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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 23, 2018 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: a highly critical report on the uk's recycling record warns that waste sent abroad could be dumped or burned. 1a people are shot in toronto. one woman is killed and a child is in a critical condition. the gunman is also dead. a three—year—old boy seriously hurt in an acid attack leaves hospital as police appeal for help to identify three people they want to speak to. good morning. there were nearly 1,000 restaurants that went out of business last year, that's up 20% compared to the year before. i'm looking at what's happening. there's a nice italian to go in the claretjug. francesco molinari becomes the first from italy to win a major. he beats off woods, spieth, rory mcilroy to win the open. good morning from hyde park, which,
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as you can see, is looking pretty dry. there's not much rain in the forecast this week. we will see some showers but for many of us, it will remain dry and still pretty hot. i'll have more in 15 minutes. good morning. it's monday the of 23rd july. our top story: waste packaging that is being sent overseas to be recycled, could be ending up in landfill according to critical report. the national audit office says the uk has met eu targets, but is carrying out inadequate checks on whether recycling has actually taken place or whether waste has simply been landfilled or burned. 0ur environment analyst, roger harrabin, reports. 11 million tons, that's the estimate of packaging waste created by uk homes and businesses last year. the uk has ambitious targets for increasing the amount it sends for recycling, but the national audit 0ffice recycling, but the national audit office says firms have chosen to export more than half of the material rather than to deal with it
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in britain. much of the material for recycling goes to developing countries less able to handle it than the uk, the report says. it wants the exports much more tightly governed. the problem with recycling material abroad is that the uk just has less visibility as to what happens to it, it has less ability to get the uk authorities getting the same assurances as occurred as if it was in the uk. the report talks about additional risks of contamination, so food residue for example in the packaging, so it's reallyjust increased risks. the na of says the recycling system needs an overhaul. two people up and down the country who are dutifully rinsing out their plastic pots for recycling, this sort of thing creates a real erosion of trust. the government says its new waste strategy, due in the autumn, will ensure that things prepared to be recycled really do get recycled. the government can't
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allow people to get cynical about recycling. without the public, recycling. without the public, recycling policy is nowhere. roger harrabin, bbc news. we will continue to talk about that. in the next hour, we'll speak to the ceo of the uk recycling association and to one woman who's been trying to give up plastics and is frustrated her efforts might be going to waste. 1a people have been shot and one person has died in toronto, according to canadian police. the shooting happened in the greek district of the city on sunday night and the shooter is also believed to be dead. a young girl is in a critical condition. the motive for the shooting remains unclear. i thought it was fireworks at first because it was rapidfire and then a pause and some more fire. we didn't know what it was. we saw people starting to run in our direction and i still didn't know
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what it was and then more people we re what it was and then more people were running so then we started running and we ran down a side street. we can speak now on the phone to jamie mauracher, a journalist from global news toronto. thank you forjoining us. can you tell us more detail about what we know so far? witnesses we spoke to say they heard rapidfire, gunshots going off as a shooter moved down the street, we're told by witnesses, going in and out of restaurants. you mentioned 1a people have been wounded, one of them has succumbed to their injuries. we've been told a little girl between the age of eight and nine according to police is critical, and police have confirmed that the shooter himself is dead. we asked how that happened, the chief of police did confirm it was through some sort of gunfire. they believe at this point it may have been self—inflicted, but, of course, we still do need to see an autopsy to
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confirm that. of out this point, the area where this happened, it's a very popular area, it's a popular area forfamilies very popular area, it's a popular area for families to go out in the restau ra nt area for families to go out in the restaurant is, it was around 10:10pm. with an people saw the gunshots they flew under the table to get cover. this is something you don't see or hear about often in toronto, in canada. the last major tragedy that we've seen on such a massive level would have been deavin attack. so toronto mayor little bit shaken at this point —— the van. toronto mayor little bit shaken at this point -- the van. jamie, do we know anything about the motive at this point. is the chief of police saying anything? they're saying anything 7 they're not ruling out anything, they're not ruling out terror but they're not ruling out terror but they're not ruling out terror but they're not confirming anything either. i did speak to a city councillor who was briefed by police and when she came out she says she was told the shooter was troubled in some way but wouldn't expand on
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that. what do we know about the condition of those in hospital today7 so, asi of those in hospital today7 so, as i mentioned, we do know there's a little girl who's in a critical condition at this point. the person who died, all was killed, was a young female, we're told, age unknown —— or was killed. the police chief couldn't confirm. 0ther unknown —— or was killed. the police chief couldn't confirm. other than that, the 13 other people, we don't know. jamie, thank you forjoining us on bbc breakfast. jamie mauracher from global news toronto with more detail on that story, which is developing. last night in toronto, 1a people we re last night in toronto, 1a people were shot and one person has died, asjamie said, were shot and one person has died, as jamie said, according to canadian police, it happened in the greek district on sunday night in a busy area with lots of people in restau ra nts area with lots of people in restaurants at the time. as yet, motive unknown. police are searching for three men in connection with a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester. the toddler was in a pushchair in a shop when west mercia police say a corrosive substance was thrown or sprayed over him. he suffered serious burns but has
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been discharged from hospital. a 39—year—old man from wolverhampton has been arrested. 0ur reporter, jon donnison, has more. it was outside this stall where the attack took place. in broad daylight ona attack took place. in broad daylight on a busy saturday afternoon. police believe the toddler was deliberately targeted. a young boy appears to have had some form of substance, potentially acid or another corrosive substance, thrown at or sprayed towards him while he's with his family. a really, really concerning incident and at the moment we're treating it as if it's a deliberate act to the child. the boy was taken to hospital with serious burns to his face and arms but has since been charged. a spokesperson for home bargains says our thoughts are with this young child and theirfamily says our thoughts are with this young child and their family at this very difficult time. local people have been asking who
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could do such a thing. it's really disgraceful if anything like that happens especially to everybody, especially if they're targeting children as well. police have released cctv footage of three men they're trying to trace. a 39—year—old man from wolverhampton has been arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to cause grievous bodily harm. jon donnison, bbc news. labour mps will tonight debate whether the party's new code of conduct goes far enough to tackle anti—semitism. the guidlines have been criticised by some jewish organisations and labour members. it comes after one mp angrily called leaderjeremy corbyn an anti—semite last week. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, is in westminster. this isn't going away for the labour pa rty7 it's how anti—semitism is written into its own code of conduct, labour mps are angry because last week the national executive body, the ruling
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body, updated its definition of anti—semitism and used a large majority of the internationally recognised international holocaust and members alliance's definition but certain parts of it were omitted. —— international holocaust remembrance alliance. tonight mps will hold a vote on a new definition later in the year when a secret ballot can be organised. the national executive committee does have the power to overrule that, so we will see this play out later in the autumn with two parts of the party potentially ona two parts of the party potentially on a collision course over this very sensitive issue. of course, for the conservative party there's a story that won't go away for them, brexit. there's a cabinet meeting later today? a change of scene for theresa may and senior ministers, the cabinet are meeting on tyneside this morning and the prime in will be talking about the government industrial
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strategy, confirming funding for the east coast mine and of course talking about brexit —— east coast main line. she says she needs to make sure both government delivers a brexit dealfor all make sure both government delivers a brexit deal for all corners of the uk, getting out of westminster, and london, delivering for all parts of the country and we will see that over the summer as the prime minister and her senior ministers visit all parts of the uk and europe as well. the new brexit secratary, dominic raab, will be back in brussels later in the week leading the negotiations there and the new foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, going to berlin. the prime minister will be travelling around the continent as well pitching her plan to the leaders of those countries for a brexit deal after we leave the european union, which, she hopes, will result in a new free trade agreement and a new customs arrangement. a busy time for everyone. jonathan, thank you. barclays bank has chosen glasgow city centre for a major new office development. up to 2,500 jobs will be located there. some of the roles in operations ansd technology are new and others will be moved from london as part
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of a strategic review. it's nasa's 60th birthday. hgppy happy birthday! today, nasa leaders past and present will host a 0&a celebrating its history and outlining their vision for the decades ahead. the space administration is also preparing to mark the 50th anniversary of sucessfully putting man on the moon. later this year, the us mint will unveil an apollo 11 commemorative coin. a big day for nasa, a huge weekend. ino a big day for nasa, a huge weekend. i no you don't really like golf... to be honest, dan, you have infected me with watching golf. i'm glad you said that! i started watching it and i thought, dan watches this all the time, i know how to play and i watched it and it was fascinating. it was one of those tournaments that
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people will talk about for some time. a brilliant story, that's it. the mix of the emotions, the highs and lows. it was a soap opera, a drama. 0ne and lows. it was a soap opera, a drama. one of the best opens... you didn't have to be a golfer, that's the bottom line, you would have been drawn in. wonderful. lots of that is down to tiger woods, he is back and with nine holes to go, he was in the best position to win it. we were all gripped. this sounds ridiculous, i almost felt tearful at the possibility of him winning again. exactly, 2008 was the last time he won a major? many said he wouldn't do it again and he had the chance but in the end, molinari, the italian, played brilliantly. the hairand the italian, played brilliantly. the hair and the tortures, they all plodded on —— the plodded on while all of them were flailing about in the bunkers. —— the plodded. —— he. how about an italian claret this morning? too early?
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not for francesco molinari. he finished in style to become the first from italy to win a major championship. he took the 1a7th open at carnoustie, beating tiger woods, jordan spieth and rory mcilroy to the title. this is lewis hamilton winning the german grand prix at hockenheim. what a victory. he came through a rainstorm and a stewards' inquiry, and that after home favourite sebastian vettel lost control on the wet track. hamilton now leads the drivers' championship. the welshman's still in yellow! going into the final week of the tour de france, geraint thomas is still leads ahead of defending champion chris froome. today's a rest day before they tackle more mountains. and greg rutherford says his son milo could jump further than him these days as he bids farewell to the london stadium at the anniversary games. that's it for now. we were paying full attention.|j
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haven't we were paying full attention.” haven't got the papers and then i said, oh, no! you all saw that at home but now we have them. a nice little window. you like to choose your moments, don't you? we don't get to choose them. steph hasjoined us as them. steph has joined us as well. them. steph hasjoined us as well. what are you cutting out, what have you got, a voucher? a brilliant story, my dog has eaten a lot of things, the new puppy, including the sofa and a carpet but not as bad as this one, the puppy eight the passports and they can go on holiday because the dog ate the passports. —— ate the passports. maybe they didn't want them to go on holiday. they went off to majorca on a wonderful holiday. is that a fake passport in the picture7 is that a fake passport in the picture? it is half chewed. 0k, we are getting distracted by the dog eating passport story. where do you wa nt to eating passport story. where do you want to start, what have you got
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there7 want to start, what have you got there? the mail. this story about a little boy who had acid thrown in his face, and that is their main story on the front page of the daily mail. let's show you the daily mirror this morning as britain heads for 95 fahrenheit, and theory as water fat cats pay £180 million dividend to shareholders instead of plugging leaks, something we spoke about last week, two days before the hose ban and shower limit hits 7 million people. the telegraph seemed to be having this on the front page, this is about britain having secretly abandoned its blanket opposition to the death penalty and guantanamo bay to allow two members of this isil terrorist group to be sent to america, according to the daily telegraph. on the front page of the times, no deal on brexit risks civil unrest, says the head of
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amazon in the uk. he says there could be civil unrest within two weeks if britain leaves the uk with no deal, and the picture is ofjake meyer, who has become the 10th briton to reach the summit of k2, which for those who like that sort of statistic, is the world's second highest mountain, just behind everest. good pub quiz answer, that. iamjust everest. good pub quiz answer, that. i am just trying to find out how many passports got beaten.” i am just trying to find out how many passports got beaten. i will talk about what is going on at the supermarket, because tesco are planning to bring out a discount stores to rival that of aldi and lidl. in 20041 stores to rival that of aldi and lidl. in 2004 i was at the opening ofa lidl. in 2004 i was at the opening of a new store when sainsbury's went into business in discount stores, and it didn't work out for them. now tesco say they are looking at potential sites where they could opena potential sites where they could open a brand which will not be
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called tesco, they are saying, which could mean we see another rival to aldi and lidl. they are desperate to cash in on that. in the graphic shows you that tesco is still huge. that big red line is how much tesco's market share is compared with the likes of sainsbury and asda, and write down their is aldi, but it is the fact tesco have been growing so quickly. some people have reported jobs being advertised in various areas, including in liverpool, at a site where there was a tesco, so there is a suggestion it could turn into one of these discount stores. and you don't have the likes bought to read the back pages this morning. incredible with lewis hamilton, you have rory mcilroy, despondent. he almost won it but he thought he had blown his chancesin it but he thought he had blown his chances in the long grass. and then you have greg rutherford, 2012
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olympic champion, back inside where he won, and look at the agony on his face. he finds it hard to run because of his foot injury. and the story everyone is talking about, francesco molinari. a lot of tears on the back page. and one good one, wrinkles and boldness can be reversed. if you want them to be, i quite like wrinkles and baldness. they have tested this out on mice, and they have turned a gene on and the mice's skin went a bit scabby and when they turned it off it regained smooth and thick fur according to a study in the university of alabama.” according to a study in the university of alabama. i don't want further. i will be honest. if that is what the options are. steph, you
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have a lovely furry face, is something i will never say to you. there has been so little rain around that it there has been so little rain around thatitis there has been so little rain around that it is looking parched. the lawns, et cetera. carol is at hyde park, standing presumably on what was the lush, green grass. absolutely right. it is completely parched. in fact, absolutely right. it is completely parched. infact, let absolutely right. it is completely parched. in fact, let me show you an aerial shot of how it should look at this time of year. normally we would be expecting to see a lot more green than we currently have. so to get a good look at that picture of hyde park, now look at how it looks from the sky right now. this picture was taken last week, and you can see the vast difference. regency park is not faring much better. it is also in london, so it should look like this. again, it should look quite lush, we would expect some rain to keep everything alive and water the
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grass, but regency park is almost the same as hyde park. again, it is looking parched and it is looking scorched. back here in london it is a muddy start to the day. temperatures in london at the moment 20 or21, temperatures in london at the moment 20 or 21, but widely across the country we are looking at the mid—teens. they haven't fallen terribly low overnight. the forecast for this week continues to be hot and humid. there will be a few showers around, but by no means will we all see them. and temperatures this week especially in the south—east could hit 33 and possibly even as high as 34. so a few showers, not much more than that in the forecast. what we have today is a weak weather front crossing scotla nd a weak weather front crossing scotland and northern ireland. that is producing some rain, but it is not particularly heavy. so by 9am you can see across scotland a fair bit of cloud around, and that rain heading south eastwards. the same for northern ireland. cloudy start
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with the rain moving south—east. the eastern half of scotland and eastern northern ireland starting off on a brighter note. northern england has afairamount of brighter note. northern england has a fair amount of cloud around and some showers. across the isle of man, cumbria, lancashire, north and west wales, north—east england has patchy cloud and a dry start with some sunshine. and that continues as we move towards the midlands, east anglia, down towards southern counties. there are a lot of dry and sunny conditions. the west wales in south—west england, a bit more cloud. through the course of the day our weak weather front will continue to push south eastwards. ahead of it, some showers, they will not get as far as southern scotland, and behind it we will brighten up to sunshine and showers. ahead of it there will be a lot of sunshine, with highs in london around 32. through the evening and overnight, a weather front continues to push steadily south eastwards, getting it across southern scotland, northern
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england, north and west wales and a new one comes in across north and west scotland, all of them producing some showery outbreaks of rain. in between, some clear spells with patchy mist and fog falling in parts of southern england. quite a mighty night began with temperatures not dip into low at all. tomorrow we start off with that weather front. again, through the course of the day it will start to fizzle, so it is showery rain we are looking at. it dries up from the west, with more cloud coming in, but equally there will be sunny spells and temperatures still in the mid—to high 20s for most. locally in the south—east we are looking at the low 30s. and there is not much rain in the forecast as we go through the rest of the week, more like showers here and there. thank rest of the week, more like showers here and there. thank you, rest of the week, more like showers here and there. thank you, i particularly like those before and after pictures, and if you have before and after pictures of your garden, we would like to see them, wouldn't we7 garden, we would like to see them, wouldn't we? absolutely. and the
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golf was burnt out, brown fairways. that was one of the first things i noticed. shias into golf, everyone. last year saw a 20% rise in the number of restaurants going out of business. so, as another chain collapses, steph is taking a look at the food industry. we're talking about this because at the end of last week administrators were called into the gaucho group which runs the cau and gaucho steakhouses. just over 20 cau branches are to close with the loss of 500 jobs. theyjoin a long list of chains that have seen closures this year, including the italian restaurant chain prezzo and the posh burger group byron. there have been others, too, and according to the government's insolvency service, last year there was a 20% rise in restaurant failures. so what's going on? megan van someren is founder and global strategy director of canteen at jwt. she works with food and drink brands around the world. what is your analysis of what is
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happening here? why are we seeing such a rise in restaurants failing7 the reality is people's expectations and behaviours around food has massively changed. it is not necessarily an issue around volume orfrequency, necessarily an issue around volume or frequency, because necessarily an issue around volume orfrequency, because 80% necessarily an issue around volume or frequency, because 80% of brits actually go out to eat at a restau ra nt actually go out to eat at a restaurant at least once a week, but 40% are saying what they are getting doesn't satisfy them. so we have done quite a bit of research into this, and what we are seeing is that people today actually want food experiences that are dynamic and exciting. they also want them to be reflective of things like their political and environmental opinions. what does that mean? a third of brits will say that what they eat represents how they feel about the environment and their political views. what is interesting is that some of these, like a steakhouse, and some of the pushback
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against the industry, you start to see some of these things impact. but i also think it is the diversity of what we want from food today. so we wa nt what we want from food today. so we want things that are a little more exotic, a little bit new and different. so i don't think it is a surprise you see changed succeeding massively, because they have created an experience. you go to these destinations, it is very affordable, they feel like you are on the streets of india, and they are co nsta ntly streets of india, and they are constantly changing what their menu is offering as well. and for those people who don't know that chain, what type of places at? it is basically indian street food, they have five or six locations, and they have five or six locations, and they have decided to upset what the curry house offered, and they offer something vibrant, house offered, and they offer something vibra nt, exciting house offered, and they offer something vibrant, exciting and modern, and you actually feel like you are transported to india. so how do you... and biron brought out posh burgers, and everyone was excited about posh burgers and notjust the
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normal ones, but how do you keep going as a restaurant brands. soon we will get used to it, won't we7 going as a restaurant brands. soon we will get used to it, won't we? we are seeing with food brands as well, what is the story behind the organisation ‘s7 what are they doing to give back to the community ‘s7 so i think that people are coming up with not only experiences but a strong point of view about why they are doing what they are doing and what they want to impact. does that really make a difference to where we eat7 are we really that of the? really make a difference to where we eat? are we really that of the? we are seeing that from a brand point of view, from experience is being created, people want to give their money and they have an expectation they will be responsibility behind they will be responsibility behind the organisations they invest in. so based on this, in your knowledge, can you see more problems ahead for the restaurant chains7 can you see more problems ahead for the restaurant chains?” can you see more problems ahead for the restaurant chains? i think those who are not adapting and evolving based on what food is today and all the different roles that can have on their lives, people will continue to struggle and those who adapt will survive. fascinating to talk to you, thank you very much. after returning from russia i had
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chips with two rings of pineapple. it was magnificent. i very much enjoyed the food in russia, but when a winner. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. london mayor sadiq khan has been branded pathetic by former mayor boris johnson for not taking more responsibility over knife crime. mrjohnson accused the mayor of blaming everyone but himself, saying it was mr khan's failure to get a grip of the problem which had made matters worse. sadiq khan has told bbc radio london crime started going up in 2014, before he became mayor. he said he doesn't have a time machine to go back in time. well, following headlines
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earlier this year saying the murder rate in london had spiked above that of new york, bbc london has been to america to see what is being done there to tackle problems of violence. one strategy is to use uses teams of so—called violence interrupters to head off trouble before it gets out of hand. and we will have more on that on our lunchtime news at 1:30pm on bbc one. a child has helped victoria tube station reduce the number of people injured on its escalators by over 60%. megan has become a station announcer. this is what she sounds like. there used to be around 15 injuries a month on the escalators. but since megan's announcements started earlier this year, there are now around just five a month. passengers say hearing a childs voice makes them take notice. hello everybody and please listen up. take care on the escalators, hold on to the handrail and your luggage. research shows that deeper adult
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voices are perceived by humans as having more authority than higher voices, so a child's voice wouldn't have that authority. but perhaps its is this shock factor. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, the dlr has minor delays between poplar and canning town. that's because of a signal failure. and on the roads, a lane is closed on edgware road southbound because of a collapsed manhole cover. and in swiss cottage, the a41 has a lane closed in both directions near the tube station. lets have a check on the weather now, with alina. good morning. it's another week where we are going to see very little if any rain, so yes, it continues dry. there will be a good deal of sunshine around, and it is going to feel very hot and humid. certainly the case today. some good
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spells of sunshine around already. there will be some cloud coming and going, so not wall—to—wall blue skies. that said, uv levels will remain high although pollen levels are remain high although pollen levels a re low remain high although pollen levels are low today. out of the bridge of this afternoon at 3132dc, just a light or gentle south—westerly breeze. and much of the cloud will tend to melt away through this evening, increasingly clear skies overnight although later in the night we could just see some mist and low cloud developing, and temperatures are not going to drop much lower than 15 or 16 celsius. so it is another quite humid and sultry night, and there is little change in this forecast. it is looking mainly dry. a good deal of sunshine by day, some warm and humid nights, and temperatures potentially by mid week could get up to 33 celsius, but very little rain in the forecast. if you aren't paying attention, she did say 31 degrees today, be warned! goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning:
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from scafell pike to great gable, we tune into songs on the summit to commemorate the fourteen british mountains dedicated as first world war memorials. team gb‘s women's hockey squad are the most successful british hockey team ever. sam quekjoins us in the studio to relive winning olympic gold in rio. can you hear me from up here is a play written about and performed by residents from four high—rise blocks in manchester. we're joined by some of the actors. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: 14 people have been shot and one person has died in toronto, according to canadian police. the shooting happened in the greek district of the city on sunday night and the shooter is also believed to be dead. a young girl is in a critical condition. the motive for the shooting remains unclear and police are asking witnesses who have any video or photos of what happened
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to contact them. i thought it was fireworks at first, because it was rapidfire and then a pause and some more fire. we didn't know what it was. we saw people starting to run in our direction, and i still didn't know what it was and then more people were running and so we started running and we ran down a side street. in the last half an hour we spoke to jamie mauracher, a journalist from global news toronto who told us what was happening at the scene year, so witnesses we spoke with said they heard rapidfire. gunshots going off as a shooter moved down the street, we're told by witnesses, going in and out of restaurants. as you mention, 14 people have been wounded, one of them has succumbed to their injuries. we've also heard
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a little girl of the age of between eight and nine according to the police is in a critical condition and the police have also confirmed that the shooter is dead. we asked how that happened, the chief of police did confirm it was through some sort of gunfire. they believe at this point it may have been self—inflicted but of course we do need to see an autopsy to confirm that. at this point, the area this happened in is a very, very popular area. especially on a sunday night, it is where a lot of families would go out and have dinner. a lot of the restau ra nts go out and have dinner. a lot of the restaurants were packed even though it was 10pm. i had a chance to speak to someone who said as soon as they heard the gunshots they flew under a table to duck for cover. this is something you don't see or hear about often in toronto, in canada. i mean, the last major tragedy we've seen on such a major level would be the van attack. so toronto a little bit shaken at this point.
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jamie, do we know anything about the motive at this point, is the chief of police saying anything about that? there not ruling anything out at the moment, they're not ruling out terror. a city chief councillor said that she was told in a briefing that the shooting was troubled in some way but wouldn't expand on that. what do we know more about the condition of those in hospital today7 asi today7 as i mentioned, we do know there's a little girl in critical condition at this point. the person who died, or was killed, was a young female, we are told, age unknown. the police chief couldn't confirm. other than that, the 13 other people, we don't know. waste packaging that is being sent overseas to be recycled could be ending up in landfill according to the national audit office. a report by the public spending watchdog says the uk has met eu targets, but is carrying out inadequate checks on whether recycling has actually taken place or whether waste has simply been landfilled or burned. the government says it is committed to improving the recycling system and will outline reforms
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later this year. police are searching for three men in connection with a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester. detectives have released cctv images in the hope of determining what happened. they believe the child was deliberately targeted in a shop yesterday afternoon, burning his face and arm. he has now been discharged from hospital. a 39—year—old man from wolverhampton has been arrested. labour mps will tonight debate whether the party's new code of conduct goes far enough to tackle anti—semitism. the new guidlines, which were adopted last week, have been criticised by somejewish organisations and labour members. the party says it has re—opened a consultation on the code which is robust and internationally recognised. theresa may says it's time to get on with reaching a brexit
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deal with the eu. the prime minister is taking her cabinet to the north east today for their last meeting before the summer recess. ministers will then visit a series of european capitals to sell the government's vision of brexit. the eu and the uk want a deal in place by october. it's nasa's 60th birthday. today, nasa leaders past and present will host a q&a celebrating its history and outlining their vision for the decades ahead. the space administration is also preparing to mark the 50th anniversary of sucessfully putting man on the moon. later this year the us mint will unveil an apollo 11 commemorative coin. you're up to date with all the latest news. here to talk about a lot of exciting golf, i say this as someone who didn't watch golf before the last few days. she has been one of. you are a convert. i think i might be but is it this exciting all the
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time7 but is it this exciting all the time? some of the stuff on the pga tour is pretty turgid but this was. . . tour is pretty turgid but this was... a great weekend of golf. wonderful, a victory for the quiet man, the little man, that's what was nice. francesco molinari is five foot eight, the same size as me. you get used to golf being these big 6—foot hulks with big muscles hitting the ball a long way but there he was plotting awayjust like there he was plotting awayjust like the hare and the tortoise. and he went all the way! not only did francesco molinari beat the likes of tiger woods to the title in winds of over 20 mph, he also became the first italian to win any major. here's tim hague. ona windy on a windy sunday at carnoustie, the change was in the air. a nervy final round for everyone.
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i probably would have felt sick watching on tv. big credits to my wife, she watches me all the time. i don't know how she does it, i couldn't do it. the best golfers in history and then to be on there, it's incredible. at the start of sunday, several players felt they had a hand on the claretjug only for it to be snatched away. so who could best content with the conditions? well, two birdies for tiger took him inside of a 15th major. the galleries wanted it, yet the gods did not. but woods wasn't the only player dropping shots. reigning champion jordan speith struggled, player dropping shots. reigning championjordan speith struggled, a trip to the shrubbery will do that. and whilejustin rose and rory mcilroy went to two under par to ta ke mcilroy went to two under par to take the clubhouse lead, fellow european molinari was just that bit too good. not a dropped shot all be supported by the odd bit of brilliance. it gave him the chance
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to secure a score of eight under par... commentator: well done. and it was neverin commentator: well done. and it was never in doubt. the italian hands his name to history as the winds of change swept their way through carnoustie. tim hague, bbc news. another dramatic come from behind story. in this one, lewis hamilton came through a storm and a stewards inquiry to win the german grand prix and reclaim the lead of the formula one drivers' championship. the briton's dramatic victory from fourteenth on the grid was in doubt after he broke the rules by crossing the pit lane line. he was given a reprimand, but allowed to keep his fourth win of the season. sebastian vettel lost the race and the championship lead after losing control on the wet track. would never have thought you could do something like that today but i just kept pushing, i kept believing and it happened. so i really ma nifested and it happened. so i really manifested my dream today, so big, big thanks to god.
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15 stages completed, six to go at the tour de france and geraint thomas is heading into the last week in the leader's yellow jersey. no change in the overall standings after stage 15, so thomas is still one minute 39 seconds ahead of his team leader, the defending champion chris froome. today's a rest day before the race climbs the mountains of the pyrenees. in athletics, the anniversary games came to a close and greg rutherford said farewell to the london stadium where he won olympic long jump gold. said farewell to the london stadium where he won olympic long jump gold. he finished tenth in the long jump with an effort well under eight metres. you can see what he thought about that. not a lot. he's expected to retire soon, and this is the last time he will compete in the stadium where he won the gold medal on super saturday at the olympics in 2012. one of the things i remember so distinctly from london 2012 was one of the people saying, go on, greg, this is your chance after ali ran through on the first attempt and that's always something i remember. then again today, people shouting,
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well done, thank you for the memories et cetera. it does bring a bit of a tear to your eye and that's how i experienced it but again, a lovely way to say goodbye. we've taken you through all the emotions today so far. now, finally, it is the scoreline generations of british football fans have longed to see, and yesterday it finally came true... sort of. it was a result imagined by comedy genius eric morecambe, famed for his love of luton town, and here it is. from group b in the scottish league cup, east fife four forfar five. strictly speaking that was the score on penalties after the match finished 1—1. this was a score james alexander gordon, if you remember, always wa nted gordon, if you remember, always wanted to read when he was doing sports report, the classified results on a saturday afternoon. but he never got the chance. eric morecambe did it wonderfully. the rhythmic combination that gets me. i khan sayed, you have to be an expert. a bit more golf now, i know
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you enjoyed the weekend. indeed. golfer francesco molinari lifted the coveted claretjug at carnoustie yesterday after becoming the first italian to win the open championship. it's always about the little stories, isn't it? about the stuff you may not see around the major tournaments. we are joined now on skype from gullane golf club by katy mcnicoll, who was drafted in at the last minute to caddy alongside her brother at the open. that was on saturday and sunday. thanks for coming on breakfast. for those that don't follow golf that closely, why did your brother come in on saturday and sunday? during the open there was an uneven number on saturday, so they prepared him to potentially play if that happens, so there was a 50—50 chance and he got there was a 50—50 chance and he got the call late on friday night to say there was an odd number and could he make up the first tea on saturday and sunday. —— tee time. just so the
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player in last place doesn't have to player in last place doesn't have to play by themselves. where were you when you got the call from your brother to say, would you like to come and caddy for me at the open7 honestly i was in the pub with my friends still. i'd maybe had one or two pints. i kind of had to end my friday night a little bit early, but it was all good for that opportunity. was he doing a stint in the club shop somewhere, either before or after the round on the saturday? yeah, he opened the shop on thursday and friday at 4:30 a.m., then he closed the shop saturday, sunday. we got done thursday around 2pm, in the shop between 3am until 10am, then he was back in at 3am and then closed the shop. azzurri weekend. the dedication of the golf professional —— a surreal weekend. you're a pro golfer yourself and you have played
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carnoustie many times yourself, what was it like to be there in those circumstances at a situation where there were so many people excited and it was a fantastic open7m there were so many people excited and it was a fantastic open? it was unbelievable. just walking through the coliseum, it created almost like an arena on the first tee, it wasn't there in 2007 and wasn't there in 1999 so a totally different environment for everyone. to get the opportunity to walk through there was pretty special and obviously, with my brother it was extra special. my husband and his fiancee we re special. my husband and his fiancee were in the stands as well. a bit emotional. i was trying to stay strong on the first tee. he's an emotional guy. it's something we never ever thought would have happened so it was really, really cool happened so it was really, really cool. did he hit some rogue shots at the start, where the nerves getting
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the start, where the nerves getting the better of him? i'm just glad he got over the burn. the raw, the cry, when he came through was i guess i'm settling for him. i was just happy that he got off the tee. he thought about hitting a two iron but i said, get the big stick out and let's just try and get it forward. he had a good drive, a bit left, but he would have taken that if he was playing in a competition himself so we were both ecstatic he got it off the tee. but how did finish, remind us, it finished in style? it was a tough one for him because he wasn't playing to get a score, so coming down the last he tried to have a good finish and he got unlucky dropping off the back edge. one of those ones where he thought if you get this close you can do well and you can two putt, the perfect line and then it dropped in. couldn't have written it better i don't
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think. then the cheer from the crowd was electrifying. the atmosphere is something you dream of. it was pretty awesome. lovely to talk to you this morning, katy. caddying for her brother, sometimes when you don't get a number that adds up, you have to go out and play. he did that with her on saturday and sunday and then did an eight—hour shift in the golf club shop after both rounds. carol is at hyde park with a look at this morning's weather. you have some amazing pictures of hyde park, we can see how parched it is, and how it would normally look. there is a big difference, isn't at? they're absolutely is. good morning everyone. we are so short of rain at the moment, if we show you some pictures of hyde park as it should look at this stage of the summer, it is still quite green, but how it actually looks from the air now, this picture was taken last week, it
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is very parched. many other parts of the country are like this as well. if we look at buckingham palace, this is how buckingham palace should look at this time. the grounds around that are quite green, but this is how it looked a week ago, and still looks quite parched. there is not a lot of rain in the forecast. in the south—east we might see some showers, but that is really about it. the forecast for this week is one of sunshine. again, there will be some showers in the forecast, but they are showers. not all of us will see them, and we will hang on to the hot and humid conditions. the temperature in london hovering between 20 and 21, depending on where you are, but widely that temperatures are in the mid— teens. you can see on the charts we have a weather front moving south eastwards, producing some rain currently across scotland and northern ireland. by 9am, this is roughly where we expect it to be.
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the brighter skies in eastern and southern scotland and northern ireland. the east of england, some cloud around producing showers across the isle of man, north—west england and north and west wales. north—west england, heading down to the midlands, east anglia, southern counties, some patchy cloud at dry and a sunny start. the west wales in south—west england, you have a bit more cloud around, but nonetheless still some brighter breaks, especially east wales. through the course of the day you will find that weather front slowly taking its rain south eastwards. it will get as far as the borders, ahead of it a few showers, and behind it sunshine and showers. for england and wales, a lot of sunshine around. one or two showers in wales in south—west england, but they will be few and far between, and temperatures up to 31 or 32 far between, and temperatures up to 31 or32 in far between, and temperatures up to 31 or 32 in the london area, widely the mid—to high 20s. locally in the north—west of scotland we are looking at 16. through the evening and overnight, a weatherfront
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moving into northern england and wales, producing some showers, and a new one comes into the north—west of scotland, also producing some showers. ahead of it, clear spells across england and wales but also some patchy mist and fog forming in the south. and it will be another humid night. we start tomorrow with our weather front draped across northern england and wales, producing some showers. still showers across north—west scotland but through the course of the day things will dry up from the west. there will still be a fair bit of cloud, some sunshine in between, and tomorrow's temperatures again into the low 30s and the south—east, and widely the mid—to high 20s. this heatwave is by no means finished with us just yet. absolutely heatwave is by no means finished with usjust yet. absolutely not, obviously. thank you. if you are a virgin media subscriber, you may have noticed that some of your favourite channels have disappeared after a dispute with uktv. steph, this row has become quite public, hasn't it? these types of negotiations go on
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all the time, but these guys are having this fight in front of everyone. there are 4 million people subscribed to virgin media, and they will have found yesterday that they had ten fewer channels than they previously had. that is because those channels are provided by uktv, and you can see the names of the channels they provide content for. you have gold, with lots of reruns of classics like the vicar of dibley and only fool ‘s and courses. uktv wa nt and only fool ‘s and courses. uktv want more money than virgin media are offering for the channels and the content, so the bosses have been having a big spat about this, and this happened yesterday on the programme when we tried to explain it. up
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up untila up until a week ago it uktv offered us continued coverage of their free channels, available over the air to everybody. we were told at the 11th hour that that offer was withdrawn, andi hour that that offer was withdrawn, and i am asking you very publicly, steve, will you agree that we can have those channels back on air as they are available to ever in else, for free they are available to ever in else, forfree in they are available to ever in else, for free in the they are available to ever in else, forfree in the uk? they are available to ever in else, for free in the uk? what we have to remember is that virgin media is a pay television company, not a free to aircompany. pay television company, not a free to air company. therefore the cheapest bundle that a consumer can buy through virgin is about £30 a month. we are being asked is uktv to pay to put out channels into the hands of customers... sorry, customers will pay them for those channels, of which none of that money will return to uktv, and most importantly to the programmes we make. and this really is about the programmes on the quality of content that we can deliver to our viewers. we want to maintain that. that is what we are passionately here to do.
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and without investment from a platform partners, we can't do that. it is very important we draw a distinction between their free channels and they pay channels. what steve is describing is the investment they make on their programme, which is funded by advertisers. three quarters of their programming is on theirfree channels, and most of that is on dave. taskmaster, red dwarf, and others. that is by making those channels available to our customers. a proper dingdong, that. body language is quite something, isn't it7 language is quite something, isn't it? and the matching shirts. and these negotiations do normally happen, but not normally on national tv. and there has been loads of customer reaction, has there?” think that has been the most surprising thing about this, how many people have weighed in with their opinion. so people on both sides. jarrod said yesterday i do sides. jarrod said yesterday i do side with virgin media on this
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matter, they should not be charged for any channel available on freeview fool ‘s jarrod said i am gutted and now thinking of swapping after yea rs of gutted and now thinking of swapping after years of being a customer. and there are lots of messages from people on both sides of the debate, the point being that they have paid for a service which they are now not getting all of, and that is where the problem lies. in terms of what happens next, these negotiations are ongoing. virgin media have put some other channels on while they try and sort it out, but dingdong. ding—dong—a—rama. paying tribute to fallen war heroes through song has been a typical means of commemoration thoughout history, but what about doing so on top of england's highest peaks7 well, that is exactly what one choir have been doing as they embark on a singing tour of the lake district fells, to honour a unique war memorial. our correspondent robert halljoined them as they climbed theirfinal summit. on the rocky slopes above
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borrowdale, a line of walkers is snaking upwards. they are among thousands visiting the lakeland landscape this summer, but these visitors are on a mission. almost a century ago, another column of men and horses was climbing into the clouds, here to build a cairn commemorating the lost lakeland is of world war i. in the years that followed, the idea grew. fell walkers raised cash to buy 12 mountains, creating the uk's largest and most dramatic memorial. now, that moment has been marked with music. over the past three months, more than 60 singers have walked 25 miles, climbed a total of 3000 feet, to reconnect with the past.”
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miles, climbed a total of 3000 feet, to reconnect with the past. i feel it is such a great opportunity, it is such a fantastic project. i am a local musician, and the opportunity to do anything that is in the fels is great. the combination of bringing singers together in this amazing landscape, for this particular project, was just too good to refuse. it was like a gift for a musician. the song cycle is just one in a series of commemorations. earlierthis just one in a series of commemorations. earlier this year, a group of park rangers defied the winter ice and rain to rebuild that memorial cairn, 900 metres up on the summit of garfield pike. another reminder of the spirit of remembrance that lay behind what became known as the great gift —— scafell pike. it has been huge, it has been an amazing undertaking, but we have had so much help from
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everybody. the mountain leaders have given their expertise are free, so it has been absolutely amazing, and it has been absolutely amazing, and it has been absolutely amazing, and it has just been so nice to see it all come together and see it all happen. the choir have called themselves the fellowship of hill, wind and sunshine, words used by the poet and mountaineer geoffrey winthrop young when he handed the fels to the nation. a century on, his great—nephewjoined fels to the nation. a century on, his great—nephew joined the celebration. i have taken it for granted all my life, but it is good to be doing it again now, singing about at all. to remind us what an inspirational gesture it was. i love that, wouldn't it be great if you are climbing up and met that lot
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at the top. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. some newsjust in and three men have been arrested in london over a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester on saturday. we'll bring you more details as we get them. london mayor sadiq khan has been branded pathetic by former mayor boris johnson for not taking more responsibility over knife crime. mrjohnson accused the mayor of blaming everyone but himself, saying it was mr khan's failure to get a grip of the problem which had made matters worse. sadiq khan has told bbc radio london crime started going up in 2014, before he became mayor. he said he doesn't have a time machine to go back in time. well, following headlines earlier this year saying the murder rate in london had spiked
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above that of new york, bbc london has been to america to see what's being done there to tackle problems of violence. one strategy is to use teams of so—called violence interrupters, to head off trouble before it gets out of hand. and we'll have more on that on our lunchtime news at 1:30pm on bbc one. a child has helped victoria tube station reduce the number of people injured on its escalators by over 60%. megan has become a station announcer. hello everybody, and please listen up. take care on the escalators. hold on to the handrail and your luggage. there used to be around 15 injuries a month on the escalators. but since megan's announcements started earlier this year, there are now around just five a month. research shows that deeper adult voices are perceived by humans as having more authority than higher voices, so a child's voice wouldn't have that authority, but perhaps it's the shock factor. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the victoria line has no service
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near king's cross because of an incident. lets have a check on the weather now, with alina. good morning. it's another week where we're going to see very little if any rain, so yes, it continues dry. there'll be a good deal of sunshine around, and it's going to feel very hotand humid. certainly the case today, some good spells of sunshine around already. there will be some cloud coming and going, so not wall—to—wall blue skies. that said, uv levels will remain high, although pollen levels are low today. a temperatures this afternoon of 31 or 32 celsius, just a light or gentle south—westerly breeze. and much of the cloud will tend to melt away through this evening. increasingly clear skies overnight, although later in the night we could just see some mist and low cloud developing, and temperatures are not going to drop much lower than 15 or 16 celsius.
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so it's another quite humid and sultry night, and there's little change in this forecast. it's looking mainly dry. a good deal of sunshine by day, some warm and humid nights, and temperatures potentially by midweek could get up to 33 celsius, but very little rain in the forecast. there is much more travel news on bbc radio london, and vanessa feltz will be starting her breakfast show in the next couple of minutes. goodbye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: in the past few minutes, police say they've arrested three men in london over an acid attack on a three year old boy in worcester on saturday. one woman is killed and a child is in a critical condition as 14 people are shot in toronto. the gunman is also dead. a group ofjewish mps will table an emergency motion at a party meeting tonight as the row over its anti—semitism policy rumbles on.
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good morning. the uk's largest mortgage broker says it is seeing a rise in surveyors disagreeing with sellers about how much their house it worth, it's called down valuing. i'll be looking at why and what it means for buyers and sellers. there's a nice understated italian to go in the claretjug. francesco molinari becomes the first from italy to win a major. he fends off woods, spieth and rory mcilroy to win the open. and i'm in hyde park, where the ground is fairly parched around me, as it is across many parts of the uk's. there's not much rain in the forecast this week to help the situation, just a few showers. for most of us, though, we'll see a fair bit of sunshine and it's going to remain hot and humid. i'll have more in15 remain hot and humid. i'll have more in 15 minutes. it's monday the 23rd ofjuly. three men have been arrested in london
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after a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy that took place in worcester on saturday according to west murcia police. this came in in the last few minutes, what more can you tell us? the men were 22,25 and 36 and they we re the men were 22,25 and 36 and they were arrested in london overnight. 839—year—old man from wolverhampton was arrested yesterday. he is also being questioned —— a 39—year—old man. or held on suspicion of conspiracy to cause grievous bodily harm —— all held. it happened in broad daylight just after 2pm harm —— all held. it happened in broad daylightjust after 2pm on saturday at a busy shopping centre in worcester. this young toddler was a p pa re ntly in worcester. this young toddler was apparently with this family outside apparently with this family outside a homeware store. he was apparently deliberately targeted, the police said, and sprayed with acid or
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another corrosive substance. john, thanks for bringing us up to date. jon donnison, thank you. ——jon. one woman is killed and a child is in a critical condition as 14 people are shot in toronto. the gunman is also dead. the shooting happened in the greek district of the city on sunday night and the shooter is also believed to be dead. a young girl is in a critical condition. the motive for the shooting remains unclear and police are asking witnesses who have any video or photos of what happened to contact them. around 10pm in the greektown neighbourhood in toronto and gunshots ring out. witnesses described hearing around 20 shots and the sound of a weapon being reloaded several times. mass shooting right beside where i am. i thought it was fireworks at first, because it was rapidfire and then there'd be a pause and some more fire. we didn't know what it was. we saw people starting to run in our direction, and i still didn't know what it was and then more people were running and so we
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started running and we ran down a side street. it's thought the victims were spread over several blocks of the cities. 1—person's confirmed damp and 13 have been injured. among them, a young girl in a critical condition. local media report the suspect opened fire at police before taking his own life. so far there's no indication of a motive. compared to the us, canada has low levels of gun violence but toronto is facing a sharp increase in incidents. canada pass largest city has seen over 200 shootings this year, more than 20 of them fatal. we will bring you more on that as soon as we get any more information from toronto. the national audit office says the
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uk has met eu targets but is carrying out inadequate checks on whether recycling waste has actually taken place or whether recycling waste has actually ta ken place or whether waste whether recycling waste has actually taken place or whether waste has simply been landfilled or burned. roger harrabin, our environment a nalyst, roger harrabin, our environment analyst, has the story. 11 million tons — that's the estimate of packaging waste created by uk homes and businesses last year. the uk has ambitious targets for increasing the amount it sends for recycling, but the national audit office says firms have chosen to export more than half of the material rather than to deal with it in britain. much of the material for recycling goes to developing countries less able to handle it than the uk, the report says. it wants the exports much more tightly governed. the problem with recycling material abroad is that the uk just has less visibility as to what happens to it, it has less ability to get... the uk authorities aren't able to get the same
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assurances as they could if it was in the uk. the report talks about additional risks of contamination, so food residue for example in the packaging. so it's reallyjust increased risks. the nao says the recycling system needs an overhaul. to people up and down the country who are dutifully rinsing out their plastic pots for recycling, this sort of thing creates a real erosion of trust. the government says its new waste strategy, due in the autumn, will ensure that things prepared to be recycled really do get recycled. the government can't allow people to get cynical about recycling. without the public, recycling policy is nowhere. roger harrabin, bbc news. in the next few minutes we will speak to the ceo of the uk recycling organisation and to a woman who is trying to give up plastics and her frustration about her efforts going to waste. a group ofjewish mps will table
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an emergency motion at a party meeting tonight as the row over its anti—semitism policy rumbles on. this has been rumbling on for some time, it's not going away. it's not going away and the signs are it's going away and the signs are it's going to get worse if anything because red labour mps will meet later in westminster and vote on adopting a new definition of anti—semitism within the labour pa rty‘s own rules, anti—semitism within the labour party's own rules, its code of conduct, and they‘ re party's own rules, its code of conduct, and they're doing that because last week, the party's ruling body, the national executive committee, approved a new definition within the code of conduct that adopted most of the internationally recognised definition of anti—semitism, but left out some key examples. there's a lot of anger within the labour parliamentary party about the way this whole thing
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has been handled by the party leadership and their failure, has been handled by the party leadership and theirfailure, as they see it, byjeremy corbyn to draw a line under the affair. labour mps will discuss this tonight but they won't be able to formally vote on it until later in the year, around september. once they do that, the party's ruling body does have the party's ruling body does have the power to overthrow their decision and that clash could be happening just ahead of the party's big conference later in the year. so this very sensitive topic threatening to overshadow labour‘s conference in september. let's talk about another party with issues about overshadowing, the conservative party, there's a cabinet meeting later, brexit so much on the agenda for them? yes, theresa may is taking her top team for a change of scenery to the north—east. she will be in gateshead later this morning with senior ministers talking about the government aspas industrial strategy, allocating funding for the east coast main line but the main focus will be on brexit ——
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government's industrial strategy. she wants to say that brexit is for all parts of the uk. after the summer break ministers will go to various different european countries with the aim of selling the uk plan, convincing them the deal the prime minister wants to strike will be as beneficial for other uk european countries as she believes it will be for the uk. countries as she believes it will be forthe uk. —— countries as she believes it will be for the uk. —— other european countries. it is nasa's 60th birthday today. and apollo 11 commemoratives coin will be later done by the us mint ash an apollo 11. let's talk about something we cover
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regularly on the back of blue planet last year —— an apollo 11. plastics, we've got some on our bbc breakfast table today. the devastating effects of plastic in our oceans has driven many of us to increase our recycling effort. the government estimates 11 million tonnes of packaging waste was used by uk households and businesses last year. recycling rates are reported to have doubled to 64% in the last 20 years, easily beating the eu target of 55%. but the national audit office says over half of packaging waste is actually being sent abroad to be processed and there's nothing to prove that it actually gets recycled. joining us now in the studio is simon ellin from the uk recycling association, a trade body which lobbies for improved recycling legislation and pragya agarwal who is attempting to live plastic free. we will see how you're getting on with that in a moment, pragya.
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simon, this is something we regularly use in our homes across the uk, how much of this is actually recycla ble the uk, how much of this is actually recyclable and how much are we not actually able to utilise in that we? the items you've got there, most of it is recyclable. some of it is good design and... —— that way. it is cleverly designed see. you can get as many bottles as you can on the vehicle —— cleverly redesigned. minimum amount of plastic in it and you can produce that bottle from recycled plastic so you can recycle it over and over and over again. there's a difference between great design for recycling and whether or not it gets recycled. absolutely. you represent companies who recycle things, some things go abroad, why
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is that? we don't have the capacity to recital it in the uk. can you guarantee when it goes abroad it gets recycled —— capacity to recycle. in most cases, you can. i present members who do that, we are exporters, we do have processes in the uk and most of the material we send out gets recycled but there is an element where there's money, there's always an element of fraud. some materials we know do end up going abroad and they're not actually recycled. this is what the audit office have picked up on. pragya, that's the warwick, people like you are trying to say, ok, making a commitment, i'm trained to get rid of these things and stop drinking my plastic bottles —— i'm trying to —— that's the worry. is it not making as much of a difference as it could? it is. it's demoralising. i read a while ago that it demoralising. i read a while ago thatitis demoralising. i read a while ago that it is being sent to china and
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it is adding to the landfill. i was also concerned about how... the things that re cycle, the milk bottles that get recycled, they can only be recycled to or three times —— the things that rsi called. other times there are chemical elements added that cause environmental issues as well —— the things that re cycle. we need clear guidelines as families and businesses about what we can do and what we should be doing. what do you think, you can't put everything in the recycling bin that you might assume you can. what is most difficult to deal with or stop using? in terms. using, there's lots of needless packaging. fruit and vegetables getting wrapped in wrapped up in plastic —— in terms. using. what do you do? itjust adds to the bins. itjust adds to the landfill because it's not
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biodegradable most of the time. that is something quite concerning. simon, for those watching this morning, i don't know if it is bin day where you're watching, it is black tendai in sheffield where we live, but the box where you put your paper —— being day. people make sure they do their bit for the environment —— being day. is there still good reason to do that? absolutely, there's good reason to do it. it is an imperfect system. plastics is the problem. the paper, the cardboard, the cans, glass that you put in your recycling bin, your milk bottles, shampoo bottles, your trays. fine, we have great recycling markets for that at home and abroad. not all export is bad, it adds competition into the marketplace and lots of the time we're sending it back from where it came from and what we need to get a handle on, pragya alluded to it, why do we need
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to wrap fruit and veg in plastic? i don't... i grow my own or i buy it loose and i will store it in the fridge for two or three weeks, why do we need to cover that with plastic film? it is that material that's the one that's very difficult to recycle. that's the one that's shipped abroad a lot of the time and some times it doesn't get recycled. do we need to produce it in the first place? if we do then can we design it with 100% recyclable at and can we label it when you're in sheffield and you're having your bin emptied, you know certainly that this can go in this bin and it can be recycled. is not that difficult to achieve to be honest. thank you very much indeed to both of you that it's not that difficult to achieve to be honest. and it is something we will continue to revisit, because we are not quite there at the moment, there are still work to be done. carol is at hyde park with a look at this morning's weather. we can see it is very parched, and
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you have been showing us what it should look like all could look like. good morning, all. hyde park looks like there has been a big rock festival on it. the grass is parched, you can see the mud coming through it. if we look at how it should look at this time of year, it should look at this time of year, it should look at this time of year, it should look much greener than this, quite lush. how it looks from the air is quite different. it is the same with regency park, as you would expect, both in london. it should look quite green at this time of year, but how it actually looks, and these pictures were taken last week, is quite different, very parched. across many parts of the uk, we are looking at parched ground. some of it split as well, and there is not much sign of significant rainfall in the forecast as we go through this week. the forecast for this week continues to be hot and humid. many will see sunny spells and a few
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showers. weak weather fronts will see sunny spells and a few showers. weak weatherfronts bumping into high—pressure, which is really dominating our weather at the moment. so these weather fronts are losing their old as they bump into this high—pressure, which is why the rain in them is quite weak and showery —— losing their oomph. we have that crossing scotland and northern ireland and by 9am this is where we expect the rain to beat. for southern and eastern scotland, eastern parts of northern ireland, a dry start with rain coming your way. for northern england and messy picture, quite a bit of cloud in the north—west and producing showers across cumbria, lancashire and the isle of man. some of the showers across northern and western parts of wales as well. some patchy cloud, but a lot of sunshine. although we have some patchy mist and fog currently across wilshire, somerset and the channel islands, that will break in the sun will come out. as we go through the day our weak weather front continues to edge
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slowly south eastwards, getting into aberdeen, argyll and bute council as 90, aberdeen, argyll and bute council as go, heading towards the east of northern ireland. behind it, sunshine and a few showers. the head of it, a few showers in northern england, north and west wales, possibly one would two in southern england. temperatures up to 32 in london, widely the mid—to high high 20s, locally in western scotland 16. showery outbreaks of rain across southern scotland, northern england, north and west wales. the new weather front comes into north—west scotla nd weather front comes into north—west scotland with some showers in it, and clear spells in between. once again, some patchy mist and fog further south, and it will be a muqqy further south, and it will be a muggy night. showers across northern england, north and west wales, but as we go through the course of the day, you will find the weather will dry out from the west, and we will see a bit more cloud around. one would two showers across north—west scotland, but temperatures still widely from the mid—to high 20s to around the
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low 30s across the far south—east. and although the south—east, east anglia, parts of the midlands could see showers on wednesday, for most this week there will be a lot of dry weather around in the most wet weather around in the most wet weather we will get will be in the shape of showers, and not all of us will see them. temperature—wise we will see them. temperature—wise we will see them. temperature—wise we will see a will see them. temperature—wise we will seea dip will see them. temperature—wise we will see a dip as we head into the weekend, at it means around 27 or 28, and at the moment it looks like temperatures will climb again in the next week. i remember the days when 27 was high, carol. we would be saying scorcher at 27, we need something more powerful than a scorcher. we will let you think on that for the next half—hour. thank you very much. another sweaty night, i will have to dig the fan out of the attic. it is
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sticky evenings, it is one of those things. definitely a word you can use, sweaty. i just things. definitely a word you can use, sweaty. ijust don't want things. definitely a word you can use, sweaty. i just don't want to know. that is not what i am here to talk about, fortunately. berkeley ‘s bank have said they will be creating 2500 jobs in glasgow, and it is going to be a mix of people being transferred from london but also newjobs being created —— ba rclays. but also newjobs being created —— barclays. and that will actually double the workforce barclays has in scotland. so this is a big dealfor glasgow, scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, said the project will be transformational for them. the thing that has caught my eye the most about this story is the deal around the types ofjobs they have to create. so the roles in operations and technology, that type of area. and what they have agreed to hear is they have been given a ground by scottish enterprise of £12.75 million towards this, with
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the view that they have to give at east 42% of the new jobs the view that they have to give at east 42% of the newjobs to people who are either disadvantaged in some way or have a disability —— at least 42%. i don't know what the exact definition is a disadvantage, but the point is it is creating high—valuejobs, notjust the point is it is creating high—value jobs, not just taking the point is it is creating high—value jobs, notjust taking a load of people from london. some of them will do that, but it is about helping the area as well. a big impact on glasgow, and more widely, as well. drones. they can do everything. they have the potential to deliver everything from your weekly shop to life—saving medical equipment. breakfast‘s john maguire is at west yorkshire fire service, in bradford, looking at the different uses for drone technology. are you going to release the drone, john7 are you going to release the drone, john? we are about to release two drones, this first one first, so matt and stuart will take off any second. west yorkshire fire service
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have had this drone for about six months now, it has been deployed on about a dozen or so different incidents. we also have our own drone on breakfast which will take off for us as well. that will be flown a bove off for us as well. that will be flown above the second drone, so two drones are better than one, i guess. let's find out what sort of different it has made to the fire and rescue service. good morning, dave. you have used them, as we say, about a dozen times. how useful have they been? they are fantastic. they give usa they been? they are fantastic. they give us a perspective on incidents that firefighters are not having at the moment. they can cover ground that we can't cover, much, much quicker than we that we can't cover, much, much quickerthan we can, that we can't cover, much, much quicker than we can, as well. they can show the extent of fire spread, and especially on northern fires, which can be a one mile long flame front, the drone can quickly move forwards and backwards along that flame front and give incident command information about what is happening. and we have some pictures ofa happening. and we have some pictures of a fire earlier this month. you
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talk about the golden hour a lot with the blue light and emergency services. will it make a difference in that sort of aspect7 services. will it make a difference in that sort of aspect? we think so. one of the things we are looking at in the future is potentially the ability to launch a drone very quickly as soon as an emergency call is received. fire crews could have information being relayed from a drone back to the fire engine as it is actually travelling to an incident, we could see the type of incident, we could see the type of incident they are attending and they can incident they are attending and they ca n start incident they are attending and they can start making plans already en route. we talked about this earlier in the year, five cities taking part in trials to see how it can usefully help the public sector, if you like. you have not started using it yet. when do you think you will start to use drones, and what for? growing our digital sector is a big part of our digital sector is a big part of our strategy for bradford district, so we are looking at a wide range of areas where it can add value. highways maintenance could be a big area, potholes are always important to people, and also even in
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regeneration terms. bradford has a lot of fantastic old mill buildings. we could bring them back into use, and we can use the drones to do 360 degrees photo mapping, inspect the asset and look at how we can restore those fantastic buildings.” asset and look at how we can restore those fantastic buildings. i hate to say the sky is the limit, but you do think of all the things which can go on. you launched this flying high challenge. the word challenge is quite appropriate. how do we go forward from here? as you can hear we have been working with cities across the uk, and they have found ways in which drones can make a massive difference. if you can send them ahead so they are not accompanied by people operating them. what happens next is firstly we need to talk to the communities to say is this what you want to do, these different drone uses, the public sector think so, fire and emergency services think so. and if thatis emergency services think so. and if that is the case, we need to test and demonstrate they work in the
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regulations need to change to enable that to happen. let's show you some pictures from west yorkshire, an industrial fire, and these pictures from west yorkshire, an industrialfire, and these pictures of the kind of areas that people can go into safely, which previously would have been inaccessible, invisible, if you like. there is another horse to ride, of course, which is legislation. we have had to do lots of safety checks to even do this, and that is a challenge as well. it is, so we have been working with the regulator, the government and the cities, and they are on board with this process. but it needs to be done carefully. at the moment you have to fly with an operator, so you can't fly ahead of an operator, so that needs to be looked at and amended. but we need to do it iteratively and learn as we develop tests and demonstrations how and where a drone should go. and that needs to be informed by the public, as well. thank you very much indeed. absolutely fascinating. the sky is the limit, i suppose. we are used to drones in a commercial
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aspect, but this is very much improving people's lives. london, southampton, medical applications, highways, as we have heard about. if drones could sort out potholes, that would be worth an investment, wouldn't it? more from us later on in the programme, after the news, travel and weather where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. london mayor sadiq khan has been branded pathetic by former mayor boris johnson for not taking more responsibility over knife crime. mrjohnson accused the mayor of blaming everyone but himself, saying it was mr khan's failure to get a grip of the problem which had made matters worse. sadiq khan has told bbc radio london crime started going up in 2014 before he became mayor. he said he doesn't have a time machine — to go back in time. well, following headlines earlier this year saying the murder rate in london had spiked
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above that of new york, bbc london has been to america to see what's being done there to tackle problems of violence. one strategy is to use teams of so—called violence interrupters to head off trouble before it gets out of hand. and we will have more on that on our lunchtime news at 1:30pm on bbc one. a child has helped victoria tube station reduce the number of people injured on its escalators by over 60%. megan has become a station announcer. this is what she sounds like. hello everybody, and please listen up. take care on the escalators. hold on to the handrail and your luggage. there used to be around 15 injuries a month on the escalators. but since megan's announcements started earlier this year, there are now around just five a month. research shows that deeper adult voices are perceived by humans as having more authority than higher voices, so a child's voice wouldn't have that authority, but perhaps it's the shock factor. a look at the tube board now.
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the circle line and district lines have delays because of a signal failure at earls court. london overground has minor delays due to faulty trains and the victoria line has no service between kings cross and victoria. and on the roads, a lane is closed on the edgware road southbound because of a collapsed manhole cover. let's have a check on the weather now with alina. good morning. it's another week where we're going to see very little if any rain, so yes, it continues dry. there'll be a good deal of sunshine around, and it's going to feel very hotand humid. certainly the case today, some good spells of sunshine around already. there will be some cloud coming and going, so not wall—to—wall blue skies. that said, uv levels will remain high, although pollen levels are low today. a temperatures this afternoon of 31 or 32 celsius, just a light or gentle south—westerly breeze. and much of the cloud will tend to melt away through this evening.
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increasingly clear skies overnight, although later in the night we could just see some mist and low cloud developing, and temperatures are not going to drop much lower than 15 or 16 celsius. so it's another quite humid and sultry night, and there's little change in this forecast. it's looking mainly dry. a good deal of sunshine by day, some warm and humid nights, and temperatures potentially midweek could get up to 33 celsius, but very little rain in the forecast. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london, and in the next few minutes, she'll have more on homeless families in london trapped in temporary accommodation because they can't get enough money together for a rental deposit. mark king hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. in the last half—hour, west mercia police say three men have been arrested in london on suspicion of conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm, after a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy
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in worcester on saturday. detectives believe the child was deliberately targeted in a shop, burning his face and arm. he has now been discharged from hospital. a 39—year—old man from wolverhampton has also been arrested. 14 people have been shot and one person has died in toronto, according to canadian police. the shooting happened in the greek district of the city on sunday night and the shooter is also believed to be dead. a young girl is in a critical condition. the motive for the shooting remains unclear and police are asking witnesses who have any video or photos of what happened to contact them. people should not reach any conclusions because the police themselves have not drawn any conclusions as to exactly what happened here and white.” conclusions as to exactly what happened here and white. i certainly have confidence, as the pooley toronto do, that the police chief and all these men and women will get to the bottom of this and determine
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what happened here. it isa what happened here. it is a city, a global city, were a lot of things are going to be a possibility here but they're going to investigate and report back to us, i'm sure, as soon as they possibly can. waste packaging that is being sent overseas to be recycled, could be ending up in landfill according to the national audit office. a report by the public spending watchdog says the uk has met eu targets, but is carrying out inadequate checks on whether recycling has actually taken place or whether waste has simply been landfilled or burned. the government says it is committed to improving the recycling system and will outline reforms later this year. labour mps will tonight debate whether the party's new code of conduct goes far enough to tackle anti—semitism. the new guidlines, which were adopted last week, have been criticised by somejewish organisations and labour members. the party says it has re—opened a consultation on the code which is robust and internationally recognised. theresa may says it's time to get on with reaching a brexit deal with the eu.
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the prime minister is taking her cabinet to the north east today for their last meeting before the summer recess. ministers will then visit a series of european capitals to sell the government's vision of brexit. the eu and the uk want a deal in place by october. it's nasa's 60th birthday. today, nasa leaders past and present will host a q&a celebrating its history and outlining their vision for the decades ahead. the space administration is also preparing to mark the 50th anniversary of sucessfully putting man on the moon. later this year the us mint will unveil an apollo 11 commemorative coin. plenty of sporting headlines over the weekend. she is in hyde park this morning, carol, the grass is com pletely this morning, carol, the grass is completely burnt out. very brown can hurt to what we're used to at this time of yearand hurt to what we're used to at this time of year and francesco molinari
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here won the open championship on the weekend at the burnt out fa i rwa ys the weekend at the burnt out fairways at carnoustie —— compared to. we had all four seasons in four days, the wind, the rain and the sunbaked days, the wind, the rain and the sunba ked fairways. molins days, the wind, the rain and the sunbaked fairways. molins re showed us he could do it in all—weather. the special thing about it was the cast list of big stars —— molins re showed. tiger woods, jordan speith, defending champion, rory mcilroy, tommy fleetwood —— molinari showed. the plodded on. he's better than that. it wasn't robotic —— he'd plodded on. -- he'd plodded on. —— he'd plodded on. not only did francesco molinari beat the likes of tiger woods and justin rose to the title, in high winds too, he also came the first italian to win any major.
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tim hague reports. on a windy championship sunday a carnoustie, a change was in the air. francesco molinari, the first italian to ever win a major. the press seemed as happy as the man himself... applause ..in what was a nervy final final round for everyone. i probably would have felt sick watching on tv. big credits to my wife, she watches me all the time. i don't know how she does it, i couldn't do it. the best golfers in history and then to be on there, it's incredible. i probably would have felt sick watching on tv. big credits to my wife, she watches me all the time. i don't know how she does it, i couldn't do it. the best golfers in history and then to be on there, it's incredible. at the start of sunday, several players felt they had a hand on the claretjug only for it to be snatched away. so, who could best contend with the conditions? well, two birdies for tiger took him in sight of a 15th major. the galleries wanted it, yet the gods did not. but woods wasn't the only player dropping shots. reigning champion jordan speith struggled, a visit to the shrubbery will do that. and whilejustin rose and rory mcilroy got to —6 to take the clubhouse lead, fellow european molinari was just that bit too good. not a dropped shot all day, supported by the odd
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bit of brilliance. it gave him the chance to secure a score of eight under par... commentator: well done. ..and it was never in doubt. the italian adds his name to history as the winds of change swept their way through carnoustie. tim hague, bbc news. another hair and torture story for you now —— another hair and fortis -- hair you now —— another hair and fortis —— hairand you now —— another hair and fortis —— hair and tortoise story. in this one lewis hamilton came through a rainstorm and a stewards inquiry to win the german grand prix and reclaim the lead of the formula 1drivers' championship.. the briton's victory from 14th on the grid was in doubt after he broke the rules by crossing the pit lane line. he was given a reprimand, but allowed to keep his fourth win of the season. and look at sebastian vettel bashing his steering wheel he lost the race in front of his home crowd and the championship lead after losing control. would never have thought that
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you could do something like that today, but ijust kept pushing, i kept believing and it happened. so i really manifested my dream today, so big, big thanks to god. 15 stages completed, six to go at the tour de france... and geraint thomas is heading into the last week in the leader's yellow jersey. no change in the overall standings after stage 15, so thomas is still one minute 39 seconds ahead of his team leader, the defending champion chris froome. today's a rest day before the race climbs the mountains of the pyrenees. greg rutherford says his son milo could jump further than him these days. such a lovely spirit from him. he said farewell to the london stadium where he won olympic long jump gold in 2012. he finished 10th in the long jump at the anniversary games
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with an effort well under eight metres. you can see what he thought about that. he's expected to retire soon and this is the last time he'll compete in the stadium where he won the gold on super saturday in 2012. one of the things i remember so distinctly from london 2012 was one of the people saying, "go on, greg, this is your chance," after i ran through on the first attempt, and that's always something i remember. then again today, people shouting, "well done, thank you for the memories," etc. it does bring a bit of a tear to your eye, and that's how it's been today. but again, a lovely way to say goodbye. great british wheelchair racer carry adenegan smashed the world record in the t34100 metres. adenegan is only 17. she beat hannah cockcroft‘s old mark with a time of 16.80 seconds, cockroft was second. it meant so much to me. i was so hungry for it today, really wanted it to be a good race but i knew coming in here hannah was so amazing, she had the world record andi amazing, she had the world record and i knew i had to really work hard
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for it. i'm so pleased with it as well. the 100 has been really strong this season, i had a pb around a month ago, i got 17.37 and i could get anything near that i will be happy. now, how about this? the lancashire bowlerjordan clark took a hat trick against yorkshire in the county championship and what a trio of players it was. first to go was england test captain, joe root. that was good enough, the teamwork cafu. —— the team were cocquard hoop. then the world's fourth highest ranked player, new zealander kane williamson, went for a duck. and he was followed next ball by another england player, jonny bairstow. it didn't help lancashire, though, who were then bowled out for 109! now finally, it is the scoreline generations of british football fans have longed to see, and yesterday it finally came true... sort of. it was a result imagined by comedy genius eric morecambe famed for his love of luton town, and here it is from group b in the scottish league cup.
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east fife four, forfar five. strictly speaking that was the score on penalties after the match finished 1—1. we thought we would have some fun with it anyway and so did a lot of people. i don't know if you remember that. everyone wanted the score. can you say it? east fife four, forfar five. can you say it? east fife four, forfar five. we will bejoined we will be joined by sam quetta will, who was part of the hockey winning side from rio a a few years ago —— from rio a few years ago ——
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—— sam quick. the heated row over anti—semitism in the labour party came to a dramatic head last week when mp margaret hodge angrily called leaderjeremy corbyn an anti—semite. jewish mps will tonight claim the party's new code of conduct does not go far enough. we'll hear the view of one of those mps, lousie ellman, in a moment. first here's whatjeremy corbyn had to say about the row yesterday. i want us to deal with anti—semitism in our society, as well as in all of our parties, including my own. and what's been done is an honest attempt to make sure that we do make it clear we will not, tolerate anti—semitism in any form and we will allow legitimate debate on issues facing israel and palestine, but it cannot ever be conducted in any anti—semitic form. but it cannot ever be conducted in any anti-semitic form. what action is margaret hodge facing about her action? a complaint is being made about... how did that feel? i felt not pleased about it, i felt upset about it but i felt very calm and i always treat people with a great deal of respect. i don't shout at people, i just listen to what they have to
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say, a complaint has been registered and that will have to be dealt with the party independent of me. have you spoken with her? not yet, no. louise ellman mp, the former parliamentary chair of the jewish labour movement, joins us now. thanks for coming on. we heard from your leader there, he is saying tonight's emergency motion should be delayed. what is your response? jeremy is wrong. he does have to the fa ct jeremy is wrong. he does have to the fact that there is mounting anger about the labour party's failure to deal with anti—semitism in its own ranks. last week, labour mps overwhelmingly asked of the national executive of the labour party to adopt the full international definition of anti—semitism. —— asked the. within two days, the labour party completely ignored that, treating its mps with contempt. since then there's been absolute uproar, not just contempt. since then there's been absolute uproar, notjust within the jewish community but outside of that as well. so tonight i'm taking a
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resolution to labour mps to start a process where we can put that full definition of anti—semitism in our own standing orders, and lading labour mps own standing orders, and lading labourmps can own standing orders, and lading labour mps can then set an example to the national party, which i hope they'll then followed. or more aware can't —— labourmps. can't —— labour mps. some is going further? this is nonsense, it sets out to fool people. why doesn't the labour party say clearly we are except the international definition of anti—semitism7 indeed, a committee of the labour party did accepted only two years ago but nothing seems to have changed. i do think the labour party should reconsider this as a matter of very great urgency and get on with tackling anti—semitism within the party. it comes to something, doesn't it, when anti—semitism
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within the labour party is dominating the political agenda. i thinkjeremy should use his leadership to recognise the problem and address it. why do you think there is this problem? and why do you think it's taken so much pressure from others, like yourself, to try and bring it to a head? and if it is taking attention from other more important issues, which is the point you just made, why hasn't it been sorted out? there does seem to been sorted out? there does seem to be able pretty deep—seated problem within parts of the labour party to recognise anti—semitism on the left, and particularly on the hard left. it isn't a new phenomena, it's a lwa ys it isn't a new phenomena, it's always been around, but it's now become much more dominant within the labour party. i think there are labour party. i think there are labour party. i think there are labour party members, and i think jeremy's one of them, who are very happy to address anti—semitism on the right, were very familiar with that, but they find it hard to accept there's anti—semitism on the
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left —— we're very. it is there, it's an ugly reality and it needs to be dealt with. let's talk about margaret hodge, who was critical of jeremy corbyn, some in the party says she needs to be disciplined. what's going on and what do you think should be done?” what's going on and what do you think should be done? i wasn't present when this incident happened, soi present when this incident happened, so i don't know what has been said. but i know the anger margaret was expressing is it reflecting being felt by many people, many labour mps —— expressing is reflecting. the jewish community has become com pletely jewish community has become completely united from liberal rabbis to her radial rabbis, uniquely coming together to condemn what's going on. —— hurray be rabbis. the party are very wrong to try to make an example of margaret hodge. she is the wrong target and i think they should withdraw that.” understand what you're saying, to
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bring up the pointjeremy corbyn made, there's a way of dealing with people. do you think she stepped over the line, if indeed she did swear and call him an anti—semitic and a racist? i don't know what is — — exa ctly and a racist? i don't know what is —— exactly what was said but there isa —— exactly what was said but there is a failure to deal with the anti—semitism and what margaret did was a reflection of that. any idea of action against margaret williams blamed the situation even more. less get on and solve the problem and we can get on with trying to be the next government hash against margaret will inflame. —— against margaret will inflame. a labour party spokesperson told breakfast it is consulting withjewish groups and that, "the code of conduct adopts the international holocaust remembrance alliance definition and expands on and contextualises its examples to produce robust, legally sound guidelines that a political party can apply to disciplinary cases." that the statement the party. ——
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thatis that the statement the party. —— that is the statement from the party. it might be one of those evenings where you have to go without the duvet and just use a sheet. carol is at hyde park with a look at this morning's weather. we might get a difference in temperature of 27 degrees. that is absolutely right. it is hot already in hyde park. the temperature is about 22 celsius, in northampton it is 21 and as you can see around me the ground is scorched. let's take an area look at how it should look at this time of year. it should be nice and green in height park, and quite lush. the same aerial view of how it was last week, and how it is now, shows how scorched it is. in buckingham palace, are very similar story. the ground around buckingham palace should be nice and green, but this is how it actually does look. it has been the driest first half of
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the summer in the uk since 1961. we have seen just 20% of the average rainfall. and you have probably heard a lot of comparisons with the summer of 1976, as well. the summer of 1976 had a dim consecutive days where the butcher was 30 celsius or more. we actually haven't had that yet —— the temperature. yesterday was 29.8, but it must reach 32 have the same intensity and meet or beat the same intensity and meet or beat the record, and as i say, it hasn't done that yet. the forecast for this week is still a hot and humid wine, especially so in the south—east, where we are looking at highs into the low 30s. we are also looking at sunny spells, and a few of us will see some showers. this morning we have a weak weather front on the againstan area have a weak weather front on the against an area of high pressure thatis against an area of high pressure that is dominating our weather, and it is producing some rain. by 9am the rain will move south—east would slowly across scotland and northern ireland. for antrim and down,
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eastern and southern parts of scotland, we are off to a bright start. for the rest of us, fairly cloudy with that rain. northern england has quite a bit of cloud around, especially in the north—west. showers across lancashire, cumbria and isle of man. western wales also quite cloudy. east wales, central parts of england, eastern england, the midlands, all the weight down towards the south coast, we have patchy cloud and a lot of sunshine. for the south—west, a bit of mist and fog around the wheelchair, somerset and the channel islands. that will then break, the sun will come out. south—west england seeing cloud around first thing. through the day as our weather front slips south—east but it will get towards the scottish borders and the likes of glasgow, argyll & bute and eastern parts of northern ireland. some showers north—west england, wales and south—west england, but they will be few and far between. temperatures widely in the mid—to high 20s, locally 3132 in the south—east, and the north—east of
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scotla nd south—east, and the north—east of scotland 32. wales producing showers, a new one coming and across north—west scotland, producing some showers. clear spells and fog patches forming across parts of southern england. another 91, that is how we start tomorrow. tomorrow showers across north—west scotland, also northern england and wales for also northern england and wales for a time. the weather will drive from the west as we start to see more cloud coming in. there will still be sunny spells around, and the temperatures will still be high. widely the mid—to high 20s. locally in the south—east the low 30s, and as we head through the rest of the week, as dan rightly said, hanging on to the high temperatures, especially in the south—east. at the weekend there is a dip to the high 20s where we have had the low 30s. into the following week, we see a return to temperatures well above average once again. it is interesting, looking behind you, the
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grass is so parched, i wonder what the long—term effects is. i am not asking for the answer, it is just a thought. i will pursue the answers elsewhere. i know you know most things. it might be beyond you, but i doubt it. you have been trying an experiment outside your kitchen window. i have, i have been using the water from the washing up, and a patch of lawn which is completely parched, and i have been pouring the water on it for a couple of weeks. it is still really parched.” water on it for a couple of weeks. it is still really parched. i like the way you are conducting an experiment. it is not going well. so there is no slightly green patch7 experiment. it is not going well. so there is no slightly green patch? i think we need photographic evidence of this. i will keep going and tell you when it finally turns green. what are you doing? nothing. the uk's largest mortgage broker says it is seeing a big spike in so—called down valuations, where a surveyor thinks the house you want to buy isn't worth the selling price.
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that can have a big impact on how much you can borrow. steph has the details. and this can have a huge impact. this is best explained with an example. say you offer £200,000 on a property, which is agreed with the seller. a surveyor then says the house is only worth £190,000, based on things like sales locally and the condition of the property. as a result, the surveyor has down—valued the property by £10,000, and that can have a knock—on effect on how much you are able to borrow. one mortgage brokers says it has seen a big spike in the number of down valuations taking place. david hollingworth is from london and country mortgages. what impact does it have to have your property down valued7
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what impact does it have to have your property down valued? well, it can reduce the amount of mortgage you can get. for the buyer, that may give an opportunity for them to renegotiate the price with the vendor. so it may be that it is not fatal to the transaction, but of course, where you have a chain, if that has a knock—on impact to the rest of those in the chain, it could ultimately see that chain fall apart, so it just ultimately see that chain fall apart, so itjust doesn't go ahead. so why do you think there is this spike in down valuations7 so why do you think there is this spike in down valuations? well, i think it can be various reasons. some of us can be a little bit over optimistic about what our property is worth, so actually maybe we have just gone to high. but secondly, where you have a slower market, you've actually got fewer comparable transactions for the surveyor to look at, and decidejust how much the current valuation is. i think in that slower market you see a little bit more caution being shown by surveyors , bit more caution being shown by surveyors, especially when we are getting a bit of a downshift in house price inflation, and we are
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certainly seeing something of a turnaround regionally, but certainly london and the south—east, for example, has flattened off, and some of the indices are saying prices are dropping back a touch. and that will be taken into consideration by the surveyors . be taken into consideration by the surveyors. so you are getting a mismatch between what the vendor is hoping to achieve, and the surveyor looking at the current market conditions and perhaps just pulling their horns in a little bit on that price. if you are the seller, you are obviously going to push to get the most you can, and it could be the most you can, and it could be the timing of two people outbidding each other to get the property. the problem is, if it is then down valued, it doesn't matter how far up it went, if the surveyor is saying it went, if the surveyor is saying it is worth less. property is what someone is willing to pay for it. evenif someone is willing to pay for it. even if the surveyor says it is worth a bit less for lending purposes, the buyer can still go ahead, of course. if they can find funds from elsewhere they can choose to pay the original selling price, or they could try and appeal that
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valuation, although i have to say it is very rare that we see appealed values being overturned. what is the impact on the bigger picture of this7 impact on the bigger picture of this? i think we are looking at a more uncertain market, perhaps, from surveyors . more uncertain market, perhaps, from surveyors. they are seeing different price movements regionally. so london and the south—east in particular was powering ahead very strongly in recent years. now we are seeing that flattening off. other regions may see less devaluation is, but they are not immune to this. and there is a lot of political uncertainty at the moment, and that some of the speculation that the flattening is because of that. in the longer term, are they going to continue to go up? this is what we a lwa ys continue to go up? this is what we always talk about when we talk about house prices. house price inflation is still in positive territory, it has just slowed down. is still in positive territory, it hasjust slowed down. welcome is still in positive territory, it has just slowed down. welcome news for people trying to get a deposit together. but others may sit on
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their hands rather than make a move, and that uncertainty could prolong that shift. interesting as ever to get your thoughts on this. do get in touch if you have any experience of this, and what you did about it. still to come on breakfast: as the hockey world cup gets underway in london we're joined by sam quek, who was part of team gb's women's hockey squad who won gold at the rio olympics. it was watched by millions of people at the time. the perfect time of day. it was very exciting, and it influenced lotsa people to play hockey, which is brilliant. —— lots of people. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. london mayor sadiq khan has been branded pathetic by former mayor borisjohnson for not taking more responsibility over knife crime. mrjohnson accused the mayor of blaming everyone but himself, saying it was mr khan's failure to get a grip of the problem which had made matters worse. sadiq khan has told
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bbc radio london crime started going up in 2014, before he became mayor. he said he doesn't have a time machine, to go back in time. well, following headlines earlier this year saying the murder rate in london had spiked above that of new york, bbc london has been to america to see what's being done there to tackle problems of violence. one strategy is to use teams of so—called violence interrupters to head off trouble before it gets out of hand. and we'll have more on that on our lunchtime news at 1:30pm on bbc one. a child has helped victoria tube station reduce the number of people injured on its escalators by over 60%. megan has become a station announcer. this is what she sounds like. hello everybody, and please listen up. take care on the escalators. hold on to the handrail and your luggage. there used to be around 15 injuries a month on the escalators. but since megan's announcements
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started earlier this year, there are now around just five a month. research shows that deeper adult voices are perceived by humans as having more authority than higher voices, so a child's voice wouldn't have that authority, but perhaps it's the shock factor. a look at the tube board now. the circle line and district lines have delays because of a signal failure at earls court. london overground has minor delays due to faulty trains and the victoria line has no service between kings cross and victoria. and on the roads, the blackwall tunnel is particularly slow northbound. good morning. it's another week where we're
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going to see very little if any rain, so yes, it continues dry. there'll be a good deal of sunshine around, and it's going to feel very hotand humid. certainly the case today, some good spells of sunshine around already. there will be some cloud coming and going, so not wall—to—wall blue skies. that said, uv levels will remain high, although pollen levels are low today. a temperatures this afternoon of 31 or 32 celsius, just a light or gentle south—westerly breeze. and much of the cloud will tend to melt away through this evening. increasingly clear skies overnight, although later in the night we could just see some mist and low cloud developing, and temperatures are not going to drop much lower than 15 or 16 celsius. so it's another quite humid and sultry night, and there's little change in this forecast. it's looking mainly dry. a good deal of sunshine by day, some warm and humid nights, and temperatures potentially midweek could get up to 33 celsius, but very little rain in the forecast. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london, and she will be speaking to our home affairs correspondent about what lessons can be learnt from america, if any, about reducing knife and gun crime. good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker
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and louise minchin. our headlines today. police arrest three men in london over an acid attack on a three year—old boy in worcester on saturday. one woman is killed and a child is in a critical condition as 14 people are shot in toronto. the gunman is also dead. a group ofjewish labour mps will table an emergency motion at a party meeting tonight — as the row over its anti—semitism policy rumbles on. ryanair says its profits have fallen £70 million in the first three months of the year — that's a 20% fall compared to the same time last year. i'll be looking at why. and there's a nice understated italian for the claretjug. francesco molinari becomes the first from italy to win a major. woods, rose and mcilroy beaten at the open. good morning from hyde park where as you can see the ground is parched,
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there isn't much rain in the forecast this week to alleviate the situation, elsewhere in the uk we will seize on showers but not all of us will see them. hot and humid and sunshine. i will more in 15 minutes. —— we will see some showers. it is monday 23rd ofjuly, our main story. west mercia police say three men have been arrested in london on suspicion of conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm, after a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester on saturday. our reporterjon donnisonjoins us now from our london newsroom. jon what more do we know? not too many details, we know the ages of the men, they were 22,25, 26, and as you say they were picked up 26, and as you say they were picked up overnight in london, arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to cause grievous bodily harm, and 39—year—old man from wolverhampton
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was already questioned. he was detained over the weekend. this attack happened on saturday afternoon just after tpm in attack happened on saturday afternoonjust after tpm in broad daylight at a busy shopping centre retail park in worcester. police say the toddler was with his familyjust ona the toddler was with his familyjust on a shopping trip when he was attacked. they believe the boy was deliberately targeted and sprayed on the arms and face with a corrosive substance or acid. he was taken to hospital and treated for serious burns. he has since been discharged. jon donnison, thank you for the latest information. 14 people have been shot and one person has died in toronto, according to canadian police. the shooting happened in the greek district of the city on sunday night and the shooter is also believed to be dead. a young girl is in a critical condition. aaron safir reports. gunshots rang out in the greektown
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neighbourhood. witnesses described 20 shots and the sound of a weapon being reloaded 20 times. mass shooting right beside where i live. i thought it was fireworks at first because it was rapid—fire and then there would be a pause and some more fire. we didn't know what it was. we saw people starting to run in our direction, i still didn't know what it was, more people started running and we ran down a side street. it was, more people started running and we ran down a side streetm it was, more people started running and we ran down a side street. it is thought the victims were spread over several blocks of the city. one person is confirmed dead and 13 have been injured, among them a young girl in critical condition. local media report the suspect opened fire at police before taking his own life. so far there is no indication of emotive. impaired to the us, canada has low levels of gun violence but toronto is facing a
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sharp increase in incidents. canada bosman largest city has seen more than 200 shootings this year, more than 200 shootings this year, more than 200 shootings this year, more than 20 of them fatal. waste packaging that is being sent overseas to be recycled, could be ending up in landfill according to critical report. the national audit office says the uk has met eu targets, but is carrying out inadequate checks on whether recycling has actually taken place or whether waste has simply been landfilled or burned. our environment analyst roger harrabin reports. 11 million tonnes — that's the estimate of packaging waste created by uk homes and businesses last year. the uk has ambitious targets for increasing the amount it sends for recycling, but the national audit office says firms have chosen to export more than half of the material rather than to deal with it in britain. much of the material for recycling goes to developing countries less able to handle it than the uk, the report says. it wants the exports much more tightly governed. the problem with recycling material abroad is that the uk just has less
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visibility as to what happens to it, it has less ability to get... the uk authorities aren't able to get the same assurances as they could if it was in the uk. the report talks about additional risks of contamination, so food residue for example in the packaging. so it's reallyjust increased risks. the nao says the recycling system needs an overhaul. to people up—and—down the country who are dutifully rinsing out their plastic pots for recycling, this sort of thing creates a real erosion of trust. the government says its new waste strategy, due in the autumn, will ensure that things prepared to be recycled really do get recycled. the government can't allow people to get cynical about recycling. without the public, recycling policy is nowhere. roger harrabin, bbc news. labour mps will tonight debate whether the party's new code
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of conduct goes far enough to tackle anti—semitism. the guidelines have been criticised by some jewish organisations and labour members. it comes after one mp angrily called leaderjeremy corbyn an anti—semite last week. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster. this has been going on for some time, what do you make of the tone7 just to pick up on your mention of the labour mp who confronted jeremy corbyn and called him an anti—semite last week, margaret hodge, who has been speaking in the last few minutes, and she said she stands by those comments and revealed that she was given a disciplinary letter 12 hours after that row with jeremy corbyn in the house of commons and described the labour party's decision not to adopt the internationally recognised definition of anti—semitism in full
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asa definition of anti—semitism in full as a bridge too far. this row will not go away for the labour party because tonight jewish not go away for the labour party because tonightjewish members of the labour party in westminster will vote on adopting a separate code of conduct which does take in that definition in full. there will be a formal vote in that later in the year. the party bosman ruling body the national executive committee, could overrule that and that threatens to overshadow the labour party conference which is happening in september. this row about anti—semitism and what labour mps say, many of them, as a failure of the party's leadership to deal with it is not going away. on the conservative side they have a cabinet meeting today, something they have been talking out for months, almost years, brexit. that's right, theresa may taking her top tea m right, theresa may taking her top team of ministers to gateshead this morning for a meeting of the cabinet before mps go away on some of it what she will be making the point, her argument that the government is trying to achieve a brexit deal which works for every corner of the
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uk. after that, ministers will be getting on planes and trains to crisscross europe over the summer to convince the heads of government in ryanair has reported a 20 percent fall in profits between april and june this year due to staff costs, oil prices and lower fares. steph's here to tell us more. £285 million between april and june, down £70 million compared to last year. it is to do with the oil prices and back that there are higher wage
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costs at the moment. there is a big crowd going on amongst ryanair staff at the moment with the people who run itand at the moment with the people who run it and the staff and this is to do with their pay and conditions anyone who has a flight booked with ryanair at the moment has probably had a look at what is going on. it is in had a look at what is going on. it isina had a look at what is going on. it is in a row at the minute and they have had two 24—hour walk—outs at the moment with pilots and there is another happening tomorrow and on wednesday and thursday some flight attendants will go on strike as well. ryanair attendants will go on strike as well. rya nair have attendants will go on strike as well. ryanair have cancelled 600 flights because of that. the civil aviation authority have said, make sure you claim compensation for this because it's obviously not your fault. anyone travelling with them, or due to travel with them, make sure you keep across that. you can see it's hitting the bottom line outcome of the fact they have had pay their staff more survey said their staffing costs have gone up by a third in that time period compared to that time period last year. it is definitely costing them more for
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their staff but their staff are unhappy still at the moment and they have lost to contend with and it's hitting their bottom line. check your flight is the take away from that one. if you think it is hot here... the heat wave injapan has reached a record high of 41.1 degrees. that temperature was recorded in a city northwest of tokyo. officials said last week that the heat had killed at least 15 people and hospitalised thousands of others. president trump has stepped up his rhetoric against iran, warning president rouhani not to threaten the united states, as tensions between the two countries countinue to mount. in a twitter message written entirely in capitals, mr trump said iran would suffer "consequences the likes of which few throughout history have ever suffered". he also said he would not tolerate iran's "demented words of violence and death." following the us decision to reimpose sanctions earlier the iranian leader had warned... i do
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apologise. yes, we willjust look at that sweet. i'm not sure what the iranian leader said, i will bring it to you in a couple of minutes. the reason is it disappeared before my eyes. sometimes it's handy to see it before. i haven't got that sweet. fear not, what we can tell you this morning is... it's nasa's 60th birthday. today nasa leaders, past and present will host a q&a celebrating its history and outlining their vision for the decades ahead. the space administration is also preparing to mark the 50th anniversary of successfully putting a man on the moon. later this year the us mint will unveil an apollo 11 commemorative coin. it is 8:11am. more than half of families living in temporary accommodation in england are actually in work, according to new analysis by the housing charity shelter. they estimate 33,000 families were "working homeless" last year, up 73% from 2013. a new channel 4 dispatches
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documentary looks at the problem. let's see a clip from the programme. the average rental deposit is more than £1000 and on top of that, most renters have to pay their first month in advance. £20007 yes. whilst you don't have the money to pay for a deposit and for the rent, where have you ended up staying7 yeah. joining us now is the dispatches presenter we saw in that clip, datshiane nava nayagam, and greg beales from the housing charity shelter. good morning to the pair of you,
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thank you for coming on to talk about this. what motivated you so much to get involved in this programme7 much to get involved in this programme? my family were made homeless when i was a child so it is a subject really close to me. i have realised for a long time that people have very set preconceptions of what homelessness is, who is homeless and why people become homeless. in my life later in my 20s i became homeless again when i was working andi homeless again when i was working and i realised this area is growing more and more and very little is done to understand it. that was the main reason. i watched the documentary and a couple of things struck me. first of all, the fact you were homeless when you were a child has deeply affected you hasn't it7 child has deeply affected you hasn't it? it is not something thatjust happened to you then, it is a theme in the way you feel. yes. home is fundamental to your kind of well—being, health, confidence, mental health, how well you do at school and how well you do at work and it's the one thing we take for granted that you always have an
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especially as a child when you lose that it knocks the core out of you and you carry that insecurity with you for a long time. i suppose, you know, the basic reason why anyone goes to work because they think that that should at least afford them somewhere to live. and when that's not happening you are in a very frightening situation. in the programme there are details about how widespread the problem that my problem is. is there an overriding reason why people become homeless7 homelessness is like pressure on a damp, it builds over time, homelessness is like pressure on a damp, it builds overtime, the rent goes up, income is cut or low and at some point the dam bursts and when somebody becomes homeless it is hard to get them back into a secure home again. -- pressure on a damp. i was surprised by the fact that so many people in the programme you found we re people in the programme you found were homeless but had jobs. is that
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on the rise? it is widespread and rising. we have published new figures today showing more than half of those families who are homeless and in temporary or emergency accommodation are in work. that really challenges people's views about how people are getting into this difficulty and i think it demonstrates that what is going on is that the link between an income and ajob is that the link between an income and a job which used to be enough to secure a home is completely breaking down in the housing market. let's have another look at a clip from the programme where you meet a security guard and hear about his experiences. two different scenes. it's like i'm superman. in the daytime, a security guard, at night—time, i'm a homeless boy. how does it affect your work? i don't have enough rest for then the next day, or full refreshed for me to get up and go to work. when i'm on my way to work, i feel tired. when i'm supposed to be at work, i don't have the energy for then for me to move or do anything at work. i just feel restless.
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you get the sense of trying to keep down a job and you spoke to a homeless woman who had to wash in public toilets? yes, she was washing in mcdonald's when she was living in her car. all her close were stacked in the back, she did her make—up in her rear—view mirror. people find ways around it. the thing is, none of her employers or colleagues had any idea she was doing this for weeks on end. kind of a double life going on? massive, the shame and embarrassment is huge and we struggled to find people to talk to others because it is a real stigma they have to overcome. the size of they have to overcome. the size of
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the problem and what you are talking about there, because there is so much shame around it, you are happy to patch over it and say it is fine when it is not? the scale of this is hidden, these are people doing the right thing, going to work and in many cases, looking after children as well. it doesn't build a safe and secure home. you can see more on this story tonight in dispatches on channel 4 at 8pm. carol is at hyde park with a look at this morning's weather. what you have been doing, carol is doing this comparison of what hyde park looks like now, which is parched and thought it should look like. good morning? if we start by taking an aerial look at what hyde park should look like at this stage of the year you can see it should still be fairly green. at the same aerial shots from last week shows
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how it looks now. it is parched, it is scorched and it is very dry. also regent ‘s park, this is how it should look. lots of green around and this is how it looked last week. it is the driest first half of the summer in the uk since 1961. we have seen just 20% of the average rainfall. there have been many comparisons with the summer of 1976. that summer had 15 days in a row when the temperature somewhere in the uk reached 30 celsius or above. although we have seen lots of days close to 30 celsius we haven't had 15 in close to 30 celsius we haven't had 15ina close to 30 celsius we haven't had 15 in a row. so the intensity of the 19705 heatwave is greater than so far. in london we would normally expect around 45 millimetres of rain. so far in the london area and the south—east we have had closer to
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one millimetre of rainfall this july. no wonder it is so parched, but it's not just july. no wonder it is so parched, but it's notjust parched in london, it is many places in the uk. this forecast won't help the situation. there will be a lot of sunshine and it will remain hot and humid, particularly in south eastern england. high—pressure is dominating our weather. at the moment we have a weather front trying to penetrate the area of high pressure but as it does so it is weakening. this morning we do have rain across scotla nd morning we do have rain across scotland and northern ireland but it isa thin, scotland and northern ireland but it is a thin, narrowband. behind it we will see sunshine and showers and ahead of it across southern and eastern scotland, antrim and down, we have a bright start for the day. the north—east of england we have a bright start producing the odd shower, the same for the isle of man and western parts of wales. but for
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the rest of england it is dry and sunny. patchy fog from this morning starting to live. through the day, narrow band of rain moves further south, from aberdeen through to glasgow heading towards argyll and bute and also the east of northern ireland. temperatures today, 31, maybe 32 around london. widely were looking at the mid to high 205 and in the north west of scotland, around 16 celsius. through this evening and overnight the weather front will continue to move south taking its like rain to southern scotland, northern england and north and west wales. at the same time another week front comes in across north—west scotland introducing showers. introducing clear skies and patchy mist and fog in the south. it is going to be a muggy night with
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temperatures not falling away very much. tomorrow we start with the wea k much. tomorrow we start with the weak weather front starting with showery outbreaks of rain across northern england and north—west wales, for example. to the day, the showers and the showers across north scotla nd showers and the showers across north scotland will fade as drier conditions coming from the west and tomorrow we're looking at temperatures from mid to the high 20s and locally in the south—east, into the low 30s. 20s and locally in the south—east, into the low 305. and that is the pattern through the rest of the week and by the weekend, temperatures willdipa and by the weekend, temperatures will dip a little in the south from low 30s to high 205 and so for the rest of the uk, temperatures coming down a degree or so but the following week, it looks like they will be climbing again. it looks like it is relentless, thank you, carol. they have the potential to deliver
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everything from your weekly shop to life—saving medical equipment, breakfast‘s john maguire is at west yorkshire fire service in bradford looking at the different uses for drone technology. john. he has a drone of his own. we have been talking about the commercial use of drones. we are looking at them in the public sector. the fire brigade has been out with their drone 12 times. we also have our own bbc drone and it will give us a bird's eye view of what this drone is seen. good morning, dave, deputy chief fire
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officer, are you impressed with this technology7 officer, are you impressed with this technology? yes, it has given us something we have never had, in terms of a perspective of an incident from above, which we have never had before. they can give us a thermal image views of the building and also the floods he suffered a few years ago, a drone can fly some distance away from us and give us an image of how far the floodwaters have spread. carol hasjust reminded us on how hot it is, and there have been fires in the north of england, you have got some shots of a fire here a couple of weeks ago. does it help with the immediate response because it is important for you to get there quickly7 because it is important for you to get there quickly? if we can get a drone there quickly we can get a better idea and the extent of the incident and plan resources going forward. these are drones can fly quickly and direct and not having to
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worry about roads and gives us an opportunity if they can work in more urban environments, go ahead of fire engines and then relay data back to the fire engines so they can have an idea of what they will be responding to. five areas where given them to trial, and counsellor alex ross sure. what are the practical implications for you? digital sector is important and there is a wide—ranging area where we can have positive roles. highways maintenance, pothole re pairs, positive roles. highways maintenance, pothole repairs, is a big issue for people. also inspecting bridges as well. bradford has a lot of old mill buildings and we want to bring them back into use and we have looked at the way drones can take 306 did degree photos and
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look at feasibility. the more you think about it, there are all of these different applications that can be used. we met you a couple of months ago when you first launched the challenge, what have you learned in the last six months that maybe you haven't thought of before? we have learned a lot, there is a lot of uses for drones that will add benefits to public services and in some cases, potentially improve them and save lives and money. there is a big demand for it. but currently drones need to operate with operators with the drones. if we are going to explore these massive opportunities, that needs to change and drones need to change, with fire emergency, go ahead of the fire engines and in the west midlands they have been looking at construction to make safe at construction to make safe at construction sites. southampton and london were looking at medical
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deliveries. what needs to happen now is we need to challenge the technology community, universities, industry to come up with these applications so we can get west yorkshire police fire response drones that go ahead of the fire engines. we need to change the regulations so we can play around with it and allow this stuff to start happening but we need to talk to the community so we are shaping the regulation around drones that people are comfortable with unsupportive of in their cities, in terms of where they go and where they don't go. because we don't want to many in the skies, things like airports where they might cause problems7 airports where they might cause problems? we need to engage with the public on exactly that. let's think about having particular routes for the drones, stay away from restricted airspace is, maybe they will fly over rivers and railway lines of major roads and are not over residential areas. but this is
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the kind of conversation that needs to be had with the public so they are shaping this kind of technology. very good to see you this morning. all sorts of different applications, commercial as he talked about in the studio and commercial as well. it gives us all sorts of different options. but it from us, more on brea kfast after options. but it from us, more on breakfast after the news, travel and weather where you are watching the programme this morning. a week of whether contrasts across the uk this week, hot weather dominating eastern parts of england, temperatures for five days could be above 30 degrees. cool in the north and west and here you will see refreshing rain at times. we have the air masses colliding and that's why we have these contrasts, cooler
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atla ntic why we have these contrasts, cooler atlantic are pushing into northern and western areas, humid and hot air moving in towards the south and east. good sunny spells through the day here, staying dry, showers in northern england, wales and southwest but more likely to see showers push across northern ireland and central parts of southern and eastern scotland but before it arrives in scotland the rain, that is, temperatures could get up to 25 inafew is, temperatures could get up to 25 in a few spots, 31, 32 in the south—east corner. tonight the weather fronts separating the cooler airfrom the hot air weather fronts separating the cooler air from the hot air continues working south into of northern and western england and wales and a greater chance of showers here. are one or two isolated showers across scotland, much more comfortable to sleep monitors across england and wales where temperatures remain in the upper teens and that contrast remains into tuesday, there is the dividing line, that weatherfronts bringing showers through the day, southern scotland, northern england and wales, a few spots in these areas will stay dry. sunny spells, co mforta ble areas will stay dry. sunny spells, comfortable and pleasant in the sunshine to the north and west of
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that but across eastern wales, central and england it will be another hot one, temperatures above 30 degrees yet again. on wednesday, if anything, the warm air pushes back further northwards and westwards, showers can find a western scotland and northern ireland, the odd isolated one elsewhere across parts of eastern england potentially later in the day. but temperatures still in the low 30s day. but temperatures still in the low 305 here whereas we will see temperatures climb into the 20s across scotland and northern ireland. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and ben bland. tensions of trade — g20 trade ministers warn of a threat to global growth. live from london, that's our top story on monday 23rd july. a risk to the global economy — that's the warning from g20 ministers after they conclude
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a two—day meeting in argentina. they say that rising global trade tensions could hurt economic growth. more in a moment. also in the programme —
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