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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  July 19, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello. it's thursday. it's nine o'clock. welcome to the programme. we did find that there was an inconsistent and patchy picture gci’oss inconsistent and patchy picture across the country. one in ten girls gci’oss across the country. one in ten girls across the country. one in ten girls across the uk are unable to afford sanitary products. campaigners say having a period is leading to financial stress. i use socks, gloves, hats, anything. tissue. if it is the summer, socks. anything. you don't rely on anyone else because you can't. plus worries that people referral units cannot attract the right staff, leading to concerns about the education of the most vulnerable of children. good morning and welcome to the
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programme. we are alive until 11 o'clock this morning. we will keep you across all the latest breaking stories. do get in touch with everything we are talking about this morning. we are particularly interested to hear your thoughts on the report that says police need to do more to combat hate crime. the report says that victims are being let down because of crimes related to personal characteristics such as race or religion. her majesty is inspected of constabulary found that in nearly half of cases, the police response was not good enough. some crimes were given a hate crime flag with no apparentjustification and others will not fly when they should have been. we would like to hear your thoughts. have you been a victim of hate crime? we would like to hear your thoughts. if you are
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emailing, please include your phone number if you are happy to be included in the show. if you text, you will be charged that the standard network rate. the new brexit secretary dominic raab will meet the eu's chief negotiator in brussels for the first time since his appointment. his visit comes as the european commission is warning countries across the eu to prepare for the possibility of a no deal brexit. they say there could be serious consequences for governments, travellers and businesses if no agreement is reached. meanwhile the prime minister is visiting the irish border today to reassure residents and businesses of the government's commitment to maintaining free movement. chris mason has the very latest in westminster. we have been focused on all of the drama and difficulties here, but a reminder today from the eu that the clock is ticking. absolutely. and this document to be published in a couple of hours from the european union, setting out its advice to the
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remaining 27 member states about how they should approach an ideal scenario. you speak to people in government here and they say they welcome that document, and they hope it includes mitigations for dealing with no deal, rather than dealing with no deal, rather than dealing with what some might see as a doom laden, negative situation. as far as the uk government is concerned, they are making the argument more vociferously than ever that preparations are under way for no deal as well. the prime minister has emphasised that she doesn't think it is any more likely than it has ever been. documents will be published over the summer so been. documents will be published over the summer so that individuals and businesses can prepare for the consequences of no deal. the vast majority of people at westminster think no deal is absolutely worth avoiding at all costs. one say the uk could positively embrace it, but but not many, including among the brexiteers. meanwhile the dominic raab, imagine being in his shoes this morning. you have made it to
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the cabinet, career achievement reached, and you have got to go before the commons in the next half an hourand then before the commons in the next half an hour and then go to brussels to meet michel barnierfor an hour and then go to brussels to meet michel barnier for the first timejust one month before brexit is due to happen. a full meeting this afternoon and then getting to know you dinner this evening. it is brexit speed skating for a guy who has only just arrived brexit speed skating for a guy who has onlyjust arrived in the cabinet and has got one heck of a job. —— speed dating. let's go to gavin in brussels. give us the perspective from there. given that the european commission is sending out this prepare it this —— preparedness card, it is saying brace yourself, this is the emergency landing card. if it is going to get us into squeaky bum time, that is when it could get difficult. they are running out of superlatives. they say the clock is ticking. it is a
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warning, a how—to guide in case it comes to leaving the eu for britain with no agreement. in it is quite a lot of specific detail about aeroplane landings, passenger records, suddenly the uk being disconnected from that, preparing customs officials. and one point they make clear, if there is no agreement with brexit, and it is world trade organisation rules, suddenly lorries at borders will be problematic. hearing at calais on the uk side of the border as well. the uk are bringing forward and employing iooo extra customs officials to cope with that. they go through detail of medicines that shouldn't be tested in the uk any more. problems with the galileo system, the satellite system that britain has invested heavily in, and the eu are clear it will have to come out of the uk, a centre for that. in all of these areas, the austrians, the dutch, the irish, they are examples of best in show
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because they have highlighted it. particularly in holland, if you are small and medium business, particularly in holland, if you are smalland medium business, put in your details and to a website and it tells you what areas you need to think about. only about one third of businesses are starting to prepare contingency plans. this comes briefly on the day that dominic raab comes to brussels as the new brexit secretary, meeting michel barnier, so secretary, meeting michel barnier, so coincidence that both things are happening on the same day? you might very well say that. i couldn't possibly comment. acquis. —— thank you. let's catch up with annita mcveigh in the newsroom. the press association says detectives believe they have identified the suspected perpetrators of the novichok attack on the russian former spy, sergei skripal, and his daughter. the pair were targetted with the nerve agent in march of this year but have since recovered. meanwhile, an inquest will be opened this morning into the death of dawn sturgess, who was exposed to novichok in wiltshire last month.
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the police watchdog has warned of a real possibility that brexit will trigger a spike in hate crimes, and said forces must take action to tackle significant problems in the way offences are dealt with at the moment. in a review of hate crimes, her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary found inadequate responses in 89 of 180 cases it looked at. here's our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. hate crime comes in different forms. anti—semitic graffiti, like this. an arson attack on a garden shed owned by polish people. and white powder sent to a mosque. police guidance says hate crime should be treated as a priority. officers are meant to attend victims within an hour of an allegation being reported. but the inspectorate of constabulary found the police response is patchy, and in many cases not good enough. the report found too many hate crimes were wrongly recorded. it took police an average of five
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days to visit victims in 40% of cases it looked at. and there were no visits to hate crime victims in over a third of the 180 cases examined in detail. it's important for victims of hate crime to be asked why it is that they think they've been victimised, so that it's identified from the outset. because if it is identified, it can then and it should then be flagged, and that in turn determines what service they receive. two years ago, there was a spike in hate crimes reported to police after the eu referendum. the inspectorate warns forces to prepare for a similar increase when britain formally leaves the eu next march. the college of policing says, in light of the report, it is reviewing the training and guidance for officers on hate crime. danny shaw, bbc news. eight people, including two who died, have been recognised by the queen for their bravery during last year's
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london bridge terror attack. three of them are to receive the george medal which is awarded for gallantry. eight people were killed last june when borough market and london bridge were targetted by attackers. donald trump has now said that he holds vladimir putin personally responsible for russian interference in the 2016 us election. at a press conference on monday president trump seemed to put russia's denials above the conclusions of us intelligence agencies. he's since said he misspoke, suggesting no other us president has ever been tougher on russia. israel's parliament has passed a law that defines the country as an exclusivelyjewish state. thejewish nation—state law also downgrades arabic as an official language, and views the advance ofjewish settlement as a national interest.
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the turkish government has ended the nationwide state of emergency that was imposed two years ago, following a failed coup attempt, according to state media. since 2016, tens of thousands of people have been arrested or dismissed from theirjobs. the decision not to extend it for an eighth time comes weeks after president erdogan was re—elected. the huge wildfire near saddleworth moor is finally out, more than three weeks after the blaze started. greater manchester fire and rescue service says it has now withdrawn all firefighters from the blaze, which started on 24th june. the fire service say much—needed showers in the last few days had helped finally bring an end to the incident. the hosepipe ban imposed across northern ireland is set to be lifted at noon todayjust as millions of people in england are facing the first of the summer. water companies in northern ireland said there had been a fantastic response from the public to its appeals to conserve water, adding that its water treatment works were now coping comfortably with demand. in north west england a temporary ban by united utilities will affect 7 million people from 5th august.
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it has been a record year for british book sales according to new figures. sales of printed books have risen for the third year in a row while sales of digital e—book svelte. lizo mzimba reports. jamie oliver's bestseller — 2017's most popular book. it helped the british publishing industry to achieve a record—breaking year. sales of printed books were up, with hardback fiction in particular seeing a big rise, of almost a third, thanks in part to new thrillers from authors like dan brown, lee child, and shari lapena. readers fundamentally still value the printed word. publishers have invested a huge amount of time, effort, and resource into making sure that books are still really attractive, that people want to buy them, and also obviously they lend themselves very much to giving as gifts, as well.
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it is the third year in a row that physical book sales have increased, while over the same period digital book sales have decreased, demonstrating that for the time being, fears from some that e—books might soon replace traditional books appear to be unfounded. the income from audiobooks rose by 25%. but the biggest contributor to the latest record—breaking figures is international trade. most of the british publishing industry's income, some 60%, comes from overseas. physical book sales to australasia are up by 1a%, while sales to the rest of europe, the industry's biggest market, have increased to a figure approaching £500 million. lizo mzimba, bbc news. nothing beats picking up an actual bookin nothing beats picking up an actual book in my opinion! that the summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9:30am. thank you. later we will be
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talking about new guidance for schools for treating four —year—olds with mental health issues. the guidance will be brought in from 2020. do you think four—year—olds should be taught about mental health and would you recognise the signs of mental health in young kids? please let us know your thoughts. text m essa 9 es let us know your thoughts. text messages will be charged at the standard network rate. now the sport. chris is that the bbc sport centre. good morning. the open championship is under way. how are the early starters getting on? they are enjoying fabulous weather with not a breath of wind at carnoustie. sunshine, baking fairways, and the greens are nice and soft and slow. the early starters should be doing well. here is the leaderboard. there are well. here is the leaderboard. there a re lots of well. here is the leaderboard. there are lots of golfers yet to go out so these are the early ones. van rooyen, no complaints if you
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haven't heard of him, he is a little—known golfer. but danny willett has had a terrible time since the won the masters a few yea rs since the won the masters a few years ago with injury, fighting to get his game back, but he has made a good start and phil mickelson is one under as well. and sandy lyle, 60 yea rs under as well. and sandy lyle, 60 years old, won the masses and the open many years ago, still trying to do his best at the scottish course. —— won the masters. let's look at the other early golfers as well. rory mcilroy goes outjust before one o'clock. he played his first open at carnoustie in fact. look at his head coverfor his driver, the saint bernard dog. he is hoping to add to his four majors. he missed the cut at the us open but he has had a good 2018. tiger woods starts just before az30pm. he last won a
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major over a decade ago and he has 14 to major over a decade ago and he has 1a to his name. this course will suit his game. you don't have to be a big hitter and with his bad back he is not as fit as he used to be. but you don't have to be a big hitter to win here. you have got to be good at the short game. ashton turner tees off at carnoustie having ove rco m e turner tees off at carnoustie having overcome a rare form of cerebral palsy as a child. he fell into a fish tank, i understand, and injured his head. his parents wanted him to ta ke his head. his parents wanted him to take up golf to be helped with his balance and recovery and just a few weeks ago he qualified for the open. an amazing story. this is his first major tournament. it was difficult growing up, obviously. i got diagnosed with a mild form of cerebral palsy when i was young and the doctor thought i might not be able to walk properly. i am too young to rememberany able to walk properly. i am too young to remember any of that, which is for the best.
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young to remember any of that, which is forthe best. i young to remember any of that, which is for the best. i started doing physio and my dad thought why not tip the balance and he got me into golf and i loved it from there. he tees off at 11:15am, so keep an eye out for him. thank you. i feel conrad is have you updated on the gulf and i would really like to interview ash. now what is wrong with alex oxlade—chamberlain? interview ash. now what is wrong with alex oxlade-chamberlain? we knew he was injured but they didn't say how bad, because they kept it a secret. his knee was damaged and he had surgery and they kept it a secret that now you can clock has said he will be out for most of the new season. “— said he will be out for most of the new season. —— you can clockjurgen klopp has said he will be out for most of the new season. we know he will be out for the rest of the season. jurgen klopp saying it will bea season. jurgen klopp saying it will be a bonus if he is back by may.
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liverpool's new goalkeeper will have a medical today, alisson. there he is. 67 million, record for a goalkeeper. he comes in from rome where he was the second best goalkeeper behind pepe reina. he has got a great record and liverpool are desperate to find a replacement for their goalkeeper who had a calamitous champions league final. and the tour de france are starting to look good for the british riders. unbelievable. it has all changed in the hills. gerraint thomas leads and chris froome, the defending champion, in second. thomas wearing that yellow jersey after winning stage 11. a breakaway up the hill, and uphill finish. chris froome eventually followed him. now it means that thomas leads the whole race by just means that thomas leads the whole race byjust under a minute and 26 seconds from chris froome. staged well today. my goodness me. 12 of 21
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stages. possibly the hardest stage of this year's tour. it is all her uphill and it is 127 kilometres. they will be knackered after this. it is good for chris froome because he likes the hills and so do thomas, so they could still be first and second by the end of the day you bring it to life! thank you. being able to afford sanitary protection should be a basic right for every woman, yet for some having a period brings with it finanical stress. it's estimated that one in ten girls have been unable to afford sanitary products. almost 140,000 girls miss school every year because of it. new research reveals that period poverty can have a significant effect on education, success, confidence and happiness in later life. it can negatively affect romantic relationships too. six in ten of those who had gone without sanitary products say they were bullied at school. of those, 39% suffered anxiety or depression.
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back in alesha dixon — who is a paid ambassador for always — is fronting a new campaign. back in alesha dixon — who is a paid ambassador for always — is fronting a new campaign. she spoke to chloe tilley about the issue alongside stevie—jo pasing who believes not being able to get hold of sanitary products is partly to blame for her homelessness and amanda king, a teacher who deals with the problem amongst her pupils. chloe started by asking stevie—jo how she manages her period whilst living on the streets. you have just got to deal with them because it is natural but it is very ha rd because it is natural but it is very hard being homeless and having periods and not having the money to get what you need when you are having periods. so what do you do? do you rely on people donating sanitary products to you? do you have to use money that you would rather be using on food and shelter? definitely not. you have got to rely on yourself. if it is winter, you use your socks, gloves, on yourself. if it is winter, you use yoursocks, gloves, hats, anything, tissue. if it is the summer, socks, anything. you don't rely on anybody else because you
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can't really. what does that do to you? it is degrading but you have just got to do it. it has got to be done. i want to bring in alesha and amanda. why are you so passionate about this? is it your background? 137,000 girls are killing missing school, and that statistic struck a chord with me. i was deeply shocked andl chord with me. i was deeply shocked and i couldn't believe it was happening in the uk. the idea that girls are missing out on confidence and self—esteem and educated because their basic needs are not being met, thatjust rang their basic needs are not being met, that just rang a their basic needs are not being met, thatjust rang a bell with me. this seemed like a huge issue with a simple solution and it felt right to have the conversation and speak openly about it, because periods is not the most glamorous thing to talk about but it is the most normal thing that happens to half the population, so let's have that
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conversation and get rid of the stigmas and taboos and normalise the conversation so that girls can feel more confident to step forward and ask for help. i know that you work ina ask for help. i know that you work in a school, amanda, in a special needs unit. but this is notjust an issue for the young girls in a special needs unit. this is across your school. explain what that is like. if there is an issue with not being able to afford sanitary products, that is one thing, but it is also a lot to do with the stigma of having periods and how we view it in society and how we talk about it in society. even our adverts, we cover up. in society. even our adverts, we cover up. we use blue ink. it is just not out there in the open. so girls arejust growing up just not out there in the open. so girls are just growing up already feeling stigmatised by having periods anyway. if there is any issue, they don't feel open enough to be able to talk about it. it is crazy because it is half the population that lives with it. give us an population that lives with it. give us an example of the stories that you hear within your school. girls
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will take time off school if they can't access sanitary ware that they need because they are too embarrassed to come to school and have to deal with it and they don't a lwa ys have to deal with it and they don't always know who to talk to. we are trying to make things available to them. but they are actually embarrassed to come and ask. them. but they are actually embarrassed to come and askm them. but they are actually embarrassed to come and ask. it is such an awkward phase of your life, when you are teenager and everything embarrasses you. it is the most natural thing and i think we need to lift the lid on this conversation. it is not the most glamorous subject but we need to normalise the conversations are children feel more comfortable to approach a teacher and ask for help. if we don't have periods, we don't have children and the world ends. when you were at school, did you miss school ever
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because of the fact you couldn't afford sanitary protection? definitely. and it wasn'tjust that. ididn't want definitely. and it wasn'tjust that. i didn't want my mum getting in trouble if she couldn't afford it andi trouble if she couldn't afford it and i didn't want to in trouble. i felt ashamed as well, making her feel like she was a bad mother, but she wasn't. she tried hardest but sometimes you can't afford those things and you have got to deal with it yourself. skipping school was a big factor. what effect did skipping school literally because of period poverty, what affected that have on your going forward? it was horrible. it led up to me being homeless now. i got into a bad crowd and i thought it was normal. just doing naughty things because you can't do normal things, can you? because you are poon things, can you? because you are poor. when you are out on the streets with other women, is this something that you all discuss amongst each other and try and help each other with? yes, we'll back each other with? yes, we'll back each other with? yes, we'll back each other up, we ask each other if we need this or that. it is just
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everyday. can you go to the doctor, drop—in clinic? everyday. can you go to the doctor, drop-in clinic? it is not that easy for us because we live on the streets. what would happen if you walked into one of those facilities? you need an address to see a doctor. so there is nowhere that you can just drop in and say i need some sanitary pads, some tampons, can you give them to me today and help me? not if... maybe you could go there but you don't know if they are going to look at you funny and not a lot of us have got confidence. a lot of the people on the streets about mental health issues as well. it is just everything. what do we need to do ata just everything. what do we need to do at a practical level? yes, we need to talk about it and have conversations, but i know there are charities that leave boxes around and people can help themselves, but thatis and people can help themselves, but that is a small—scale operation, isn't it? lots of organisations are doing lots of things and the
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government has a part to play. some people are doing brilliant things by donating millions of pads but longer term, we need to think that you can get free condoms, you can go to a food bank, and people are in need. this woman should not be going through this and it is not a cce pta ble through this and it is not acceptable in any level in our country. we need to take away the shame and the stigma and be able to talk about it openly. talking only achieves a certain amount. you need to act. absolutely. and talk to the mothers and notjust the children. make mums not feel ashamed if they can't afford things for their kids that they need to get for their kids. i am sure everybody is watching this wondering how they can help because it is so frustrating. what should people do to help you? there has got to be somewhere where they can go where they don't feel like they are being watched, where they can just go, and theyjust want to have a chat and say i am
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struggling, can you help me? and not fill ina struggling, can you help me? and not fill in a big essay because a lot of us fill in a big essay because a lot of us can't read or write. you can't see alesha's face in the studio that ican and see alesha's face in the studio that i can and i know you are horrified. are you quite shocked? it is human rights. we haven't got human rights on the streets. she deserves human rights. it is all about this issue, self esteem. what should we be doing in every school in this country to stop this? stevie says it started with period poverty and that is why she is living on the streets now because its spiral. in every toilet in every school there should be a box where girls can go in and take what they need and they shouldn't have to ask anybody for it, not on a nurse's office door. they should just be able to access what they need. simple. do we need to have more of a conversation with boys as
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well? we hear about boys teasing girls about periods. well? we hear about boys teasing girls about periodslj well? we hear about boys teasing girls about periods. i went into a school a couple of weeks ago and that was the one thing the boys said to me —— the girls said to me, that the boys were taking the mickey. you turn round to that boy and say, listen, mate, if it wasn't for periods, you wouldn't be here. did you know any girls growing up affected by period poverty? when i was growing up it wasn't something that was openly spoken about. looking back, ithink that was openly spoken about. looking back, i think a lot of people were suffering in silence. it was one of those situations where people were to embarrassed to say anything and they handled it by themselves. that breaks my heart that girls were going through that and nobody knew. this is why it is important to talk about it because i think there will be people listening, going through that, who might think that is happening to me and they might feel confident enough to speak out about it because it is
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not the scary thing. asking for help for something so simple. i can't believe we are even having the conversation in 2018. stevie, what would you like the government to do? what would you like to hear from on high to make a difference to your lives? touching the homes, telling the parents that they are not doing anything wrong if they can't afford it. they are not doing nothing wrong. they need somewhere they can go and ask for help and not get looked at like they are being bad pa rents looked at like they are being bad parents because they are not bad pa rents. parents because they are not bad parents. they are just struggling. we all struggle now and again. i don't care who you are, you do struggle with everything. difficult choices to be made. do you put food on the table? heat their home? pay the rent? send them to college or university? do this or that? itjust sta rts university? do this or that? itjust starts at home. what would your
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message be to the government, alesha? 0h, message be to the government, alesha? oh, my goodness. we have got to start talking about this. for me it is quite a simple solution. it is not that complicated, like you said. make them readily available for those that need them. no ifs and buts, no long drawn out forms, we don't need to debate it. let's not talk, just act. just make them available for those who need them. basic hygiene needs to be taken care of and life is stressful enough without worrying about your personal hygiene. it is your human right to have this taken care of, isn't it? we need to act now. amanda, alesha, thank you for coming in, and stevie, thank you for coming in, and stevie, thank you for talking to us. do take care. on facebook, bev says this is disgraceful in 2018 and it is on the government's head. and this one, sanitary products should be free.
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and this one, each product only costs £1 , so and this one, each product only costs £1, so why are we using poverty. how are the soiled items like hats and gloves disposed of? am i missing something? and on twitter, the government spends £30 billion on foreign aid when girls cannot afford sanitary products. you couldn't make it up. and charles, this is one very backwards country. still to come. pupil referral units take on some of the most troubled and vulnerable children in society. children as young as four will be given lessons on looking after their mental health. we will be speaking to someone health. we will be speaking to someone who has advised the government on their plans. let'sjoin any
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let's join any to mcveigh for the bbc news. the press association says detectives believe they have identified the suspected perpetrators of the novichok attack on the russian former spy, sergei skripal, and his daughter. the pair were targetted with the nerve agent in march of this year but have since recovered. meanwhile, an inquest will be opened this morning into the death of dawn sturgess, who was exposed to novichok in wiltshire last month. the police watchdog has warned of a real possibility that brexit will trigger a spike in hate crimes, and said forces must take action to tackle significant problems in the way offences are dealt with at the moment. in a review of hate crimes, her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary found inadequate
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responses in 89 of 180 cases it looked at. the government says it is clear all hate crimes are an acceptable and will ensure victims get the support they need. eight people, including two who died, have been recognised by the queen for their bravery during last year's london bridge terror attack. three of them are to receive the george medal which is awarded for gallantry. eight people were killed last june when borough market and london bridge were targetted by attackers. donald trump has now said that he holds vladimir putin personally responsible for russian interference in the 2016 us election. at a press conference on monday president trump seemed to put russia's denials above the conclusions of us intelligence agencies. he's since said he misspoke, suggesting no other us president has ever been tougher on russia. it has been a record year for
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british book sales while the sales of digital books fell. the publishing industry as a whole is worth £5.7 billion. that is a summary worth £5.7 billion. that is a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you, let's join chris for a sport update. danny willett is three under par. he has been injured and his form has been struggling but showing signs he is getting back into it. alex oxlade—chamberlain here, bad news for liverpool fans. he has had surgery on for liverpool fans. he has had surgery on his knee after the injury against roma. he will be out for the whole of the season. that is coming
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from jurgen klopp. bad news for liverpool fans, alex oxlade—chamberlain out for the whole of the season. and alison, he is going the £67 million to liverpool. let's see how good he is... pretty good, worth 67 million. let's get to the tour de france. britain's geraint thomas leads with chris froome — the defending champion in second. thomas now wears the leader's yellow jersey after winning stage 11. froome came in second. stage 12 of 21 today — possibly the hardest stage of this year's tour de france with 3—mountains to earlier this year we were invited into hawkswood primary school, a pupil referral unit in north—east london.
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its where children who have been excluded from mainstream to school are taught. we had exclusive access to the inner workings of the school, which has been rated outstanding by ofted. here s a reminder of our time there. it is a big day for kayden. his first with a new class at hawkswood pupil referral unit. he's only six, yet he's in danger of being permanently excluded from his mainstream school. i did really bad stuff, like pushing other people and punching some people. and sometimes kicked them. kayden, you are very good at that. he's recently, from what we understand, been on a reduced timetable so he wouldn't be in class all day. do you know why you did that? i don't know, i think they got me in a really bad mood. people do that sometimes. yeah. so our aim would be to get him back into a mainstream classroom
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where he can be there all day, accessing the curriculum like all of his peers. he's in a class with four other children who are in the same boat. today is the first time they've all been together. when they all first came in i think they were a bit bubbly, and a bitjumpy because theyjust needed to feel secure in the space. and they needed to feel secure with me. and a new environment is testing one of kayden's triggers — noise. he called me a baby. know i didn't. yes you did. boys? you don't like noise, do you? no. you were hurting people. that's why my nan and grandad got ear defenders, to block off every single noise. you need to speak nicely to your friends and if you can't do that... scared by the noise, kayden has started to act up.
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we are going to move you out of this area. what do you want me to do? why are you doing this to me. no! i want to be left alone. kayden? i want to be left alone. come on. leave me alone. i just want to be left alone. kayden, i will take you to the room now to the blue chair... just want to be left alone. why can't i be left alone? you will be left alone, it's not safe for me to leave you here. i want to be left alone. i can leave you alone, but not here. yes.
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here is not the place. i can leave you alone inside the classroom on the blue chair. i don't want to go. you know you are not allowed to hit me, kayden. i don't care. 0k, well i do care. i don't care. why are we here on the floor? are you able to use your words and tell me what's happened? ok, that's fine, but this isn't a very safe place to be, in the middle of the corridor. i don't care. you don't need to care, you just need to know that we do. he almost ran from the noise. i would say it distressed him and that led on to undesired behaviour. he wanted a little bit of peace and quiet to calm down. kayden, can we go to a safer place than the corridor, where it's a bit quieter? he was kind of stuck in the moment, so you try a few different tactics. well done. can i show you something before we go? want to show you something here, look. in here? we said, have you seen our new library, do you want to go in? and that was it, he
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came right out of it. that's my favourite book. no way, that's your favourite book? serious? oh my goodness. do you know what we are going to do? that was distraction. in that moment, that's what brought him down again. well one major problem for pupil referral units is attracting teachers to work inside them. research out today from the institute for public policy research has found the most vulnerable pupils are over twice as likely to have unqualified teachers. but why? and what impact does that have on children? joining us now, heather and her 13—year—old son sean. sean was excluded from mainstream school injune and is now in a pupil referal unit. also matt westwood who previously worked as a teacher, despite not being qualified, but now works in a pru. and kiran gill is the founder of a programme called the difference, which aims to get more teachers working in alternative provision and pupil referral units. and catherine davies is the executive teacher at the hawkswood
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pupil referral unit. kieron, explain how it is unqualified people are working as teachers in any school? it is possible to teach without qualification. it is good practice those teachers are put on a teaching qualification but they are the least experienced in the school. as full—time teachers or assistance? as full—time teachers or assistance? as full—time teachers. in referral units they have been rising every year and units they have been rising every yearand are units they have been rising every year and are now 16% so you are now more likely to have an unqualified teacher. why is that? i don't see it asa teacher. why is that? i don't see it as a huge problem, it is not like mainstream schools have to follow the national curriculum where as referral units can be in at a vivid
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and adjust in the curriculum they teach to motivate students. we saw the example earlier of the young boy and his issues. very intelligent young man and his ability to manage his behaviour and think things through. we have excellent unqualified teachers who have those skills from life, maybe to football or other work—related organisations and want to be teachers. i am quite open and! and want to be teachers. i am quite open and i am proud of our unqualified teachers. many go on to be qualified as teachers. but what are the qualifications you need to turn children's' lives around. we are teaching individuals and you have to understand the holistic needs of those children. is it letting them down academically because in the end they should come out with qualifications and an education? it hasn't worked in mainstream, so teachers who focus
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just on academic qualifications, if thatis just on academic qualifications, if that is their sole focus and they haven't got the wider skills they need to understand the children's needs and reach them, it hasn't been working. they come to us because something different is needed. i can speak on behalf of of hawkswood, the children perform in line with the curriculum, we just need to do something different. whether people have a teaching degree at that point, the aim is to go on and get it but personally i would rather have an unqualified teacher who is empathic, ambitious and sees the child as an individual and meet their needs, than somebody who has a piece of paper who has been to university and got that, because they have got it on the job. shaun cummings you were permanently excluded from mainstream school in june, how does the teaching compere
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now? you get a lot more attention than you would than in mainstream schools because there are less pupils. however, since then, not as many people, everybody is at different levels and teachers have to look at other students who maybe aren't as academically bright as others and they have to pay more attention to certain students. do you feel like the academic stuff is less important than where you are now? it is still important but mental health and issues that went on in your mainstream school are also a priority. how have you found that for you? i have found it quite helpful because there have been a lot of issues regarding my education
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andl lot of issues regarding my education and i feel the attention i get in terms of the issues that have gone on and how they can help me, has helped a lot. it is really good they are doing that. how do you feel, heather about sean being in a pupil referral unit and the potential impact on his academic outcome? my concerns are that the academic side might get hindered. just before his exclusion he were starting to do his end of term exams. now he has gone into a smaller environment with other children where they are at different levels, i think with him only been there a few days, the teacher said she doesn't see him being there too long because they wa nt to being there too long because they want to get him back into mainstream school. but in the short term, we don't know how long he will be there, it could be six months, it
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could be a year. i do feel his academics will be hindered because where he started and where he is at now, i don't know if it will affect him later on because they are catering for each individual child. if you have a child slightly more advanced, where does it leave them? catherine, you have kids of wide—ranging academic abilities in these places? we have indeed. from what i have heard about sean's situation, he is not able to access the academic curriculum because of issues that have to be supported, his well—being, his mental health, his well—being, his mental health, his reactions to certain situations. until you get it right he will never succeed to his academic potential anyway. it sounds like it is a turnaround short—stay that is right for him and given time, sometimes they stay for six weeks, sometimes they stay for six weeks, sometimes they stay for three months. at the
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aim is to get them back to mainstream, but you cannot ignore the fact individual children like sean and other children, they need a different type of education, they need a different type of personal skills to be able to cope with life. but is what we are strong at. pupil referral units have the extra to look at well— being, referral units have the extra to look at well—being, mental health, coping mechanisms, controlling anger and reacting to certain situations. i have no doubts, given time, if he works on those things, he will be backin works on those things, he will be back in mainstream and he will be excelling. but to keep him in mainstream where there are key areas blocking his success, it that is on right. most parents have the fear they will not be academically challenged, but after a few weeks they see that isn't the case. we ca re they see that isn't the case. we care passionately about the academic side and we know it will help them thrive in the future, but there are barriers. quickly, does that sound
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fair enough to you? i think it is definitely a good point. when you have all these things going on inside your head, it can sometimes distract you from learning. then you are not excelling to your full potential. it is good to get those problems out of the way so you can excel to the best of your potential. you have been in mainstream schools and you are now in a pupil referral unit? part of my training was in a mainstream school but i have primarily been in a pupil referral unit from the start of my career. what do you think of unqualified teachers being in pupil referral units? does, in teachertraining, does the emotional intelligence and the focus on well—being in the round come into play when you are being taught how to be a teacher?”
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started off as an unqualified teacher. very quickly, i think i started, i am only talking about myself in this situation, i started to feel very limited in what i could provide for my students. very quickly i started to look at how i could train as a professional teacher. that was in a mainstream school? no, i pupil referral unit. when i started to look it was difficult to get training in a pupil referral unit. my route has been very different to that kind of mainstream teacher. sorry to interrupt, if he felt he felt you did need to go on and be properly trained, it sounds like you didn't
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fill you could deliver on what the kids needed in the pupil referral unit? what my training has given me is the ability to have an academic platform for me to build a solid teaching practice. as well as working in a pupil referral unit whilst training, that helped me specialised, working with very vulnerable students. in an ideal world, we are hearing about the good aspects that can come from people who are not trained, but in an ideal world, presumably absolutely everybody teaching kids, where ever they are, should be trained. why is it so hard? the data we have got todayis it so hard? the data we have got today is to show we are not attracting enough teachers into what can be the most important and rewarding part of teaching. it should be seen as the pinnacle of the profession to teach in a pupil referral unit, where you are not
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just making progress with children who have lost their learning but dealing with complex issues going on in their lives which means they have fallen out of the mainstream. that isn't happening so we are not attracting enough teachers to do this fantasticjob. attracting enough teachers to do this fantastic job. i attracting enough teachers to do this fantasticjob. i had matthew speak about how he progressed from just giving students stuff to do, to actually planning where they wanted to be and what to do next. we need more pupil referral units like hawkswood, which is excellent. only 1% of excluded children who finish their education in a pupil referral unit will get the gcses they need. the cost to the state of not having the transformation educational facilities for these children leads to vulnerability in crime and
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vulnerability in prison. all of these can happen if the education system isn't fixing the gaps for pupils. it costs the state about £1.2 billion for last year's cohort of excluded students. we need more brilliant teachers like matthew into the profession. we need to make sure there is specialist training for those teachers because they need to be the most specialist, not the least specialist. we need more people in our pupil referral units who can train people like maggie because we have seen vacancies rise in the senior leadership team is. catherine is very passionate about the work that is being done in the unit, saying the point is it is about addressing other issues aside from academic, what is going on academically in order to get out and back into mainstream. if that is the absolute goal of these places, there are two conflicting things going on?
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we need brilliant pastoral staff around pupils who are not the train, but not teaching lessons and the need to attract more fantastic teachers to teach lessons so the two things can work in sync. this story has happened because we expect government figures to show a rise in the number of people to have been excluded. we have more vulnerable children falling out of the education system and that is why we have set up the difference. it recruits brilliant teachers to come into leadership positions in pupil referral units and help development in teaching and learning and also learning about the mental health needs of their pupils. but the end of the two—year programme they go back into mainstream with that specialism to reduce the number of children who get excluded in the first place. thank you all very much, it is something we will talk about later. we will have the figures on the number of referrals
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to pupil referral units, which will be out later. meanwhile, we have had some new statistics out on crime figures. they arejust some new statistics out on crime figures. they are just through to us andi figures. they are just through to us and i think we can bring them to you? we and i think we can bring them to you ? we have and i think we can bring them to you? we have got the latest figures from the office for national statistics, knife crime is up 16%, murder has gone up by 12%. those figures cover april 2017 to the end of march 2018 in england and wales. a separate crime survey for england and wales suggest there is no change in overall crime levels. those figuresjust in overall crime levels. those figures just out. in overall crime levels. those figuresjust out. children in overall crime levels. those figures just out. children are going to be taught a new lessons on mental health and anxiety. they will be called health education and will help youngsters understand how to stay safe online and the importance
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of healthy relationships. announcing the plans, the education secretary says the changes are long overdue. so much has changed in the world. you think back to 18 years ago the last time this guidance was updated, we didn't have snapchat and we didn't have instagram. we didn't have many different ways people now interact with each other as a norm on the internet. we talked as grown—ups about having to distinguish between the online world and the off—line world and how they are different. for children, they don't make that distinction it is all part of normality. that is a new thing for us, but for kids coming through the school system now, we have to make sure we reflect that. we talk now to the head teacher and an adviserfor the we talk now to the head teacher and an adviser for the department for education on these proposals. some might say teaching four—year—olds about depression and anxiety, isn't
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it too young? thank you very much and good morning. i think what we are doing in the guidance published today you have just heard the education secretary talking about is identifying key elements to support young people to manage their mental health better. it will be explored with them in a way that will be age—appropriate from the beginning of primary school, through to secondary school. we won't be talking with very young children about very complex, mental health problems. we can support them by talking about their feelings, learning to identify when they are feeling perhaps a little bit sad. accessing the kind of help and support they might need to get them through those experiences, which they might encounter, whatever their age, going from primary age right through to secondary school. our mental health issues a problem for kids as young as four or is it about
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actually just giving kids as young as four or is it about actuallyjust giving kids the tools for how to deal with their emotions and feelings from a young age before issues potentially hit?” and feelings from a young age before issues potentially hit? i think it issues potentially hit? i think it is exactly that. it is enabling children to identify how they are feeling, learn to be open about how they are feeling, explore their emotions and learning names for the key emotions they might be going through. critically learning that not all feelings of sadness or negative emotions are necessarily mental health problems. there are the ups and downs of normal human life and enabling children to understand that and understand where an line is crossed and the normal range of emotions become something thatis range of emotions become something that is problematic, that they need help and support to get through, is going to be an important part of this education. it is a massive leap
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in terms of how we talk about mental health in this country. you saying giving children the understanding for even to put a label on the emotions they are feeling might seem to some, a little bit alien. they might think isn't it obvious what you are feeling? but we all know, it isn't always? giving these things names and encouraging young people to talk about them, named them and tell them it is ok to talk about them is a really big step forward and this new health education which is being proposed today for consultation, will be the first time there will be monday to re—lessons across the spectrum of schools in england talk explicitly about mental health as well other aspects of this education including physical health. thank you forjoining us. let us know your thoughts on that and the usual ways of getting in touch.
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right now, let's catch up with the weather. we have got some rain on the way. not for everyone, but there is another fine start to the day. the warm weather continues, a bit hot for one or two of you. this from midlothian earlier. cloud in the skies which has been pushing up from the south and the west. it is thin, high—level cloud turning sunshine hazy in places. this strip of cloud will bring rain for some of you as you finish today and go into tonight. most will be dry, sunny spells with one or two isolated showers. many gardens will go com pletely showers. many gardens will go completely dry to the day and warmer as well. temperatures up to 27, 20 8 degrees in the south east corner, low 20s across the north. pleasant conditions rather than anything too hot further north. temperatures in
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the 20s for the first day of the openin the 20s for the first day of the open in carnoustie. this afternoon will see more in the way of wind picking up and splashes of rain tomorrow. the rain comes in tonight, in scotland and northern ireland in particular. not everywhere, about a quarter of an inch or civil and that will push into north—west england and north west wales by the time we hit daylight tomorrow. most places will be dry tonight and mild across the north. places staying in the teams for a couple and muggy in the south east corner. it is part of england that will best be favoured for sunshine tomorrow. cloud amounts will gradually increase. cloudy day for many with brightness in the north—west highlands and islands. we could import one or two intense thunderstorms towards the south east corner. warming up when the sun comes up temperatures down on today's values. the ridge of high pressure building in behind a call from bringing air in off the
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atlantic, so nothing desperately hot on the first day of the weekend. remnants of the weather front will be across some southern counties. that could be some gardens back get a drink of rain through the day. isolated showers and one or two isolated showers elsewhere. most schools across england and breaking up schools across england and breaking up and pleasantly warm at 18 to 26 degrees. on sunday more cloud to scotla nd degrees. on sunday more cloud to scotland and northern ireland and eventually northern england. greater chance of a few showers and longer spells of rain across the highlands. much of england and wales will be dry. temperatures are on the up again around 28 degrees. as we go into next week we're back above the 30 degrees across southern areas. a good deal more comfortable further north. hello. it's thursday. it's ten o'clock. i'm joanna gosling. the police watchdog has warned of a real possibility that brexit will trigger a spike in hate crimes and says the way police deal with such incidents across england and wales
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is inconsistent and patchy. the initial response is key, because if the police get it right at that stage, then the quality of the service follows from that. we'll hear from the police and from hate crime victims shortly. pupil referal units take on some of the most difficult and vulnerable children in society. new research shows they're more than twice as likely to have unqualified teachers. my my concern is that the academic side might be hindered. we have examples of excellent unqualified teachers do come to us with skills from life, maybe through football or other work—related organisations and wants to be teachers. the latest government figures shows the number of excluded pupils continues to rise, so we ask what more can be done to support children? after cliff richard wins his court case against the bbc,
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should there be a right to anonymity for those accused of sexual assault? here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the day's news. the new brexit secretary has said it is time to intensify negotiations with the european union. dominic raab is due in brussels for his first round of talks since taking over from david davis. his visit will coincide with the publication of a document by the european commission outlining what it would be like if britain exits the eu without a deal. the press association says detectives believe they have identified the suspected perpetrators of the novichok attack on the russian former spy sergei skripal and his daughter. the pair were targetted with the nerve agent in march of this year but have since recovered. meanwhile, an inquest will be opened this morning into the death of dawn sturgess, who was exposed to novichok in wiltshire last month.
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with us now is sarah campbell. is there any more detail at all on what detectives have apparently said about this development in their investigation? we should very much say that this has been attributed to the newsagency pa, and it has not been independently confirmed to us by the metropolitan police. but as you said, they are saying that investigators have identified the suspected perpetrators of the novel chopper attack. they say this is through cctv and they cross checked this with records of people entering the country at around that time. the pa are also saying that investigators are sure the suspects are russian. that is the latest information. the latest information we have got from the police, no update from what we had at the weekend, which is that police are still conducting this huge surge in
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the salisbury area and they have recovered around 400 items which they think are linked to the latest poisoning of dawn sturgess and charlie rowley, who came into contact with nova choc on the 30th ofjune. and we know that dawn stu rg ess, ofjune. and we know that dawn sturgess, aged 34, sadly died. her inquest will be held today, which might give us more information about this ongoing investigation which is very much continuing. thank you. the police watchdog has warned of a real possibility that brexit will trigger a spike in hate crimes, and said forces must take action to tackle significant problems in the way offences are dealt with at the moment. in a review of hate crimes, her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary found inadequate responses in 89 of 180 cases it looked at. the government says it is clear that all hate crimes are unacceptable, and will ensure victims get the support they need. official figures show a big increase
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in knife crime in england and wales in the past year. figures up until the end of march show a 16% rise. the total number of recorded crimes increased by 11%. however, the separate crime survey, based on people's experiences, suggests no overall change in crime levels. eight people, including two who died, have been recognised by the queen for their bravery during last year's london bridge terror attack. three of them are to receive the george medal, which is awarded for gallantry. eight people were killed last june when borough market and london bridge were targetted by attackers. donald trump has now said that he holds vladimir putin personally responsible for russian interference in the 2016 us election. at a news conference on monday, president trump seemed to put russia's denials above the unanimous conclusion of us intelligence agencies. he's since said he misspoke, suggesting no other us president has ever been tougher on russia. it's been a record year
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for british book sales according to new figures. sales of printed books have risen for the third year in a row, while sales of digital e—books fell. the publishing industry as a whole is now worth £5.7 billion. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10.30. thank you very much. now let's catch up thank you very much. now let's catch up with the sport with chris. good morning. the open championship is under way. beautiful day for the early starters. sunshine and very little wind. 140 to go out or thereabouts. tiger woods just before 3:30pm and rory mcilroy just before woods just before 3:30pm and rory mcilroyjust before 1pm. woods just before 3:30pm and rory mcilroy just before 1pm. on woods just before 3:30pm and rory mcilroyjust before 1pm. on the cause right now is danny willett, playing well. wonderful to see. very close to the top of the leaderboard at three under par. he won the masters in 2060 but he has had a terrible time since. it is little—known erik van rooyen from south africa. he plays on the
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sunshine tour, the championship, if this one is the premier league. little—known but leading the open. ash turner, we hope to hear more about him. he tees off at carnoustie at 7:15pm. he overcame cerebral palsy as a child. he took up golf to aid with his balance and he qualified for the open just a few weeks ago. this is his first major tournament. it was difficult growing up tournament. it was difficult growing up obviously. i got diagnosed with a mild form of cerebral palsy when i was young and the first thing the doctors thought was that i might not be able to walk properly. i was too young to remember any of it, which is probably for the best. i started doing physio and my dad thought i should practice my balance and so i got into golf and i loved it from them. good luck to him. this is the
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leaderboard as it stands. very early stages with four rounds to play and erik van rooyen leading by one from danny willet. sandy lyle, the former winner, it still going for it, 60 yea rs winner, it still going for it, 60 years old, winner, it still going for it, 60 yea rs old, two winner, it still going for it, 60 years old, two under par at the moment. we hope he makes the cut at the end of day two when the best 70 golfers go through to the final two rounds. we understand liverpool's new and very expensive goalkeeper will have a medical today. they're paying £67 million for the roma goalkeeper. he is the man in the middle with his thumb up. he is pleased about the move. he is a brazilian goalkeeper with a great record. liverpool desperate to find a replacement for loris karius who had a terrible champions league final a few months ago. alex oxlade—chamberlain is expected to miss the majority of the new season. that is according to managerjoejurgen new season. that is according to managerjoe jurgen klopp. new season. that is according to managerjoejurgen klopp. he was injured in april playing in the
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champions league and he will be out now for most of the new season. how celtic getting on in the qualifying rounds? very well. james forrest and two from moussa dembele. so celtic have got through to the second quaffing round of the champions league. 3—0 on the night and 6—0 on aggregate. ryan hall, known as one of the hardest men to stop, will leave leeds rhinos after more than a decade at the end of the super league season. england's all time leading try—scorer will join the sydney roosters in 2019. hall won six grand finals and touched down 231 times during his time with the rhinos. don't make him angry! that's all the sport for now. thank you, chris. a watchdog says police in england and wales must tackle significant problems in handling hate crime ahead of a possible rise in such offences after brexit.
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her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary found inadequate responses in 89 of 180 cases it reviewed. it said hate crime rose after the referendum and the same could happen when the uk leaves the eu next year. i'm joined by suresh grover, who is director of the monitoring group charity, which works with people suffering violence and harassment, and assistant chief constable mark hamilton from the national police chiefs council. we are also joined by two people who have been affected by hate crime. sahar al—faifi in cardiff and sulayman munir in amsterdam. thank you all very much forjoining us. i will come to you first of all, suresh, because you are a victim of hate crime in the 1970s. he was stabbed by a gang of skinheads. we are talking now about how hate crime is dealt with these days. tell us
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what it was like then to see how far we have come. it was a period called pakistani bashing, and i am not actually pakistani or muslim, but if you are seen as actually pakistani or muslim, but if you are seen as the other, you attacked almost like sport. i was attacked almost like sport. i was attacked by people i knew in school. it was reported to the police and a senior officer came to our house and i never saw the police again. i saw the perpetrator walking outside my house on a daily basis and i decided to leave nelson in lancashire, because i was so frustrated and demoralised. it was one of those moments which made me work in the field that i do. i was actually a sports man, into music, very happy—go—lucky guy. i didn't think about racism. i didn't really think i was about racism. i didn't really think iwas indian about racism. i didn't really think i was indian or asian. ijust thought i was a young kid in school. but it changes your life if you
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don't get the right response. we set up don't get the right response. we set up the monitoring group after someone's death and we have dealt with 180 racial murders since. i was a coordinatorfor with 180 racial murders since. i was a coordinator for the stephen lawrence family campaign. the period after brexit, which is what i want to come too, was very similar to the environment in the 1970s. we had a golden period after the stephen lawrence inquiry. the police began to ta ke lawrence inquiry. the police began to take on the issues properly. and there was a centralised, coordinated effort to deal with the problem. there were specialist officers. but after five years, those processes and procedures, the infrastructure that was cultivated with community groups, it vanished. we have clients at the moment to wait months to see at the moment to wait months to see a police officer. i have had letters
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from police officers who have refused to see clients because they don't see us as an advocacy agency, even though it is in their policy to see them. i have clients with photographs who have been beaten up, whose corridors have been daubed with the n word or the p word which is coming back into schools, and there is a rise in racial violence and crimes over the last decade. we are ina and crimes over the last decade. we are in a period which is alarming. there are cuts and police services. iam not there are cuts and police services. i am not saying that is the only reason why we have become so complacent. i think mcpherson identified three reasons for the lack of conviction during the stephen lawrence inquiry. it was to do with incompetence, lack of police leadership, and institutionalised racism. those other elephants in room still. let's bring in mark from the national police chief counsel.
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suresh giving us a lot to think about. i started by saying let's see how far we have come since the 19705. what how far we have come since the 1970s. what we are hearing from her majesty inspectorate of constabulary, who looked at 180 cases, and found inadequate responses in 89 of them, 65 of the victims were not seen at all and in 73 there was an average of five days for them to be visited. what is your view on how much of a priority hate crime is for the police and how it is being dealt with? compared to what people experience in the 705, 805 and 905, the understanding of hate crime and police 5ervice5 805 and 905, the understanding of hate crime and police services is far advanced. i think that police 5ervice5 far advanced. i think that police services do understand it far better than we everdid services do understand it far better than we ever did and i think the re5pon5e5 than we ever did and i think the responses are better than ever they were. that said, the standards that were. that said, the standards that we set was the standard again5t we set was the standard against which hmrc carried out the inspection. —— hmic. i
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which hmrc carried out the inspection. —— hmic. lam not unhappy that they have pointed out the constituencies and they have given us recommendations for how we can improve. i think we are very committed to dealing with hate crime, among the other issues in the criminal justice crime, among the other issues in the criminaljustice system. crime, among the other issues in the criminal justice system. our processes are far above were many countries would be but that is not good enough. i think the hmic report has highlighted to us that more needs to be done. more understanding has got to be had and there are significant inconsistencies around the country in how we identify and fly kate crimes. while it can be depressing in media reports, ithink this is a very useful report. it allows us to point our efforts more clearly towards addressing problems.
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sahar, you clearly towards addressing problems. sa har, you have clearly towards addressing problems. sahar, you have been subjected to verbal abuse. tell us what your experiences have been, in terms of what you have been on the receiving end of, and how it has been dealt with by the police. thank you first of all for having me today. as you can see, i am of all for having me today. as you can see, lam a of all for having me today. as you can see, i am a veiled woman, so visibly muslim, so a lot of the abuse i have faced is islamophobic abuse, mostly all verbally apart from one where somebody attempted to ta ke from one where somebody attempted to take off my face veil. but one incident that i will never forget is in the hospital where i work, when i saw two teenagers trying to steal bicycles from hospital site. i tried to stop them and straightaway they started swearing at me using the f word, muslim, go back to your country. at that moment, one of my lab colleagues was passing by and she stood by me and she protected me until the police came and provided a statement. the question is how the
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police dealt with it. that is another thing. police dealt with it. that is anotherthing. in my police dealt with it. that is another thing. in my case, the police could not find the perpetrators. they gave excuses like the camera was not in the right direction and i didn't give them enough details about the perpetrators and so on. there is another incident. i came across last week in newport when a veiled woman had her veil pulled off and the way she described it to me, she said it wasn'tjust islamophobic she described it to me, she said it wasn't just islamophobic but she described it to me, she said it wasn'tjust islamophobic but it was also a sexual assault because she felt naked. imagine if a woman was wearing a miniskirt and somebody pulled down her miniskirt. how would you feel? this was exactly what she felt. the incident was recorded on the camera and the police managed to catch the man within two hours but he was released without a fine. that was very devastating for the victim.
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she had evidence. she didn't receive enough support. she felt that she wasn't taken seriously. a lot of these hate crimes, islamophobic hate crimes, they are gendered. what do i mean by that? a lot of the perpetrators happen to be male, white, working—class, committing these physical and verbal abuses against the weakest of the society, who to be muslim women's network in our case “— who to be muslim women's network in our case —— muslim women in our case, in our world, our case —— muslim women in our case, in ourworld, because our case —— muslim women in our case, in our world, because of the continuous normalisation of hate and bigotry nowadays. sorry to interrupt you but i want to bring in the other speakers as well because i want to hear all of your experiences. tell us what has happened with your family. you are joining us what has happened with your family. you arejoining us from amsterdam but you live in this country and you have had things happen here. thank you for having me on. i live in reading but i'm out of
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the country at the moment. we are following brexit. one of my friends was almost run over. that was in the immediate aftermath of brexit. following that, my daughter, who was ten yea rs following that, my daughter, who was ten years old at the time, someone told her to go back to her country. a few days after that, my wife went to pick up my daughter from school, and on the way back home, walking back home, a motorcyclist pulled over next to them and pulled up his visor and said you f word this and that, you terrorist, go back to your own country, and then drove off. things like that are very shocking. to lift up your visor, swear at someone to lift up your visor, swear at someone and ride up again, it really affects the confidence of my daughter at the time. but going one step further, we had a community
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centre that opened a few weeks ago in reading and there was a far right protest. i am a talkative person and i try to engage with the far right activists, add a couple of individuals said we don't want to talk to you. come round the side of the crowd and we will fight you. they repeatedly said to me come out and fight. it is that mentality that we have. the police anticipate that post—brexit there will be a spike in hate crime and i think that assumption is probably correct. sorry to interrupted but i want to get marc's reaction to what he is hearing from you and sahar. obviously they are talking about things that have happened that they have described as shocking, devastating. we heard suresh saved
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his life changing when you are on the receiving end of this. do the police have the resources to be tackling these at what is the best way to tackle things that run across a broad range from purple to physical? —— verbal to physical?” talk to victims of hate crime regularly and they are appalling crimes. anyone who has been a victim of it knows that it is extremely personal and it affects you very deeply and it affect the community you come from. i want to recognise that. i have the utmost sympathy for the stories this morning. there is a big issue for the police service in making sure that victims feel that they are being taken seriously and that we provide an effective response. police resourcing has been under pressure for a long time, not just in this area of criminality. that is not an excuse for poor responses. what hmic has identified
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is exactly what we are talking about ourselves, making sure that at the point of contact, victims are understood and the crime is defined properly, be it racial, religious, transgender, disability, sexual orientation. there is an appropriate response that meets their needs. and also if there is evidence, for readable chance in the criminal justice system of getting someone to court and allowing justice. that is where we want to be and that is what we wa nt where we want to be and that is what we want to do. sometimes that sounds unconvincing to victims, but that is entirely what i have been trying to do and others chief police officers have been trying to do across the country. this report wants us to do better. we will do that. we are listening to stories of the victims again and it raises for me, as it does every day, the need to do more.
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thank you all very much. do let us know your thoughts as well and your experiences. coming up: the hockey world cup is due to start on saturday, but two of its biggest stars are missing thanks to injuries you're more likely to expect in boxing. the number of pupils in england being permanently excluded or excluded from school for a fixed period is rising according to the latest figures from the department for education. more than 7500 pupils were permanantly excluded — a thousand more than the year before. boys are three times by likely to be excluded than girls and those with special educational needs account for half of all exclusions. in a moment we will speak to logan who was excluded last year and now goes toa was excluded last year and now goes to a pupil referral unit. he is here with his mother. earlier this year we had exclusive
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access to hawkswood primary pupil referral unit to see the work the staff do to try to reintegrate children back into mainstream education. at my old school i was hitting and punching and kicking and it was really bad. the worst time was when six or seven people had to hold me down on the floor and i spent eight months without being in school. it wasn't good. it wasn't good because it made my brain hurt. i didn't even learn anything. my sister had to teach me, you know, nursery, nursery, nursery. fouradd four, stuff like that. why do you think you were kicked out of school? because you are naughty. do we say naughty? bad. do we say bad? what did she do? she made the wrong choices. we teach the children that
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they have a choice when they feel frustrated and anxious and angry. we teach them that they are in control of those choices. well done for doing the right thing. jamaal, hands in yourlap. if doing the right thing. jamaal, hands in your lap. if you interrupt me again, you will go on the timeout chair to think about it and i don't wa nt chair to think about it and i don't want that. but you need to make a good choice and we are not interrupted when i am speaking. understand? good interrupted when i am speaking. understand ? good boy. interrupted when i am speaking. understand? good boy. we have two minutes until lunchtime. strict rules are always enforced. nicholas is refusing to wash his hands before lunch. you need to wash your hands. time to go to the timeout chair. is he going to wash his hands or go to the timeout chair? the timeout chair. fair enough. at times that can lead to a physical intervention to keep the child say. the meaning
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of restraining, that is when they hold you down because you are being unsafe. i understand it here because they explain it in a more specific way. i have got to to make sure everybody is safe. we need to teach them from very early on that we can keep them emotionally and physically safe, and undesired behaviours will not be tolerated. but positive behaviours will be rewarded with attention or incentives or whatever that might be. well done, nicholas. that's ok but you have got to stay on the chair. if you are being unsafe... say if i came into this room and i threw the table, then one of the staff would call assistance and what they would start holding me down because i am being unsafe. nicholas, we need to make sure that you are safe and you are staying on the chair. do you remember? i have
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seen the chair. do you remember? i have seen it before while i am in class. some children have been held. i don't know the reason why and it is none of my business. i have just stayed out of it. we need to wash our hands before we have our lunch. if we had said never mind after five minutes, then next day when it came to washing his hands, he could have potentially showed us that their behaviour because he would have learned that behaviour got him out of washing his hands. some of the children, potentially their families are struggling with housing and they are in quite cramped living conditions. some children have come from a background of some kind of abuse. but not all children have, and i think that is really important to stress. that is a slight misconception that all the children who attend the pupil referral unit have come from an
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abusive home, and that is incorrect. the majority of parents are working. trying really hard to provide for their children. but somewhere along their children. but somewhere along the line, something has gone slightly wrong. it is home time now and we have collected these items that have two of the new pupils' pockets, but this is not completely uncommon. we find that children with attachment issues and they are trying to form new attachments with the staff here, they feel that they need to take something from here and take it home with them so that they feel connected to hear, the place they felt safe and contained today, and ta ke felt safe and contained today, and take it back home, to another place where they feel safe and contained. we can speak now to logan, who attends the pupil referral unit, hawkswood, that we saw in that clip. he is with his mother kerry. cheryl pheonix is from
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the black child agenda which supports children and families facing exclusion. and also with us is the labour mp emma hardy. emma is a member of the education select committee, which has been cheryl pheonix is from the black child agenda looking into this issue. the issue of pupil referral units and unqualified teachers. logan, while we were watching that about your school, i asked you how long your school, i asked you how long you had been there and you immediately said when you come in seven months and 19 days as you seem to be better at maths than me! —— you immediately said one year, seven months and 19 days. ijust look at the day and i know. how do you like the day and i know. how do you like the school? it is good. i like it. what do you do there? maths. you have been there quite a while. how is it different to where you were before? does it suits you better? in what ways? yes. do you just like
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being there? i didn't really hear you. i whispered. in being there? i didn't really hear you. iwhispered. in what being there? i didn't really hear you. i whispered. in what way does it suits you better? i don't know. shall we ask your mum? what do you think? it has been fantastic since he came there. he was in mainstream school until your two and he went back to hawkswood as part of the referral unit. when he was in the referral unit. when he was in the referral unit, he was there for longer than the recommended 12 weeks, because it is normally only 12 weeks recommended for the referral unit. then he went back into mainstream school but he didn't learn anything. he had a complete block. his anxiety was at an all—time high. when he went into your reception, the way he was treated and the misunderstanding of the teachers, it's knocked his confidence. he was wetting the bed, having nightmares, patches of validation on his face. you can see that little blood spot on his face.
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the first day of hawkswood he had them all over his face because they had restrained him and it looked like lots of little spots everywhere. but the stress of him going to mainstream and the lack of understanding from the teachers and the lack of security, i think. it's completely caused a major meltdown for him. like an adult breakdown. it sounds like for you you are happy he is in the right place for him?” wasn't at first. why was that? because of the restraining techniques. he would come home and have marks across his face, literally all over his face. if he had a stressful day he would get them from one side to the other, but it was all over his face. i called a friend and i said, i am
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it was all over his face. i called a friend and i said, lam not it was all over his face. i called a friend and i said, i am not going to send him back. but i calmed down, i thought send him back, it is stressful for anybody on the first day. it is stressful for somebody to start a job for the first day, seven to send him back to a school which was used as kind of a disciplinary measure, rather than being better. he was sent there as the referral unit and that was for a naughty child. basically being told you're going to this referral unit because you are a naughty child. when he started hawkswood, it was the primary unit rather than the pru. now they are integrated. it must have been stressful for him. within the week, he had calmed down, was more relaxed. more understanding that the teachers care. we are
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straining you because we don't want you to hurt yourself or hurt other people but this behaviour is unacceptable. in mainstream school they didn't have that structure, they didn't have that structure, they would have to remove all the other children from the class and just be there to make sure he didn't hurt himself in any way. emma, the figures today is the number of kids going into prus is up. how do you say because as kerry is describing, the instincts around it are about there being a stigma but for kids in need,it there being a stigma but for kids in need, it can be absolutely transformational and the teachers are in these places and they can be some of the finest? absolutely, from some of the finest? absolutely, from some of the evidence people have given, they have felt the children had to break before they could access the help and support they needed. surely that is the wrong
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way? the prus we went to sea and the teachers we have spoken to are offering an incredible service, a tailored, inc personalised service. they feel loved, looked after and valued. my frustration is rather than saying send more children to prus or put them in an alternative provision, the answer should be to restore schools properly so every school can offer the same compassion and care. is it possible? it is with the right level of resourcing and the right level of resourcing and the way we look at our schools. if we go back 15, 20 years there weren't as many exclusions. things have changed and we need to look at the drivers for the change in behaviour in schools and what can be done to reverse them? every child should be in a school that suits them and not go to the anguish that
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kerry has described, first. what do you think, when you look at the outcomes for kids who have been in prus, it is not as good for kids who have been in mainstream schools and actually, when you look at the number of prisoners, it is extraordinary to note that one in two were excluded from school? exactly, our organisation, the black child agenda is for that reason. the disproportionate number of exclusions with specifically black boys, is rocketing and it is getting worse. why is that? because they are making schools academies, also direct discrimination and girls who have natural hair like mine they are ke pt have natural hair like mine they are kept in isolation up to four weeks ata time kept in isolation up to four weeks at a time and told by her is an
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a cce pta ble at a time and told by her is an acceptable from school. i don't see how my haircan acceptable from school. i don't see how my hair can prevent me from learning. tell me that again! boys came into school and they have been told their hair is an acceptable. i specifically asked a teacher not too far from here. specifically asked a teacher not too farfrom here. iasked if specifically asked a teacher not too far from here. iasked if the specifically asked a teacher not too farfrom here. iasked if the hair was long and straight, would that be a cce pta ble was long and straight, would that be acceptable and i told her to be careful how she answered, but the answer was yes. we have heard reports of children being put in isolation for having the wrong type of haircut. this stigma and the issue of putting children in isolation units in schools and the zero tolerance behaviour policy which is supposed to somehow fix these problems is driving these exclusions. that is a different perspective from what we are hearing about. if a child has behavioural issues for whatever reason and they
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are disruptive in class and needs special attention elsewhere, that is one thing, but are you saying kids are being permanently excluded from school... hairstyles. they dress in the same school uniform but when you have children with learning needs, who are not being identified when sometimes you can clearly see they have a learning need. but they have been identified and they have an education plan, but the school isn't following the plan, they end up falling behind. you have quite intelligent children filling up prus. i am in schools every day, hearings every day, i have been doing this since 2011 and since then today, i have not lost one case. that says to me, not lost a case where we have gone to the governors, which is a waste of time, then we
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have to go to independent review, which is independent of the school and they hear the facts and the evidence to do with the child and an sen worker will analyse the child's work, analyse their file and then say to the school, you haven't done the right thing. for me to have won every single case but one since 2011, there is a huge problem with the system. it is resource heavy and it cost a lot of money and time, our schools being lazy and finding it too easy to exclude? there are lots of different drivers and we have to look at some of the unintended consequences we have seen. one look at some of the unintended consequences we have seen. one of this is the growth in zero tolerance behaviour policies, where there is no flex in the system, no ability to differentiate. i was a teacher for 11 years and you know sometimes children walking with that rage you can feel and you may have a
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different way of handling them on that day and calm the situation down. if you have a zero tolerance policy, your answer is the same and you have no flex in the system. it comes down to accountability measures, it is how schools are judged. you value as a society, what do you judge? they are the things that count. if the only thing that cou nts that count. if the only thing that counts is academic achievement, if thatis counts is academic achievement, if that is the only measure we judge what a good school is, that is going to drive behaviours. why would you, asa to drive behaviours. why would you, as a headteacher, keep in your school, someone with a problem with attendance, someone who may not achieve very well and bring your results down and make your school look bad, when you can move them onto an alternative provision, solve the problem and your results look good. that is why we should be looking at why this is happening in schools. thank you all very much
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indeed. we've had this statement from the department for education informal or unofficial exclusions ? such as encouraging parents to take their children out of school ? are unlawful, and permanent exclusions should only be used as a last resort. sir cliff richard has called for people to the have the right to anonymity until they are charged after being awarded substantial damages after a judge ruled that the bbc had infringed his privacy rights when a police raid of his berkshire home was broadcast by the bbc in 2014. sir cliff was never arrested or charged over a historical child sexual abuse claim. the case has thrown a fresh spotlight on the question of whether anonymity should be granted for people accused of sexual assault, with many also saying that the ruling could have far reaching consequences for the freedom of the press. let's remind ourselves of the case. i can't really answer to many questions at the moment. i can't really answer too many
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questions at the moment. it's going to take a little while for me to get over the whole emotional factor. so i hope you'll forgive me. cheering and applause. thank you. viewers may remember the bbc put up a helicopter. sir cliff lived in a gated community and the only way to get the pictures, the bbc argued, was to send a helicopter up and that helicopter showed pictures of the police going into sir cliff richard's apartment. what is significant about this ruling is, the judge found that it wasn't that, if you like, the sensationalist nature of the reporting, the putting the helicopter up that breached sir cliff's privacy. it was the very fact that the bbc published his name and broadcast his name as a suspect, and i stress the word "suspect", in a police investigation. the case clearly confirms that
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individuals, including high profile ones, have a reasonable expectation of privacy in relation to police investigations. what transpired in august 2014 resulted from decisions taken by a only a small number of people at the bbc. however, it was as a direct result of those decisions that the impact on sir cliff over the last four years was so profound. the judge came to a clear conclusion that sir cliff's privacy rights were not outweighed by the bbc's rights to freedom of expression and that there did not exist, a public interest in identifying him. what this case established is that anyone who is a suspect in the early stages of a police investigation, before charge has a reasonable expectation that that matter should be kept private and not covered by the news media. that's the real significance of this ruling. it potentially changes the way in which the media can
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cover the early stages of a police investigation. it will put decision—making about naming individuals in the hands of the police over the public's right to know. we don't believe this is compatible with liberty and press freedoms. for all of these reasons, there is an important principle at stake. that is why the bbc is looking at an appeal. the issue of damages is with privacy, you can never undo the harm. we're never going to be able to not see the images of the police storming into sir cliff's house. but what the judge has obviously done is set the damages at the highest level to send a very clear message that this was completely wrong. we can speak now to ian murray from the society of editors, as well as sam armstong and honey lyons. sam was cleared of any wrongdoing after being accused of sexual assault, and honey waived her right to anonymity after she was assaulted
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in cambridge in 2016. thank you all forjoining us. ian, i will come to you first for a reaction on the ruling and the implications for journalism? reaction on the ruling and the implications for journalism ?m reaction on the ruling and the implications forjournalism? it was summed up quite well in your introduction and follow—up reports. what has taken everyone in the media by surprise is that, we expected helicopters flying overhead and it was likely to find no favour with thejudge when it was likely to find no favour with the judge when it came to invasion of privacy. what we didn't expect was the ruling by simply naming circle if in this case and any other person who is the subject of an investigation, even in the early stages is, as thejudge
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investigation, even in the early stages is, as the judge said, against the law. this is a surprise to everyone and why there is so much media coverage about this. what this means is it is a dampening of press freedom. it is a dampening, very much, on the public‘s right to know. you have this one case deciding a whole new set of restrictions on what the public can say, but only through the media. it won't affect social media. we have found this time and time again, we have had discussions about fake news, the powers that be will address the media, but seemingly put to one side and forget about the fact that the rest of the world is looking at social media. it won't stop one woman washing are going on in her neighbour's has putting it on social media but it will stop the newspaper reporting what is taking place. what is the issue of naming someone, why
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should somebody who hasn't been arrested have their name put in the public domain? it is difficult especially when it comes to individual cases. the case of sir cliff started with accusations against him, it proved unfounded and the police took no action. they are serious allegations for an allegation will be a nightmare for anyone. in the public‘s mind, and someone anyone. in the public‘s mind, and someone has referred to it as cliff's law. it humanises it. it is difficult to take a step back from it and say, the way that it went was too far and wrong but the whole principle here of actually saying we now put into the hands of very few people, perhaps the police, to say which people under investigation can be named. at the moment, the police, even though they have guidelines,
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which they broke in the case of sir cliff, to say we will not identify anyone under investigation. they can decide to do that and they do it quite often, they can choose to do it if they wish their name to get into the public domain, so other possible victims can come forward, witnesses can come forward. there has been in many cases where this has been in many cases where this has worked and people have been convicted on the basis of this. one presumes the police will continue to do this. and as a unsworth was saying on your report, it will be down to the public to decide —— down to the police to decide what the public has a right to know. sam, i mentioned you were publicly named over allegations and you were subsequently cleared of the allegations. what impact did being named have on you? i work in politics and an accusation like this makes it impossible. for 14 months i
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was suspended from myjob. i rarely left the house, it felt like the walls are crumbling in around me. the career i had spent a lot of hard work trying to build was snatched from me. that was by the publicity rather than the judicial process itself. what do you think about what has come out of the cliff richard case and the judge saying it was wrong even to name him?” case and the judge saying it was wrong even to name him? i agree with lord patten, he used to be the chair of the bbc trust. news editors don't have a particular problem with this ruling in itself, it's more they are concerned about the overall hostile approach the state seems to be taking to the press. it seems to be the consequences of being named are so the consequences of being named are so horrendous. cliff will never be back to where he was before. you cannot send the process of fact—finding, working out if
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something went on, into the punishment. if you do that, innocent people will have their lives ruined by false allegations, by fraudsters, frankly. honey, you are here because you have waived the automatic right to anonymity you have as a victim of a sex crime, what are your views on anonymity and the fact that obviously not everybody caught up in these situations has it and the impact we are hearing about on their lives as a result? i believe that while the bbc did go too far in getting the helicopter and filming his house, that wasn't right, but you do need to have names in the public domain. you need to have... the point is we need an honest conversations about these types of cases. i still find it difficult talking about what happened to me andl talking about what happened to me and i have been talking about it for
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three years now. if we leave it behind closed doors, every high—profile case we have like this is pushed under the carpet, we will not make any progress. we need to have honest conversations about this stuff. is there a difference between naming somebody before any charges have been brought and something being covered if and when it is proven? i think there is a difference. they're still need to be names in the press and in the public, maybe before an arrest has been made. sometimes in a lot of historical sex cases, you don't have enough evidence and if the name is out there, more victims can come forward. as you were saying, ian, it is not necessarily going to become the case that police will not be able to use the media to get cases out there where they do want people to come forward as a result. how
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important has that been in some cases? there is lots of evidence and my own experience of working in newsrooms for over four decades, the police would come reasonably often to the crime reporter and say, this isa name to the crime reporter and say, this is a name we would like published and out there because we genuinely believe there are other victims and witnesses that can come forward. this led to successful court cases. i cannot imagine that as we go forward , i cannot imagine that as we go forward, if this ruling remains that came from sir cliff's case the police wouldn't still want that. then you we will have this strange set of circumstances that the only names of people being investigated that appear in the media, will be the one the public knows that the police themselves have released this, so no smoke without fire. it lifts them on to another level, kind of thing. we know they did more and we are looking... this is
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ridiculous, there are two levels of investigations and enquiries and people that are subject to it. we are fast running out of time, it is good to talk to all of you. ian, sam and honey, thank you. with high profile incidents in football, boxing and rugby, sport's battle with concussion is very much in the public eye. but it's notjust an issue in the obvious sports, the women's hockey world cup starts this weekend in london, and two of england 5 biggest stars are missing the tournament after concussion sustained five months ago. our reporter katie shanahan went to look into an issue very close to her heart. harder, faster, stronger. as sport develops, concussion is becoming one of its biggest challenges. for me it is a personal issue too. i grew up playing hockey for england before a blow to the head made me decide to leave the sport and i haven't played since. and as london prepares to host the women's world cup, the sport i love is the latest to be thrust into the concussion spotlight.
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great britain have won the olympic gold medal. history makers in 2016, but for two of great britain's olympic gold medallists, there will be no home world cup. shona mccallin was concussed in a tour game back in february and i have come to see my old team—mate to find out how it's affecting herfive months on. it feels a little bit like a hangover in handcuffed. i've had ankle injuries, i've had knee injuries, i can still go out for dinner, still go and get a copy, still go and get a coffee, still drive home for the weekend. but with this, you can't. and it just takes over your whole life. there's been times where i've been looking down a dark tunnel and there's no light at the end. concussion is relentless, there have been times where i've thought, am i going to be able to get back to just having a normal life, first and foremost?
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then get back to playing hockey. six months down the line i am not clear with it and if i have to make a decision about what i'm going to do, then i'll have to make that decision. if shona's career is to get back on track, it will be down to her treatment with a big focus on concussion specific work, such as eye tracking and balance exercises. again, headache related to tasks that we are basically challenging her eye movements and also lots of rotation movement. she is absolutely fine doing cardiovascular work, but as soon as we start to challenge her on a bit more of a chaotic environment, tracking a ball for example, that's where it's been a little bit more difficult. shona's concussion was caused by a collision with another player. the main way athletes are concussed in other sports such as football and by in other sports such as football and rugby will stop but hockey carries the danger of being struck by a stick or buy a ball, as in my case. masks were introduced in 2015 but they are not allowed to wear them only for short corners. is it enough
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orders more expensive headgear need to be born, as in other sports like lacrosse and krkic? hockey authorities will say, how much of a change will be made to the game and what evidence is there to say how many concussions are occurring from defenders on the line wearing the full facial masks? it is about looking at the evidence, looking at the options and making sure the sport is able and willing to change if and when required. with preparations for the world cup now into theirfinal stages, preparations for the world cup now into their final stages, the international hockey federation says there are no imminent plans to adapt any rules or regulations. and as the sport gets ready for its moment in the spotlight, experts sale to moly, there is no way to protect against concussion. there are undoubtedly will be some concussions that go on during the games. it is making sure they are treated appropriately. we have just had the football world cup
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and there was one high profile incident where the protocols were ignored. it is shocking that on the biggest stage of all it is allowed to happen without being challenged. hockey is trying to evolve, improve and look after things. that is great, but the key thing is, is enough being done to get the message down to the grassroots level and no sport can afford to be complacent in that task. what i don't want to happen is for people not to say or express their symptoms because they are scared they will, you know, miss match or miss a tournament. that is not important, missing a match or a tournament, what is important is your long—term health, your brain health and your life. plenty of questions for hockey going forward but when the world cup starts here on saturday, we hope it is not the spectre of concussion but the spectacle of hockey grabbing the headlines. before we go, let's bring you a
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flavour of the comments on the report we had earlier on young people not always being able to afford sanitary protection during periods. chris on twitter says what type of society do we live in that sanitary type of society do we live in that sa nita ry towels type of society do we live in that sanitary towels for women is not free? it is a product that should have no charge and should be available to all women. we give condom is away, the government should be funding this, half of the population need it without choice. bill on e—mail says women should be able to walk into the local chemist to collect what they need and in turn the pharmacy could claim against the local nhs. another e—mail says we should place free sanitary machines in toilets, and in public toilets, for the homeless. and twitter comment, not one mention of the fantastic work being done in scotla nd of the fantastic work being done in scotland to tackle period poverty
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which includes free products in schools, universities and colleges. thank you very much for your company today. we will be here at the same time tomorrow and i will see you soon. time tomorrow and i will see you soon. have a lovely afternoon. we have had sunny spells across the uk this morning. cloud making the sunshine hazy at times. plenty of sunshine hazy at times. plenty of sunshine at the moment and we will keep a lot of sunny spells this afternoon. it is the north west of scotla nd afternoon. it is the north west of scotland and through northern ireland where the cloud will encourage this afternoon and eventually rain pushing in here. otherwise it will be a warm
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afternoon for england and wales. temperatures in the mid—to the high 20s and fresher further north. about 20s and fresher further north. about 20 to 23 degrees. tonight this area of rain will push further south and east, breaking up as it moves into northern england and across wales. a warm and sticky night towards the south east, temperatures no lower than 17 degrees. it is the rain that will move south and east, breaking up will move south and east, breaking up as it does so but showery rain for many and northern western areas of the uk and into the midlands will be cool. warm and staying humid towards the south—east. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. these are the top stories developing at 11:
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the new brexit secretary travels to brussels for the first time today with a message that more needs to be done to reach an agreement. in the starting to step up some of those preparations, and some will be more publicly facing in the weeks and months ahead. and i am live in brussels as the european commission publishes its advice to the 27 eu countries on how to deal with brexit in case of no deal. it's being reported that police have identified several people directly involved in the novichok poisoning of sergei and yulia skripal. knife crime increases by 16% in the last year —

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