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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  July 16, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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‘ trust, ‘trust, on the no trust, a lack of trust, on the two sides. he talked about dan coats, this is president trump's national intelligence director, his chief intelligence officer. he was asked what he made of the comments from dan coats this week that the red lights were flashing on the dashboard and they had real concerns the russians might interfere in the mid—term elections and future elections. he said, dan coats thinks it is russia. i don't see any reason why it would be. he then returns to theissue why it would be. he then returns to the issue of hillary clinton's server, which he has done many times before, talking about the fbi investigation into hillary clinton's 33,000 e—mails. president putin saying several times that there is a treaty between the two sides that could ensure they send material to the russian side and hold a joint investigation. and that the only way to get to the bottom of what happened in 2016 was to come to a verdict through the courts. plenty of other things discussed in the
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press c0 nfe re nce . of other things discussed in the press conference. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet was watching with me. let's talk about an area that you know well, syria. what did they talk about it? they didn't go into too many details. resident from said that he paid a great deal of attention —— president trump said. they talked about the importance of saving hundreds of thousands of lives. so, syria was definitely part of their discussions, but they didn't get much clearer as to, but they make a deal about, resident putin would like to curb iran's influence. it was noticeable that president putin praise the deal, president putin praise the deal, president trump was determined to rip up the deal, and indeed he did. we don't have enough details, we will have to wait for greater details to see it that crea how they are going to move on from this. many would say it is late in the crisis. yes, it is great there are talking
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about it now, but syrians will say, they should have done this a lot longer ago. yes, he talked about setting up working groups, not only on syria but on business, bringing cap and of business together. there will be a lot of people watching in the united states that will say, well, let's walk before we run. clearly, as i wasjust well, let's walk before we run. clearly, as i was just saying, well, let's walk before we run. clearly, as i wasjust saying, there isa clearly, as i wasjust saying, there is a trust deficit between the two sites. how do you think the tone of the us president will go down at home? there will be shocked. there will be gasps amongst the journalists —— there were gasps amongst the journalists. he was pressed repeatedly on russia, tell us pressed repeatedly on russia, tell us what you hold russia responsible for? he blamed both sides. they said, tell us, do you believe there is any russian involvement in the us elections? the senate committee and two us agencies say there were russian collusion. but president trump again blamed both sides. he said he believed president putin as
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much if not more than he believed his own intelligence agencies. when you talk about where they will go from here, it was breathtaking, very typical of trump, a sweeping assessment. he has a right to say that this is in keeping with the bold tradition of american diplomacy that will help change the world. i think everyone would agree to that. but in the same way that when he came out of his meeting with the north korean leader and said, the north korean leader and said, the north korean leader and said, the north korean nuclear threat is over, he came out of this one and said, four hours ago our terrible relations between russia and the united states have changed. just as i have sat down with president putin and had this conversation, things are all, completely different now, and they are going to keep being different. we will set up these working groups and it's going to be all changed now. ithink working groups and it's going to be all changed now. i think we would wa nt to all changed now. i think we would want to believe that this is the beginning of what both said was a great conversation, but at the details kept spilling out, i think
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more and more people found it very ha rd to more and more people found it very hard to believe the president of the united states refused to side with his own administration to rage —— raise any of the concerns. he didn't talk about crimea, for example. president uddin himself said, we disagree. but president trump, when asked about this, did not talk about the annexation of crimea in 2014, he did not talk about ukraine. there was a lot that will raise questions backin was a lot that will raise questions back in the united states. his supporters may have caused back him, but in the foreign policy establishment there will be questions. what he left out with equally breathtaking. yes, we have heard this before after the meeting in singapore with kim jong—un, heard this before after the meeting in singapore with kimjong—un, we heard it was an overwhelming success , heard it was an overwhelming success, but when we look at the detail, there was very little that we have had very little detail in the week that follows. i want to show people a bit of detail about the press conference. we had direct, open, deeply
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productive dialogue. it went very well. before i begin, iwent productive dialogue. it went very well. before i begin, i went to thank the president of finland for graciously hosting today's summit. president putin and i were saying how lovely it was and what a great job they did. i also want to congratulate russia, and president putin for having done such an excellent job in hosting putin for having done such an excellentjob in hosting the world cup. it was really one of the best ever, and your team also did very well. it was a greatjob. i'm here today to continue the proud tradition of bold american diplomacy, from the earliest days of oui’ diplomacy, from the earliest days of our republic american leaders have understood that diplomacy and engagement is preferable to conflict and hostility. a productive dialogue is not only good for the united states and good for russia, but it is good for the world. the
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disagreements between our two countries are well—known, and president putin and i discussed them at length today. but if we're going to solve many of the problems facing oui’ to solve many of the problems facing our world, then we're going to have to find ways to corroborate in the pursuit of shared interest, too often in both the recent past and longer ago, we have seen the consequences when diplomacy is left on the table. we have also seen the benefits of cooperation. in the last century, our nations fought alongside one another in the second world war. even during the tensions of the cold war, when the world looked much different than it does today, the united states and russia we re today, the united states and russia were able to maintain a strong dialogue. but our relationship has never been worse than it is now.
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however right that changed, as of about four hours ago. i really believe that. nothing would be easier politically vinta refuse to meet, the reviews —— politically vinta refuse to meet, to refuse to engage. but that would not come to shinnie —— anything. i cannot make decisions on foreign policy in a futile effort to appease partisan critics in the media or the democratic party. constructive dialogue between the united states and russia forged the opportunity to open new pathways towards peace and stability in our world. i would rather take a political risk in pursuit of peace than the risk peace in pursuit of politics. as president, i will always put what is best for america and what is best
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for the american people. so, that was president trump speaking at a press conference just a few moments ago. let's just hear a little bit of what president putin had to say. translation: in general, we are glad with the outcome of our first full—scale meeting, because previously, we only had just met briefly an international fora. previously, we only had just met briefly an internationalfora. we had a good conversation with president trump, and i hope we start to it in understand each other better, and i am grateful to donald for it. clearly, there are some challenges left we were not able to clear a ll challenges left we were not able to clear all the backlog. but i think that we made a first important step in this direction. president putin speaking just a few minutes ago. let's bring in alexander hug, the deputy head of
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mission of the osce. he has been watching some of this press conference as well. alexander hug, cani conference as well. alexander hug, can i talk to you about ukraine, first of all. tomorrow is the fourth anniversary of shooting down of the malaysian airline, but no reference from donald trump or vladimir putin to that. good afternoon. the special monitoring mission of the osce has been documenting the violence since it started more than four years ago. we have not had a single day without that, we have been registering a ceasefire violation. in fact, last year alone we have been registering over 401,000 ceasefire violations this year, today, this number stays over 150. the ongoing violence has taken a toll on the civilian population, severely so. last year, over 480 civilian casualties to the mission had been confirming. this year, the number is over 150
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civilian casualties. it has to be said, though, that since the latest commitment that started on the 1st ofjuly this year, when the signatories of the minsk agreement, russia, ukraine, in certain areas of the minsk and luhansk region, agreed to commit to an already agreed ceasefire, the numbers went down from four digit numbers to two digit numbers, that is a positive development, but it is on very thin ice, and unless real measures are implemented, as they were agreed in minsk, including the withdrawal of heavy weapons and disengaging forces, this will be yet again short lived. you said there had been a rich commitment to the minsk objectives. in that press conference, —— a recommitment. president putin said that he wanted the americans to lean on the ukrainian side. would you say that the ukrainians have done enough on their side, or is there some more work for the ukrainians to do? all
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involved here have the further conduct dialogue. ultimately, this conflict can only be resolved for a dialogue, and what i do think is important, and we have seen this on the ground on a daily basis, but when the signatories to the agreement would take the civilian concerns first, measures would automatically come that would improve the situation. unfortunately now, military logic is still raining this almost 500 camilla sordell kilometre long contact line —— kilometre long contact line —— kilometre long contact line, until that changes, we will be documenting the violence in the eastern part of the violence in the eastern part of the country. ok, alexander hug, thank you very much. as we were saying, president p10 said there are differences between the two sites, specifically when it comes to crimea. —— president putin said. he said donald trump had recommitted to
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design the communique from last week's nato summit that the takeover of crimea was illegal, in his view. and could not be accepted. the russian side said that they had held a referendum according to un conventions and back as far as they we re conventions and back as far as they were concerned, crimea remains part of russia. so, that is one area where there is fiercely a major difference. it didn't appear that there was much progress on ukraine either —— obviously a major difference. and that was the bbc‘s christian fraser reporting from helsinki. it's been confirmed that the government will accept all proposed changes suggested by conservative brexit supporters to the customs bill being debated in the commons this afternoon. the most significant of these would prevent the uk collecting duties for the eu unless brussels agrees to do the same for britain. a government source said this wouldn't conflict with the cabinet plan agreed ten days ago at chequers on how to proceed. joining us now is our chief political correspondent, vicki young. well, that is very much disputed
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about what kind of changes are accepting this amendment does. remember, this is about those who are very pro—brexit, they think the goverment‘s plans, team—mate back row‘s plans —— theresa may's plans would tie the uk too closely to the eu after we have left. they are trying to show how here in parliament that they have the numbers to make her change her mind. as ever, she has two sides of the conservative party, neither of them happy about what is going on. we had a former cabinet minister today saying, there is such a deadlock in parliament that we are even going to have to consider having a second referendum. theresa may was here to talk sensibly about the nato summit last week, but she was asked about brexit and challenged by labour over why the government has decided to accept these changes to the customs bill, which many think would com pletely bill, which many think would completely change the actual deals she got at chequers. was the
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speaker, the prime minister has rightly said that nato and the eu are the two cornerstones of our security. why then does she keep dancing to the tune of the european research group, and does she see that by capitulating to their proposals on the customs and trade bill she is accepting that the tekkers deal is now dead in the water? well, can i say to the honourable gentleman that he is absolutely wrong in his reference to the agreement that was reached at chequers. i would the agreement that was reached at chequers. iwould not the agreement that was reached at chequers. i would not have gone through all of the work that i did to ensure that we reach that agreement only to see it changed in some way through these bills. they do not change that chequers agreement, they do not change it, and the minister from the dispatch box later today will be making that clear. well, let's discuss this. i'm joined by the conservative bernard jenkin, who is with me now. theresa may is saying accepting these four amendments doesn't change the
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chequers agreement at all, do you agree with yellow well, the chequers agreement, if it is implemented, will be the subject of a new agreement with the european union. that is the withdrawal agreement. and also the future framework agreement. if these require legislation, which they do, that will be done in separate legislation. yes, this has nothing to do with the chequers agreement. white you want these amendments put down to the customs bill? well, we will always just down to the customs bill? well, we will alwaysjust probing down to the customs bill? well, we will always just probing the meaning of this legislation and trying to understand government policy. the fa ct understand government policy. the fact that government has accepted that we are living with the customs union and we are not going to enter a new one with the european union, that we are leaving the fat regime, that we are leaving the fat regime, thatis that we are leaving the fat regime, that is confirmed by accepting the amendment, the government is not going to enter into any international arrangements that might separate the northern ireland from the rest of england, scotland and wales for customs purposes. these are the sort of things that we wa nted
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these are the sort of things that we wanted just clarified, and the government has clarified these matters by accepting our amendments. what about the idea that we won't be allowed to collect any tariffs from the eu unless it is reece burke —— reciprocal. the goverment's intention always was that there should be a reciprocal arrangement. whether it is strictly reciprocal, as our whether it is strictly reciprocal, 3s oui’ amendments whether it is strictly reciprocal, as our amendments adjust, or whether it is dealt with in another way, we have made a signal that we would expect is a property in some way, that it's not a one—sided agreement. that is the goverment's intention. what about this idea of a second referendum, not a majority of people here, that there are some who said that there is parliamentary deadlock, and the only way around it is another referendum on the chequers deal, or a hard brexit, is another referendum on the chequers deal, ora hard brexit, if you want to call it that, or one staying in the eu? well, the fact that staying in the eu might be on the balance paper isjust an insult to the people who voted last time.
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he voted leave. parliament, a sovereign parliament, gave that decision to the british people, it was made absolutely clear what that decision men. in the leaflet the government sent to every household, and the people duly voted. we are leaving the eu. anybody who wants a second referendum is usually a remainer who is trying to undo the decision. and indeed, the eu would love us to have a second referendum, because that's what they usually only countries in the doing. i don't think anyone outside nsw one and remained central really wants another referendum. in fact, opinion is hardening across the country, people are getting impatient with the way the eu has been bullying by prime minister and the country, even if it means leaving on wto terms without a proper agreement. there is not a majority in parliament fighter that all the tekkers deal, so there
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isa that all the tekkers deal, so there is a deadlock. there may not be a majority for the chequers deal, it is not beloved by the remainers or levers. but most constituencies voted leave, let's just see. levers. but most constituencies voted leave, let'sjust see. do you think mps would vote for wto terms? i don't believe parliament would vote to stop brexit because they don't like it after a referendum. there could be no more so for an expression of the british people than i referendum ratified by parliament, and that is what we have had. the idea that the eu should be able to bully the united kingdom into submission would be a defeat for our whole country, and i don't think mps really want to do that, because they wouldn't get re—elected. because they wouldn't get re-elected. bernard jenkin, thank you very much. it does seem that theresa may has avoided a clash this evening. there are of course many other opportunities, though, for mp5 to have their say. studio: yes, indeed, vicki, thank
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you. vicki young in westminster. the headlines on bbc news: donald trump and vladimir putin hold talks in helsinki — the first summit between the two leaders. president putin described the discussions as "very successful". mr trump said they had been "open, direct and deeply productive". the government bows to the demands of conservative leave supporters and accepts four amendments to its brexit trade bill. and in sport... france have arrived backin and in sport... france have arrived back in paris, and are set to parade the world cup trophy along the sian sir lee is a shortly. thousands are in the french capital after their win over croatia yesterday. cristiano ronaldo's move tojuventus from real madrid will be confirmed. it will cost the spanish champions around £100 million. world heavyweight oxime champion anthony joshua will be back in action on the 22nd of september. it's a tough
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challenge from russia's alexander povetkin at wembley stadium. i'll be back with more on those stories after 5:30pm. let's go to paris now, where people are celebrating france's world cup win, gathering on the champs elysee for their victory parade. the team is due that very shortly. and the scenes, as you can see, are just amazing. it looks as though the whole city has come out to welcome the team back after their victory. the team are going to be receiving a heroes welcome. as you can see, flags and cheering. and they've got all these people waiting to see them. later on, they're going to be welcomed by president appear leave the palace. —— by president at the ely is a panellist and they will
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receive the legion of honour. throughout the city, they are being celebrated and faded. six metro stations in paris have been temporarily renamed to celebrate the team, including one in order of the coach, didier deschamps, and another for the goalkeeper, hugo lloris. huge anticipation and excitement there in paris. a record number of eu citizens emigrated from the uk last year, with over 139,000 leaving the country in 2017. it means net migration from eu countries is now at its lowest level since 2013. but figures released today also showed that net migration from countries outside the eu rose to its highest level since 2010. caroline davies has more. packing up years of their lives. it's not been easy for paolo and costanza to decide to leave the uk. it's taken us two years to take this decision. well, i wanted to leave the day after the referendum really! i was in tears.
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but he... and i said, "don't worry, they're going to find a way to get a deal", but actually, after almost two years, i started to worry as well. they're just one family who have decided to leave britain's shores. the number of eu citizens to emigrate from here last year was the highest level ever on record —139,000. but the number of people coming to the uk from the eu is still more than the number leaving. net migration from the eu was 101,000 last year. from outside the eu, it was 227,000. it's not as simple as adding those two together to find the total, but overall net migration is 282,000. today's figures show there's still more people coming to the uk than leaving it. that figure has remained relatively stable, but it is still far above the level the government has set itself of tens of thousands.
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what i think is really important is that we look to the future. we know migration is broadly stable but we have brought in a raft of policies over the last eight years which will enable us going forward to make sure that migration is headed in the right direction, and that we have taken back control of our own borders. for some, the uncertainty has been too much. paolo and costanza leave for italy in two weeks. but for others inside and outside the eu, the uk is still a place they want to call home. caroline davies, bbc news. the defence secretary, gavin williamson, has promised that the uk will remain a leader in the aerospace sector. he made the claim at the farnborough international airshow, where he was unveiling the government's new combat air strategy. he said the government would invest £2 billion over the next seven years to develop a new model of fighter jet, called tempest. our defence correspondent, jonathan beale, was there. this is the moment the british
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aerospace industry has been waiting for. what they hope will be a commitment to develop the next generation of fighterjet in the uk. and with a promise from the government of an investment of £2 billion. this is a commitment for the future. we've got to be planning not just for next year, but we've got to be planning ten, 15, 20 years in the future. so manyjobs and prosperity, but most importantly, making sure the royal air force has the right capabilities. this is stilljust a concept of what it might look like. it might be manned or unmanned, with hard—to—detect stealth technology that could be fitted with laser—direct energy weapons. but no—one knows yet how much it could cost. developing new fighter jets isn't cheap. this, the new us—designed f—35, is already america's most expensive defence project ever. each cost more than £100 million.
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the mod says it'll eventually buy 138. but it'll struggle to find the cash. so is it really feasible for the uk to embark on designing another jet for the future? in the long run, £2 billion is not going to give the raf or the uk a new combat air system in the 2030 time frame. what that does is buy the government into that sort of development phase, and £2 billion until 2025 will be enough to get a foot in the door, but to actually field a combat aircraft that looks something like the fast jets we imagined today in the 2030 timeframe, they'll have to find a lot more than £2 billion. with the defence budget already under strain, it's still not clear how britain will be able to afford it, and it will almost certainly need other partner nations to develop this next generation of fighterjets. it is an ambitious strategy, but it's a long way from getting off the ground. jonathan beale, bbc news, at the farnborough airshow. rail passengers travelling with govia thameslink
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are facing their third new timetable in two months. the company, which operates several franchises, including thameslink and great northern, has promised a more reliable service than that provided by its changes in may, when it had to cancel hundreds of new trains. but it said this morning it was "too early to say" if there was disruption. tom burridge sent us this update from kings cross station in london. i think if you were writing a school report based on govia thameslink‘s performance this morning, you might say, "improving, but still some way to go". yes, there were delays, yes, there were cancellations, but by and large, most trains ran on time. there was only significant disruption between this station and cambridge. now, that's a big improvement on may, when govia thameslink and northern both implemented, or tried to implement, more ambitious timetables. then, the proper planning wasn't in place and it was nothing short of travel chaos. it matters not only because passengers, huge numbers of passengers, have been suffering for weeks, but also, and excuse the pun, because govia thameslink
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is on the rails. some people say the company should be stripped of its franchise. but companies across the country running our rail network know that they have to deal with the problem of overcrowding, but change must come in an orderly way. passengers in the north of england are awaiting a new timetable there to alleviate some of the problems. tom burridge reporting. buddhist monks have held a ceremony outside the flooded cave complex in thailand to honour a diver who died during the operation to rescue 12 boys and their football coach trapped inside. it happened as a clean—up operation continues in the area following the rescue mission. howard johnson reports. a blessing drum signalled the start of the ceremony. in northern thailand, a drum is used to bless warriors and summon people to important events. today, prestigious monks and dignitaries gathered to send blessings to the spirit
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of saman kunan, the former thai navy seal diver who died during the operation to save the trapped football team. there were offerings, too — pig heads, a symbol of wealth and prosperity. ajahn robert is a british buddhist monk who lives in the thai capital, bangkok. he came to take part in the ceremony. we don't believe that the journey‘s ended just because his body has died. his karma, everything, just goes on and on, and we will pray for his good health, good luck in his next life, which has already started. over the last few days, thousands of volunteers have streamed into the area around the cave to clean up behind the rescue operation. this is the closest we've been able to get to the entrance of the tham luang cave complex in weeks, and what we can see now behind us is a security fence has been set up to stop anyone from getting in. there's also a security detail here, and what we've heard is that the authorities say it will take six months to clear the cave complex.
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there's a lot of equipment that was used during the rescue operation. today's ceremony was a chance for many to offer their own blessings to spirits and deities they believe guard these caves. one lady told us she had visited the cave before the rescue operation. she'd asked the spirits to keep the football team safe, and today she returned to show them her gratitude. howard johnson, bbc news, chiang rai province. a british man involved in the rescue mission says he is considering suing the tesla car founder elon musk. in a now deleted tweet, the entrpreneur described vern unsworth, a cave diver who lives in thailand, as "pedo guy". mr unsworth had ridiculed mr musk‘s offer of a mini—submarine to help with the rescue. time for a look at the weather. here's the forecast. here is darren bett with the forecast. good evening rita. the
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midlands yet to see the fresh air. it's been 30 degrees in the heat and humidity here today. & trying to end the day, too. we have seen a fresh appeal across scotland, about 19 or 20. in between this ragged area of rain moving across north—west england towards the south—east of scotla nd england towards the south—east of scotland and away into the north sea, pockets of rain further south, but missing the south—east of england and much of east anglia and exiting out into the north sea. the showers in northern ireland should fade away and generally become dry overnight, a better night for sleeping, although the heat will be there for a while longer across the south—east of the uk. it will be fresher by the morning, a sunnyside for many parts of the country. the cloud will increase through the day —— a sunny start. we could get scattering of showers, the odd heavy one, like the showers further south and no rain likely in the south east. not as hot or assume it as
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today, 25 degrees. further north, temperatures near it 19 celsius —— not as hot or humid. this is bbc news. the headlines. president trump and president putin hail theirfirst face—to—face summit as a ‘good start‘ to improving relations in an worse than the colour however, that changed as of about four hours ago. two-day's negotiations reflected ourjoint wish to redress this negative situation. the government bows to the demands of conservative leave supporters and accepts four amendments to its brexit trade bill the number of eu citizens leaving the uk last year was the highest on record, according to new figures time for all the sport now. the
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world cup may be over for now, but the party has not stopped just yet. france squad continue celebrations today after securing a second world cup victory. tens of thousands of jubilant fans celebrated on the streets. their captain, hugo lloris arrived back in paris today and they will see much of the same of what we saw yesterday in paris, these are oui’ saw yesterday in paris, these are our life pictures from paris. fans already coming out in their thousands. awaiting their heroes. they will have a parade of players along thejobs of they will have a parade of players along the jobs of these eight. —— a
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parade of players along the champs elysees. there will be a hiro's well, as well for the defeated creation side. it was the first ever world cup final for a creation side. it was the first ever world cup finalfor a nation ofjust over 4 million people. they greeted passionately back on the streets. formerly part of yugoslavia. the country on b came into being in 1991. cristiano ronaldo has been having his medical in turin today before completing that move to the italian champions. he's met fans and signed shirts this morning, before the all important tests with the doctors. ronaldo's moving from real madrid for around £99 million. england openerjason roy has been given little chance of being fit for the deciding one—day international against india at headingley on tuesday. the surrey batsman has been in good form, but suffered a finger injury during saturday's win
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at lord's over the tourists. hampshire's james vince has been added to the squad with roy said to be only 30% likely to make tomorrow's series decider. despite that setback, the england bowler says that the side aren't worried. we are pretty relaxed. loosely, it wasn't good enough, the first game. we knew what we needed to do better. it was not doom and gloom, it was this is what we need to do next. well the test series with india is a couple of weeks away too, and alastair cook will be hoping for a big summer. he's playing for england's second team — the lions — against an india a side in worcester. and he's in the runs too. britain's former world champion lizzie deignan is the big signing for a new women's world tour team — trek factory racing. she's not racing at present because she's pregnant,
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but the briton will leave her current squad boels—dolmans at the end of the season and says her new team don't see her as a risk whilst she's pregnant, they see her as an investment, and a valued athlete. more than £10 million is to be invested as pa rt more than £10 million is to be invested as part available see investment. the tournament, which is to be held in the uk is a huge opportunity to grow the sport. the money will focus on facilities, engaging with communities and encouraging innovation. that is all the spot for now. we will have a full round—up on sports day for you at 6:30pm. more now on the customs debate going on in the house of commons. it's understood the government will be accepting all four proposed amendments from tory brexiteers joining me now from our westminster studio is stephen dorrell, a former conservative mp
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and minister injohn major's cabinet, when mr major told his backbench critics over europe to ‘put up or shut up', provoking a leadership election. he's now chairman of ‘the european movement‘ which is an independent, cross—party organisation committed to keeping the uk in the eu. a full biography for you. thank you for joining a full biography for you. thank you forjoining us. people know all about you now. as ijust said, the government has indicated that it is going to accept these forum and meant from conservative backbench brexiters. thereby, altering that carefully balanced chequers agreement that mrs may had drawn up. what you make of that? it begs the question, who governs britain? we have the cabinet spent the whole day, not much more than a week ago hammering out a set of compromise
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proposals. that was followed by the resignation of two of the principal ministers with responsibilities associated with the brexit process. the government is now in the house of commons amending the possession that it has spent the whole of last friday hammering out and which led to two ministerial resignations. these arab amendments that have been tabled by a faction within the conservative party that does not reflect, i don't believe, majority view of the british people. which is why i think we now need a commitment to ta ke why i think we now need a commitment to take this process asjustin greening said this morning back to the british people. parliament, frankly, cannot make a decision for which there is any legitimacy. will run that idea of a second referendum ina run that idea of a second referendum in a moment. if the conservative brexiters don't reflect what the british people think, they clearly
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reflect enough of the opinion of the conservative benches too worried the government, which is presumably why they have given in. precisely. this cannot be an internal discussion within the conservative party. it is supposed to be a negotiation between britain and the eu. the eu 27 must be waiting for somebody to invite their opinion on all of this process , their opinion on all of this process, more than two years after the referendum. the factors, in my view, neither the government's version, still less the jacob riis mork version, neither of those are what british people thought they we re what british people thought they were voting for in 2016. this is a process that has been committed back to parliament. parliament, asjustin greening said this morning is gridlocked. it is incapable of making a decision on this issue.
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brexiters who are perfectly happy with the outcome would say that you are simply wanting a second referendum because you disagree with the result of the first one. that is not the reason why. the reason i think there is a case now for people's vote and i think it is beyond the way that the issue can be resolved is that i think it becomes day by day clearer that there is not a version of brexit which can command a majority in the house of commons. our system committed it back to parliament, but i don't believe that there are many people on either side of the argument that think that parliament is going to produce a workable long—term suit solution. which is why, only the people can decide. when i introduced you i said that you were a member of john major's government when he urged his backbench medics to put up 01’ urged his backbench medics to put up or shut up. how does what is going
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on now compared to what was going on then? i think the big difference between the cabinets is thatjohn major, at least led a habit which had a policy. not everybody agreed with it, but we did have a policy. we were able with difficulty to maintain support in the house of commons. that is not the position of theresa may's position. as i started off this conversation by saying, the question is who governs britain? many thanks indeed. we can cross live now to the house of commons, where the customs bill debate is currently underway. we can listen to the remain supporting mp. i will quickly give
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way and that will be my last word. if the government was guaranteed the support of the labour party and the scottish nationalists against these amendments, we could reveal what a tiny minority in the house of commons as a whole, are trying to hold us all to ransom. my right honourable friend is as right as ever. that resulted is that both main political parties are now in the grasp of the few. who falsely claim to speak for the money. a lack of ability or perhaps courage, a liking of a quiet life on either side of this house, means that our
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country is not just side of this house, means that our country is notjust hurtling to the extremes country is notjust hurtling to the extre m es of country is notjust hurtling to the extremes of british political life but equally over the brexit cliff which the overwhelming majority of leavers did not vote for. they were promised the precise opposite. the time has come for the nonsense to be stopped. the time has come for people to show courage and do the right thing by our country. we are leaving the european union, but we have got to leave in such a way that protects the jobs and chris tea and peace in northern ireland for everybody in this country. it is time to put aside the ideology and the nonsense that invariably comes from not inhabiting the real world. reject these two ludicrous amendments that the government have agreed to and in due course lets wa ke agreed to and in due course lets wake up to the further reality. we will end up in the single market and
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the customs union. the question is that new clause one b read the second time. can i commend the passion in the speech from the right honourable member who spoke... we are going to leave that debate that will go on into the evening. there will go on into the evening. there will be continuing coverage on bbc parliament if you want to watch. a bbc investigation has revealed the full extent of an islamist terror network founded in the uk — which funded operations for so—called islamic state across the globe. the network was founded by siful sujan, a bangladeshi—born computer expert who settled in wales. he was killed in an american drone strike in 2015 after it was discovered he d been sending funds and high tech equipment to isis. but, as wyre davies reports, international police investigators say the network continued long after his death. he was an external operations,...
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december 2015, an american colonel announces the death of a top commanderfor so—called announces the death of a top commander for so—called islamic state. that man was sujan. a supporter of isis. he helped develop weapons systems for isis. the full extent of that terror network is only now come to light. sujan came to the fbi attention when he sent thousands of dollars to an isis sympathiser in the us. he was sent on making videos and directed to
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carry out an attack. that never happened thanks to the fbi. the network was incredibly sophisticated. this is sending money across a number of different countries. it is the only known isis funded plot in the us. sujan influence continues to brief felt around the world. from the us, our investigation led to southern spain. where sujan's brother was arrested at the end of 2017. after setting up an it company which continue to send thousands of dollars and hi tech equipment to isis supporters. he has not been charged with any
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offence and he denies the allegations against him. another man who worked as a computer expert for the company was abdul saman. he was named as somebody who sent money to isis. challenged over those accusations and his recent contacts, the man arrested in spain said that the man arrested in spain said that the allegations went new. what about the allegations went new. what about the company... he denies any role in doing. and any involvement in a terrorist network and says he does not hold terrorist views. we have seen not hold terrorist views. we have seen evidence that sufjan network...
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the cell may now have ceased to function. the headlines on bbc news. donald trump and vladimir putin hold talks in helsinki — the first summit between the two leaders president putin described the discussions as "very successful" — mr trump said they had been "open, direct and deeply productive the government bows to the demands of conservative leave supporters and accepts four amendments to its brexit trade bill an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. a peninsula in the far north of scotland is to become the uk's first spaceport. the site in sutherland will be used to launch rockets vertically to put satellites into orbit. it's hoped the first launch
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from there could take place in under three years. the announcement is part of a £30m government plan to help establish spaceports in the uk. our science correspondent victoria gill has more. blasting off soon from our shores. in as little as three years, rockets like this will be launched from a removed stretch of land on the north coast of scotland. the peninsular in sutherland has been chosen as the best place to launch rockets. £2.5 million will be contributed. best place to launch rockets. £2.5 million will be contributedm best place to launch rockets. £2.5 million will be contributed. it will save cost in having to export satellites to other countries. it will make it easier logistically.
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that will take cost out of the satellite programme. it may enable more spacecraft to be built and launched. while rockets blast off vertically from scotland, another type of launch pad could be built at the opposite end of country. cornwall council signed an agreement with richard bra nson's cornwall council signed an agreement with richard branson's virgin orbit. eventually, aircraft could take off from newquay. the commercial space sector is growing. partly because the satellite technology is shrinking. it is now possible to fit a great deal of communications, gps and whether monitoring capability inside a relatively small box. a
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development which is made these new modest spaceport is a possibility. two coastal sites could boldly take the country another step into the commercial space age. ten years ago the abba musical mamma mia smashed box office records — with its winning mix of greek sunshine and singing hollywood stars. this week sees the release of the sequel mamma mia! here we go again — which stars cher and andy garcia. ahead of tonight's premiere, charlie stayt went to meet them. # mamma mia, here i go again #. grandma, you are invited. are you both huge abba fans?|j grandma, you are invited. are you both huge abba fans? i am now. it was so both huge abba fans? i am now. it was so huge in the rest of the world, but it wasn't as gigantic in
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america. yes, there were the songs. but, after the play and then after the movie, it is huge in america. what about you ? the movie, it is huge in america. what about you? i was really more in tune with orange b and things like that. really, we were bombarded with it, if you happen to be on pop radio, you would hear the songs over and overagain. radio, you would hear the songs over and over again. the two of you have to sing together. you do a duet. # they were closer now, fernando. # they were closer now, fernando. # every hour, every minute seemed to last eternally. #we last eternally. # we were so afraid, fernando. we
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we re # we were so afraid, fernando. we were s0 young and # we were so afraid, fernando. we were so young and full of life and none of us prepare to die. # i'm not ashamed to say the roar of guns and cannons almost made me cry. #. your characters knew one another long ago. we were medically involved. he had his throne turned upside down. —— we were romantically involved. you have to personalise the story. what it means to you. a very profound love that has been lost. you have two really know that somehow. the acting gods give you
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that. # there was something in the air that night, the stars were bright, fernando. #. you are working a lot now. people might be thinking that you would ta ke might be thinking that you would take it a bit easier? i didn't mean it to be like this. i didn't think i would be doing anything after 50. this is ridiculous. i should not be working. i should this is ridiculous. i should not be working. ishould be this is ridiculous. i should not be working. i should be knitting, this is ridiculous. i should not be working. ishould be knitting, or something. #just one something. # just one luck and i can something. #just one luck and i can hear a bell ring #. times are different, socially, economically. there is an thing about going to season thing like this, the role that it has to play. it is escapism. something that i can just lose myself in. and it also
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lets you. this is a particularly happy movie. i think that in times of stress, happy movies and musicals lift your spirits. thank you both very much. the christening of prince louis has been marked by the release of a set of family photographs. the four images were taken by photographer matt holyoak, following the ceremony in the chapel royal at st james‘s palace. it's the first time the duke and duchess of cambridge and their three children have been seen together publicly as a family of five. let's go to paris now, where people are celebrating france's world cup win, gathering on the champs elysee for their victory parade. the carriage bringing them back from
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the airport. it is just making its way back into the centre of town. the victorious team will be greeted by this extraordinary sight. terrific atmosphere. much excitement and anticipation. here is the forecast. what might have been? it has been hot and humid across the midlands and eastern england today. temperatures up to around 30 degrees. we are seeing a change. it is a gradual change, fresh air heading our way. sunshine in the next few days. perhaps, one 01’ in the next few days. perhaps, one or two spells. we have seen the fresher air coming in to scotland and northern ireland, it has brought
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one 01’ and northern ireland, it has brought one or two and northern ireland, it has brought one 01’ two showers and northern ireland, it has brought one or two showers around already. it threatened one or two showers, but it has been very humid. in between those different air masses, we have got one or two showers. we still have some bursts of rain, some heavy rain in wales and into the north—west of england. perhaps into the south west of scotland. it shall rory best of rain moving towards the west country, perhaps into the west midlands as well. heavier rain moving into northern england, into south east scotland. some showers in northern ireland, but temperatures become drier across north and east scotland. there is that wetter weather. you can see how hit and miss it is. it is probably going to
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be nothing in the south—east of england. that moves through and then we see england. that moves through and then we see that fresher air arriving. a more comfortable night forced thing. you will notice it more by the time you get up in the morning. probably a bright and sunny start. the cloud tending to increase. a sprinkling of showers. the odd heavy one, perhaps. very few showers for england and wales further south. still quite warm here, but i'm sure 25 will feel much better than the 30 and humidity that we had today. high pressure dominating around the middle part of the week. it looked at one stage as if this weather system here was going to drag down across the whole country on friday. that will not happen now. it will peter rout. for wednesday, we have one or two showers. but that is the story
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really on thursday, two. those temperatures rising again, in london, perhaps closer to 30 celsius by the end of the week. president trump and president putin stand together to tell the world they have started a productive dialogue. a handshake signals what the us president says is a chance to do great things with russia. our relationship has never been worse than it is now. however, that changed as of about four hours ago. and president trump refuses to back the fbi‘s allegations that russia interfered in the us election. theresa may caves into pressure from tory brexiteers over her blueprint to leave the european union. the number of people coming into the uk from the eu compared with those leaving falls to its lowest in nearly five years. blast—off from northern scotland,
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as it's chosen to be the site of the uk's first spaceport.
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