Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 18, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at 2. "a moment of miracle" — the thai footballers trapped in a cave for more than a fortnight describe how they felt when british divers found them it was a miracle, it was a miracle, i was shocked. i... i it was a miracle, it was a miracle, iwas shocked. i... i had it was a miracle, it was a miracle, i was shocked. i... i had to think about the questions. when he got up, he asked how i knew, and i said, i'm 0k, andi he asked how i knew, and i said, i'm 0k, and i was shocked. sir cliff richard has won his high court privacy battle against the bbc, receiving 210 thousand pounds in damages. i can't really answer to many questions at the moment. it's going to take a little while to get over the whole emotional factor sol to take a little while to get over the whole emotional factor so i hope you will forgive me. i will talk to some other time, thank you very much. the bbc apologises for any distress caused to sir cliff, but say its journalists had acted in good faith. more battles over brexit —
2:01 pm
after narrowly avoiding defeat in two key votes, theresa may prepares to address conservative mps later today. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport — with chris mitchell — early retirement? absolutely, we are trying to digest the news that the welsh rugby hero sam warburton has retired at the age of 29. not many people saw this coming. we will be talking about that later on. thank you very much. you don't have to be called christer appear on afternoon light but it helps! and the weather? i'm going to be taking you straight back to school, those who did geography might remember meanders and oxbow lakes. i will tell you how the jet stream can and oxbow lakes. i will tell you how thejet stream can be kind of like that and the impacts that those changes will have on our weather for friday and saturday as well. thank you very much. also today,
2:02 pm
today marks the anniversary for nelson mandela, some young people are criticising his legacy. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. their story of survival captivated the world, and now the members the thai football team trapped in a cave for more than two weeks, have all left hospital and spoken publically for the first time. in the past hour, the twelve boys and their football coach have been speaking about their underground ordeal — they described the moment when they were discovered by two british divers as "a moment of miracle". the boys have now left the news conference, after being declared healthy, both physically and mentally. let's talk now to our correspondent
2:03 pm
devina gupta, in chiang rai. great to see them all so well. absolutely, happy ending, definitely, for this wild worst team of 12 courageous boys and their coach. —— wild blows. and at the centre were the conference ended recently, the team walked into the conference waving at the news cameras, and remember these boys are as young as i! cameras, and remember these boys are as young as 11 years old to 16 years old, going through something extraordinary and their lives that no one could have imagined, beating the odds to survive the long dark night of the cave. and also recuperating really fast from the hospital. when these boys spoke, the world listened, and they were stories of genuine human courage. one of the boys also said that how he felt so hungry that he didn't
2:04 pm
think about food because that would have meant losing the battle. and thatis have meant losing the battle. and that is really the message coming out of it, that discipline, teamwork and how they worked against the odds supporting each other through thick and thin stop from here, these boys went out to their hometown, which is about 30 minutes from here, and from now, it is all celebrations for them. they will be needing their families and friends for the first time —— meeting theirfamilies and friends, and the state governor said they would not be allowed access via they would not be allowed access via the media. they will return to their homes quickly. thank you very much. let's find out more about what the boys had to say at their press conference. discharge. the 12 boys emerged today into the sunlight at last and
2:05 pm
straight onto minibuses, on their way to tell the world for the first time about their extraordinary ordeal. the celebratory sendoff from relatives, who still can't quite believe their luck. nor, it seems, can the boys themselves. deeply grateful to be alive and well. the hospital that treated themselves they put on an average three kilograms and are all strong, ready to go back to their lives. one by one, the young football team introduced themselves. translation: hello. i play the midfielder. hi. i am 11 years old. hello. and then they answered questions, carefully vetted by child psychologists. the first was about the incident rescu e rs first was about the incident rescuers discovered them huddled together in the cave. they got out the water and they were saying
2:06 pm
something das i thought... i thought they were tight, but they were officers. —— i thought they were tight. but when they got out of the water, i found that they were english. i didn't know what to say to them so ijust say hello. and then what happened next, it was... it was a miracle. i was shocked. i thought we would be stranded there. we got stuck there. so the second option is to dig through the wall of the cave to find a way out. at least we we re the cave to find a way out. at least we were doing something to try to get out. i try not to think about food because thinking about food... what you think about, then? i tried
2:07 pm
not to think about fried rice. and thai paste. this was the start of a dramatic rescue operation that deliver them from the mounted against the odds. for their families, it was an agonising wait. and then, nine days after the wild boars football team went missing... the moment when british divers first found them, deep inside the cave complex. they written, hungry, but water dripping from the cave walls had kept them alive. —— they were thin. but how to get them out? it was a race against the clock with the risk of more floodwater engulfing them. but a painstaking, dangerous and daring mission by thai navy seals and international rescu e rs navy seals and international rescuers in which one thai diver died finally brought all the boys to safety. there is interest in a
2:08 pm
hollywood treatment of their incredible story but first, they've got to finish telling it themselves. and then, alas, these boys are going home. —— then, at last. some breaking news now regarding the investigation into the grenfell tower fire. we're investigation into the grenfell towerfire. we're hearing from scotla nd towerfire. we're hearing from scotland yard detectives and metropolitan police investigating the fire have carried out the interviews under caution. this is because the force is considering whether offences including gross negligence, manslaughter, corporate manslaughter and beaches of the health and safety act had been committed. you will recall, of course, there is a public enquiry under way into the themselves how tragedy in which seven stu people died lastjune —— 72 people died, when the tower block caught fire. detectives have carried out the interviews under caution is,
2:09 pm
considering whether gross negligence, manslaughter, corporate manslaughter and beaches of the health and safety act had been committed. sir cliff richard has won his high court privacy battle against the bbc, and has been awarded an initial £210,000 in damages. the court found that the corporation's reporting of a police raid, in connection with an allegation of historical child sex abuse, infringed the star's privacy rights in a "serious and sensationalist way." sir cliff always denied the allegations, was never arrested or charged and described today's ruling as "wonderful news". the bbc says it's very sorry for the distress caused to sir cliff, but will look at appealing the decision. daniela relph has more. for sir cliff richard, it was an overwhelming legal victory. he cried in court as the judgment was read and judges ——and showed his emotion as he left. i can't really answer too many questions at the moment. it's going to take a little well for me to get over the whole emotional factor. and so i hope you will forgive me.
2:10 pm
i will talk to you some other time. thank you very much. in august 2014, the bbc reported on a police search of sir cliff richard's home in berkshire. it was part of a south yorkshire police investigation into an historical allegation of sexual abuse made by a boy under the age of 16. sir cliff richard was never arrested or charged. he argued that the coverage was intrusive and an invasion of his privacy. today, thejudge agreed. he never expected after 60 years in the public eye that his privacy and reputation would be tarnished in this way and that he would need to fight such a battle. although he felt it necessary to pursue this case, and the sum awarded in damages is one of the highest ever in this area of law, sir cliff's motivation was not for personal gain as he knew all that he would be substantially out of pocket, no matter what. there is one point i think i was recorded as saying, he was pretty well skin and bone at that time. but, you know, he has tremendousjoy about him anyway as an individual, he has tremendous tenacity.
2:11 pm
he was determined to fight this case. bbc reporter danjohnson had been told about the search on sir cliff's home by the police. in his ruling, thejudge said he believed mrjohnson was capable of letting his enthusiasm for the story get the better of him. though he stressed he did not believe he was a dishonest man. the judge's harshest criticism was directed at gary smith, who was then uk news editor and is now head of news for bbc scotland. the judge said he did not feel mr smith was always a reliable witness, describing him as undo the defensive. ——unduly defensive. fran unsworth signed off on the story at the time. she was described as an honest and conscientious witness. she is now the bbc‘s director of news. after today's ruling, she said the bbc was very sorry for the distress caused to sir cliff but warned that the judgment had wider implications. it will put decision—making about naming individuals in the hands of the police over the public‘s right to know. we don't believe this is compatible
2:12 pm
with liberty and press freedoms. for all of these reasons, there is an important principle at stake. that is why the bbc is looking at an appeal. but for now, the bbc faces a substantial bill. general damages of £190,000 covering the effect on sir cliff and his life. then aggravated damages of £20,000 because the bbc entered the story for scoop of the year in the world television society awards. and there could be further special damages awarded to be decided at a future court hearing. the issue of damages is with privacy, you can never undo the harm. we're never going to be able to not see the images of the police storming into sir cliff's house. but what the judge has obviously done is set the damages at the highest level to send a very clear message that this was completely wrong.
2:13 pm
# congratulations... #. a small group of sir cliff richard fans were there to support him today, loyal and vocal. as sir cliff richard left court, he did so knowing that this was a significant win. and a case, he said, that caused him unbelievable how it. ——hurt. our correspondent helena lee is at the high court and has been following the case. and danny savage is outside south yorkshire police headquarters in sheffield. first, we can see there, the slight hustle there was outside the court, huge amount of media interest. tells what has been happening. well, inside the court, when that judgment was read out, sir cliff richard looked tearful, he hugged his supporters, gloria hunniford, his supporters, gloria hunniford, his very loyalfriend, his supporters, gloria hunniford, his very loyal friend, the
2:14 pm
television presenter, came to court today. as she did when the case took place ever this year. and in fact, she provided a witness statement to the court. he was very visibly upset in the court when the judgment was read out, when he came outside as we saw in that piece there, with his solicitor by his side, again, he looked visibly upset. and when the case took place, sir cliff richard gave evidence in the witness box himself and he had described at the time how the day after the bbc‘scoverage, he collapsed on the floor sobbing, he said, for nine months after that, he felt like he was going to have a heart attack and stroke. so he described the significant mental and physical damage as well as the loss of earnings from the bbc‘scoverage. just a couple of lines from the judge'sjudgment just a couple of lines from the judge's judgment earlier today. when he talked about the presentation, the way the bbc presented the story
2:15 pm
on that day in august 2014, he said, in short, the bbc went in for an invasion of sir cliff's privacy rights ina invasion of sir cliff's privacy rights in a big way. and he also touched on a number of other issues, just touching on the damage to sir cliff richard's health, he said that it was practically all of it was caused by the bbc‘sbroadcasting the story in the first place and continue to do so in the following hours is that search continued. huge relief for sir cliff richard, a difficult, devastating day for the bbc. they are now pouring of this judgment which is about 200 pages long and we heard from fran unsworth, the director of news and current affairs of the bbc, that they are now going to look into whether they are going to appeal or not and it's not the end of it. there's going to be another hearing, as well, where the judge is going to look at special damages. that will
2:16 pm
involve sir cliff richard's loss of earnings as a result of the bbc‘scoverage. that hearing will ta ke bbc‘scoverage. that hearing will take place at some point later this month. thank you very much. and, danny, not just and, danny, notjust the bbc involved in this case but south yorkshire police, to? yes, i think south yorkshire police will feel relieved, if you like, today's ruling. they have been entwined in this. they are effectively three parties in this case, sir cliff, the bbc and south yorkshire police. it was a south yorkshire police press officer who dan johnson, the was a south yorkshire police press officer who danjohnson, the bbc reporter, originally came to with details of the story from a source and things went from there when he had a meeting with a senior police officer here and had a tentative agreement, if you like, that the bbc would be involved or able to film the subsequent raid on the sir cliff richard's apartment. which was filmed by the helicopter. what has happened today with the ruling from
2:17 pm
thejudges that happened today with the ruling from the judges that the happened today with the ruling from thejudges that thejudge happened today with the ruling from the judges that the judge has basically said that he found the witnesses from south yorkshire police to be more credible than those from the bbc. in a statement today from the chief constable hugh, he said that the judgment was fully accepted he said that the judgment was fully a cce pted by he said that the judgment was fully accepted by some thought police can he says, i particularly welcome the finding that all police officers and staff were found to have acted entirely honestly and were credible and reliable witnesses sub i would like to take this opportunity again to offer our condolences from south yorkshire police offer our condolences on the distress cliff richard has suffered. the witnesses from south yorkshire police were the detective superintendent who was described as a clear and reliable witness by the judge described as a clear and reliable witness by thejudge in his findings today, the press officer, he was first approached by danjohnson from the bbc, was described as a careful and reliable witness, not guilty of any dishonesty. there is a
2:18 pm
suggestion indicates that you've written notes and not use them later in the case which was dismissed by thejudge. but let's in the case which was dismissed by the judge. but let's not in the case which was dismissed by thejudge. but let's not forget in the case which was dismissed by the judge. but let's not forget that south yorkshire police did pacer cliff richard £400,000 in damages in an out—of—court settlement, if you like, in the months that followed. but that did pay sir cliff richard. and at the time, there was another enquiry which concluded that the south yorkshire force should not have confirmed what it is great is highly sensitive and confidential details to the bbc or facilitated a meeting between a senior detective and dan johnson. so meeting between a senior detective and danjohnson. so there was some criticism of south yorkshire police, definitely, ending weeks of that followed this broadcast but today, south yorkshire police witnesses have been described as will a blind clear. thank you very much. also in the next half hour, we'll be speaking to gloria hunniford, a long term friend of sir cliff richard,
2:19 pm
who gave testimony at the case. let's return to the breaking news report of a few moments ago, metropolitan police investigating the grenfell tower fire have carried out three interviews under caution. our home affairs correspondent is here and can tell us more. it's a significant development. the police have been doing, as they say themselves, searches, frederik tests, digital scanning of the tower, photography, they are brought in experts, we've seen five very detailed reports presented to the enquiry. and now we see a significant new phase in which three people have been interviewed by the police under caution, which means they are told, they say —— what they say could be used against them in court. they have not been arrested. but it is clear from what the police say they have a programme of doing the sort of interviews with people, possibly people from companies involved in the refurbishment, that sort of thing, they are going to
2:20 pm
work their way through that list of people. of people that are looking at. now, why is this important? general in these complex investigations, lots of document evidence, forensic evidence, picture evidence, forensic evidence, picture evidence, is gathered first and then thatis evidence, is gathered first and then that is put to people who might be suspect in the case. so i think we are moving into that stage. other particular offences that the police are examining whether were actually committed ? and yes, they're looking at potential manslaughter, potential corporate manslaughter, manslaughter committed by a company, and also potential breaches of the health and safety at work act. and they have also said that they are looking specifically, this may not be the only place they are looking, they are looking specifically at the council, the royal borough of kensington and chelsea, and its te na nt kensington and chelsea, and its tenant management organisation, the organisation the council gave the role of looking after its social housing. so there may well be other companies in the frame that the police are looking for, looking at, but those was a rodina priti that
2:21 pm
have been named so far. and the met says it is keeping records of the g re nfell tower area, says it is keeping records of the grenfell tower area, victims of the breed, family of the brief, keeping of them up—to—date with what is happening. —— victims and family of the breeze. and it must become debated because of the scale and nature of the fire. incredibly, forget it. so that incredibly completed. we are talking about everything right down to the way in which fire starts, spreads, building regulations, which are very competitive, what companies be about that, literally millions of documents to bullet through by the police and vast amounts of evidence potentially. —— to be looked at by the police. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. the young thai footballers describe the "miracle" moment divers found them trapped in a cave.
2:22 pm
sir cliff richard is awarded an initial £210,000 at the high court in damages for the bbc‘s coverage of a police raid on his home — the corporation says its journalists acted in good faith. the brexit battle continues as theresa may prepares to address and in sport, the former wales captain sam warburton has retired from rugby at the age ofjust 29. wadden hadn't played since leading the british and irish lions to that, series against new zealand in 2017. selling wembley stadium for £600 million would help grassroots football, some according to some. and team blue sky have been controlling the tour de france today as it heads towards its first mountaintop finish. i will be back with more on those stories for you at around half past. theresa may has been defending her brexit strategy,
2:23 pm
after days of parliamentary battles over key legislation. at the last prime minister's questions before the summer break, labour accused the government of being in complete chaos. tory divisions were on show today, with one brexiteer mp, accusing mrs may of wanting to remain in the eu. our political correspondent iain watson reports. ifa if a week is a long time in politics, ten days is an absolute yawn. treason act and hired her cabinet was behind —— theresa may declared her cabinet was behind her brexit plan but now she's facing chaos in the commons. the government has sunk into a mire of chaos and division. the agreement that was supposed to unite the cabinet led to the cabinet following apart within 48 hours. at pmqs, jeremy corbyn
2:24 pm
highlighted conservative divisions but the prime minister focused on her differences with labour.|j but the prime minister focused on her differences with labour. i will end free movement committee wants to keep it. i want us out of the customs union, he wants us in. i wa nt customs union, he wants us in. i want us out of the single market, he wa nts want us out of the single market, he wants us in. i want us to sign around trade steals, he wants to hand them over to brussels. i will have ruled out a second referendum, he won't. —— i have ruled out. have ruled out a second referendum, he won't. -- i have ruled out. many in the labour party are angry with a handful of brexit supporting mps in their ranks who voted with the government last night and helped theresa may avoid defeat in a crucial vote. but as has been clear from the commons today, very serious divisions remain inside the prime minister's own party. order! a dozen conservative mps who backed remain in the referendum unsuccessfully rebelled last night to try to keep britain ina rebelled last night to try to keep britain in a customs union. they say the threat of an early election reduced the size of their rebellion.
2:25 pm
there was a very considerable whipping operation last night and that were made that there would be a vote of confidence in government if this failed. but many long-standing relief campaigners believe the plan the prime minister agreed at chequers keeps britain close to the eu and someone to oust her. —— leave campaigners. at what point was it decided that brexit remains remain? brexit continues to mean brexit! of his other things can get any worse for theresa may... what your plan for theresa may... what your plan for brexit, mr johnson? for theresa may... what your plan for brexit, mrjohnson? the former foreign secretary will give a speech in the commons this afternoon. the prime minister left the commons for a number of high—profile meetings at westminster but she seems determined not to depart permanently. now more from our chief political correspondent, vicki young at westminster. it rather testy atmosphere at times today on brexit? yes, interesting that the toughest
2:26 pm
question for theresa may came from her own side and really, what andrea jenkyns said there sums up the problem the prime minister has. there are many who agree with andrea jenkyns, there was the brexiteer side of the party, that the compromise that theresa may has come up compromise that theresa may has come up with is effectively about the same as remaining within the eu. the problem is on the other side of the ardsmen, there are many who think that now, it is not workable, you might as well stay in and be closer to the european union. so this is the dilemma that theresa may finds herself in, were her compromise doesn't seem to be pleasing anybody, 01’ doesn't seem to be pleasing anybody, or labour. the question is, is she willing to back away? jeremy corbyn says her white paper, that chequers paper, is obsolete. she says it is not. she's insists it is the only workable compromise to get through all this and deliver what she would say on brexit by controlling immigration, controlling borders. of
2:27 pm
course, the other question is whether anyone can trying a further to change her mind on all of this and stepan boris johnson. to change her mind on all of this and stepan borisjohnson. he and the next hour so will be making a resignation speech. this is pretty unusual. it doesn't happen very often that all cabinet ministers are allowed to stand up and make this personal statement, not many choose to do so. david davis, for example, the brexit excluded not. but boris johnson is. many people are trying to anticipate what he will do. i think it is unlikely he will launch a personal attack on the prime minister, she won't be in the chamber to you it, but he will certainly attack her policy on brexit which will be a pretty undermining for her. one other former cabinet ministerjust undermining for her. one other former cabinet minister just told undermining for her. one other former cabinet ministerjust told me there will be many conservatives listening to it every word boris johnson has to say, seen whether it gives him the green light to put in letters to the 1922 committee, that mechanism by which they can try to remove trees in may. they need 48 letters, rumours have been going on for weeks now, of course no one
2:28 pm
knows, only one man knows, the magic charge of the tour and he's not telling anybody. —— to try to remove theresa may. and labour anti—semitism causing issues by the party again? yes, we have had a labour resignation today, john woodcock, who has been a labour mp for many yea rs, very who has been a labour mp for many years, very much a critic ofjeremy corbyn. he has decided to leave the party and says that anti—semitism has been tolerated in the party. he do have also been reports of an argument last night between margaret hodge, very senior mp, and jeremy corbyn in which she was alleged to have set a list of carbon, using an expletive, that he was an anti—semite and a racist. —— said to mr corbyn. she has denied using the swear word. what has happened since is that a senior labour spokesman has said that action will be taken against margaret hodge. it's saying that it was clearly unacceptable
2:29 pm
between colleagues. they won't say what action will be taken but in some ways, thisjust what action will be taken but in some ways, this just really fans the fla mes some ways, this just really fans the flames again of this divisive argument within the party. we have in the past had many labour mps get up in the past had many labour mps get up and say that they have been the victims of anti—semitism and they just don't think thatjeremy corbyn is doing enough to tackle it. thank you very much. police investigating the wiltshire novichok poisonings that that left a woman dead and a man seriously ill are searching a city centre park. dawn burgess and charlie rowley visited the queen elizabeth gardens in salisbury before they collapsed. our correspondent duncan kennedy is there. what takes in particular to this again, duncan? well, it's part of many, many investigations going on, not only here in salisbury itself but also in amesbury, about seven miles away. that's the place where charlie rowley lived, where the police
2:30 pm
believe that the poisoning by novichok took place. the small bottle was found at his flat last wednesday and the police believe that was the source of the novichok poisoning. but the investigation is not only going on at the flat there but also here in salisbury, and you're right. this morning and number of officers in this park, right in the heart salisbury, down on their hands and knees, checking things out, to find out exactly why they're here and join by the deputy chief constable wiltshire police. why were you officers out on some numbers here this morning in this playground behind us here and elsewhere in this park? today we started up and searched as part of the overall operation. members of the overall operation. members of the public are aware that we have another accordance both here in salisbury and also in amesbury. we are aware that this particular location is a location that charlie enstone visited the day before they came ill —— riley and dawn, so as pa rt came ill —— riley and dawn, so as part of that we are undertaking a search for seven days to go through all the parkland to see whether not there is anything that is linked to
2:31 pm
there is anything that is linked to the investigation and we will keep an open mind in relation to that. but also and importantly, when we actually release this particular location, we want to be able to do so with the public comfort that we have been the tickets around making sure there's not any risk at particular location. do you think this is where charlie or dawn found that small bottle with the novichok in question at we were clear last week when we announce that item had been found that we still don't know. we are continuing to build a picture. we don't have specific information or intelligence to this particular location but we keep an open mind, and our sworn civility is to be thorough, meticulous, to make sure each part of this part is searched. we will do that at every location and that public confidence bit that when we return this to open parkland again, the public can be confident we have removed things such as waste and rubbish that are actually there, and they can come back to things like they can come back to things like the playpark, which we will do a fingertip search on, and be
2:32 pm
confident there is no risk or concern of risk. briefly, rayo also still saying there is no guarantee there might not be more novichok in some location or another? that is what we said last week and we remain in that position. again, we have to be intelligence and information led by this. we're looking at the locations charlie dawn went to, each of those we are meticulously searching to see if there is anything that can help the investigation and also to make sure the public are safe when they return to normal public use. mr mills, you very much indeed. dawn sturgess of course died ten days ago, the postmortem took place yesterday, we don't have the results yet. so far as charlie rowley is concerned, still in hospital in a serious condition but in a stable condition as well. time for a look at the weather forecast with chris fawkes. that looks like we will learn something about river systems first? we will talk about meanders and jet streams but i am also working on my
2:33 pm
telepathy skills. i will try and make you think of a uk soap just by showing you this picture here. how is that working? even i can work that out. east enders, big river meanders, and the atmosphere works very much like rivers do. they take these big meanders where they get a bit slow and lazy, low—level parts across the south—east of england, the land is pretty flat so the rivers take these big meandering paths, and eventually these big meanders, if they get big enough, the river thinks i can't be bothered to go around that path it is a bit ofa to go around that path it is a bit of a fat and instead just goes in a straight line and you get this cut—off flow, oxbow lake. that is rivers. this will happen in the atmosphere, right over the uk, and it will play havoc with the forecast in terms of exactly where we will get rain around. i will show you the atmosphere, here it is. thejet strea m atmosphere, here it is. thejet stream is the thing that makes and moves our areas of high and low pressure. when we get these big
2:34 pm
dips, we have big meandersjust like those rivers, when those meanders get really big, this happens. you get a little cut—off local instead of the wind is blowing this way, they actually blow exactly the opposite direction. the front will slow down, the amount of rain you get will change and also the area that could get showers will change and this is what we are battling with at the moment towards the end of the week. so what happens to that independent little circle? of the week. so what happens to that independent little circle ?m of the week. so what happens to that independent little circle? it can stay in the atmosphere for quite a number of days because at this point, when this has happened, it is just like the river. the river cubby bothered going round those big loops and so will start cutting off and going across northern europe, leaving that area of spinning air. when we get cyclonic spin in the atmosphere like that, finally enough it encourages a rise, causing plans to form and we get the rain. so it isa to form and we get the rain. so it is a really important feature. the
2:35 pm
other thing is computer models are no good at working out when exactly that will happen, and it is really important for our weather. that will happen, and it is really important for our weatherlj that will happen, and it is really important for our weather. i can talk about this all afternoon but i will get told off, cider to ask you what impact it will have us.|j will get told off, cider to ask you what impact it will have us. i will show you the friday chart in just a moment but before we get there, we have a reasonable day of weather, some cloudy spells, and ace catherine of showers. over the next couple of days, more of the same, the weather generally warming up a bit, some cloud but some warm spells of sunshine. the chance of showers increases during the end of the week partly due to thatjet increases during the end of the week partly due to that jet stream phenomenon and i showed you. through the rest of the afternoon, plenty of showers across wales, into the midlands, north west england but heavier showers are across southern scotland, particularly the southern uplands. 21 to 25 degrees for most of us, some sunny spells break in through the cloud at times. overnight tonight any showers around will tend to just overnight tonight any showers around will tend tojust fade overnight tonight any showers around will tend to just fade away, we will be left with patchy cloud, some clear spells, a quiet night of
2:36 pm
weather, temperatures slowly easing down to between ten and 15 degrees. thursday is another pretty straightforward day of weather really. quite a bit of cloud at times across southern parts of inman and wales but there will be some spells of sunshine and probably fewer showers. given more sunshine, it will be a warm day for england and wales with light winds, the north—west of the uk a weather front approaching, quite a rare feature this summer. they will be bringing somewhat weather to western scotland by being the day, but in england and wales it will be another very warm one, temperatures mid to high 20s, depending how much sunshine we see. that jet stream trick will happen depending how much sunshine we see. thatjet stream trick will happen on friday. what will happen, we will get our rain into scotland, northern ireland and north—west england, i am pretty sure that will happen. but the question is across east anglia and south—east england. you can see in these charts, it is dry but if that jet stream changes in these charts, it is dry but if thatjet stream changes its pattern we could end up getting some big thunderstorms across east anglia and south—east england, 30 millimetres of rain, or half a month's
2:37 pm
south—east england, 30 millimetres of rain, or half a months worth of rain possible injust half an hour, which could cause problems with localised flooding. we could even see some rain in southern wales and south—west england, so those of a kind of uncertainties we are looking at because of that change in the jet stream. as we go on through friday evening at the first part saturday, though showers will tend to push eastward, they might linger across eastern england even into the first pa rt eastern england even into the first part of saturday because that log of cyclonic li spinning air isjust close by. as we go on through the weekend we will see the weather becoming drier, brighter and warm with fewer showers around, so an improving weather picture, there are just some differences in the models that we may well see for friday and the first part of saturday as well. we will keep you up—to—date. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
2:38 pm
12 boys, who were freed, along with their football coach, from a flooded cave in thailand, have been released from hospital, and talked about their ordeal — they said their rescue was a "miracle." sir cliff richard has been awarded an initial £210,000 in damages, after a winning a privacy case against the bbc over its coverage of a police raid on his home. the bbc is looking at appealing the decision, saying it's journalists acted in good faith. theresa may has clashed withjeremy corbyn over brexit negotiations in the final session of pmqs before it breaks for summer. she's due to address conservative backbenchers later. police investigating the grenfell tower fire have interviewed three people under caution, as they consider whether offences including gross negligence manslaughter, corporate manslaughter
2:39 pm
and breaches of the health and safety act have been committed. sport, now, on afternoon live, with chris mitchell. what seems to me like a rather premature retirement from rugby. yes, 29 does seem very young, not many saw this coming. sam warburton, the welsh hero, has retired from professional rugby. there will be a lot of disappointed people out there, the former wales and british tyra nts there, the former wales and british tyrants orton lions captain was in training the cardiff blues at that had not played since leaving the lines that trawled series against new zealand last year. he was expected comeback but he has had me and neck problems and it seems they have ruined his plans. he was the winner of 74 wales caps, five for the lions. he said this in a statement, unfortunately the lions. he said this in a statement, u nfortu nately after the lions. he said this in a
2:40 pm
statement, unfortunately after a long period of rest and rehabilitation, the decision to retire from rugby has been made with my health and well—being as a priority. the wales and lions coach warren gatland said it was hugely disappointing news. warburton was a huge figure at the welsh side, never shied away from a thumping tackle, he led them to the 2012 six nations victory, and in 2013 captain the lions to a series win over australia. that was the tourist‘s first test series triumph in 16 yea rs, first test series triumph in 16 years, so a huge figure, massive in wales, but also to rugby as a whole. and the sale of wembley, a parliamentary committee meeting to discuss that. £600 million! that a lot of money, isn't it? the purple association is hoping to convince the government select committee today that selling wembley stadium isa today that selling wembley stadium is a good idea. why? they say it will benefit grassroots football, something they believe needs urgent attention. i spoke to andy swiss our
2:41 pm
sports correspondent, who explained the stance of the fa. it is a chance for them to outline the benefits as they see it that selling wembley would have the grassroots game. the fa say at the moment only one in three pitches at grassroots level is of adequate quality, one in six matches they say are called off because of poor pitches. at the moment the fa and its partners invest around £30 million a year in community facilities. they say that by selling wembley would unable them to more than treble that figure to around £100 million a year. so what will happen at parliament this afternoon? we will hear a range of viewpoints, the former international gary neville will be giving evidence. he was particularly outspoken back in april, when times this potential sale first came to light. he said back in april the idea was absurd, he said it was short—term play that would be regretted forever. we will also hear evidence from the fa chief executive martin glenn, also from sports
2:42 pm
minister tracey crouch. obviously the potential sale of the home of ingush football is a pretty emotive issue so we could be in for a pretty lively afternoon. in the last half hour or so we've been hearing from the new chelsea manager maurizio sarri. he's been introduced as antonio conte's replacement at stamford bridge. sarri was was unable to give guarantees over the futures of eden hazard and thibaut courtois amid speculation the belgian pair could leave this summer. sarri's also taked about his disinterest in the transfer market. translation: i think that i am one of the few managers who is bored by the transfer market. i don't want to talk about transfer market, and i am not that interested in it. i think that our task, as managers, is growing the players that we have.
2:43 pm
maurizio sarri talking through an interpreter, i hasten to add. one other line of football news to bring you and liverpool have agreed a fee in the region of £66 million with roma for the brazilian goalkeeper allison. that would be a record for a keeper, if that were to go through. that is it from me, i will be back a little bit later. sir cliff richard has won his high court privacy case against the bbc, over its coverage of a police raid on his home. the singer's been awarded more than £200,000 in damages, with further damages to be decided later. he'd claimed the bbc‘s reporting of the 2014 raid, which was part of an investigation into historical child sex allegations, was a "serious invasion" of privacy. high courtjudge mrjustice mann said sir cliff had privacy rights in respect of the police investigation. the bbc infringed those rights without a legaljustification. it did so in a serious way and also in a somewhat sensationalist way. the singer walked out of court saying "i'm choked up,
2:44 pm
i can't believe it, it's wonderful news". with me me now is the tv presenter gloria hunniford, who gave evidence during the case, as a close friend of sir cliff richard. thank you, gloria, very much for coming in. pleasure. tell us what the impact has been on circlet of this case hanging over him personally and professionally. you have got to remember it has been for yea rs by have got to remember it has been for years by one month, and £4 million to lawyers in total of torture for him. iwas to lawyers in total of torture for him. i was in court today he gave his evidence, he said, his words, when the bbc did to me what they did,i when the bbc did to me what they did, i thought that my career and my life was over, and he fell to his knees and just went into buckets of tea rs. knees and just went into buckets of tears. and what i've noticed, i have known cliff and nearly 50 years as a friend, and there is no doubt about it, there was a point a few years backin it, there was a point a few years back in particular when he was like skin and bone. if he gave you a hug,
2:45 pm
he was just skin and bone. if he gave you a hug, he wasjust skin skin and bone. if he gave you a hug, he was just skin and bone, and today in court, i watched him going to face the cameras, and he was really shaken today. there was no revelling in it, i thought that there might have been a bit morejoy in it, i thought that there might have been a bit more joy on in it, i thought that there might have been a bit morejoy on his part because he had won his case, but in fa ct because he had won his case, but in fact he was very, very emotional about it, and healy chouly couldn't speak when he went outside the court. i think it will take a while for it to sleep in, after four years of day and night torture for him, that he has a tube on this case. how important will it be that in retrospect there are things we would have done differently, said the director of the bbc? allan he was looking for an apology, the police apologised quite early on, and they have paid up damages, £300,000, and another 300,000 coming, when you add that to the 210,000, it will be just under a million but still very far off the 4 million he has had to pay
2:46 pm
personally. as cliff says himself, i have the money to do it, but a lot of people in my situation did not and lost the house and so on. paul gamba genie was also in the courtroom, and he said one man's win is for all really. so i think this is for all really. so i think this isa is for all really. so i think this is a landmark case and i think it eventually change the law. which brings us to the issue of privacy versus freedom of speech, and press freedoms in particular, because the bbc feels it may have a chilling effect on journalists's efforts to try to do their work in future. what concerns do you have? he did not fight this case on freedom of the press, that was never an issue, it was purely on the privacy aspect, the fact that he felt totally invaded. i think at the beginning, this is only my assessment of watching tv, at the beginning when cliff was accused, people were going, my goodness, cliff richard has been accused of sexual offences. they did not particularly notice,
2:47 pm
they did not, although it was shown at the time, the camera going in through the window, but as one lawyer said, the fua the fact that police were holding up underwear and you could see right into his house for cliff was a total invasion of the sea, and he only ever went into that flat again five minutes and then he sold it completely, so that how deeply he felt. i know from a personal point of view he has been distraught. he has just personal point of view he has been distraught. he hasjust been thinking about it night and day, waking up in the middle of the night, and he told me that he prayed every night that the truth would out, and i think that is a very important thing. so if it is not about press freedoms then, is it a matter of degree? if a public figure except there will be a certain public interest in their lives, where does their privacy start?|j where does their privacy start?” think it depends what happens. in this case what was mainly cited was the fact the camera went through his window. i personally have never seen that, and i am a fair age myself, i
2:48 pm
have never seen a camera go through someone's window and show the police looking for reading through the draws. i have never seen that and i think this was one of the strong points of this particular case. legally he did not fight it on the freedom of the press. you say it could lead to a change in the law, what sort of changed to you envisage, bearing in mind as a broadcaster you also no doubt that you the freedom of the press? of course, but as paul gamba genie's said, one man's win is all because i think it is really unfair for example under the law at the moment that the other parties making a force accusation in this case doesn't get named, however cliff has had to live with it for four years, and so what really, vague, paul gamba genie and so on, they want to band together and see that neither party is named until someone is charged, and that seems to be a fair way forward. but i think this is certainly a step in the right direction. gloria hunniford, thank you for coming in. video streaming services such as netflix and amazon now have more
2:49 pm
subscribers in the uk than traditional pay tv services, like sky and virgin, according to new data from ofcom. the media regulator says british tv will have to change the way it operates to compete with the internet giants. our arts correspondent david sillito reports. this was far from scientific, but the results do reflect something of today's research. we asked people to pick a favourite. one or two plumped for sky and the bbc, more went for youtube. i watch it every single day. but the clear winner — especially with the young — was netflix. iam i am netflix too. subscriptions for online video streaming services such as netflix and amazon prime now exceed those for traditional pay—tv operators such as sky and virgin. viewing of traditional tv services has dropped by more
2:50 pm
than 40% amongst the young, and ofcom says british broadcasters need to work together if they are going to compete. we would love to see british broadcasters, the bbc, working collaboratively with itv, channel 4 and channel 5, so they have got that scale to compete globally, making shows together, co—producing great shows that all of us can watch. creating a british netflix — a british amazon? i think it would be great to see a british netflix. the average 20—something now watches an hour a day of youtube. the one group whose habits haven't changed much are people over the age of 65, who still watch an average of more than five and a half hours of traditional tv a day. the average age of viewers to bbc 1, 2 and itv now over 60. rachel is here and there will be telling us about
2:51 pm
the business use but first a look at the business use but first a look at the headlines. the young thai footballers who were trapped in a cave describe the "miracle" moment divers found them for the first time. sir cliff richard is awarded an initial £210,000 at the high court in damages for the bbc‘s coverage of a police raid on his home — the corporation says its journalists acted in good faith. after narrowly avoiding defeat in two key votes, the brexit battle continues as theresa may prepares to address conservative mps. for a third month in a row uk inflation remains at 2.4%. the june figure comes as a surprise to some analysts, who had been predicting a rise. google is slapped with a record £3.8 billion over its android operating system. the fine follows a three—year investigation by the european commission — more on this in a moment. blue skies ahead for easyjet, after the budget carrier announced a 14%jump in revenues in the third quarter to £1.6 billion. easyjet also announced it will complain to the european commission about strikes by french air traffic
2:52 pm
controllers, which caused thousands of their flights to be cancelled. google hit with a rather large fine? yes, £3.8 billion. yes ? and the issue here is not a case of whether they can afford it ? that is not a problem — google's parent alphabet held cash reserves totalling nearly $103bn at the end of march — but google don't believe they have done anything wrong. the european commission have spent three years looking into android — that's the os or mobile operating system devised by google — which many of us have on our phone and tablets. the commission claim that google have given themselves an unfair advantage when it comes to what internet search engine people use — because they used various techniques to get manufactures to pre—install their systems — the google search app and the google browser, chrome.
2:53 pm
so that is the search engine people use and the european commission says has given it an unfair advantage. let's talk to our reporter paul blake on the floor of the nyse — paul — the issue here is that google's systems were pre— i nstalled on phones and tablets — but that doesn't stop users accessing other search engines does it? exactly right, it comes down to the pre—installed applications when you buy your phone you from the manufacturer. people sympathetic to google's point of view say at the end of the day nothing about this stops anyone from downloading another browser or search service, they say at the end of the day it is just the default. the eu would argue at the end of the day only 1% of users are actually downloading an
2:54 pm
alternative search app and 10% downloading an alternative browser. the eu also argue that matters because 80% of phones in europe and around the world are based on android, the google operating system, and by making that the default and by customers being somewhat apathetic to look at and not going money is getting fuelled back into google's add services, which david wiese to be free. back into google's add services, which david wiese to be freem back into google's add services, which david wiese to be free. it is not the first big fine against google, reminders of the previous one and how google reacted to both of these finds? google and the eu are doing battle on three different fronts, there was a case injune 2017 when the eu find google for its shopping related services, the issue was how google was placing its services at the top of search results, so if you search for something that was a product you wa nt something that was a product you want to buy, google's shopping services came up want to buy, google's shopping services came up at the top and the eu said that is unfair, you are using the dominance of your search
2:55 pm
engine to back—up your shopping services. there was a big fine, $3 billion. the other one gun that is still ongoing. google's add services, we could see an outcome in the coming months and years. how has google's parent company, alphabet, how are they trading? wall street seems to be shrugging it off largely, the premarket trading this morning it was down about a quarter ofa morning it was down about a quarter of a percent. morning it was down about a quarter ofa percent. i morning it was down about a quarter of a percent. i checked before we came on air, google was at early, so it seems to be waiting to see what goes on here, waiting to see what happens. google says they will appear the is appeal the decision and google is fighting back saying you are wrong to the european commission, but see how that changes over the coming days and weeks and months and how google will react. if it dips into google's advertising revenue , it dips into google's advertising revenue, its main lifeline, or if you start to see further finds from the eu which the eu has said if google does not come into compliance with its decision within 90 days,
2:56 pm
they could start taking up to 5% of google's global daily revenue, so investors will be watching to see what happens in the coming weeks and months as this potentially affects google's bottom line. take us back a little bit, the european commission have said google use various techniques to ensure that manufacturers pre—installed their operating systems. how did google insure that happened ? operating systems. how did google insure that happened? it comes down to google owns the android operating system. they made a version of it and some of the code out there that people could what they call fork, which means make your own flavour of the android operating system, but google's version of it has come to dominate, and it has done that by striking deals with phone manufacturers... at is go live to the house of commons where the former foreign secretary boris johnson is speaking. have rallied the world against russia's barbaric use of chemical weapons with an unprecedented 28 countries joining
2:57 pm
together to expel 153 spies in protest at what happened in salisbury. we have rejuvenated commonwealth with a superb summit that saw zimbabwe back on the path to membership and angola now wanting to membership and angola now wanting tojoin, and as i leave, we are leading global campaigns against illegal wildlife trade and in favour of 12 years a slave the quality education for every girl, and we have the flag, the union flag and going up in nine new missions, in the pacific, the caribbean and africa, and more to come, so that we have overtaken france to boast the biggest diplomatic network of any european country. none of this, mr speaker, would have been possible without the support of my right honourable friend, the prime minister. everyone who has worked with her will recognise her courage and her resilience, and it was my privilege to collaborate with her in promoting global britain, a vision
2:58 pm
for this country that she set out with great clarity at lancaster house on january 17 with great clarity at lancaster house onjanuary 17 last with great clarity at lancaster house on january 17 last year. with great clarity at lancaster house onjanuary 17 last year. a country eager, as she said, notjust to do country eager, as she said, notjust todoa country eager, as she said, notjust to do a bold ambitious and, hence of free trade agreement with the eu out of the customs union, out of the single market, but also to do new free trade deals around the world. i thought it was the right vision then, i think so today. but in the 80 months that have followed, it is as though a fog of self—doubt has descended, and even though our friends and partners, like the lancaster house —— liked the lancaster house —— liked the lancaster house —— liked the lancaster house vision, it was what they were expecting from an ambitious partner, what they understood, even though the commentators liked it, and the markets liked it, my right honourable friend the chancellor i am sure observed the pound soared.
2:59 pm
we never actually turned that vision into a negotiating position in brussels, and we never made it into a negotiating offer. instead we do that, and we burned through our negotiating capital. we agreed to hand over a £40 billion exit feed with no discussion of our future economic relationship, we accepted the jurisdiction economic relationship, we accepted thejurisdiction of economic relationship, we accepted the jurisdiction of the european court, and worst of all we allowed the question of the northern ireland border, which had hitherto been assumed on all sides to be readily soluble, to become so politically charged as to dominate the debate. order, the statement by the right honourable gentleman must be heard, and by long—standing convention, it is heard with courtesy, and without tackling. mr borisjohnson. no one wants a hard border. you
3:00 pm
could not construct one if you tried. but there certainly can be different rules and north and south of the border to reflect the fact that our two jurisdictions. of the border to reflect the fact that our twojurisdictions. in of the border to reflect the fact that our two jurisdictions. in fact, there already are, there can be checks away from the border and technical solutions, as the prime minister rightly described at mansion house. in fact, there already are. when i and other colleague s proposed further technical solutions to make customs regulatory checks remotely, those proposals were never even probably examined, as if such solutions had become intellectually undesirable in the context of the argument. and somehow, after the december joint
3:01 pm
report, whose backstop arrangement we we re report, whose backstop arrangement we were told was provisional, never to be invoked, it became taboo to discuss technical fixes. so after 18 months of stealthy retreat, we have come from the bright certainties of lancaster house to the chequers agreement. you put them side by side. lancaster house said laws would once again be made in westminster. chequers says there will be an ongoing harmonisation with the common eu rule book. lancaster house said it would be wrong to comply with eu rules and regulations without a vote on what they are. chequers now makes us rules takers. lancaster house said we don't want anything that leaves us half in, half out. to hold onto
3:02 pm
bits of membership as we leave. chequers says we will remain in lockstep on goods and agri— food and much more besides, with disputes ultimately adjudicated by the european court of justice. ultimately adjudicated by the european court ofjustice. far from making laws in westminster there are large sectors in which ministers will have no power to initiate, innovate, or even deviate, after decades in which uk ministers have gone to brussels and expostulated against costly eu regulation, we are now claiming we must accept every jot for our economic health with no say of our own and no way of protecting our businesses and entrepreneurs from rules now and the future that may not be in their interests. the chancellor was asked to identify the biggest single
3:03 pm
opportunity from brexit. after some thought, he said, regulatory innovation. well, there may be some regulatory innovation post—brexit. it won't be coming from the uk and certainly not in those areas. we are volunteering for economic notjust in goods and agri— foods but we would be forced to match on the environment, social affairs and much else. we all want high standards. but it is hard to... i say to my honourable friend it is hard to see how the conservative government of the 80s could have done its vital supply—side reforms with those freedoms taken away. the result of accepting the eu rule books and over our proposals for a fantastical
3:04 pm
heath robinson customs arrangement is that we have much less scope to do free trade deals. as the chequers paper acknowledges. and which we should all acknowledge. because otherwise, if we pretend otherwise, we make the fatal mistake of underestimating the intelligence of the public. saying one thing to the eu about what we are doing and saying another to the electorate. and given that in important ways this is brexit in name only. i am of course unable to accept it, as i said in the cabinet session at chequers. i am said in the cabinet session at chequers. iam happy said in the cabinet session at chequers. i am happy now to speak out against and be able to do so. mr speaker, it is not too late to save
3:05 pm
brexit. we have time in these negotiations, we have changed tack once and we can change again. the problem is not that we failed to make the case for a free trade agreement of the kinds belt out at lancaster house, we have not even tried. we must try now, because we will not get another chance to get it right and it is absolutely nonsense to imagine, as i fear some collea g u es nonsense to imagine, as i fear some colleagues do, that we can somehow afford to make a botched treaty now and then break and reset the bone later. we have seen even in these talks how the supposedly provisional becomes eternal. we have the time andi becomes eternal. we have the time and i believe the prime minister has the support of parliament. remember the support of parliament. remember the enthusiasm for lancaster house
3:06 pm
and mansion house. it was clear last night there was no majority in this house for a return to the customs union. with goodwill and common sense we can address the concerns about the northern irish border and all of the borders. we have fully two and a half years to make the technical preparations, along with preparations for a world trade outcome. those preparations which should now accelerate. we should not and need not be stampeded by anyone. but letters again game explicitly for the glorious vision of lancaster house, a strong, independent self—governing britain genuinely open to the world, not the miserable permanent limbo of chequers, not the
3:07 pm
democratic disaster of ongoing harmonisation with no way out and no say for the uk. we need to take one decision now, before all others. that is to believe in this country and what it can do. because i can tell you the uk's admirers, and there are millions if not billions across the world, are fully expecting us to do what we said and to ta ke expecting us to do what we said and to take back control, and to be able to take back control, and to be able to set new standards for technologies in which we excel, to behave not as rules takers but as great independent actors on the world stage and to do free trade deals for the benefit and prosperity of the british people. that was the vision of brexit we fought for, that was the vision the prime minister rightly described last year. that is
3:08 pm
the prize that is still attainable. there is time. if the prime minister can fix that vision once again before us, i believe she can deliver a great brexit for britain, with a positive self—confident approach that will unite this party, unite this house and unite this country. order, i this house and unite this country. order, lam this house and unite this country. order, i am grateful to the... this house and unite this country. order, i am gratefulto the... boris johnson making his resignation statement. it is unusual for resigning cabinet ministers to do that but he clearly had a message she wanted to get across, partly i think to mps sitting around him and the standout phrase is it is not too late to save brexit. there will be some sitting around him that feel he is the person to save brexit, and we
3:09 pm
will have to see if they decide it is time to get rid of theresa may. as he went through the statements, the speeches theresa may made last year, lancaster house, mansion house speeches, her vision for brexit and then made the claim she deviated from that, as he put it the fog of self—doubt has descended. he said he was behind her when she said she wa nted was behind her when she said she wanted a certain kind of brexit and he now feels she has wrote back and it isa he now feels she has wrote back and it is a mistake and he said the government dithered. he's not naming her personally but undermining and criticising her own strategy on this. he said after 18 months of stealthy retreat the government needs to change tack and urges the prime minister to change her mind and he said if she is to do that she can bring forward the new vision, but the question is whether there are people in the tory party who think they need someone else at the helm. this is happened while theresa
3:10 pm
may is not in the commons, she is elsewhere, in front of the liaison committee, which is a committee made up committee, which is a committee made up of the chair men and women of the select committees. she will be in front of them taking questions at least two hours and she has fielded lots throughout the day on her brexit policy and after this she will speak to the backbenches. we can listen to what she is saying to the committee. prime minister, we have read that in the white paper and understand. in that case, what i am going through is what you understand but when parliament came toa understand but when parliament came to a decision, parliament would take into account a number of aspects of the operation of the future relationship and also include commitments to northern ireland. finally, can you confirm the proposed facilitated customs arrangement, assuming it is agreed by the eu, will be ready to go by
3:11 pm
december 2020? the majority of what is required for the facilitated customs arrangement will definitely be in place by december 20 20. there isa be in place by december 20 20. there is a question as to the speed of the repayment mechanism being in place and so far the suggestion is it could take longer to be put into place. that is yet to be determined, the date at which that will be possible. the implementation will be quicker than the previous proposals of the max fac and customs partnership? the majority would be in place by december 20 20. now we have questions from the international trade committee. you are a survivor. you are doing well. the camp kicking down the road has beena the camp kicking down the road has been a successful policy. following
3:12 pm
the irish border issue, the irish independent said today is inevitable. is the hardboard are inevitable. is the hardboard are inevitable in ireland and of course its implications for everyone else. what we have set out in the chequers agreement and detailed in the white paper is a proposal for a facilitated customs agreement and the regulatory arrangements that would ensure we did not have a hard border between northern ireland and ireland. this is a factor we have considered throughout the process. we have been over the last two yea rs, we have been over the last two yea rs , we we have been over the last two years, we waited to trigger article 50 to do preparatory work and then we have worked on all of these elements in what is a complex set of negotiations and put forward a proposal that would deliver no hardboard. the hardboard is merely
3:13 pm
the eu- uk hardboard. the hardboard is merely the eu— uk border on the island of ireland and it will apply to every other border the uk shares. what would happen at dover and everywhere else? the proposal put forward, we have always said... this morning we heard the dutch are hiring 1000 more customs officers, preparing for difficulty. have you? everybody is and we are hiring more officers because we are preparing for all contingencies but the proposals put forward in the chequers agreement set out a plan for the future relationship on customs and certain areas of regulation with the european... trade with the eu, which would enable us not only to have a frictionless border between northern ireland and ireland but also between the uk and other member states. and ifi the uk and other member states. and if i may make this point, from the
3:14 pm
point of view of the irish economy, the east — west trade between ireland and great britain is a more significant element of their economy than the trade between northern ireland and ireland. you are out of the customs union and single market and you don't have orders?m the customs union and single market and you don't have orders? if you looked at the white paper and agreement in chequers, you will see the proposal is we no longer a member of the customs union, member of the single market, we put forward a proposalfor the of the single market, we put forward a proposal for the common of the single market, we put forward a proposalfor the common rule book ina a proposalfor the common rule book in a specific area of industrial goods and agri— food and the customs arrangement that can go alongside that, which would deliver frictionless borders. where else in the world does this exist? it is a novel idea, it does not, but i would sincerely hope you would not suggest the only approach the uk government can take to this is simply to say
3:15 pm
what else exists and what can we ta ke what else exists and what can we take out of that, rather than saying, what is the arrangement we think is best for the uk? let's put that forward and argue for that in negotiations. others might say pie in the sky. you triggered article 50 to leave in march 2019 and went to florence to ask for 24 months and the eu gave you another 21 months. do you have enough time for your novel ideas? yes, both sides are working to the same timetable and we will leave the eu on the 29th of march 2019. as you indicated, the implementation period, which enables business and government to prepare for the future relationship will end in 2020 and we are still working to the timetable of ensuring we have a
3:16 pm
withdrawal agreement and detail of the future relationship agreed by october, such that it can come before parliament. when this parliament and i think the same is true of the european parliament, when this parliament is asked to put the withdrawal agreement and implementation bill legislation through, they will want to know what the arrangements are for the future relationship, which is what we are working to. is us - uk trade deal still on the cards? yes. that is worth 0.2% of gdp. what does the government estimate of the to gdp on the eu option? 596? very often people look at this equation is if one substitutes for the other.” look at this equation is if one substitutes for the other. i ask for the estimated figure. you agreed the first figure very quickly. you
3:17 pm
stated the first figure of 0.2. what iam stated the first figure of 0.2. what i am looking at is ensuring we can both maintain a good trading relationship with the eu and build on that with improved trading relationships around the world. one of the things we will be doing is looking at continuity of agreements the eu already has with certain parts of the world where we are a member of those so there is no cliff edge for businesses involved, and then look to improve. 596 damage is what your government estimates, two and a half times the costs of the crash of 2008. to replicate that with an american agreement you would need 25—30 of those agreements to make up the difference. having bought and crashed the rolls—royce, you are going to the second—hand car shop to look for the best second—hand car for the uk. shop to look for the best second—hand carforthe uk. it
3:18 pm
shop to look for the best second—hand car for the uk. it will not make up for the damage you have chosen with your government over a quite hard brexit for the economic damage you are doing, is it? what we aren't doing is delivering on a vote taken by the british people. parliament voted 6—1 to give the british people a choice. i'm sorry, because the alternative to what you suggest is staying in the eu. you accept economic damage? i am not accepting that. you are talking about the position we are in in terms of the negotiations for leaving the eu. the reason we aren't doing that is we asked people what they wanted to do, they have said they wanted to do, they have said they wanted to do, they have said they want us to leave the eu. not in scotland. in delivering on it, we deliver on what people voted for, like an end to free movement, but ensuring we do it in a way to protect jobs, that is ensuring we do it in a way to protectjobs, that is what the chequers agreement delivers. home
3:19 pm
affairs. yvette cooper. can i return to the issue of the borders, on to the proposal for the facilitated customs agreement, are you proposing that eu countries will not have to collect that eu countries will not have to colle ct a ny that eu countries will not have to collect any additional or different tariffs for the uk? no, if you look at the concept of reciprocity is in the white paper. what we propose is there would be a formula arrangements so there would be a formula agreement for sums of money collected by the uk for the goods coming notjust to the uk but into the european union through the uk and a sum of money that would be related to those goods that would enter the european union destined for the united kingdom. it sounds complicated. it is not. what is
3:20 pm
happening at the border first, at our border, we will collect eu tariffs for goods heading to the eu. will we all will we not expect eu countries to collect our tariffs on goods destined to the uk? what we have put in the white paper and expect is eu countries, in fact the way the eu does this is not necessarily through individual countries in terms of the way payments are made, but that sums of money that would be relevant for goods entering the eu destined for the uk would be paid to the uk. there would be reciprocity in payments. if we have different levels of tariffs, it says clearly,
3:21 pm
in page 17, however the uk is not proposing that the eu applies the uk's proposing that the eu applies the uk's tariffs and trade policy at its border for goods intended for the uk. is that still the case? as you will see in the paragraph earlier, the uk proposes a tariff revenue formula taking account of goods destined for the uk entering via the eu and goods destined for the eu entering fired the uk. the important thing is there is reciprocity in the sums of money paid. i am asking about... what we are saying is a good would not enter the eu destined for the uk without the european union being expected, through the arrangement, money to be recognised as being due to the uk. suppose we
3:22 pm
have different tariffs, suppose we have different tariffs, suppose we have lower ta riffs of have different tariffs, suppose we have lower tariffs of goods coming from the us and europe as lower tariffs on goods coming from new zealand, for example. we would then collect the higher eu tariffs on goods coming from the us when they came in through liverpool or wherever, would we expect goods coming into the eu from new zealand much would we expect the eu to collect higher tariffs for us, or would we expect them to apply eu tariffs at the border? what i am saying and the paragraph says is this is not a question of somebody physically handing cash over at the border. the way we deal with this is a formula revenue agreement between the european union and united kingdom that would reflect goods... what was required for goods entering the eu destined for the uk, just as
3:23 pm
it would, the money relevant to the eu would reflect goods coming into the united kingdom and destined for the united kingdom and destined for the eu. payment still has to be made somewhere so if goods are coming in from new zealand and arrive at a port in spain, somewhere, and we have a higher tariffs on goods from new zealand, where is the higher tariff paid? when the goods arrive in spain or italy, or not paid when the goods arrive in spain or italy? there will be, as i say, there will bea there will be, as i say, there will be a formula agreement with the eu in terms of the sums of money. the importer, when today pay? importers will be under a requirement to ensure they have paid the correct tariffs. to spain or italy? what matters is what money comes to the uk. ijust don't know how we are going to get it. there are two macro
3:24 pm
elements. we are having a tariff revenue formula, an agreement with the eu that relates to the sums of money that are due from one side to the other in the movement of goods. it only applies to what happens between the governments. when is the importer paying extra money? when the goods arrive in spain or italy, orare the goods arrive in spain or italy, or are we going to have to charge them when the goods get transferred across from spain, across to the uk? how do we make sure the porter pays the fair tariffs? -- importer. there will be a requirement on businesses to ensure they pay the correct tariffs, what i am saying is the overall concern from the uk is surely to ensure the arrangement we
3:25 pm
have with european union is relevant to and reflects the flow of goods between both, the nature of tariffs that are relevant in different... relation to goods coming from different places, and that money is able to be exchanged between the two macro in relevant sums of money. you cannot exchange money that has not been paid. i do not understand, when does the importer pay the extra tariffs? if we have different harris in the uk compared to the eu because asi in the uk compared to the eu because as i understand it that is what you wa nt as i understand it that is what you want to happen, you want to be outside the common external tariff, you want different tariffs to the re st of you want different tariffs to the rest of the eu. if we have the different tariffs, where is the money going to be paid? what matters to us in terms of the first of all one reason to have different tariffs is being able to lower tariffs so you can encourage trade around the world. you are assuming there will
3:26 pm
be circumstances in which the uk will say we will charge higher ta riffs will say we will charge higher tariffs than the eu is charging. what matters is we have an agreement such that for goods crossing the border the money paid between the european union and the united kingdom reflects those goods. this is part of the proposal put forward to the eu. and there will be elements of this we will be discussing and negotiating in terms of how that tariff revenue agreement would be entered into. here is the problem. i would be entered into. here is the problem. lam baffled would be entered into. here is the problem. i am baffled as to what will happen and how differential tariffs will work. i am more baffled because we have this statement in the white paper that says that we are not going to have the eu applying the uk tariffs and trade policies of the border, but you accepted an amendment, clause 36,
3:27 pm
yesterday, two days ago, which requires reciprocity and the government will account hmrc for duties and taxes collected in that country on a reciprocal basis we don't have reciprocal arrangements, whether it is our border or in spain and italy. isn't the problem the reason we are going around in circles is because you have a problem that you are not being straight about the language and what it is you propose? everybody is confused and as a result nobody trusts what the government is doing. i have been straight about the language. notjust i have been straight about the language. not just straight i have been straight about the language. notjust straight in saying it but it is published in the white paper. what we propose is a reciprocal agreement with the eu in relation to the exchange of tariffs paid on external borders the goods entering the uk destined for the eu and goods entering the eu destined for the uk. and you hope it will be in place and working by 2021? good
3:28 pm
luck. i have answered a question from our point of view. the future customs arrangement will. .. from our point of view. the future customs arrangement will... the facilitated customs agreement will be... it is baffling. i am facilitated customs agreement will be... it is baffling. iam not sure what is baffling about exchanging sums of money relevant to both parties, but there we are. norman lamb, science and technology committee. we should be able to agree on the importance of science collaboration but you will understand there are people in the science community deeply anxious about the uncertainty we have. you helpfully talked about a far reaching science and innovation packed, and accord, i do not think it makes much different that you call it that, but we have not heard
3:29 pm
about the progress made, where has it got to and what is the timescale for getting this completed so we can have certainty for the science community? we have been trying to give certainty to the science community in terms of what is in existence in the horizon 22 projects. they are worried about the future and planning and research projects. i recognise that but i wa nted projects. i recognise that but i wanted to get that on the table. we have had exchanges with the commission, positive exchanges on the science and innovation front. what we propose in the accords does need to be agreed as part of the future relationship and in negotiation will doing there. the timetable as i said is we are working to have that agreed by autumn, october is the date originally set. you hope you could have the far reaching accord in
3:30 pm
place by the autumn? what we will have in the autumn, working to is agreement on the overall relationship and within that the science and innovation accords would be part of that. i would hope... what i am working for is sufficient detail that people have the confidence of knowing where they will stand. that will not be an absolutely full legal text on every aspect. you said you wanted to include as your ambition to remain a participator in what will be the rise in europe, the —— horizon europe, the successor programme, and it is vitally important, and doctor patrick vallance on the radio this morning indeed said, keeping continuity of science collaboration is an absolutely key aim that we must keep right. is it still your ambition to be part of a rise in
3:31 pm
europe? we do want to, it is still an ambition, we want to make sure that we have those, and we want to have a look at the question of horizon europe. we need to look at exactly what that will entail for the future. we know the details of the future. we know the details of the progress which we participated in... and we also need to know as pa rt in... and we also need to know as part of the negotiations with the european union, we will be discussing of course what the basis ofa uk discussing of course what the basis of a uk outside the eu involvement in horizon europe could be. as you will be very well aware, there are countries outside the european union that are able to participate in these programmes. and you have talked about the need for an appropriate level of influence because we are one of the biggest contributors to the programme. what
3:32 pm
does that mean because the eu appears to be clear that third countries won't have a vote, and if thatis countries won't have a vote, and if that is the case does that mean we won't be part of horizon europe? the point is these will all be part of the negotiations, exactly what would the negotiations, exactly what would the package of involvement look like? we have that ambition we think actually that make sense of the european union as well, given the world leading nature of many of our universities, and much of the research that is done here in the uk, but we obviously need to negotiate as to what those para meters negotiate as to what those parameters for our involvement would be. in all of the evidence we have taken, the thing people are most concerned about is people, the flow of the brightest and the best, i think you have described them as, and that all career levels, it is not just the top, and that all career levels, it is notjust the top, but it is the lab technicians, the students, the postgraduates and so forth, and it
3:33 pm
is not just postgraduates and so forth, and it is notjust in academia, it is in commerce and industry as well. are you committed to ensuring we have an immigration system in place, both for eea citizens but also the wider world, that enables us in a seamless way to get the best people to work in this country for the good of our economy? we have always been committed to ensure how the brightest and best can come to the uk. free movement will end when... but we're talking about skilled workers. but what we will be doing is to set out, and this will come before parliament obviously, the immigration rules that would apply if people coming from within the european union in the future once we have control of our immigration rules for people from the european union. obviously we have a set of rules that apply for those outside the eu at the moment, the migration advisory committee has been doing a piece of work and will be reporting later this year on the input and the
3:34 pm
contribution of the eu workers and impact of eu workers on the uk economy. that will provide an evidence base against which we can then bring forward the proposed immigration rules for the future. have you made any brakes on galileo, because this is a vitally important project that involves a lot of uk collaboration, a lot ofjobs are at sta ke collaboration, a lot ofjobs are at stake here, but apart from our security interests and the reason we are involved in it in the first place? earle there continues to be difficulties on galileo, we talk of the conditioner about them, but what we also doing alongside that is if we also doing alongside that is if we can't be a member of galileo in the way which we believe we should be and is important for our participation, then we are looking at doing that, taking a project ourselves, if you like, going it alone or potentially with others and not being part of galileo. but i recognise the significance of it. we come to the european scrutiny
3:35 pm
committee. prime minister, when and how did you in number ten make substantial and unexpected changes in the white paper proposals in the run—up to chequers? and did you or ollie robbins show the proposals to angela merkel and all the eu before showing them to the cabinet? if so, this prima facie would be, i would suggest, contrary to the ministerial and the civil service codes. did you ask the law officers for their opinion on the white paper, as required by the serial code before the chequers meeting, and if so, was this consultation with them, and i use the words in the ministerial code, in good time, given its critical, legal and constitutional importance, and if so when? first of all, can i lay on the head, there has been a suggestion i have seen
3:36 pm
that we actually took papers of the white paper and showed it to people outside of the united kingdom. we did not. you ask about the ideas that are in the white paper. in fa ct, that are in the white paper. in fact, ideas that are in the white paper, some of the ideas in the white paper that perhaps have caused most debate and discussion following the chequers agreement and the publication of the white paper, were ideas that were set out as potential issues for us to look at in the florence speech that i gave last september. there had been discussions about these throughout, and that was slightly fleshed out in the mansion house speech that i gave earlier this year, so those proposals were there and were considered and looked at by ministers. we then decided the route we would going to take, and spent some time discussing that with the
3:37 pm
european commission, and obviously, in terms of the negotiations with the european union, it became clear that that was not negotiable. alongside that of course we were looking at the customs arrangements in relation to the two options that had originally been on the table and then refining those two options to ensure we could deliver on the frictionless trade at the border and the no border with northern ireland. what became clear was that it was necessary to evolve the mansion house physician and there was discussion about that particular issue. the underlying concept was one that had been previously discussed, because it was there in the florence and then mansion house speeches. and the law officers? did you ask them for their opinion in good time as required by the ministerial code, and what was their response? as i know, sir william, you will know, we don't normally
3:38 pm
give in public details of law officers‘s opinions that are given to the government, but i can assure you that all those who needed to be involved in this, and who needed to look at this from their responsibilities, were involved. and that did include the law officers, asa that did include the law officers, as a matter of fact? as a matter of fa ct, as a matter of fact? as a matter of fact, i mean, the law officer sits around the cabinet table and somebody who is consulted through that process. thank you. the common rule book is an eu rule book. the former president of the efta court has recently in the last few days stated that under it and i quote, the uk would recognise that the ecj is supreme on the interpretation of the eu law,", and under the arbitration, independent arbitration system, we would agreed to refer questions to the ecj. the ecj will
3:39 pm
determine not only the interpretation but also the outcome of any disputes. now under the similar ukraine, georgia and moldova treaties, the ecj in practice decides, not the arbitrators, so given what the former president of the youth dear —— of the efta court stated, and i think it is generally understood he understands the staff very well, how on earth could you argue that the white paper does discontinue ecj jurisdiction, and how do you reconcile, as i asked you in the house the other day, the repeal of the 1972 act with the continuing application of the functions of the european court of justice to the uk, when as you now only too well, section three of the european commissions act 1972 is the jurisdiction of the european court over the uk jurisdiction of the european court overthe uk in jurisdiction of the european court over the uk in domestic law, and
3:40 pm
under the repeal act that is actually going to be repealed on exit day? we acknowledge in the white paper the role that the european court of justice white paper the role that the european court ofjustice has in being the determinant of the interpretation of european union law. and that is acknowledged in the white paper. but we will not be under thejurisdiction white paper. but we will not be under the jurisdiction of the european court of justice. under the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. through the proposals that are in here, as we say, in those cases where there isa we say, in those cases where there is a dispute, which involves the interpretation of eu law, and in the industrial goods ahki of course, there is a significant volume, a significant amount of case law already in existence in relation to the interpretation of those rules, many of which have been stable, have not changed for some time, then it will be a bit possible through those cases to ask for an opinion —— it will be possible to ask for an
3:41 pm
opinion from the eu on european law. the european court ofjustice will not determine any disputes that is in question at the time. the court of one party cannot be the arbiter, in terms of a dispute between two parties. obviously we have the hierarchy of determinations of disputes that takes place. the european court of justice, disputes that takes place. the european court ofjustice, by definition, as the arbiter of eu law, would have an influence, but it would have an influence in cases even when we had no deal with the european union. because if you were a business that was exporting to the european union, and doing so on the basis of eu rules, and there was a dispute, your importer for example raised a dispute about whether he had met those eu rules, the arbiter of that eu rules would be the european court of justice. of that eu rules would be the european court ofjustice. in terms of disputes braking before the court in the uk they would get uk courts, they would be determined by the uk courts. i under that is the
3:42 pm
trajectory of your answer but i still leave on the table the questions i have asked and i remain unconvinced that the moment, but we shall come to this no doubt in due course. i suspect sir william you andi course. i suspect sir william you and i may have some fairly lengthy discussions on some of these! chuckling we will have to be one to the next section, so the next chair is sir bernard dinkins, chair of the public administration and constitutional affairs committee. thank you very much, good afternoon, prime minister. good afternoon. the white paper talks about stepping up plans from no deal. so far there appears to have been some reticence about making announcements on the basis of no deal. what is the basis of when to announce for what is being done in preparation for no deal? there are two aspects we have looked at,
3:43 pm
the first is obviously the work that needs to be done by the government in determining the operations, and the second is the point at which it is important to ensure that others outside government who would need to be involved are able to have the information they need. i was going to... we're not yet on the debate later this afternoon but the secretary of state for exiting the eu be setting out today that over august and september we will be releasing a number of technical notifications to set out what uk citizens and businesses need to do ina no citizens and businesses need to do in a no deal scenario. so making much more public awareness of the preparations. we imagine there will be around 70 of those technical notices that will be issued. that is if you like taking a next step. cabinet agreed we needed to step up our no deal preparations but this is pa rt our no deal preparations but this is part of it, making those technical notices available to those who need
3:44 pm
to know that information. thank you. you have ruled out the option of negotiating and fta with the european union because they won't negotiate with us that the backstop, they won't countenance an fta without the backstop, that is correct, isn't it? yes, but this is where language is important. if we talk about a free trade agreement, then the european union has a single concept of what a free trade agreement is, so it is like canada, thatis agreement is, so it is like canada, that is a free trade agreement. what we're talking about in here is a much wider and more ambitious overall partnership with them. at its heart it is a free—trade area with the eu but that is why we don't use the term free—trade agreement, but you are right, the two options that were on the table from the eu we re that were on the table from the eu were on the one hand eu and free customs union, which i think would not reflect the vote, and on the other was a free—trade agreement
3:45 pm
that actually was less good than the canadian free—trade agreement, but with effectively the border down the irish sea. one of the reasons we have not gone for a canada plus plus plus free trade agreement is that they will not negotiate with us on they will not negotiate with us on the basis of northern ireland remaining in the same customs area as the rest of the united kingdom. they won't do that, will they? their proposal was for a free—trade agreement, which actually split northern ireland off great britain. so if we have a wto brexit without an agreement with an agreement, can you give us an assurance that will be on the basis of a wto brexit for the whole of the united kingdom and there is no question of splitting ireland from the rest of the united kingdom in these circumstances? well, i have been, i have said on many, well, i have been, i have said on any well, i have been, i have said on many, many occasions, that one of the targets, one of the games that i have in relation to the negotiations
3:46 pm
that we have is to ensure that we retain the united kingdom together. i believe that is important, i believe our union is very precious, soi believe our union is very precious, so i will certainly be working to ensure we are able to keep it together. as i said in response to the earlier questions... that's fine. in a no deal scenario will have to consider what action we take and others will have consider what action they take us to but the new deal planning is planning for an invisible frontier in northern ireland? the issue of what happens in relation to that is an element that we have to be looking at. the preparatory work that is being undertaken is being undertaken across a whole range of departments. the question is very simple, prime minister... and i am being careful in answering, because i have already a nswered in answering, because i have already answered a question like this and i
3:47 pm
don't want to be any misunderstanding between the answers i'm giving to the same question. misunderstanding between the answers i'm giving to the same questionm the government planning for an invisible is customs frontier in northern ireland, because you have to, that is part of the no deal planning? as we look at the no deal planning... it is not quite a yes. one of the elements we are looking at is that whole question of the border in northern ireland.” at is that whole question of the border in northern ireland. i don't think we will get any further on that one. for matters such as the regulation of chemicals, aviation, food safety and medicines, which the house of commons voted on yesterday, presumably no deal planning includes d raft presumably no deal planning includes draft legislation is in order to provide registration —— regulation of those markets, and when we see that legislation? no deal planning does involve looking at any legislative requirements that are needed for these points. identify a timetable for any required legislation at the moment. we have
3:48 pm
already put through some legislation thatis already put through some legislation that is relevant in a no deal scenario, in terms of our preparations for my for leaving the eu. but there is work that is undertaken for example in relation to, ensuring you would be looking for example there at probably a set of bilateral agreements, and the department for transport is looking at that. we will have to probably use the provisions under the eu withdrawal act, we will have to have regulations under that act in order to replace those functions, a let's hope they give us those bilateral agreements because it would be very destructive and vindictive if they did not. but when do you think we will see those draft regulations or d raft will see those draft regulations or draft bills? look, there will be a whole range of exit, a whole range
3:49 pm
of primary and secondary legislation that will be brought forward over time, obviously. as i have said, we have already passed the withdrawal act, the nuclear safeguards built, the sanctions bill, we are expecting to lay at least 40 eu exit sis before recess. the work is ongoing. there is a significant number of 51s that need to be laid in all of these areas. we come onto the transport committee now. prime minister, i am sure that like many people you are looking forward towards micro—jetting off on holiday, we even understand you are quite keen to get away early. obviously one of the things happens, when people come back from the holidays they want to book their flights for next year, and at the moment that is looking very uncertain. last autumn, the secretary of state was confident that the government would have made clear progress by this summer on aviation, but we have yet to see
3:50 pm
anything concrete. how close are we to having the necessary post brexit aviation arrangements in place to retain access to the eu single aviation market? well, as we have set out in the white paper, we want to as part of the future relationship explore options that would enable the uk to continue to participate in vinales, as a non—eu member state. we are moving at a pace in terms of negotiations in relation to the future framework, because we want that to be sufficiently complete by the autumn of this year. obviously full legal text to follow thereafter. we believe that what is in this white paper is the right package we can put forward, as i have said, what the department for transport are also doing is looking at what happen ina no also doing is looking at what happen in a no deal scenario and what arrangements would need to be in place in a no deal scenario to
3:51 pm
ensure planes can keep flying. grounded planes were in no one's interest, were told they were very unlikely, we are told now potentially autumn, does that mean september, october, november, does it mean december? what is holding up progress on a deal on this vital area? it will be part of the future relationship. the future relationship. the future relationship has been put to the european union, we started having discussions with the european union on the basis of that future relationship, the timetable everyone is working to is to have that future relationship agreed in detail by october, such that when this parliament looks at the withdrawal implementation bill, it will know what the details of the future relationship will be. that is the timetable will working too. when the secretary of state confirmed the aviation industry would need comfort that we are making progress by summer, last october he told us
3:52 pm
that, we are well into summer, shouldn't we have had some of those things nailed down by now? as i say, the department for transport is working with the aviation industry to ensure the necessary arrangements will be in place. we have made a specific proposal here as part of the future relationship, and that future relationship is being negotiated, as i said, with that timetable that was set, of october. you say it isn't everybody‘s interest to ensure the planes can still fly. it is notjust in our interest but in the interest of others in the eu 27. so we were promised progress by summer and now you're saying that has slipped to the autumn? diyas, i am saying this is an ongoing negotiation on a variety of levels. the future relationship is being negotiated with the european commission with a view to that by october. the department for transport have also
3:53 pm
been discussing with a number of countries the arrangements that could be put in place if there is no agreement on a multilateral basis with the united kingdom for those proposals, to ensure that whatever the outcome is that the planes can still fly. so are we in negotiations on bilateral agreement with each of the 27 eu countries, in addition to other international bodies? we are in discussion where it is necessary to be in discussion to ensure that if there is no deal, this is part of no deal preparations, that the planes can fly. but what we are proposing here is an arrangement that would enable that to continue to happen in the circumstances in which we have a deal, as part of the deal. alongside that, notjust the department for transport, the civil aviation authority is also working with the aviation sector, it is making the preparations necessary for it. obviously we propose
3:54 pm
participation, but it is making preparations as the surrey where it has to work outside. why has not worked with the us to provide some certainty to the airline industry and passengers? are the sticking point with the united states and if so what is holding up progress on the deal with the us on open skies? we have had a number of rounds of negotiations with the united states on this issue, we are confident we will be reaching an agreement with them. when are we expecting, wouldn't it have been good to have got that deal in place in order to put more pressure on the eu to reach agreement with the uk— eu arrangements? we will conduct the negotiations and to the arrangements in place when they need to be put in place. so does that mean when people come back from their holidays perhaps in a few weeks' time, they will be buying flights or they might
3:55 pm
be thinking about putting next yea r‘s be thinking about putting next year's holiday and they really don't know whether those flights will operate or not, whether there will be any arrangements in place to give them certainty about booking their holiday? as you will recall, firstly we look at what will be in place post—march 2019 but wheels have an impermanent asian period up to the end of december 2020, and we are looking to the relationship that will be in place at the end of that implementation period. some things could be put in place at an earlier stage within that implementation period. the department for transport is working with the aviation sector, with governments within and outside the european union, and also, as we have put forward, this is for negotiation with the eu 27 collectively. we are making preparations to ensure that whatever the circumstances, whatever happens in terms of the outcome of the
3:56 pm
negotiations, we still have those arrangements for planes to fly. so book your flight at your own risk, i think. moving on now to the environment, food and rural affairs committee. could afternoon prime minister, i think the answer is to come to the west country for the holiday and not worry about the flights. there must be times when you feel you are dammed if you negotiate with the eu and you are dammed if you don't, and sol actually very much welcome your decision at chequers, and the cabinet, and the white paper on agri— food because i think rules need to be dealt with. 30% of our manufacturing industry is food & drink, much of that food is grown here, and undervery drink, much of that food is grown here, and under very good welfare conditions and environmental conditions. also the northern ireland border i think the republic, much of the trade between the two is food, and it is perishable and it crosses border several times. but my actual question to you is on
3:57 pm
fishing. at the moment, the fishing industry contributes 1.3 billion to the economy, 34,000 jobs and 708,000 tonnes of fish are caught, and we do process a lot of that. so to our coastal communities and fishermen it is very important. but the issue is, as we leave the eu, and we become an independent coastal state, at the moment they take something like six times the amount of fish from our waters as we take from theirs, and so it is an ace card, if you like, in our pack as we negotiate. our fishermen want to make sure they get their feedback —— their fish back, and what they want to hear very clearly from you is that as we do these negotiations, they are not going to have their fish negotiated away, because we cannot only get that fish back but we can also actually build up our coastal communities, our processing, and it can be a really positive step from leaving the european union. so this
3:58 pm
isa leaving the european union. so this is a reassurance, i seek. chuckling first point, we will be out of the common fisheries policy, and we will come out of the common fisheries policy and we will be acting as an independent coastal state. of course, there are issues of fishing and then the question of fishing products, and the access to markets in relation to fishing products, but in terms of the access to waters that our fishermen would have, we wa nt to that our fishermen would have, we want to be sitting there is an independent coastal state, able to make, obviously as you will be aware, there are annual negotiations, not just, aware, there are annual negotiations, notjust, i mean obviously there is the eu structure within the common fisheries policy but more general negotiations about access to waters, and we will be pa rt access to waters, and we will be part of that as an independent state. we are very careful of the way in which fishing has been approached in the white paper, so that it approached in the white paper, so thatitis approached in the white paper, so that it is separate from the question of that other elements of
3:59 pm
the economic partnership, precisely because i recognise the concern that the fishing industry had in the uk when we went into the european union, eec, as it was. there is no doubt the fishing industry lost out dramatically. it is just doubt the fishing industry lost out dramatically. it isjust that fishermen are bound to be slightly worried that it is tempting when you are sitting down around the negotiating table, there are some sticking points on other issues, on trade, that you start negotiating away some of that extra fish. i except it may take one or two years to get there but the fishermen want to get there but the fishermen want to be absolutely certain they will get their fish back and it will not get their fish back and it will not get traded away. no, we are going to be insuring that the control of our natural resources is distinct from the negotiation of the future economic partnership, from the eu. so fishermen can be assured they will get their fish back? chuckling it will be a separate negotiation, a separate part of the agreement. so therefore it will not be a bargaining tool? we can say that
4:00 pm
quite clearly as we negotiate out of the eu? does the eu want greater access to our fish because they have it at the moment, so they are bound to try and play hardball on it. this will be a separate agreement, separate part of the negotiations. it will not be jumbled in with the elements of the trade relationship in the way it was in the past. fishermen can rest easy? we want to ensure that we not only restore the independence of the uk in terms of determining access to its waters, but we also have the opportunity to see ourfishing but we also have the opportunity to see our fishing communities but we also have the opportunity to see ourfishing communities being built up and the benefits that would bring. a final question, as we get those fishing rights back and fish back, the quid pro quo is a lot of thatis back, the quid pro quo is a lot of that is traded into the european union, so therefore the deal on
4:01 pm
making sure the agri— food market works on a perishable product is even more important. yes. just before we move to the next session on air quality, can i ask a point about contingency planning? you have mentioned in an answer to st bernard, the technical notices you will issue to those you need to know. what about the wider public? what information will you give the public about the different contingencies you plan for in the event of no deal? and the costs involved. would you be transparent with everybody about the range of areas where you will be making preparations and making that information available to the public? we will be making more information available generally about the preparations being made. the technical notices are specific to those who need to consider how they personally or their business
4:02 pm
prepares for the potential circumstance of no deal. by making those available, we will be, it will be part of making more information available on the preparations taking place. as pointed out, there are wide ranging areas in which no deal would not be better than a bad deal where there could be significant impacts on individuals. will you set them out so the public can see what them out so the public can see what the potential implications could be? on the health committee we have looked at many implications such as if we do not have access to the european health insurance card after we leave the eu, in the event of no deal, it would effectively mean people with long—term health conditions would not be able to be assured to travel to the eu. are these areas you will lay out to people? i think, if i
4:03 pm
these areas you will lay out to people? ithink, if! made, these areas you will lay out to people? i think, if! made, there is an issue where we are looking to negotiate a deal and negotiate that by october, and at that point, the question will come to parliament. we have the meaningful vote, then the potential withdrawal agreement and implementation bill. at the point of which it is... at that point, with an agreed deal, it will become clear what the future relationship is going to be and the basis of that relationship. if you are asking me to say are we going to say to people here and now if there is no deal you will not be able to do a, b, c, what preparing for no deal is about is making sure government, business, those who have to take actions to prepare for no deal are able to do
4:04 pm
that and do that in a timely way because some of these may be actions that would take time to put into place. it is about letting the public know well in advance what the issues will be a for every government department and have them in their everyday lives. if it were to be the case, we are working for a deal, a good deal. if it were to be the case we were to be in a no deal scenario, the information it would be necessary for the public to have would be made available. it looks as if we are getting closer towards the possibility of no deal. everyone appreciates you would like to achieve a good deal. but this is about setting out clearly the consequences of no deal, what the planning necessary for that would be and the potential costs. so it is clear to the public. you based your
4:05 pm
question on the assumption that said we we re question on the assumption that said we were getting closer to a no deal scenario and i do not believe that is the case. we have put forward a proposalfor is the case. we have put forward a proposal for the future relationship and we believe it should be with the european union and we are in negotiations on the basis of that. the timetable set out still remains in relation to having sufficient detail and for... agreed by october. i accept you do not accept the premise of my question but there is the growing possibility that we could end up with a no deal scenario and my question was, will you lay out for the public the consequences of that? if we are in a no deal scenario we will now the consequences for the public. what we are doing is working for a deal. what we are doing is working for a deal. that is the basis on which the
4:06 pm
check and is agreement and white paper is made and the basis on which we have started discussions with the eu so at this point, what we are doing is saying we will ensure, as we step up no deal preparations, we will ensure technical notices are issued so that those who need to have that information have that. you have that information have that. you have made that clear. i think what you are asking me to do is do something else, to set out the argument for no deal rather than actually saying we are working for a deal. prime minister, with respect, lam asking deal. prime minister, with respect, i am asking you to set out for the public because sometimes the public do not realise the scale of the issues we would be facing and the costs and the necessity we start planning now because time is getting short. i guess my request to you is will you agreed to publish this so that the public can see what the
4:07 pm
consequences are and what you are planning for? what we will be doing is ensuring that more information is available on the preparations the government is making for no deal, that we published technical notices so that those who need to make preparations for no deal are able to do so. my concern was for the wider public understanding the consequences but we will move onto a different subject air quality. and opening the questioning... there we have the prime minister appearing before the liaison committee, consisting of chairs of various commons select committees. concentrating as you might expect on elements of brexit, whether it is to do with how immigration will work, what tariffs... how eu tariffs might differ on goods whether the european court ofjustice would have a role,
4:08 pm
how flights would work after brexit and what the impact could be on the european health insurance card on which so many british people rely when they travel abroad. the prime minister will not necessarily have heard what her former foreign secretary boris johnson heard what her former foreign secretary borisjohnson had to say when he stood up in the commons, talking about the plan for brexit being ina talking about the plan for brexit being in a permanent state of limbo. he described the prime minister presiding over a stealthy retreats as the talks at lancaster house, and compared those talks with those that took place at chequers. our chief political correspondent, vicki young, is at westminster an interesting choice that she appeared before the liaison committee on time, thereby missing what boris johnson committee on time, thereby missing what borisjohnson said. committee on time, thereby missing what boris johnson said.” committee on time, thereby missing what boris johnson said. i do not think that was deliberate. boris johnson made a decision to make this
4:09 pm
personal statement. it is unusual for cabinet ministers to do that but he clearly had a lot to say. he had to wait for several statements to get out of the way so theresa may was never going to be in the chamber to listen and i'm sure she was glad she was not because he completely ripped apart her approach on brexit, the central part of government policy, the chequers white paper she thought she had agreement on, the workable compromise as she would call it, but he went through that, criticising it and saying it was because of that he decided he had to leave government and he compares it to previous speeches where she laid out a certain vision that he said he could go along with but he was not happy she had moved away from it. the question is what reaction it gets from others in the conservative party. i spoke to two former ministers before the statement and they said everyone will look at it to see if it gives the green light
4:10 pm
to see if it gives the green light to conservative mps to put in more letters to the 1922 committee, the mechanism by which they can force a vote of no confidence. it takes 48 of them to do so and i think some of them will think that he was really setting a deadline for theresa may to say there is still time to say brexit, but if you do not change your mind, it might be taken out of your mind, it might be taken out of your hands. we can hear more now from our political correspondent ian watson. if a week is a long time in politics, ten days is an absolute eon. theresa may declared that her cabinet was behind the new brexit plan hammered out at her country retreat, chequers. but since then she's lost two cabinet ministers and faced rebellions in the house of commons. after two years of dither and delay, the government has sunk into a mire of chaos and division. the agreement that was supposed to unite the cabinet led to the cabinet falling apart within 48 hours. at pmqs, jeremy corbyn highlighted conservative divisions, but the prime minister focused
4:11 pm
on her differences with labour. i will end free movement, he wants to keep it. i want us out of the customs union, he wants us in. i want us out of the single market, he wants is in. market, he want us in. i want us to sign our own trade deals, he wants to hand them over to brussels. i've ruled out a second referendum, he will not. bad blood is flowing in gallons, or perhaps that should be litres, at westminster. many in the labour party are angry with a handful of brexit—supporting mps in their ranks who voted with the government last night and helped theresa may avoid defeat in a crucial vote. but as has been clear from the commons today very serious divisions remain inside the prime minister's own party. order! last night a dozen conservative mps who backed remain in the referendum rebelled. we are volunteering for economic
4:12 pm
vassalage not just in we are volunteering for economic vassalage notjust in goods and agri— foods, but we will be forced to match eu arrangements on the environment and social affairs and much else besides. he was apparently urging the prime minister to return toa urging the prime minister to return to a vision of brexit set out at a speech in london 18 months ago. in reality, he was damning her with praise so faint, it was barely visible. it is not too late. to save brexit. we should not and need not be stampeded by anyone. but let us again aim explicitly for that glorious vision of lancaster house, a strong, independent self—governing britain that is genuinely open to the world, not the miserable, permanent limbo of chequers. this
4:13 pm
conservative mp wants theresa may ousted as party leader. she was more six linked than borisjohnson. ousted as party leader. she was more six linked than boris johnson. at what point it was decided that brexit means remain? brexit continues to mean brexit. despite the criticism, the prime minister does not intend to depart permanently from number 10 before britain leaves the eu. boris johnson's friends say he deliberately did not try to emulate geoffrey howe, who delivered a resignation speech which many say prompted the resignation of margaret thatcher. borisjohnson's prompted the resignation of margaret thatcher. boris johnson's friends said he is simply trying to get the prime minister change of policy, not trying to change the prime minister. theresa may will be visiting northern ireland this week to talk about brexit — let's speak to our northern ireland political correspondent enda mcclafferty in belfast. some rather opposing views she is
4:14 pm
likely to hear? i would imagine so. taking theresa may away from the destruction and pressure cooker of westminster. what we know about where she plans to go, she is going to visit the border and speak to people who live along the frontier and also speak to businesses who will be keen to hear more about her white paper plans. we knows she is coming to try to sort out the other great headache, the fact we have no devolved government in northern ireland, absent for 16 months. when theresa may is here, she will take time to speak to political leaders to see if she can plot a course to get them back in government here in belfast, which is no easy task. on friday, she will be addressing some
4:15 pm
of the concerns around customs arrangements, particularly with the republic, when she makes a keynote address and will no doubt take questions. i imagine over the 48 hours she will spend northern ireland, she will get plenty of food for thought. what is the view of the customs arrangements? we heard boris johnson referring to them. saying some ideas have been ruled out without being considered. how likely is she to hear lobbying about technical arrangements? she has got to hear that from people who know what it is like to live on the border. people who cross it every day. the last thing they want to see is infrastructure that will delay journeys and impinge on their lifestyle. 1' m journeys and impinge on their lifestyle. i'm sure they will make that known to the prime minister, about what they want theresa may will her plan involves a frictionless border and she will not do anything to disrupt their lives, but i'm sure they will press her for
4:16 pm
fine detail, because they will know it could come down the track in the autumn and they will want assurance from the prime minister about what is in store and of course we have those who trade across the border, they have concerns about the notion of playing along with the eu's rule book. what will it mean for people on the front line? the majority of people in northern ireland voted to remain so! people in northern ireland voted to remain so i would imagine tomorrow she will get a cross—section of use from people demanding answers. thank you. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. in his resignation statement to the house of commons, borisjohnson urges theresa may to change direction on brexit. while borisjohnson was delivering his speech, the prime ministerfaced questions from the liaison committee of mps, reaffirming her committment to the goverment‘s brexit strategy. "a moment of miracle" — the thai footballers trapped in a cave for more than a fortnight describe how they felt
4:17 pm
when british divers found them. and in sport, the former wales captain sam warburton has retired from rugby at the age of 29. he had not played since leading the british and irish lions to a drawn series against new zealand in 2017. liverpool have agreed a fee of around 66.8 million pounds for the rome goalkeeper allison. there will be a new man in the yellow jersey at the tour de france to night. team sky's gareth thomas is in contention. i will be back with more on those stories shortly. their story of survival captivated the world, and now the members the thai football team trapped in a cave for more than two weeks, have all left hospital and spoken publically for the first time.
4:18 pm
the 12 boys and their football coach described the moment when they were discovered by two british divers as "a moment of miracle". the boys have now been declared healthy, both physically and mentally. caroline hawley reports. discharged, the 12 boys emerged today into the sunlight at last and straight onto minibuses on their way to tell the world for the first time about their extraordinary ordeal. a celebratory sendoff from relatives who still cannot quite believe their luck. nor it seems can the boys themselves. deeply grateful to be alive and well. the hospital that treated them says they put on an average of three kilos and they are all strong and ready to go back to their lives. one by one the young football team introduced themselves. translation: hello, my name is pornchai kamluang, nickname is tee. i am playing the midfielder. hi, i'm 11 years old.
4:19 pm
hello. and then they answered questions, carefully vetted by child psychologists. the first was about the incident rescuers discovered them huddled together in the cave. translation: they got out of the water and they were saying something. i thought that there were officers but when they got out of the water i found they were english. i did not know what to say to them, so ijust said hello. and what happened next? it was a miracle. i was shocked. after we found out that we were stranded and we knew that we'd got stuck.
4:20 pm
so the second option was to dig into the wall of the cave to find a way out. at least we were doing something to try to get out. i tried not to think about food, just thinking about food. what did you think about? i tried not to think about fried rice. and thai pears. this was the start of a dramatic rescue operation that delivered them from the mountain against the odds. for their families it was an agonising wait and then, nine days after the wild boars football team went missing... how many of you? ..the moment when british divers first found them deep inside the cave complex. they were thin, hungry, but water dripping from the cave walls had kept them alive.
4:21 pm
but how to get them out? it was a race against the clock with the risk of more floodwater engulfing them. but a painstaking, dangerous and daring mission by thai navy seals and international cave rescuers, in which one thai diver died, finally brought them all to safety. there's interest in a hollywood treatment of their incredible story but first they have got to finish telling it themselves and then, at last, these boys are going home. caroline hawley, bbc news. sir cliff richard has won his high court privacy battle against the bbc and has been awarded an initial £210,000 in damages. the court found that the corporation's reporting of a police raid, in connection with an allegation of historical child sex abuse, infringed the star's privacy rights in a "serious and sensationalist way". sir cliff always denied the allegations, was never arrested or charged, and described today's ruling as "wonderful news". the bbc says it's very
4:22 pm
sorry for the distress caused to sir cliff, but will look at appealing the decision. daniela relph has more. for sir cliff richard it was an overwhelming legal victory. he cried in court as the judgment was read and showed his emotion as he left. i can't really answer too many questions at the moment. it's going to take a little while for me to get over the whole emotional factor. and so i hope you'll forgive me. i'll talk to you some other time, thank you very much. in august 2014, the bbc reported on a police search of sir cliff richard's home in berkshire. it was part of a south yorkshire police investigation into an historical allegation of sexual abuse made by a boy under the age of 16. sir cliff richard was never arrested or charged. he argued that the coverage was intrusive and an invasion of his privacy. today thejudge agreed. he never expected after 60 years in the public eye that his privacy and reputation would be tarnished in this way and he would need
4:23 pm
to fight such a battle. although he felt it necessary to pursue this case and the sum awarded in damages is one of the highest ever in this area of law, sir cliff's motivation was not for personal gain. as he knew all along he would be substantially out of pocket, no matter what. there was one point where i was already quoted as saying he was pretty well skin and bone at that time. but, you know, he has tremendousjoy about him anyway as an individual, he has tremendous tenacity and he was determined to fight this case. bbc reporter danjohnson had been told about the search on sir cliff's home by the police. in his ruling, thejudge said he believed mrjohnson was capable of letting his enthusiasm for the story get the better of him. although stressed he did not believe he was a dishonest man. the judge's harshest criticism was directed at gary smith, who was then uk news editor and is now head of news for bbc scotland. mrjustice mann said he did not feel mr smith was always a reliable witness.
4:24 pm
describing him as unduly defensive. fran unsworth signed off on the story at the time. she was described as an honest and conscientious witness. she is now the bbc‘s director of news. after today's ruling, she said the bbc was very sorry for the distress caused to sir cliff, but warned the judgment had wider implications. it will put decision—making about naming individuals in the hands of the police over the public‘s right to know. we don't believe this is compatible with liberty and press freedoms. for all of these reasons, there is an important principle at stake. that is why the bbc is looking at an appeal. but for now the bbc faces a substantial bill. general damages of £190,000 covering the effect on sir cliff and his life. then aggravated damages of £20,000 because the bbc entered the story for scoop of the year in the royal television society awards.
4:25 pm
and there could be further special damages awarded, to be decided at a future court healing. the issue of damages is for privacy — you can never undo the harm, we are never going to be able to not see the images of the police storming into sir cliff's house. but what the judge has obviously done is set the damages at the highest level to send a clear message that this was completely wrong. # congratulations!# a small group of sir cliff richard fans were there to support him today, loyal and vocal. as sir cliff richard left court he did so knowing this was a significant win in a case he said had caused him unbelievable hurt. daniella relph, bbc news. president trump has defended his meeting with russian president vladimir putin, after a backlash over his comments. he said he misspoke at the press conference on monday
4:26 pm
when he sided with mr putin over his own intelligence services on claims of russian election meddling. today on twitter, mr trump condemned "haters" who did not want him getting along with mr putin, saying they suffered from "trump derangement syndrome". earlier he also tweeted about nato. he said, "while the nato meeting in brussels was an acknowledged triumph, with billions of dollars more being put up by member countries at a faster pace, the meeting with russia may prove to be, in the long run, an even greater success. many positive things will come out of that meeting." let's speak to our correspondent in washington, gary o'donoghue. that is a new syndrome, but where is the criticism for his comments coming from? coming from everywhere, really all quarters, from the republican party, we are told from inside the white house, among some of his senior staff, including the
4:27 pm
chief of staffjohn kelly, we are hearing it from supporters in the media in terms of people like fox news. i think this is the sort of thing the president had not expected. he strolled out of that meeting confident, with his new football, if you remember, a gift from the president of russia, got on air force one, flew to the us and saw the coverage and was i think appalled by it, as we understand, appalled by it, as we understand, appalled by it, as we understand, appalled by the reaction. nobody going out to defend him. realising some of this had to be walked back, claiming it was a question of two letters. in terms would rather than wouldn't. i do not see why russia wouldn't. i do not see why russia wouldn't have involved, as opposed to what he said, he did not see why russia would be involved. notably also his failure to back his intelligence services on the public
4:28 pm
stage standing next to president putin. it is a huge tactical, strategic error that has happened. even some of the most conservative voices, like newt gingrich, saying this is the biggest mistake of his presidency. he talked about the fact he thought there would be big results coming from this relationship with president putin. what does he mean? jam tomorrow, indeed. we will have to wait and see what he means. partly talking about it in that respect, north korea, believing he has enlisted the russian president's help in putting pressure on north korea to deliver denuclearisation and the aim of the summit he went to in singapore some weeks ago. we will see what pressure the russians are prepared to bring in that regard. he also thinks his tough talk... his semi—threats to
4:29 pm
withdraw from nato, has made those countries stump up more money. we will see if they get to the 4% figure he floated, off their national income, which will be a huge rise for many of these countries and very surprising if anybody commits that. he believes this disruptive, unpredictability, he thinks throwing these things up in the air create something better in the air create something better in the long—term. there is no evidence yet, but in that sense we will have to see if he is right in a few weeks, months, years. gary, thank you. time for a look at the weather. chris is with us. why have you got the opening titles to eastenders? do not worry, we're not catching up on episodes. the atmosphere works like rivers and when they flow through lower areas, this is through london, they meander
4:30 pm
like this. when the meandering, the loops in the river get big, you can get something called a cut—off lake, oxbow lake, when the river cannot be bothered going around the lips and instead takes a short route and were left with this curl in the river and the atmosphere does the same. it will be doing on friday. this is the atmosphere meandering and this makes the weather and when it gets to the shop loops, sometimes it takes a short cut and we are left with a spinning area of low pressure, which changes the speed of weather fronts and the entire weather pattern. the computer models are no good because it isa computer models are no good because it is a small change from the wind going that way and taking a short cut and can cause problems with the forecast which is what we content with on friday. it at the moment, so they are bound to try and play hardball on it. so how difficult is it to tell how difficult the changes will be? we know these processes will happen but
4:31 pm
as it happened across eastern england will cross into europe? it isa england will cross into europe? it is a very small change but will have a massive impact on the weather as i will explain. before we get to those typical part of the forecast, today the focus has been relatively straightforward, quite a bit of cloud rabbitohs has unpleasant spells of sunshine. that was the scene in cumbria earlier on and as far as the weather goes for the next few days, yes, some sunny spells to come, temperatures will be rising a little bit but chances of some showers and the rest of the uk and the rest of the week. should be a fine end to the day for most of us but we have shower still around, some of the heavier still around working across the southern uplands of southern scotland. the showers will tend to fade away with time. we will tend to fade away with time. we will be left with dry conditions a dagger through the night. temperatures slowly easing down to between ten to 15 degrees. the thursday, fewer showers and probably a bit more in the way of sunshine across england and wales but there will still be quite a bit of cloud
4:32 pm
to start the day across more southern areas. to the north and west, the cloud thickening up with outbreaks of rain as we had through the afternoon. turning dampen to the western isles, the rain getting into the highlands before the end of the day. temperatures mid—20s, maybe high 20s given some decent final spells, that the change in the jet stream, that will take place on friday. what is more uncertain as we could will cease and thunderstorms breaking out across parts of eastern england, east anglia and south—east england. if those storms to form they could be slow—moving but they could also be torrential, bringing 30 millimetres of rain in the space of just 30 millimetres of rain in the space ofjust an hour, about half a month's worth of rain, so we could see some flooding issues and it is not even out of the question we see some rain across southern england in south—west wales and south—west england. saturday, the risk of some showers affecting eastern parts of
4:33 pm
england but that fades over time and much of the week and will be dry with some sunny spells, temperatures rising, mid—to high 20s and the warmest spots as we go on the course of the weekend. we will see some changes in the weather, the real uncertain time is friday. not quite sure we will see thunderstorms across to eastern england but we will see a band of rain edging into north—western parts of the uk, and given how dry the weather has been for so long, that rain will be welcome rain but even across south—east england and east anglia we could see some useful heavy thunder read down pours. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson has used his resignation speech in parliament to urge theresa may to change course on brexit. it is not too late. to save brexit.
4:34 pm
we have time in these negotiations. we have time in these negotiations. we have time in these negotiations. we have changed tack once and we can change again. as the former foreign secretary gave his warning, the premise of toddler committee of mps she was committed to her plan.” have been clear these are the proposals the government is taking forward and that is being engaged with the european commission. 12 boys who were trapped with their football coach in a flooded cave in thailand have been released from hospital and talked about their ordeal — they said their rescue was a "miracle." sir cliff richard has been awarded an initial £210,000 in damages after a winning a privacy case against the bbc over its coverage of a police raid on his home. the bbc is looking at appealing the decision, saying its journalists acted in good faith. sport now on afternoon live with
4:35 pm
chris mitchell. let's start with some rugby and a retirement. yes, that not many people saw coming to be honest. the welsh hero of rugby union sam warburton will not play again, he has retired from professional rugby. the former wales and british and irish lions captain, just 29 years old, that is young, had been in training for cardiff blues but had not he had expected to come back but disney and neck problems have ruined those plans. warburton made his debut for wales when he was 20 and went on to captian the side more times than anyone... here's our rugby union reporter, chrisjones. you're we know that warburton hasn't played since the third test for the lions against new zealand's, back in july third test for the lions against new zealand's, back injuly 2017, almost a year at code to the day. many thought he would come back having had over a year out of the game but
4:36 pm
clearly after so many surgeries, the mental and physical toll that would have taken come he got back into pre—season training and his body just could not deliver what it has donein just could not deliver what it has done in the past so it is a great shame he is having to give up at the age of 29, far too young you feel for a player who may be had so much more to give but also we can celebrate quite a fantastic career for a celebrate quite a fantastic career fora man celebrate quite a fantastic career for a man highly respected on and off the field. the sale of wembley being discussed by politicians. £600 million, what would you do with that? the english fa wanted, they say they want to spend it on grassroots football. former manchester united star gary neville says it is not a good idea. he has criticised the fa's proposal to sell one b. a government select committee has started hearing evidence from the fa and other interested parties on whether selling it is a good idea. the fa say it will benefit the grassroots of the game but neville disagrees.
4:37 pm
the fa feel they have to sell the national asset, a national stadium, it is quite simply ridiculous i completely agree with everything you put into that statement before the question finally came. this is a nonsense , question finally came. this is a nonsense, it is a nonsense. this is not me being emotional more about wembley, what is it next, st george's park has to go because we have to build another 500 4g pitch is? then what happens after that? this is not long—term thinking. harsh criticism. one other line of football news to bring you and liverpool have agreed a fee in the region of £66 million with roma for the brazilian goalkeeper allison. the club are now free to talk to the player, and if the deal goes through it world record fee for a keeper. the premier league record for a keeper is the 40m euros manchester city paid benfica for ederson injune last year. the open is the americans
4:38 pm
tournament to lose... that's what rory mcilroy thinks... he tees off at the open tomorrow hoping to add to his four majors... his form has been inconsistent since he last won a a major in 2014... unlike the americans on tour at the moment... mcilroy admists the likes ofjorden speith, patrick reed, dustinjonston are the ones to beat... they have so much depth, that if it is notjordan, it isjust and, if not it is brooks, if not it is patrick, if not it is dustin. so there are so many great players, and it just seems like there are so many great players, and itjust seems like at there are so many great players, and it just seems like at this there are so many great players, and itjust seems like at this point in time they are all playing really good golf the same time, and it is going to be tough. it will be tough to beat them next week, it will be tough to beat them in france that is just the way it is. europeans have their nice little run a few years ago and! their nice little run a few years ago and i just their nice little run a few years ago and ijust think their nice little run a few years ago and i just think these things work in cycles, and right now these quys work in cycles, and right now these guys are playing really good golf,
4:39 pm
and they are some of the best players in the world and deservedly so. some breaking news, at the tour de france correct thomas has just won stage 11, and he takes the leads yellow jersey. stage 11, and he takes the leads yellowjersey. fantastic stage 11, and he takes the leads yellow jersey. fantastic news stage 11, and he takes the leads yellowjersey. fantastic news for teams guy. —— geraint thomas. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to cardiff where nick servini can tell us more about a new report that shows the number of young people taking risks on the railway track has doubled in wales and borders in the last four years. and alexis green is in southampton, where a 90 year old farmer is still working the fields and has been for around 65 years. alexis has met her and will tell us her story in few minutes.. but first to nick...
4:40 pm
the new numbers showing a worrying increase in the number of teenagers trespassing onto rail lines? that's right. we are picking up on two elements really, some of this research and questioning done by network rail, which incidentally applies right across the uk. we are picking up on some of the welsh angles and some serious warnings from the rail industry in wales to some of this data, but, frankly, the figures and some of the anecdotal stories are as applicable in any corner of the uk as they are in wales. and a picture is emerging of a significant number of teenagers who are going on to tracks, nearby tracks, playing near tracks, they are taking selfies on tracks, and a significant number simply unaware that it significant number simply unaware thatitis significant number simply unaware
4:41 pm
that it is illegal to truss pass on to the rail network. and a picture is emerging i think of a combination of some pretty dangerous games played by teenagers, and the more kind of innocent habits, but no less dangerous for example dropping things next to a railway line, and innocently going down to pick it up without checking whether a train is on its way or not. all of this, as you can imagine, has fuelled a big campaign from british transport police, network rail, the rail operating companies, no doubt acutely aware that the schools are about to break out, and messages for example from british transport police to schoolchildren, saying this is not a playground around here. network rail pointing out that if you have a train travelling at 100 mph for example, if that tries to stop, it could take a mile before it comes to a halt. all backed up with some pretty devastating figures. in the past year, right
4:42 pm
across the uk, seven under way teams we re across the uk, seven under way teams were killed on the uk rail network and nearly 50 had left changing injuries. you have been speaking to a train driver who probably has to confront this problem at times? that's right, this train driver operates on the valleys network in the south wales valleys, he has just been doing thejob the south wales valleys, he has just been doing the job for a the south wales valleys, he has just been doing thejob for a number of yea rs been doing thejob for a number of years but already has built up quite a catalogue of experience of having to deal with a lot of these problems with teenagers all inhabiting this area in and around the tracks. he picks up interestingly from the psychological perspective of the rail drivers, which can be lost in all of this. if there is an incident can he know some examples of collea g u es can he know some examples of colleagues of his that have had to deal with tragic circumstances, there is a traumatic impact on the drivers involved. maybe a final thought in all of this, as we see the electrification of the rail network right across the uk, and south wales where we are focusing
4:43 pm
tonight is no exception to this, of course the rail engines themselves will be far quieter than they are now and can accelerate at a quicker pace. so this is something that will get more serious, rather than less. and alexis, you've been in dorset today with a 90—year—old farmer who's still driving a combine harvester? yes, what a remarkable woman winford is. she's a beer regis in dorset, i we nt is. she's a beer regis in dorset, i went to meet her today and she is still driving the combine. she has been farming fora still driving the combine. she has been farming for a decade since the age of eight, when her father used to make a go out and do the fields, go to school on her pony, come home and do some farming work. she does all types of farming work, poultry, beef, dairy and now arable. she doesn't do the lion karzai chair of the work but she is still keeping a hand in. i grew up on a farm, it was a dairy farm, but actually getting
4:44 pm
ina14 a dairy farm, but actually getting in a 14 tonne vehicle with a 90—year—old woman was a bit, well, i was a 90—year—old woman was a bit, well, i was a bit anxious, if you like! that it was all fine, she has total control, she was doing three—point turn is all over the place. the lady can definitely drive a combine harvester. she is definitely keep another technology but she does say that it another technology but she does say thatitis another technology but she does say that it is a little less hard now with all the machinery than it used to be. yes, certainly different for all the youngsters. they don't do the handwork like we used to have to do. i used to carry two and a half wits of corner my back. oates was one and a half, and barley was to hundredweight. i used to carry —— two hundredweight. would you say farmers had an easy life now? compared with us, yes, i suppose. my nephew said you were born too soon,
4:45 pm
that's your trouble. not many holidays to be had as a farmer, though, and ours can be very long, so what plans does she have if any to hang up her wellies? if she has her way she would still be farming right away through. her son chris is making her slow down a—lister bit more. she is doing the odd day here and there in the combine harvester, she makes lunch for her son and grandson but she is one incredible lady, making jams and chutneys the local charities because she is not allowed on the farm as much because her son says she is not allowed to do as much work. but you will find more on that on south today this evening. thank you very much. more now on borisjohnson's speech to the commons where he spoke
4:46 pm
of a "needless fog of self—doubt" which had descended over britain during the past 18 months, but the former foreign secretary did stress that it was not too late to save brexit. the conservative mp david jones told my colleague vicki young that others in the party share boris johnson's concerns over brexit. well, he has made some very important criticisms, and in fact criticisms that a lot of colleagues have been voicing the sometime. the fa ct have been voicing the sometime. the fact is that the lancaster house speech the prime minister took delivered in january last year did set out a very clear course for the future of the negotiations, and what we saw in chequers was a complete departure from that and of course as he quite rightly says a position where the uk will cease to be
4:47 pm
effectively an independent nation and will continue to be a rule taker, and we can't allow that to happen. he said there is still time to say brexit. many will see that as a warning to theresa may, change tack and go back to what you said before or else i will challenge you for the leadership. i think you have to read into it what you will but it was certainly a very trenchant criticism of what the prime minister announced after chequers last week. asi announced after chequers last week. as i say, it reflects a loss of the concerns a a lot of colleagues have had over the last few days and i think he is quite right, it is not too late to change tack but we really do have to start doing that now. frankly what we saw this week, the amendments we saw this week, have made the white paper almost impossible to deliver and therefore we do need to have a rethink. theresa may would say this has to be a compromise and by definition you can't get everything you want, you can't get everything you want, you can't have your cake and eat it, as borisjohnson once said he wanted. that is the political reality isn't
4:48 pm
it, of the numbers in the house of commons? we saw the issue of numbers yesterday and it is clearly the case that the whole house has to be taken with it. but of course the majority yesterday was very small indeed. what we do need to do is to look at the white paper, consider whether it is deliverable, whether most importantly it actually delivers on what people voted for back in 2016. i don't think either is the case anything it is important now to have anything it is important now to have a change of tack, as borisjohnson quite rightly said. how many of your collea g u es quite rightly said. how many of your colleagues would want to get rid of theresa may as leader? lots of rumours about the number of letters going into the 1922 committee, whether it has reach that number of 48. are we heading that way?” whether it has reach that number of 48. are we heading that way? i don't know, there is only one person who knows that, graham grady, the chairman of the 1922 committee, and iam not chairman of the 1922 committee, and i am not in chairman of the 1922 committee, and iam notina chairman of the 1922 committee, and i am not in a position to say what the contents of his safe are. do you think theresa may should change
4:49 pm
tack, live she doesn't she should move aside and let someone liked borisjohnson move aside and let someone liked boris johnson takeover?” move aside and let someone liked boris johnson takeover? i think the pie militias should return to her vision she set out at lancaster house, i think the party would unite behind that and i think that is what she should go back to. rachel is here with all of the business news, but first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. in his resignation statement to the house of commons, borisjohnson urges theresa may to change direction on brexit. while borisjohnson was delivering his speech the prime minister faced questions from the liaison committee of mps , reaffirming her committment to the goverment‘s brexit strategy. "a moment of miracle" — the thai footballers trapped in a cave for more than a fortnight describe how they felt when british divers found them. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. around 1,500 jobs are at risk after gaucho calls in the administrators. the restaurant chain has been trying to find a buyer for months, but high debt levels have put
4:50 pm
potential bidders off. and for the first time in six years, millions of flat owners have seen no growth in the prices of their homes over the past year, according to the office for national statistics. it's mainly because a quarter of the uk's flats and maisonettes are in london, where prices are falling. but overall house prices were up by 3% in the year to may. and british steel shows its metal, after it decides to invest £50 million in a scunthorpe mill. the firm says it's the biggest single investment in the industry for a decade. let's start with the inflation figure — it was a surprise for some? that;s right — some analysts were expecting inflation to rise but for the third month in a row it has stayed at 2.4% — these latest figures are forjune. this is important because the next opportunity for the boe to change the interest rate is in august — curretnly at 0.5% — we were expecting a rise but with inflation staying put that could weaken the argument for an increase.
4:51 pm
it is at 0.5%, it was down 72% the last time i checked. also today we had that major fine for google £3.9billion for freezing competitors out of its android operating system. the european commission says the american tech giant unfairly favoured its own internet search service. google says it will appeal. also today we had that major fine for google £3.9billion for freezing competitors out of its android operating system. the european commission says the american tech giant unfairly favoured its own internet search service. google says it will appeal. shares in its parent company alphabet are down slightly in new york.
4:52 pm
a strong set of results from easyjet but some challenges ahead? they are bringing in more money specifically in areas like ticket sales, baggage charges, they so say their profits will be higher than previously predicted by the end of the year but there they announced today they will be complaining to the european commission about strikes by french air traffic controllers, which have caused them to cancel more than 2500 flights so far at a cost of about £25 million. joined by supriya menon — senior multi—asset strategist at pictet asset management — supriya — clearly lots of challenges facing airlines — compared to their competitors but how are easyjet doing? yes, we heard easyjet raising their profit outlook, is a rather more upbeat than the market expected. i think interestingly here we got an increase in revenue per seat, as
4:53 pm
well as an increase in ancillary revenues, and this suggest that pricing power is quite strong. as consumers we now have higher disposable incomes, the job market has been quite wrong, so this is all quite positive that this sector and for easyjet. we also saw some of the american airlines, united also gave quite a positive picture yesterday, delta last week, and all of them have fit the pattern of quite strong revenues. of course, they all face the challenges over rising tensions, as well as higher fuel costs across—the—board, as well as higher fuel costs across—the— board, but coupled as well as higher fuel costs across—the—board, but coupled with that you have strong positive drivers, the strong tailwinds of business confidence, rising tourism in asia in particular, but also higher disposable income is across—the—board. we are quite positive on easyjet, although it has
4:54 pm
to be said easyjet valuations are at the higher end of the spectrum for airlines. let's talk about inflation, just explain to us why does that mean we could be less likely to see an interest rate rise by the bank of england next month? we have been quite closely watching these inflation figures. we have had quite a downward view, it is rather lower than what the market does. this fits our view of quite a low probability of a rate rise on the 2nd of august. not only weaker than expected inflation figures but also weaker than expected wage growth just yesterday, notjust weaker than expected wage growth just yesterday, not just a macroeconomic picture but when also coupled with political uncertainties we think it definitely weakens the case for a rate rise on the 2nd of
4:55 pm
august. thank you for your time. the markets. the ftse100 is up, one of the reasons is because sterling is down because of interest rate rises less likely. and issues theresa may has been facing have told sterling down. we will be hearing from companies tomorrow, some trading statement agms. thank you as always. a little bit of breaking news before we hear the weather forecast, and bit of breaking news before we hear the weatherforecast, and it bit of breaking news before we hear the weather forecast, and it is good news for long—suffering gardens in northern ireland. the hosepipe ban that has been in place in the end of june is set to be lifted tomorrow. that is it from afternoon live for
4:56 pm
today. next the bbc news at one clock on the time for a look at the weather with chris. we have heard quite a bit of club today and some passing showers particularly across western part of the uk. earlier this morning, spotted just off the coast of harlech beach, we saw this waterspout just off the coast of north west wales. we are looking at some spells of sunshine but there will be some showers around, they will be some showers around, they will generally turn a little bit warmer over the next few days, and we have showers around. a few pushing into the midlands. 25 degrees with some sunny spells coming and going. as we go through this evening and own an overnight any showers will fade away. temperatures slipping back to between ten and 15 degrees by the end of the night. thursday, a similar kind of day weather—wise,
4:57 pm
sunshine across england and wales with some cloud bubbling up through the afternoon. it will turn a bit cloudier through the far north—west of the uk with outbreaks of rain getting into the western isles. temperatures given a bit more sunshine across england and wales a few degrees higher. towards the end of the week jet stream, the few degrees higher. towards the end of the weekjet stream, the thing that makes our weather, will undergo a change. it can start to form a low pressure and the winds can start to spin around the other way, which placed havoc with the forecast. what will happen on friday as we will get a band of rain pushing southward and eastwards, the rain likely to be heaviest across the north—west but this weather front, the speed it moves eastwards, could be affected by the jet stream, but also the risk of heavy thundery showers breaking out across south—east england will be controlled by that changing the jet stream as well. that is open to
4:58 pm
some uncertainty, so it will be very difficult to locate exactly where the heaviest showers and thunderstorms will be. nevertheless it is quite likely we will see some storms working through south—east england as we go through evening and overnight into saturday morning. those showers could bring 30 millimetres of rain in the space of an hour. localised flooding is a possibility. some of those showers hanging around across eastern england on saturday but generally the weekend turning a bit sunnier and warmer. today at five, boris johnson urges the prime minister to change course in the brexit talks and condemns her latest plans for life outside the eu. delivering his resignation statement to mps, mrjohnson says there's a ‘fog of self—doubt‘ over britain's ambitions and says there's still time to change tack. it is not too late to save brexit. we have time in these negotiations. we have changed tack once and we can change again. and mrjohnson was on his feet in the commons, the prime minister was in another part of westminster, denying that britain was set
4:59 pm
to leave the eu, without a deal. ebay still question of an assumption that said we were getting closer to a ideal scenario, i don't believe thatis a ideal scenario, i don't believe that is the case. we have put forward a proposal for what the future relationship
5:00 pm

62 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on