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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 20, 2018 7:00pm-7:46pm BST

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this is bbc world news today, i'm kasia madera. the irish border are still a block on the road to brexit, as the eu and the uk call challenge to change position. it is now for the eu to respond. not simply to fall back on previous positions, which have already been proven unworkable. even if you want to reach a deal, it is also back in a responsibility to be prepared for all scenarios, including a know it deal. this abiding victim of the novichok poisoning, charlie rowley, leeds hospital. two is—year—olds who plotted to murder pupils and teachers at a school in yorkshire are given custodial sentences. donald trump causes another star in washington. that's the reaction of
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the us head of intelligence when he's told that president trump has invited president putin to washington. and the 100th edition of now that's what i call music is released today. in maybe only 310 miles long, but the border between ireland and northern ireland is causing a major problem today. the eu's chief the go sure to respond that he is open to any solution that is legally
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workable. michel barnier also welcomed mrs may's brexit white paper that triggered a slew of resignations and westminster, but questioned whether so that could work in practice. the protest often turn out for theresa may, but the proms brexit follow her everywhere. today, she was in belfast with a plea and a promise, promising there was no hard order when the uk reads the eu. she had compromised and higher brexit plan, now it was brussels' turn. wave as this represents a significant change in oui’ represents a significant change in our position, it is now for the eu to respond. not simply to fall back on previous positions which been proven to be an workable. as the border, how plan c is good moving freely between the eu mdu and ireland. so no special status for
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northern ireland, no undermining the union. this is a practical, workable solution which reflects the vote of the british people, but ensures we don't see a hard border between northern ireland and ireland. in brussels, the stage was set for an important moment, how would british compromises go down the? eu foreign minister is had met and set the tone, wary, not convinced, at least not yet. i will iwill remain i will remain an optimist, but it is ha rd i will remain an optimist, but it is hard to be an optimist in these challenging times. we will work on the basis of our principles and see to what extent our british partner fully get it, including the british parliament. then it is the negotiator‘s turn, he wasn't ready to buy the offer as it stood, but he was willing to talk. there are several elements that open away to a constructive discussion, he said, but his doubts and questions pounds
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puppet britain trade with europe's single market without following the same rules? and, in plain english, the eu was ready to contemplate the outcome many fear most — talks ending in no agreements. even if you want to reach a deal, it's also our responsibility to be prepared for all scenarios, including a no deal. the european council said, we have to step up preparation at all levels for all scenarios. this was no moment of breakthrough and it was never likely to be. there will be some relief from government that the british plan wasn't dismissed out of hand, brussels wants more concessions, and some mps so some concessions are made, as it stands, seniorfigures on all sides are telling me it is ha rd to on all sides are telling me it is hard to see mrs may is blueprint getting through in the autumn as mps prepare for their summer break,
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brexit looks like a crisis waiting to happen. if only all talks are as friendly as this, but nothing's easy. not brexit, certainly not brexit. today was the first time we heard the eu response to theresa may's brexit white paper as our europe reporter, gavin lee reports. there is this unified simons and departments briefing quite happily to us normally are saying, let's wait for a unified response to the white paper. the meeting between a michel barnier and the ministers lasted for four hours, and we were told the press conference was longer and later because ministers had to have their say. bear in mind, what michel barnier is saying is a
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unified position. he wasn't discounting everything, he was saying there are bits you can take from this paper, but when theresa may talks about her of position, she says this is not going to be the paper, you can add bit from it. one of the hope is that michel barnier says, i use a superlative, the clock is ticking. they think if the irish issue can be sorted out, there is enough sign before the next summit. let's go now to our political correspondent, jonathan blake, who joins me from westminster. can theresa may be grateful this has not been dismissed out of hand? she will believe this is not the day michel barnier stood up and effectively ripped up the white paper and said we can't work with this. it was a cautious welcome, but it was also a warning from the
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european union today that there are several parts of theresa may's plans that they believe cannot work. and as you keep him should just then, among those is the view that it would be difficult for a eu countries to collect customs on behalf of the uk and vice versa. he questioned how there could be a free trade agreement on goods but not on services, which is what the government wants, because the two are intrinsically linked. and he also said, as you heard, time is an issue, occurs as we know, there will be negotiations through the summer, but 0ctober be negotiations through the summer, but october is the date when the eu and uk need to get the deal done. this close to summer break, there will be some sighs of relief in government that there was a constructive tone struck by michel barnier today. but on the other side, talk about no deal and the
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british government saying it is going to put out more at details about what that might mean. that might be alarming, considering both sides say they want an agreement? there is preparation being made in government and that has been stepped up government and that has been stepped up in the last few days and weeks for a no deal scenario, and that will include instructions to people published on line for businesses and individuals from other eu countries living in the uk as to what they should do to prepare for such a scenario, where there is no deal reached. both sides saying they do wa nt to reached. both sides saying they do want to reach a deal, but with every day and week that goes by, that seems to be further and further away from being possible, they have to, along with that, continue their preparations for their being no deal. thank you. and we'll find out how this story and many others
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are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:45 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. joining me will be political commentator, giles kenningham, and the political correspondent for the guardian, jessica elgot. the surviving victim of the novichok poisoning in amesbury in wiltshire, charlie rowley, has been discharged from hospital. his partner dawn sturgess, who was also contaminated, died over a fortnight ago. duncan kennedy reports. it's been a life—changing weeks for charlie rowley. contaminated by a nerve agents, but now well enough to leave hospital. i'm pleased to confirm that charlie was discharged today. he has been through an appalling experience most of us can never imagine. today is a very welcome milestone in his recovery, and all of us at the hospital wish him well. the news of his release comes barely two weeks after the death of his partner from novichok
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poisoning. today, in a park insoles three, a few of don's friends gathered in tribute. she was a nice person, always looked out for people. help them out anyway she could. it is a shame to see her go, she was a caring person. dawn and charlie came into contact with the novichok here at charlie's home. the source of the poisonous liquid was a small glass bottle found here. police released these pictures of a park insoles bray were it's possible charlie or dawn picked up that bottle. four months after the skripals were contaminated, charlie
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was able to leave hospital today. this is now the heart of a major police investigation. 0ur correspondent caroline davies is in salisbury. a terrible ordeal, what else is the cost it'll been saying? it is not yet three weeks since charlie and dawn were admitted here after coming into co nta ct dawn were admitted here after coming into contact with that nerve agent. i into contact with that nerve agent. , hospital spoke earlier they were keen to praise the clinical staff, saying they had worked tirelessly to get charlie to this point. there we re get charlie to this point. there were also keen to reassure the public that only five people had been exposed and given hospital treatment to that agent. they have also continued with the advice that, if you didn't drop it, don't pick up. hot on the heels of his controversial talks in helsinki with the russian president, president trump has invited president putin
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for a summit at the white house. the news has taken many by surprise in washington , not least the us head of intelligence, who was told while he was being interviewed on stage at a security conference. from washington, gary 0'donoghue reports. 0ne one week on and still we don't know what these two men agreed to behind closed doors. the two—i were long meeting with the only translators present. but after that appearance, donald trump seeming to side with russia over his own intelligence services, faced a whirlwind of criticism, and crossed a clear bank horrify his support for his own side. getting on with russia is a positive, not a negative. now, that being said, if that doesn't work out, i will be the worst enemy he's ever had, the worst. we have some breaking news, the white house is announced on twitter that lads putin is coming to the white house in the
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fall. and others, even catching the man who runs the entirety of us intelligence off—balance. man who runs the entirety of us intelligence off-balance. say that ain? laughter vladimir putin... yeah, yeah. 0k... that's going to be special. on the face of its the invited president putin is battling. white risk another attention humiliation on home soiljust weeks before keeping rational elections? the answer is that around 70% of republican voters believe the summit was a success and getting them out to vote will be crucial. but the president faced scepticism on both sides of the political divide about his whole strategy to russia. some opponents have called it a betrayal.|j strategy to russia. some opponents have called it a betrayal. i found it shocking, one of the most disgraceful, remarkable moments of
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kowtowi ng to disgraceful, remarkable moments of kowtowing to a foreign leader by an american president that anyone has ever witnessed. and it wasn'tjust that it was a kind of surrender, it is that it was dangerous. the president stood there and did not defend our country. and while the politicians get stuck in, the comedians can't resist either. second meeting, because they first we nt second meeting, because they first went so well! it's just like the exciting sequel coming out this summer exciting sequel coming out this summer titanic 2: here we go again! the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, has said many questions remain about theresa may's vision forfuture links between london and brussels. novichok victim charlie rowley, who was found in critical condition in amesbury earlier this month, has been released from hospital. his partner dawn sturgess died last week. two fifteen—year—old boys who plotted to murder teachers
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and classmates at their school in north yorkshire have been given custodial sentences of ten and twelve years. 0fficials officials in gaza place say people had been killed in a day of violence. three other people were killed in air strikes and tank fire, which israel says was targeting hamas. the latest violence comes a day after israel was mike parliament passed controversial laws defining the country as the nation state of the country as the nation state of the jewish for magicked people. the country as the nation state of thejewish for magicked people. now back to washington and the story that president trump has invited
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president putin to the white house in the autumn. we've seen a little earlier the shock on lots of people's faces. as ever, we get donald trump saying one thing, seem to row back, and then seeming to go back by inviting president putin to washington? donald trump tweeted earlier this week that he viewed the summit asa earlier this week that he viewed the summit as a great success, despite all of the criticism, which he portrayed as the fake news media blowing things out of all proportion. and what better way than to show what a great success it has been then to plan the next summit just a few months later? that is what donald trump has done. it shouldn't come to much as a surprise, that donald trump would act unilaterally, that he would make act unilaterally, that he would make a surprise act unilaterally, that he would make a surprise announcement. act unilaterally, that he would make a surprise announcement. every member back to the announcement of a summit with kimjong—un, member back to the announcement of a summit with kim jong—un, that got eve ryo ne summit with kim jong—un, that got everyone off guard at the time and nobody said it would happen, and
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thenit nobody said it would happen, and then it ended up taking place as scheduled. this is the way this president operates, the only thing unsurprising at this point is that there was surprise this week. another story breaking at the moment out of new york, the new york times has a story saying that president trump was mike long—time lawyer secretly recorded a conversation with the present two months before the election discussing payments to former playboy model? this was revealed by a fbi raids on michael cohen's office as part of an investigation into michael cohen's business dealings, including possible payments that he made to women who are alleging sexual affairs with donald trump. this one in particular is a playboy playmate who said she had a year—long affair with donald trump, an affair that donald trump has denied. he has also denied in being bowled in any sort of arrangements to pay off these
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women. this could be evidence undercutting that assertion. that was a line he said about a payment to stormy daniels, the adult film star who was also alleged to have an affair. if donald trump knew about these payments and did it in order to further his presidential campaign, to help become elected president by diffusing potentially expose of stories, that could be a violation of campaign finance law. it could also be putting more pressure on to michael cohen by investigators looking into possible ties the hat with donald trump as pa rt ties the hat with donald trump as part of the russian investigation. sophie feels more imperative cooperate, that could be bad news for donald trump. thank you. two fifteen—year—old boys who plotted to murder pupils and teachers at their school in northallerton in north yorkshire have been given custodial sentences.
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the teenagers were inspired by the killings of 13 people at the columbine high school in america almost 20 years ago. thomas wyllie — on the left — was handed a 12—year custodial sentence while his co—defendant, alex bolland, was given 10 years. reporting restrictions had been in place which meant the two boys couldn't be named before — our correspondent phil connell explains why the judge allowed the names to be released. during because of this trial we've not been able to identify either of these two boys, but today after being challenged by the press, those restrictions were lifted. there are named as thomas wiley and alex pollens, thejudge named as thomas wiley and alex pollens, the judge telling the court she believed it was in the public‘s interest. today we've heard how both became obsessed by the columbine shooting in america and planned to carry out a similar attack in northallerton. we've heard how the
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gathered potential bomb—making equipment and had planned to shoot both pupils and teachers. she sentenced them today, the judge told the boys there a conspiracy to murder was not wishful thinking or fa ntasy. murder was not wishful thinking or fantasy. she said it was a real plot to massacre many people. she said the attack intended to cause terror and her decision to name the boys totally act as a deterrent to other young people. an al qaida bomb—maker who plotted a knife attack on mps and police outside the houses of parliament, has been handed three life sentences with a minimum term of a0 years. khalid ali had three knives when he was arrested by armed police in parliament square last april following surveillance by counter—terrorism police. the new health and social care secretary has said he will look again at the current key a&e target in england of seeing patients within four hours, and whether it is realistic. matt hancock also said he wants to address how undervalued many nhs staff feel and boost morale.
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0ur health editor hugh pym has been to meet him. nice to meet you. demonstrating his bedside manner, the new health and social care secretary was out on the wards ahead of making his first big speech in thejob. he certainly has's got a lot more to think about and problems to face up to. first nhs targets — they've been missed for some time in england. waiting times in a&e and for routine surgery. nhs leaders have been waiting for them to be changed, and matt hancock told me he would consider that. of the nhs have told me, can we have a set of targets that are more clinically appropriate? i want to listen very carefully to the proposals they put forward. but the use of targets to
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measure performance is important. we're just got to make sure the other right ones clinically. workforce is an area that mr hancock says it is a priority. he says it is heartbreaking to see how undervalued staff feel. you identified low morale is a problem, is that not partly down to the government and nhs leaders? we need to be crystal clear about the value that we attach to people who give up their working lives to improve the lives and health of others. health unions welcome pledge, was noting that workforce shortages had to be tackled. it's about having the right numbers, training and tools to do thejob as numbers, training and tools to do the job as well as a culture which is less top—down and less bullying and enable people to work to work to the best of their ability. better use of technology is another of the
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secretary of state's games. he is a fan ofan secretary of state's games. he is a fan of an online video consultation service currently used in london and would like to see a draw that across the country, but some doctors are concerned. there is a worry that we could end up with some groups being given a better service than others. 0n the front line, patient levels are rising and the new money promised by the prime minister would kick in until next year. before then, matt hancock will have to face then, matt hancock will have to face the familiar intense pressures which winter will bring it to the nhs. at least 17 people have died after an amphibious "duck boat" carrying tourists sank in stormy weather in the us state of missouri. the vessel was carrying 31 people when it capsized in table rock lake — a popular tourist attraction in the state. authorities have said there are children are among the dead. ben ando reports. ba rely
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barely making headway, shocked tourists watched as one of the duck boats struggled against the storm. another vessel, for the rounds, didn't make it back, and sank in the la ke didn't make it back, and sank in the lake with 31 people on board.|j didn't make it back, and sank in the lake with 31 people on board. i saw two people way off in the distance, so we were two people way off in the distance, so we were at the front. i believe they may be workers thatjumped in after others to try and save them. 17 are dead and 17 people were rushed to hospital. our thoughts and barriers were with the families and victims in this tragic event that's occurred down here. it is a sad occasion and a lot of evil and families involved, trying to enjoy time and it ends with an incident like this. donald trump took to
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twitter to express his deepest sympathy with those involved in the tragedy. the so—called duck ride is are an attraction on the lake with children themselves are allowed to steer the vessel on the lake. the vehicles which can go on land or by sea were vehicles which can go on land or by sea were originally designed in world war ii. many took part in the d—day landings and carried more than half of the allies' supplies onto the beaches. there have been accidents before, students were killed when a boat collided with a bus in seattle. the course of this latest tragedy is not yet know and. local superstorm came up so my. authority said life jackets on board everyone, but it is not clear whether the passengers had been ordered to put them on. the youngest pilot in the battle of britain has died at the age of 96.
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geoffrey wellum joined the royal air force in the second world war when he was only 17. just over a year later, he was engaged in a ferocious dogfight in which he brought down at least three enemy aircraft, sustained damage to his own and yet managed to escape. robert hall looks back at his life. archive: the british met the challenge by throwing everything they had. i came out with a parachute over my shoulder and looking at this elegance, relaxed fighter. the chap said to me, go and fly it, but don't you dare break it. it was the start of a true partnership. afterjust a few months training, jeffrey was in the cockpit of his first spitfire. either summer of his first spitfire. either summer of 1940, he was a veteran. dev today, he and his young friends struggle to meet german attacks. us heads up, it was a difficult time.
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when she were strapped into your aeroplane and error one, then it was up aeroplane and error one, then it was up to you. in later life, geoffrey's experiences were dramatised in a film. for most of the battle, british aircraft were heavily outnumbered. dogfights were chaotic and often short. the spitfire only carried enough ammunition for a few minutes of combat. , the controller coming on and saying, 150 plus coming on and saying, 150 plus coming in over dungeness. and my goodness, it looked it too. we went into it head on. like a lot of insects on a summer into it head on. like a lot of insects on a summer evening. into it head on. like a lot of insects on a summer eveningm into it head on. like a lot of insects on a summer evening. it was unrelenting. when i spoke to geoffrey earlier this year, he said survivors had to shut out there emotions. you just accepted it. survivors had to shut out there emotions. youjust accepted it. it was a dangerous game and it was a
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dangerous war. if you lost a close friend, yes, there was a little bit of... but let's go out to the local pub, but you had to except it. geoffrey eventually suffered a motion a physical breakdown and left active service in 1943. but his memoirs ensure that we never forget that short period in our history. we we re that short period in our history. we were young fighter pilots doing a job, defending our country against the king's enemies. geoffrey wellum — who has died at the age of 96. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good evening, some rain tonight in many places, this band sinking southwards and continuing to fizzle away. summer showers across parts of the south east. summer showers
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continuing through the night across parts of the south. generally speaking, becoming dry, markey and parts of scotland, cloud around and temperatures not dropping far. tomorrow, a lot of dry weather arounds, spells and sunshine developing. summon cloud as well. small chance of a shower across the south, some heavy and patchy rain. temperatures higher than today, 20 degrees in glasgow, 27 in london, and looking ahead to saturday, a heat building in the south, sunshine, more clout and a little rain further north west. hello, this is bbc news.
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the headlines... the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, has said many questions remain about theresa may's vision forfuture links between london and brussels. novichok victim charlie rowley, who was found in a critical condition in amesbury earlier this month, has been released from hospital. his partner dawn sturgess died last week. two 15—year—old boys who plotted to murder teachers and classmates at their school in north yorkshire have been given custodial sentences of ten and 12 years. donald trump has invited vladimir putin to visit the us later this year,
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to the surprise of many in washington. a four week—old baby who was taken during a carjacking in birmingham has been reunited with her mother in hospital. eliza 0'neill was abandoned in her carseat by the carjackers at a health centre three miles from where the incident took place. the baby's mother, who was forced out of the vehicle, was left with facial injuries. sima kotecha reports. a mother who thought the worst, now relieved after being back together with her baby. it was yesterday clare 0'neill pulled up outside her home in south birmingham, two men demanded her car keys and then drove off in her vehicle, injuring her in the process. her four—week—old daughter eliza was still in the back. some of her neighbours saw it happen. we thought at the time, i thought a couple of kids were playing or fighting but when the screaming continued
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i had to go out and find out. it's disgusting what they've done. it's not the sort of thing that you expect to happen. around 45 minutes later, baby eliza was found here at this health centre just a few miles away. she was still in her car seat. police said she seemed blissfully unaware of the drama she had been involved in. officers say they're looking for the men and the car, which is a grey audi. the intent and the greed around the people responsible for this taking above a child's life and ultimately emotionally, to anybody out there who has any information in relation to this crime, i want those people to come forward. today, from hospital, clare 0'neill said she was shaken. but that because the men ran over her as they made their escape she is unable to hold her daughter properly. the child was missing for less than an hour but for her,
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those 45 minutes are likely to have felt a lot longer. more than 200 people were treated for the effects of sunburn at hospitals across northern ireland during the recent heatwave. temperatures soared to around thirty degrees celsius. thirty degrees celsius. the public health agency has warned that a single episode of sunburn could double the risk of malignant melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer. dan stanton reports. the beach at newcastle in county down last month, when temperatures here were similar to what you'd expect in spain. but while many did listen to advice by wearing hats and putting on a high factor sun creams especially for children, many other people didn't pay attention. in total, 221 patients needed urgent medical care in hospital. in the belfast area there were 69 cases. in the southern trust, 45.
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western trust, 38. south—eastern trust, 37. and 32 cases in the northern trust area. being burnt also increases your likelihood of having a malignant melanoma. skin cancer is actually the most common form of cancer here in northern ireland and there is about 4000 cases and 400 of those are malignant melanoma, so that's the more serious form of skin cancer. so initially in terms of prevention, really, we would encourage people to check their skin and look for any changes in their skin so if they have moles or any skin changes, look out for changes in size, shape or colour of morals, shape or colour of moles, or any itching or bleeding. the advice is, if you think you might have any of those symptoms from spending too much time in the sun, is, go and get it checked out by your gp. now, those of us of a certain age remember buying the original now that's what i call music album —
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today, the 100th edition is released. 35 years ago, the opening track on that first compilation was phil collins, with "you can't hurry love". since then, the albums have sold more than 120 million copies, and featured hits from bob marley to bob the builder. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson charts the history of the biggest—selling music compilation series in the world. now that's what i call music! 1983, and the compilation album changed forever. no more dodgy cover versions of the latest hits. on now, it was the real thing. 11 number ones from duran duran... nows came out at a rate of three a year, so 35 years later, here we are at now 100, and this is their london base. how many of you are there here? there's only eight of us. steve pritchard has been there since now 20, and has a theory why it's survived. it's that strange mix
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of current music, because now is always about currency, and nostalgia, because mums and dads remember their first now and maybe want to buy it for the kids or for the family in the car. now 44, with number ones from steps... # tragedy! now 44 was the biggest selling now album ever. released in november 1999, people bought it for their millennium parties. robbie williams has made the most now appearances with 31, and now 48 even became a crucial plot point in peter kay's car share. # you can't hurry love... most music fans seem to remember their first now album. this was mine, the originalfrom 1983. so i thought i would go out and about and hear people's memories. oh, this was literally the first one we got, on cassette. # karma, karma, karma, karma, karma chameleon... karma chameleon, can't argue with that. too shy, kajagoogoo. slightly dodge. # too shy, shy, hush hush, eye to eye...
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every christmas, i get one. every birthday. who would give you it? grandma, or my dad. had grandma ever heard of anyone on it? definitely not. but my grandad liked the sugababes. # cos i know how i feel about you now... it would always be the best side of it as well. usually, the first disc was the best disc. # ooh, ijust wanted to get your name... liam payne appears on now 100 and thinks the series was ahead of its time. that was almost the world's first playlist a little bit, which is now the theme of the industry for all the different platforms that you listen to music on. it's all about playlists, so they kind of kicked that off. and now believe they will survive because, with so much choice out there, many consumers actually like the simplicity of it all being done for them. # 0ne kiss is all it takes... the next goal — to make it to now 200 in the year 2053. now, that's what i call a long way in the future. colin paterson, bbc news.
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here with me now are alex mccloy, the director of digital at now music, and dan stubbs, the commissioning editorfor the music journalism website nme. 0h, oh, that takes me back! think i did sadly by the first one! but what i wa nt to sadly by the first one! but what i want to know is, what's the secret, what is the recipe for the success? i think because now is such a time capsule of what is popular, it's not... it is the popular culture that chooses the tracks and we just cu rate that chooses the tracks and we just curate those. so now is a memory maker and it evokes positive, warm emotions and it takes you back to car journeys, holidays, emotions and it takes you back to carjourneys, holidays, times from the past. the downside of them, it says here, from bob marley to bob the builder, unfortunately they were sometimes on the same actual album, you would listen to it and there
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would be some good ones and there and there would be the ones who didn't want to hear! i think that is pa rt of didn't want to hear! i think that is part of the joy of it. it just takes three months of music with almost no kind of narrative. so you get these mad things. but you when you rip back to old ones from the past, they are a real time capsule of that time, in the sense of the revisionist history of music which writes out all these tracks and there they are lurking on an album. i think that is part of the pleasure of it. did you buy them? i did. retrospectively i collected the old ones on vinyl. i had about 1—220 on vinyl. my first one was now four which we had on vhs.” vinyl. my first one was now four which we had on vhs. i still remember trying to record radio1 which we had on vhs. i still remember trying to record radio 1 on the old cassette. and trying to get rid of the djs. we have just relaunched it on cassette and it is amazing, it's a beautiful product. but you won't be able to play it!|j
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was going to say i would buy it for my children but exactly! how have you managed to keep it popular?|j you managed to keep it popular?” think when you've got all these streaming services with 40 million tracks, people want to know what is popular and now has always been a trusted signpost for that. things like bob the builder, it was so huge at the time that we put it on our albums and people can remember back to that period in time. but you still need duration nowadays cleaner iam going still need duration nowadays cleaner i am going to say there is an element of laziness. we have the world of music at our fingertips but can you build was it —— can you be bothered to decide what to listen to? some people like to have it done for you. it is like radio, radio is more popular than ever now because it isjust, more popular than ever now because it is just, you more popular than ever now because it isjust, you do it for me. and is there any sense that it is a bit naff? no! it is what is popular, it is what the people have decided and we arejust is what the people have decided and we are just curating that. it is almost laziness. so, that is the
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difference. because back in the day we just difference. because back in the day wejust got difference. because back in the day we just got what you put on it. it's the will of the people. now it is a lot more democratic! and now has music has changed and you have got these different genres coming through like grime and hip—hop, we still put things on there which is popular at the time. you can almost follow now back to the 1980s, with ub40, issue by issue. that's the thing, the mix, still mixing up the genre is, it is still quite a strange thing to do. i'm going to say they are a bit naff, in the best possible wager they act as a sort of gateway so you might buy it for this p0p gateway so you might buy it for this pop song that you love but then you also find out about this crime artist that you don't know about. anything that gives you your new favourite artist, by accident, you then love that thing. that's why... esposito was discovered through now 97 and everyone has heard that track
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and now there are people going to the download product undergoing, oh, my god have you heard this new justin bieber track? and then it gets a follow—up resurgence, which is amazing. what is the target audience? now is so broad, it is families... because people like me are buying it for my children. exactly. to younger people buy it? they do still. we have got playlists on streaming services, the top five ocular playlists and people are engaging with them. so now is cross mac genre, crossmatch demographic. car journeys. mac genre, crossmatch demographic. carjourneys. carjourneys, parties... you would be having a row about which one you skip. exactly but it takes away that sort of... it is the perfect playlist that period of time so it takes away the feeling of, what if i put on my personal music and someone doesn't like it?! what i want to know is, are
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originals worth a lot of money?” what i want to know is, are originals worth a lot of money? i am interested in this! your first one, on cd, now four was a limited run on cds that is worth a lot of manager thank you very much indeed. the headlines on bbc news. the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, has said many questions remain about theresa may's vision forfuture links between london and brussels. novichok victim charlie rowley, who was found in critical condition in amesbury earlier this month, has been released from hospital. his partner dawn sturgess died last week. two 15—year—old boys who plotted to murder teachers and classmates at their school in north yorkshire have been given custodial sentences of ten and 12 years. now it's time for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch with
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me, samira ahmed. sir cliff richard wins his case against the bbc but was the finding a triumph for the individuals right to privacy or a threat to press freedom? and as the bbc says it may appeal, what about the decision to show the extensive helicopter footage of the police searching his house and was it editorially justified? searching his house and was it editoriallyjustified? it searching his house and was it editorially justified? it was almost four years ago that bbc news revealed sir cliff richard was being investigated about a claim of historical child sexual assault and it showed helicopter pictures of south yorkshire police officers searching his home. there were many complaints from those watching and the bbc‘s head of newsgathering, jonathan munro, came on austin shortly after to defend the coverage. he was pressed by viewers
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on the decision to send up that helicopter and broadcast live footage of the raid. the helicopter is another newsgathering resource, like employing a camera crew at ground level. any visual medium is going to want to get a clear view of an event happening, which is newsworthy, it was a newsworthy event as anthony says himself. getting a clear view and only by getting that could we see how many officers were involved and viewers could make a judgment about weather they felt the search was appropriate in terms of its size and scale. helicopter footage in terms of its size and scale. helicopterfootage on in terms of its size and scale. helicopter footage on the ten 0'clock news and the six o'clock news that evening was only 21 seconds of coverage and there was less tha n seconds of coverage and there was less than a minute of live helicopter coverage right towards the end of the search in the afternoon. so we used a very restrained portion of the helicopter. the investigation was later dropped because of lack of evidence and sir cliff richard was never arrested. the singer then sued the bbc, accusing

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