as a global trading nation. at the heart of our proposal is a creation of an eu- uk of our proposal is a creation of an eu— uk free trade area for goods, supported by an upfront commitment to harmonisation on goods and agricultural products. it
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facilitates customs arrangement, which would operate as if we were a combined customs territory. removing the need for customs checks and controls between the uk and eu, whilst at the same time allowing us to set our own tariffs for other countries outside the eu. but, how confident is mrs may she can push through this band? perhaps not that confident. there are signs that mrs may is the in the threat of a brexiteers' revolt, inspected the night, bill. signs that the government will expect a a series of critical amendments put down by the brexiteers to avoid a potentially shattering defeat. amid all this, the former education secretary, justine greening, says, look, the only way we can get a clear sense of direction is to go back to the people and allow them a second vote. you know, i think it was right to try and find a workable compromise, but i think this is a compromise that in practice doesn't suit anyone, really.
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and also, i worry, having looked at the detail, that it's also unworkable, and that the common rule book will not be able to be updated when we want it to, and that it'll steadily break down. so, we have to recognise that, we have to recognise that parliament's reached an impasse, and find a way through anyway. that's why i think you have to take the decision out of the hands of deadlocked politicians and put it back into the hands of the british people. so, how much support is there now for a second referendum? well, as i said, we know the snp and the lib dems are obviously in favour of a second vote. labour have in recent days said, well, we're not that keen on the idea, however, we're not closing the door to it. and the former attorney general dominic grieve says he's backing justine greening's hole. and he says he thinks more tories —— he is backing justine greening's call. he thinks more tories are backing the idea. it's going to be resolved in
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parliament by the majority of members asserting what they think they want collectively. 0r, members asserting what they think they want collectively. or, as they say, asjustine has rightly highlighted, the only alternative would be to go back to the public and say, this is a situation where it is the most important decision you are probably going to make in the cost of your lives about this country's future, not just for yourself, but for your children and grandchildren. it is time to wake up to the realities of the uk's position in the world and what it is that we want to do for our future. now, you remember when mrs t was toppled all those years ago, mrs thatcher faced that resignation speech by geoffrey howe from her cabinet, which was seen as the trigger that led a lot of tory mps to abandon her after he gave a speech to talk about how he had been sentin speech to talk about how he had been sent in to bat against the eu with eight broken cricket bat. some better news for mrs may this morning. david davis, the man who resigned last monday, says he is not going to do a geoffrey howe. do you think that the prime minister
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can survive another week? of course! you know, she's a good prime minister. the fact we have a difference of opinion doesn't change that. and i presume the way you'll be voting today goes without saying? i'll be supporting the government on the bill and on the customs union elements where there's a challenge to them, but i'll also probably support one of the amendments on ensuring that northern ireland is not separated from great britain. in any event, that's government policy, but it'll do no harm putting it into the bill. so, david davis is not going to be waiting around with a broken cricket bat. unlike geoffrey howe. on the less good news site for theresa may, another ministerial resignation. a chap by the name of scott mann has thrown himself overboard. by my calculation, that is the ninth resignation from the government since david davis dotted the whole ball rolling. that is just over one resignation per day. on top of this,
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we await to see what one boris johnson does. we're told there is not going to be a resignation statement from him today. but might he speak out later in the week? something which could cause mrs may considerable concern. all interesting, thank you very much indeed, norman. more from you a little bit later. let's just update you on what is going on in helsinki. vladimir putin has arrived for those talks with donald trump in the past few moments. vladimir putin's plane arrived in helsinki and his motorcade is now making its way through the city. we were hearing that his armoured car is actually even more impressive than donald trump's the beast, who knows if they are competitive about those things? they will beam a room with no one else other than by translators. —— they will be in a room. they have come into contact with each other before, on the margins of broader
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summits. we will keep you covered on everything happening in helsinki. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we'll say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to with simon king. we have got some welcome rain in the forecast today. it is quite a narrow band of rain moving from west to east at the moment, there's still lots of dry weather and sunshine out there. this is in wakefield, you can see some cloud, but there are sunny spells through that club. we are keeping sunny spells across eastern areas of england into the afternoon, turning pretty hot once again. you can see that narrow band of showery rain through the afternoon. some of that could be on behalf of your side. much fresher conditions here, as well as across the north of the uk and scotland and northern ireland. here there are sunny bowl is developing through the afternoon. charl is rumbling on for a time. showers in norfolk and suffolk later on. further showers moving their way into western scotland. temperatures
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overnight, in 11—15. that's it from me. bye—bye. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: president trump and president putin are beginning theirfirst summit. ahead of their meeting in helsinki, in finland, mr trump tweeted that relations between the two countries were the worst they'd ever been. a former minister, justine greening, has dismissed the brexit chequers plan as a fudge and called for a second referendum. net migration from the eu to the uk has fallen to its lowest level in nearly five years. an estimated 101,000 more eu citizens arrived in the uk than left in 2017. govia thameslink launches its third timetable in the space of two months. this one, it claims, will be more robust and reliable. and it's the morning after the night before in paris — french football fans celebrated their world cup victory through the night. sport now, here's tim.
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let's start with that world cup win for france, and the former england defender rio ferdinand reckons that striker kylian mbappe is taking the crown of lionel messi and cristiano ronaldo. mbappe's just 19 and scored france's fourth in their 11—2 win over croatia in the final. he's the first teenager to score in a world cup final since pele in 1958. france winning their second world cup — their first away from home — after winning in 1998. plenty for mbappe and his teammates to celebrate, then. and just as they did, the heavens opened. french manager didier deschamps captained the 1998 winning team, and becomes just the third man in history to win the world cup as a player and a coach. gareth southgate says
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he and his players had a few drinks afterfinishing fourth at the world cup. they're back home now after their best finish since italia 90 and southgate says there's lots for fans to look forward to. amazing. amazing group to work with. really tight, everybody connected, players and staff. you know, we did have a few drinks last night, and everybody was singing. and it was very special. so that gives you a chance of being a successful team — it's not all about science and it's not all about what happens on the pitch. sometimes those little moments that you share together, and those relationships and friendships are with you forever, and that's the important part of sport. cristiano ronaldo is having his medical in turin ahead of his move tojuventus. he's met fans and signed shirts this morning before heading in to see the doctors.
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he's moving from real madrid for around £99 million. and novak djokovic said he doubted if he'd ever win another grand slam title, before earning the 13th of his career at wimbledon. he's really struggled for form in the last couple of years, but this looked like the djokovic of old, as he beat the giant south african kevin anderson to win his fourth title at the all england club. world heavyweight champion anthony joshua will fight russia's alexander povetkin on september 22nd at wembley stadium. joshua will defend his ibf, wba, and ibo titles against the wba's mandatory challenger. it's the first time the briton will have fought at wembley since his famous victory over wladimir klitschko in april 2017. joshua says that "povetkin is a serious challenge "and only a fool would underestimate what he brings to the table." that's all the sport for now.
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i'll have more for you in the next hour. justine greening has been speaking to our political correspondent, jonathan blake. i think parliament has reached an impasse, it the prime deal is unworkable, and i think we need to go back to the british people and give them the three clear choices that we on the table, either a soft brexit, hard brexit, clean break that i think most leavers were voting for, or staying in the european union. the prime minister has reached a compromise, she has a difficultjob to do to keep enough
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people happy. do you not recognise that, that in coming to this point in putting forward horror plan, it was in her view, the best way for red and she has taken a decision in good faith. —— her plan.|j red and she has taken a decision in good faith. -- her plan. ithink it was right to figure a compromise, but having looked at the detail, i feel this is unworkable and the common feel this is unworkable and the common rule book will not be able to be updated when we want it to end it will steadily breakdown. we have to recognise that and recognise that parliament has reason impasse and find a way through any way. that is where i feel we need to take the decision out of the hands of deadlock politicians and back into the hands of the british people. how much appetite to you think there is across the uk for another referendum? across the uk for another referendum ? the votes across the uk for another referendum? the votes was held a couple of years ago and the result was there for all to see? a think it is with a heavy heart i propose
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another referendum. i would have liked it if parliament had been able to reach a compromise, but it is clear that it can't. you have to recognise that the reality and ask yourself what is the way we can still get through this and perhaps deliver on the brexit people wanted, that we can still put the choice in front of the british people. that is what i am proposing. i think it will bea what i am proposing. i think it will be a route forward that many mps would reckon i is has a lot of sense to let. indicator that is, what is your hunch about the way that three—way choice would go?|j your hunch about the way that three-way choice would go? i have not idea, that will be down to the british people. but i think they have the right to put across an option they want and they should have two choices, there are best choice, the one they must once, but also the one after that there would be their second best. i think that's
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the best way to find a consensus. it is exactly the way we elect mayors across the country, so this is not a brand—new proposal, but i think sid gets us the best way to have consensus on a route for it. you say you campaigned to remain in the european union, this isjust a way of stopping brexit, it your detractors may say? vladimir putin isjust vladimir putin is just arriving vladimir putin isjust arriving in the building where he is going to be meeting donald trump for talks. is just gone and theme of those stairs, we will see what happens. warm the choreography here, whether there will be a handshake on camera by the two men here. what we are expecting to happen is that they will start with one—to—one talks just in the presence of interpreters, and then there will be a continued, extended format later for the talks. it is no
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doubt going to be very interesting, because no—one can really predict what will happen with those two men on their own in a room. apparently, donald trump, we are told, has done little preparation for this summit, but he will obviously know what it is that he wants to achieve. in terms of expectations, we will have to wait and see. there will be a news co nfe re nce to wait and see. there will be a news conference later. the talks will get under way later, we will stay across that and keep you updated. the number of eu citizens coming to look for work in britain has reached its lowest level since 2013. figures from the office for national statistics shows long term net migration fell to just above 100,000 in 2017. overall net migration — which shows the difference between the number of people entering the uk and those leaving — was slightly up on last year. with me is our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw.
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these are really interesting figures, the drop in net migration from eu countries is remarkable. figures, the drop in net migration from eu countries is remarkablem is significant. it shows the dust appear to be is significant. it shows the dust appearto bea is significant. it shows the dust appear to be a post—brexit referendum affect. figures have been coming down since june referendum affect. figures have been coming down sincejune 2016, so net migration from the eu, the difference between the people coming to live in the uk for more than 12 months and those leaving is 101,000, the lowest since 2013. however, there is still 240,000 people who arrived in the uk from eu countries, so it is not as if the flow has stopped entirely. the large numbers of people coming to the here, but not quite so many working. we have separate figures for the first three months of this year, showing there was 2.29 million eu nationals working in the uk, 28,000 less than
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the year earlier, and that is the first annualfall for the year earlier, and that is the first annual fall for eight years. so, if you are eu people living here, and also emigration of eu nationals is at its highest level ever. hundred 39,000 eu nationals left britain last year, the highest figure on record. that is clearly a function of the fact that there are 3.5 million eu nationals living in britain, so you have more living here, a large proportion will choose to leave, but that a significant number less. and the migration figures for people outside the year hasjumped. the highest since 2011, the main reason for that is because a greater number of people coming from outside europe, something over 300,000 in fact came from outside europe to live in britain. most will
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have come to work, others to study, other for have come to work, others to study, otherforfamily have come to work, others to study, other for family reasons. those levels we haven't seen since 2011. what is really interesting is that levels of eu net migration may be coming down, but levels of non—eu net migration are going up. so what is the overall figure? the overall figure is reasonably static, 282,000, the cash it well above the government's target to get it down to the tens of thousands. so here is a problem for the government that wa nts to a problem for the government that wants to reduce overall net migration, is that while they may ta ke migration, is that while they may take more control and power over what happens in the european union, after brexit, they can control the numbers coming in and so on, those controls that they have for the numbers outside the eu, well, that
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seems to show that more people are coming in. it's as though there is some kind of balancing act going on internally within the country. businesses, employees, not attracting so many people from the eu and therefore seeking those from outside it. the rail operator govia thameslink says it's latest timetable will be more robust and reliable — it's the third in two months. gtr, which oversees thameslink, southern and great northern routes, changed the time of every service on may 20th. it meant some were withdrawn and cancelled without warning. the operator says the changes will mean an increase in services across the network. our correspondent ben ando has been at london bridge station for us. commuters, and probably the management at govia thameslink, will be at least allowing themselves a small sigh of relief, because so far, things are considerably better than they have been since may the 20th, when the first new timetable was introduced, and sincejune the 4th, when a revised timetable was introduced, which still doesn't solve all the problems. some are delayed a few
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minutes, maybe, but most are running as they should. they've done that, they say, by prioritising the rush hour, the peak services morning and evening, and by moving trains around to try to ensure there are fewer delayed trains and fewer cancellations. they've done that by cutting some services of the timetable altogether, but at least passengers will have more certainty if they're confident that the trains that are advertised in advance will run when they say they'll run. it was one of the most exciting and memorable world cups of recent years. but while the tournament may be over, the party for winners france, has been going through the night. les bleus beat croatia on sunday night at the luzhniki stadium in moscow. the winners are now en route back to paris where they will travel through the streets and up the famous champs elysee to celebrate the win at home. lucy hocking's followed the game from a fanzone at the eiffel tower — and that's where she sent this report from a short time ago. (tx sor) mostly terrorists are down here
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right now, most parisians are probably at home, contemplating how they can keep the party going. they had bastille day yesterday and an amazing party last night, they are going to parade down the sums are lazy and i suspect there will be tens of thousands of people there. as was the fan zone yesterday, blazing hot. were standing here watching the game with thousands of fa ns watching the game with thousands of fans who all had great expectations. they were the favourite going into the game and they delivered, but probably not until the second half, i think most would agree. but what a victory. standing here is muhammad, how you feeling today? very good, very good. handy you think these entire provence? customised a very tough game, the first half was very tough game, the first half was very tough and a happy ending for us. how
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would you describe the atmosphere? amazing, everyone was together, no racism, at the end everyone was french, celebrating together, amazing. 15 members of the squad of 23 trace their origins back to africa. do think that says in thing about the immigrant dreamer? you choose whatever your origins are, you can be successful and influence. maybe some people are not french, but they brought a lot ofjoy maybe some people are not french, but they brought a lot of joy for french people, that's amazing. most people's favourite player seems to be in batley, is yours? yes. for his age, he did a lot of things that some players never had the chance to do, and he did a very good world cup and he's only 19. he can do much more for france. how do you think it will be today? it will be wild,
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eve ryo ne will be today? it will be wild, everyone was celebrates, it will be amazing. we're all going to celebrate today until the end, until the night. a three-day holiday here in france, anyone at work today? no, no—one. i didn't go to work, i don't ca re no—one. i didn't go to work, i don't care about what to get. world champions, congratulations. the party continuing here in france as they celebrate that incredible victory over croatia last night. to helsinki live where we're awaiting the arrival of president trump at the present‘s palace in helsinki for the talks between donald trump and let me appeared in. donald trump and let me appeared in. donald trump and let me appeared in. donald trump arriving at the building just in the last five minutes or so. and president trump, we're expecting, any moments. the billionaire businessman, who has
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been president for 18 months, meeting the seasoned former kgb officer who has run russia for 18 yea rs. officer who has run russia for 18 years. both of them have said they're going into these talks with low expectations, but obviously very high interest. from the watching world as these two political heavyweights have their first face—to—face conversation on their own behind closed doors since president trump took office. they had met previously, but it has been on the sidelines of other events. this is their first formal summit and willjust this is their first formal summit and will just be this is their first formal summit and willjust be them plus their interpreters. we're be back in helsinki as soon as there's any movement there. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: vladimir putin arrives in finland for talks with president trump — who says relations between the us and russia have never been worse.
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former education secretary, justine greening, backs calls for a second brexit referendum — describing the prime minster‘s current approach as the worst of both worlds. net migration from the eu reaches its lowest level for five years. but migration from elsewhere is on the increase in the business news: blue skies ahead — theresa may promises huge investment for the aerospace industry, a few weeks after airbus threatened to reduce its uk presence because of brexit disruption. more trouble for debenhams as their shares tumble after weekend reports of a cash crunch. the retailer denies the reports and says its cash position is healthy, but investors are not convinced. and china's economy remains on the right track — it grew by 6.7% in the second quarter, which was in line with market expectations. however, investors still remain concerned about the fallout of the trade war with the united states. so, the prime minister is promising
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investment in the aviation industry. cynics might suggest this £300 million or so, much of it's in research and development, is to buffer the industry from the fallout from brexit. after all, airbus was saying just two weeks ago that a hard brexit, leaving the eu without a deal, would force it to take much of its production work out of the uk. but mrs may said her proposals for trade with the eu after brexit meant there would be frictionless trade in goods with the eu, and would secure millions of aviationjobs in britain. joining me now from the farnborough airshow is our business correspondent theo leggett. she's giving them £300 million, or promises that, and it's nothing to do with brexit? i think what theresa may's trying to do here is regained the initiative. she came in for a
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lot of criticism over because few weeks, not least from the chief executive of airbus, suggested the government had no clue or at least no consensus over how to implement without damage. last week's white paper has been broadly welcomed by people here, they have said positive things about it, it protects the trade in goods and promises seamless borders, which is what the likes of airbus and rolls—royce really want. promising to invest in the future, thatis promising to invest in the future, that is a gesture of public relations, and saying even though we're leaving the eu, the british aerospace industry is expected to prosper. along with those buns from as for innovation, there is also a commitment to a big, new defence programme. the government has set out details of its combat area strategy, a fighter to replace the euro typhoon, this represents theresa may trying to regain control
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a little and show the aerospace industry — what castro huge number ofjobs in this country and edge than she does care. you mention the defence space as well, they're interested in investing in that and r&d generally? year at the show, was in previous yea rs, year at the show, was in previous yea rs , we year at the show, was in previous yea rs, we are year at the show, was in previous years, we are hearing about your technologies. one hand, new supersonic planes to replace concorde, potentially. as whereabouts city transport, creating a new urban area taxes, things that will pick you up from your apartment and take you to your office by air or by themselves. a kind of stuff is many years away at the moment, but research is getting under way. and then sprays, potentially a huge industry. pfft so this morning about investment in scotland and also potentially income will as well. covering all these bases, trying to generate enthusiasm in the industry
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is. that is what government geary to do and the areas it finds interesting, what about the talking going on at farnborough? brexit is a major subject here, you can't get away from it. giannis there within the industry is a little more positive than a couple of weeks ago. they have seen the white paper, and won their point of view, it works. they think it is better to have sea mless they think it is better to have seamless borders that the threat of a no—deal brexit which would cause problems. the comments about remaining parts of the european aviation safety agency, that is something they really want to see, because otherwise it aircraft parts manufactured in this country would not have the safety certification is they needed to fly. survey courses they needed to fly. survey courses they well, the white paper, they know it is a negotiation standpoint, things may change, and forwards, and mrs may is under a lot of political
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pressure in her own party. they know nothing can be taken for granted, but they have welcomed the publication of the white paper as a step forward. the uk space agency is giving scotland's highlands and islands enterprise £2.5 million towards the development of the uk's first spaceport on the a'mhoine peninsula, in sutherland. it will work with a consortium that includes the american aerospace giant lockheed martin, looking to launch its first rockets in the 2020s. shares in chinese telecoms equipment maker zte surged more than 25% in hong kong. the company had been banned by washington from receiving american supplies after it was found to have done business with iran and north korea. to escape these sanctions, it's agreed to a fine of at least a billion dollars and to replace its board of directors and retain outside monitors. govia thameslink railway has launched its third new timetable in two months after two chaotic
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attempts to rebuild its schedules which started in may. it said it was too early to tell whether the thameslink, southern and great northern schedules were working but that they would provide a more robust and reliable service. and national savings and investments is cutting the interest rate it pays on its direct individual savings account, affecting nearly 400,000 savers. from the 24th of september, the rate will be reduced on its direct isa from 1.00% to 0.75%. some 387,000 people held direct isa accounts in march this year, holding a total of £4.6bn. that's all the business news. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. back to helsinki, where at the presidential motorcade is making its
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way to the palace where budding of eden hazard arrived and awaiting the arrival of president trump. -- where president putin has a right. these lengthy motorcades carried notjust the presidents, but the entire entourage. dozens, i'm not actually sure how many vehicles are in the motorcades, but i can in oxfordshire and the other day, and it is a to see. there is the beast, carrying the president himself, and that you putin arrived in his own version of that just a while putin arrived in his own version of thatjust a while ago. in terms of what the summit might offer, both presidents have said we don't have very high expectations, playing down any hopes there maybe some sort of breakthrough coming out this summit. what it is is the first chance for the two of them to speak privately, face—to—face, just the two of them,
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with their translators. there will be those initial talks held between the two of them, we understand they will then broaden out, the talks, afterwards. there will be a news conference later, so an interesting day in helsinki. the finnish president has lent his palace for this occasion. in the run—up to the talks, president from has been on twitter, he has said our relationship with russia has never been worse thanks to many years of us foolishness and stupidity, and now that the rate witch—hunts, referring to what has been over indictments in the united states over allegations of russian meddling in the us election. there, the us president arriving with the first
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lady. heading straight in the stairs, no word to the watching media, exactly as vladimir putin did at the backjust quickly up those stairs and no doubt then the talks will get underfairly stairs and no doubt then the talks will get under fairly quickly. so we will get under fairly quickly. so we will be watching and waiting to see what happens here. there'sjohn bolton, heading up the stairs, the full entourage of the presidents, wow full entourage of the presidents, wow row all going to be left outside as the two presidents just have their own private meeting. there was, of course, that nato summit in brussels last week, at that... all the key figures involved are there, but lets wait and see what happens
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there in helsinki. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. some rain in the forecast today, moving west to east, a very narrow band but erath shy for many of us today. another dry day with sunshine, and certainly part of that sunshine, and certainly part of that sunshine across eastern areas of england. this is in nottinghamshire early, a little cloud in the sky, but still fair weather to the house. we will keep the cloud through eastern areas, where it will turn pretty hot. this is a narrow band of showery rain. gives the heavy in the afternoon, parts of north west england down to south west england as well. fresh recommendations in north western areas, temperatures in the high 20s. could triggers showers around norfolk and suffolk later this afternoon into the evening.
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generally, most showers clearing into the north sea. some showers into the north sea. some showers into the north sea. some showers into the west of scotland. temperatures around 11 degrees, fairly uncomfortable for sweeping across the sow of england, but afresh a day in the southeast the actress tuesday. into the rest of the week, temperatures slowly climbing up once again. bye—bye. this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. these are the top stories developing at midday: donald trump and vladimir putin are in helsinki for talks. president trump says relations between the us and russia have "never been worse".
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former education secretary justine greening backs calls for a second brexit referendum, describing the prime minster‘s current approach as "the worst of both worlds". the only way through this now is to take that decision away from the hands of politicians and put it back into the hands of the public, for them to be able to decide. net migration from the eu reaches its lowest level for five years. but migration from elsewhere is on the increase. and, will it be third time lucky for train passengers? govia thameslink launches its third timetable in the space of two months. this one, it claims, will be more "robust and reliable". also this hour: here we go again! we'll be hearing from some of the stars of the mamma mia sequel, which has its premiere tonight. the landmark summit
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between president trump and the russian leader vladimir putin is getting under way in helsinki. ahead of the talks, donald trump said he had "low expectations". the meeting between the two leaders comes after 12 russians were charged with hacking during the 2016 us presidential election. they are expected to talk about the alleged meddling and the syria conflict. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, is in helsinki. they have both just arrived in helsinki. president trump arriving just in the past few moments to the presidential palace on the waterfront in helsinki. let'sjoin lyse doucet, who is there. welcome to helsinki, the finnish
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capital. for decades, it has been the venue of choice for american, formerformer the venue of choice for american, former former soviet, and now russian leaders, for the first time in eight years, an american president and a russian leader will have face—to—face talks. they are saying, don't call it a summit, it's very informal. president trump is saying it is a meeting, and he likes to have meetings. president trump has just arrived in the finnish capital, basking in the glory of having hosted the world cup. in football, one side wins and everyone else loses, although everyone enjoys the game. here in helsinki, both sides are hoping it will be a win — win situation. the very fact of these two leaders meeting will be seen by both sides as a success. but what will the substance p, at a time of so many conflicts in which both the united states and russia are involved? well, the united states and russia are involved ? well, president the united states and russia are involved? well, president trump, accompanied by his wife, melania,
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has just got into the presidential palace. they are accompanied by the finnish president. these are life pictures. they had a working meeting this morning. that was imagesjust a small time ago. ezadeen putin is already inside. —— president putin. there is also the national security adviser, john haltern, and the secretary of state, who came from mexico oil is president trump was golfing, and it was said, preparing for this summit at his most favourite golf course in the world, turnberry in scotland. so, we are told there is no fixed agenda from the american side at least. little preparation, and a lot of what we now know to be typical trump unpredictability. they worry that in those private talks between the two leaders, accompanied only by their interpreters, what will president trump say and what will he perhaps give away? joining me here in
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helsinki are's distinguished members of the economist having that on summit here in helsinki, the american editor, who hasjust come from washington. also the russian editor of the economist and the author of a very interesting book called the invention of russia. . welcome to both of you. it's a great book! we hope there will be no fake news today! it might be beyond our cameras, news today! it might be beyond our cameras, but here in this gorgeous setting in finland right on the baltic sea is this, on the manager of lawn, a protest is taking place. they call it the spirit of helsinki. of course, the spirit of helsinki is respected human rights, territorial sovereignty. john prideaux, is this the best place for ease to meet west again westlaw i think there could be worse places. the nice thing about your welcome here is that you are welcomed as a hero as a member of
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the press corps, there has been a campaign in the newspapers to stand up campaign in the newspapers to stand up for the free press. finland really knows what the value of freedom is, having faced down russia are couple of times and been a refuge for people trying to escape from the soviet union throughout much of the 20th century. so, yeah, ican think much of the 20th century. so, yeah, i can think of worse places for them to meet, certainly. there is something very strange and very like the cold war about the fact that the two presidents have to meet on neutral territory. the people of finland are not neutral any more, now that they meeting here at a time when finland is a proud member of the european union, it is a privileged partner of nato. in fact, donald trump in his comments this morning seemed to suggest that finland was a member of nato.m not! but it is still a very good venue not! but it is still a very good venue for the russians to meet so club. that is where a lot of spooks were, a lot of track two diplomacy
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was going on between russia and the us. this is like the bridge of spies, if you like. which it has been. it has been. in the world of trump and putin, it's exactly the symbols that matter. they want this to look this way. so, it is quite deliberate. and there is something very similar about the two men. we've talked about how different they are in terms of their backgrounds. one is a businessman, a salesman, a property developer, the other is a former kgb man. but where they come together is in the appreciation and importance of television and the manipulation of the media and the fake news. we before donald trump came up with this idea, you know, with the phrase of fa ke this idea, you know, with the phrase of fake news, but armia putin at the beginning of his presidency, —— vladimir putin at the beginning of his presidency, there was the kursk
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submarine, very badly handled, and putin blamed that on television. there was a famous meeting between heating and the relatives of the sunken, the sailors who died in that, who drowned in that tragedy. where he said, television, daylight, they lie about. of course, the very first thing that he did and he became president was to take control of the television. he has an advantage to president trump, he has monopolised russian television space, he has tighter control over it. in terms of how the two men used television, and in terms of how they contemplate their own images, —— cultivate their own images. one cultivates the image of a self—made man, maverick. the other cultivates the image remaster spy, even though he was a low ranking kgb man, not even he was a low ranking kgb man, not even stationed in finland, but dresden, during the cold war. stay with us you moment, gentlemen. we
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are talking about, giving it its name, information warfare. we can bring in molly mchugh from washington, who is an expert on this. we waiting to see those images of the two leaders, the body language and chemistry between the two men. they will want to say they get on really well. what will they be trying to protect? that is exactly it — — be trying to protect? that is exactly it —— trying to project. it will be an image of friendliness and hospitality, we are here to get along. that will be the symbol that they are talking about, it will be they are talking about, it will be the symbol of this new—found friendship between the united states and russia that both leaders are eager to project, which i don't think represents the very deep, very doubled back troubled relationship thatis doubled back troubled relationship that is underneath. and if information is a weapon, particularly in our age, donald trump isa particularly in our age, donald trump is a master at using this weapon was ? resident trump is very good at by
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voting attention from things that we need to talk about. more than anything, that is his primary school. —— anything, that is his primary school. — — by anything, that is his primary school. —— by voting attention. at this point, the meeting with putin doesn't even need to happen. last week, resident rob attacked our neato allies and liz —— attacked our nato allies and equated it to russia and china. the moral equivalent c, everybody is just the same and china. the moral equivalent c, everybody isjust the same so and china. the moral equivalent c, everybody is just the same so who really cares? he also explicitly said and we did numerous times that he does not believe that what we now know is a multi—year operation attacking the united states conduct did by military officers is anything that we need to worry about. those are very significant. i'm going to just interrupt you, molly. i go do this with an information war first rationalist! this is the image of the two men. it looks a bit stilted at the moment —— with an information
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was best list. a very serious demeanour. my colleagues are looking at them. president trump waiting for that handshake. inaudiable speaks in russian. and now we are watching live pictures coming from inside the
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presidential palace by the finnish broadcaster. president putin has been speaking. we will wait and hear what president trump has to say. where still waiting for that handshake. resident rob always likes... let's listen. and also, your team itself is doing so well. inaudiable i watched quite a bit. in the united states, we call it soccer. i watched quite a bit of it. i watched the semifinals, they were really spectacular game, it was beautifully done. congratulations on that. speaks in russian. most importantly,
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we have a lot of good things to talk about, and things to talk about. we have discussions on everything from trade the military, the missiles, to china, will be talking the bit about china, will be talking the bit about china, our mutual friend, presidency. —— president —— president xi. speaks in russian. i think we have great opportunities together as two countries that frankly we have not been getting along very well for the last number of years, i've been hearing that two young. —— too long. it's been getting close to two years, but i think we will end up having an
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extraordinary relationship. i'm sure you have heard of the years, and as icampaign, getting you have heard of the years, and as i campaign, getting along with russia as a good win, not a bad thing. inaudiable speaks in russian. and i really think the world wants to see us get along. we are the two great nuclear powers. we have 90% of the nuclear, and that's not a good thing, it's a bad thing. and i think we can hopefully do something about that. because it is not a popular force, it is a negative force. we will be talking about that, amongst other things. speaks in russian. and with that, the world awaits, and
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i look forward to our personal discussion, which i think begin is now. and then we're going to meet our whole team. we have quite a few representatives, and we all have a lot of questions, and hopefully we'll come up with answers, most importantly. speaks in russian. thank you very much. thank you. thank you, everybody. think you very much. and there you have it. that first sit down, the beginning of the first informal summit between president putin and donald trump. president
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trump mentioning just how bad relations have been, and how he thinks that with time they'll have an extraordinary relationship. he mentioned about how good it will be to discuss all of the issues with his russian counterpart. and president putin as well said it will —— was good to be there to have discussions with the american president. a key part of president trump's diplomacy, that handshake. he didn't try to play any game with president putin, i'm sure he would have given back as much as donald trump would give, being the one with the strongest arm. in terms of body language, we were just talking about information warfare, very stiff and formal and no smiles. that's exactly what you would expect. if you imagine it as a plate. act one! sort of the opening scene —— as they play. putin is playing the role of a tough leader. you know, a proud and
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tough leader. you know, a proud and tough leader. you know, a proud and tough leader who is standing up for the interests of his country. he's not going to give anything away. he doesn't even look happy to be here! he doesn't need to be happy. in a way, they are recreating the cold war atmosphere, if you like, of the whole thing. trump, on the hand, is in the position, he is very clearly the one who initiated the meeting. putin is sitting back saying, 0k, you wanted to talk to make what do you wanted to talk to make what do you wanted to talk to make what do you want to talk to me about? what have you got the waffle? he is sitting back, he is not smiling, he's not trying to ingratiate himself —— what have you got tough. it is very much from's idea to make that call, he has come to me. i'll just hear what he has to say. we have seen this play before, haven't haven't we, john prideaux, in which troubled talk about, we all get along really well. he used the word, extraordinary relationship, this is very much in the trump lexicon. extraordinary is a very well chosen
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word, he got that spot on! he didn't look delighted to be there either. he is possibly sensitive to the idea that he risks doing vladimir putin's bidding. he thought it was good for the world if america and russia got on. the difficulty is what happens if nothing comes out of this meeting, what happens the next time that russia tests the west by meddling in an election and so forth. you will come under strong criticism. stay with us, john prideaux of the economist. molly mchugh has been watching all of this from washington. and information wa rfa re from washington. and information warfare specialist. a battle going on inside the presidential palace in helsinki. your comments on the first meeting and the public sighting of the two leaders together, and smiling and very serious.” the two leaders together, and smiling and very serious. i very much —— unsmiling. i agree with what our colleague said, this is what you
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would expect going in. trump asked for this meeting and putin is waiting to see what is on offer. both sides going in have made clear what they want to be talking about. the russian foreign ministry explicitly saying that the mola indictment issued on friday was an act of information warfare against russia in order to his truck this meeting, it is an active fake news, and the president in dawson that view with his own tweets basically saying, this is alljust noise to keep us being best friends with russia. it will be interesting to see what happens on the other side of the meeting, if there are more smiles, more congenial handshakes, how thatjoint press smiles, more congenial handshakes, how that joint press conference goes. i think the only sort of comparative data point we have on thatis comparative data point we have on that is the first press conference with president and president putin in france, where macron was very tough and came out and delivered a message to the russian president that france would no longer tolerate russia's attacks on its democracy,
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and it would be nice to see the president of the united states doing the same, but i think that nobody is really holding their breath for that this morning. and aside from the great symbolism of today's meeting, there are really important strategic interests here, the beginning of what many people see as a nuclear arms race, the hope they could extend the start treaty, governing that treaty which is set to expire, the ongoing wars in syria and ukraine, they are opposite sides. they could do something to make the world a safer place here. absolutely. to some extent, i think that the recent nuclear discussions that the recent nuclear discussions that are being floated are bit of a distraction from everything else. you know, this isn't the cold war, everybody is talking about sort of modernising nuclear arsenals, fine. but this is in no way the primary issue that we need to focus on in our relationship with russia or in terms of russia's relationship with the world. ukraine needs to be foremost on the list. syria needs to
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be foremost on the list. russia's increasing use of hybrid warfare tactics to attack on allies of the united states and the united states itself needs to be primarily on the list. every time we sort of move these subsidiary items further up these subsidiary items further up the list and say, hey, look a week agreed on this, isn't this nice, we are just playing out another version of the reset. we have two consecutive presidents who have failed to address them really terrible behaviour of this russia, that has been to the debt rid of our country and our allies and we need to be more clear about what the consequences and costs will be russia continues to act the way it doesin russia continues to act the way it does in the world. president putin so far has been reluctant to criticise the annexation of crimea in 2014, the first annexation of european territory after the second world war, a huge issue for nato allies. if president trump gives that legitimacy, what is the risk in that legitimacy, what is the risk in that was blocked if president trump says anything more clear than he already has about the fact that
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you're ready kind of beliefs that may be russia has a point that crimea belongs with russia —— he already kind of leaves. in dawson all of them narrative that comes from bridgen —— in dawson all of the narrative that has from putin since 2014, you have the us ambassador in moscow and the secretary of state, you have had a variety of people saying no, no, no, our policy has not shifted. but you have also heard the secretary saying, maybe there is a deal that we can outline for you showing why this makes sense, that crimea would just give up on fighting another one of these frozen conflict on fighting this battle to get crimea backs, when we all know that russia is never going to give it up. here's what the other side of that deal looks like. i don't think we are going to see that today, there has been no prep work done but anybody knows. but i feel like the erosion of this line, it's gone beyond just the repetition of, no, crimea is ukraine, we will not
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recognise the state that was invaded by another country. but it does seem like there is erosion of that happening, and it's very dangerous. olly mchugh, thank you forjoining us live from washington —— molly mchugh. early morning on washington as the day unfolds here in the finnish capital, helsinki. that highly anticipated summit between president trump and president putin is now under way. we have seen the two men shaking hands, and smiling, very serious. for the next hour and a half —— not smiling. they will be on their own, only with the interpreters. the question is, what will they get and what will they give away? they will go into their three hours of meetings with their respective teams. a lot is at stake here in this helsinki summit, and it is quite expected goal. we will continue our live coverage here from the baltic sea. but for now i will hand you back to our studios in london. thank you very much, lyse
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doucet. the former education secretary justine greening has called for a second referendum on leaving the eu. the putney mp, who voted to remain, describes theresa may's brexit plans as "the worst of both worlds". meanwhile, another government minister has resigned over brexit. scott mann, an aide to the treasury, said the prime minister's chequers plan put him in direct conflict with the views of a large section of his constituents. a spokesperson for number ten said that there is not going to be a second referendum under any circumstances. our assistant political editor, norman smith, has been outlining the challenges facing the prime minister. all the signs are that mrs may is really now being assailed on all sides over her brexit plan. notjust from the labour party on the opposition parties, but within her own party. we saw over the past few days toure brexiteers saying, this deal is unacceptable. we saw over the past few days toure brexiteers saying, this
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deal is unacceptable. now, tory remainers like justine greening also coming out and saying, this is a fight and it doesn't suit anyone. it doesn't deliver this brexit that brexiteers want and it doesn't keep us in the eu, which is what remainers want. mrs may is hunkering down and sticking to the plan, this morning at the farnborough airshow, where she says companies like aerospace, which are there, these companies will benefit from her plan because it will ensure which frictionless trade with the eu and no interruptions in that crucial supply line. here was mrs may setting out the advantages of her plan. the frictionless free trade of goods, an independent trade policy, the avoidance of a hard border between northern ireland and ireland, and between northern ireland and great britain, these are conditions we seek. to do anything else risks the integrity of the united kingdom, reneges on the belfast agreement, and simply will not deliver for britain as a global trading nation. so at the heart of our proposal is the creation of a uk—eu free trade area for goods, supported by an upfront commitment to ongoing harmonisation with eu rules on goods and agricultural products.
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a new business—friendly customs model, a facilitated customs arrangement, which would operate as if we were a combined customs territory, removing the need for customs checks and controls between the uk and eu, whilst at the same time allowing us to set our own tariffs for other countries outside the eu. but, how confident is mrs may she can push through this ban? perhaps not that confident. there are signs that mrs may is to back off in the threat of a brexiteers' revolt. signs that the government will expect a a series of critical amendments put down by the brexiteers to avoid a potentially shattering defeat. amid all this, the former education secretary, justine greening, says, look, the only way we can get a clear sense of direction is to go back to the people and allow them
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a second vote. you know, i think it was right to try and find a workable compromise, but i think this is a compromise that in practice doesn't suit anyone, really. and also, i worry, having looked at the detail, that it's also unworkable, and that the common rule book will not be able to be updated when we want it to, and that it'll steadily break down. so, we have to recognise that, we have to recognise that parliament's reached an impasse, and find a way through anyway. that's why i think you have to take the decision out of the hands of deadlocked politicians and put it back into the hands of the british people. so, how much support is there now for a second referendum? well, as i said, we know the snp and the lib dems are obviously in favour of a second vote. labour have in recent days said, well, we're not that keen on the idea, however, we're not closing the door to it. and the former attorney general dominic grieve says he's backing justine greening's call. and he says he thinks more tories
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are backing the idea. it's either going to be resolved in parliament, by the majority of members of parliament asserting what they think they want collectively. or, as i say, asjustine has rightly highlighted, the only alternative would be to go back to the public and say, "this is the situation we're in, this is the most important decision you're probably going to make in the course of your lives about this country's future, notjust for yourself, but for your children and grandchildren, and it is time to wake up to the realities of the united kingdom's position in the world and what it is that we want to do for our future". now, you remember when mrs t was toppled all those years ago, mrs thatcher faced that resignation speech by geoffrey howe from her cabinet, which was seen as the trigger that led a lot of tory mps to abandon her after he gave a speech to talk about how he had been sent in to bat against the eu with a broken cricket bat. some better news for mrs may this morning. david davis, the man who resigned last monday, says he is not going to do
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a geoffrey howe. do you think that the prime minister can survive another week? of course! you know, she's a good prime minister. the fact we have a difference of opinion doesn't change that. and i presume the way you'll be voting today goes without saying? i'll be supporting the government on the bill and on the customs union elements where there's a challenge to them, but i'll also probably support one of the amendments on ensuring that northern ireland is not separated from great britain. in any event, that's government policy, but it'll do no harm putting it into the bill. so, david davis is not going to be waiting around with a broken cricket bat. unlike geoffrey howe. on the less good news side for theresa may, another ministerial resignation. a chap by the name of scott mann has thrown himself overboard. by my calculation, that is the ninth resignation from the government since david davis got the whole ball rolling.
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that is just over one resignation per day. on top of this, we await to see what one borisjohnson does. we're told there is not going to be a resignation statement from him today. but might he speak out later in the week? something which could cause mrs may considerable concern. norman smith reporting. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. many had a hot and sunny weekend. that is going to continue through this morning. some rain moving its way is to add. that rain is going to affect north—west england through wales and the south—west, breaking up wales and the south—west, breaking up into some heavy showers along that line of rain into the afternoon. fresher feel the these northern and western parts. temperatures 19—23. towards the east, is going to be another hot and
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sunny one as well, with temperatures about 28—29. tonight, showers clearing the way up into the north sea, and going into the early hours of tuesday morning, temperatures getting down to about 12—14. still a bit uncomfortable. being in the far south—east. during tuesday, there could be a few showers in the north east of england. over the next few days, plenty of dry weather, temperatures starting to rise again. bye— bye. it's getting close to two years, but i think we will end up having an extraordinary relationship. a former minister, justine greening, has dismissed the brexit chequers plan as a fudge and called for a second referendum. net migration from the eu to the uk has fallen to its lowest level in nearly five years. an estimated 101,000 more eu citizens arrived in the uk than left in 2017. govia thameslink launches its third timetable in the space of two months. this one, it claims, will be more robust and reliable. and coming up, knowing me knowing you — we'll be hearing from some
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of the stars of the mamma mia sequel, which has its premiere tonight. so, we're going to take you back to what president trump has been saying in the last 15 minutes in helsinki. he's there to meet vladimir putin, the russian president, a meeting about which he said before had he had low expectations. here he is, talking to reporters at the presidential palace in the finnish capital. most importantly, we have a lot of good things to talk about. we have discussions on everything from trade, to military, to missiles, to nuclear. we'll be talking a little bit about china, our usual friends, president she. —— president xi.
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reporter seeks russian. i think we have great opportunities together as two countries that frankly we have not been getting along very well for the last number of years. i'm been here not too long, getting close to two years, but think we will end up having an extraordinary relationship. you have heard that as i campaign is getting along with russia is a good thing, not a bad thing. reporter asks question in russian.
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i really think the world wants to see us get along. we are at the two great nuclear powers, we have added% of the nuclear, and that's not a good thing, that's a bad thing. over that 90%. it's not a positive force, it's a negative force. reporter asks question in russian. with that, the world awaits, and i look forward to our personal discussion, which begins now, and then we will meet our whole team. you have a few representatives and
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we have questions and will hopefully come we have questions and will hopefully come up with answers. let's get more now on that call from the former education secretary justine greening for a second referendum on brexit. the putney mp — who voted to remain — describes theresa may's brexit plans as the worst of both worlds. she spoke to our poltical correspondent jonathan blake a little earlier. i think parliament has reached an impasse. think the prime minister's deal is, in practice, unworkable, the worst all worlds. think we need to go back to the british people and give them the three clear choices we have at the table, either a soft brexit, a hard brexit — a clean break that i think most believers were voting for — or staying in the european union. the prime minister has reached a compromise, has a very difficultjob to do, to keep enough people happy. do you not recognise that, that in
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coming to this point in putting forwards harrop diane, it was in her view, clearly the best way forward is, and she has taken a decision in good faith? i think it was right to find a workable compromise, but i think this is a compromise that doesn't suit anyone in practice. i worry, having looked at the detail, that it worry, having looked at the detail, thatitis worry, having looked at the detail, that it is unworkable and that the common that it is unworkable and that the common law book will not be able to be updated when we want it to, and it will deadly breakdown. we have to recognise that and recognise that parliament is's reached an impasse and find a way through anyway. that's why i think we have to take the decision out of deadlocked politicians and put it back into the hands of the british people. politicians and put it back into the hands of the british peoplel politicians and put it back into the hands of the british people. , boot do you think there is across the uk for another referendum? do you think there is across the uk for another referendum ? the do you think there is across the uk for another referendum? the vote was held a couple of years ago and the result was there for all to see? held a couple of years ago and the result was there for all to seam is with a heavy heart i propose another referendum. i would have
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liked if parliament had been able to reach a copper mines, but. is
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