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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 25, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: greece begins three days of mourning after wildfires destroyed whole communities, killing at least 7a people. five men have been charged in connection with an acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester. one of the world's best selling pop stars, demi lovato, is in hospital after a suspected drugs overdose. can you trademark the shape of a chocolate bar? later this morning, nestle will find out if it can protect its kitkat from copy—cats. in sport: it's a decisive day at the tour de france, with geraint thomas still in the lead. good morning. the swimmers are already out, the sun is climbing and it will be another hot day, but the weather is turning hotter for many of us,
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especially tomorrow, and potentially for some on friday. i will have more details in 15 minutes. it's wednesday, 25 july. our top story: greece is beginning three days of mourning after wildfires killed at least 7a people. emergency crews have spent the night searching through destroyed communities, and dampening down remaining fires. andrew plant reports. searching among the ashes, rescue teams walking among the still—smouldering ruins of this seaside resort. so far we have found 30 bodies which were dead or burned and we have located, we are trying to locate another four which are so far missing. those who managed to escape from here are now returning to homes destroyed by fire. i am a wreck. a lifetime‘s work, a lifetime of memories go to waste. it's totally heartbreaking,
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everything is gone. the flames swept through here after dark, burning everything in their path. many tried to flee by car. the road, surrounded by flames, covered by clouds of smoke. this driver escaped. others were killed in their cars, overcome as they tried to leave. seen from above, this coastal village looks like a war zone. greece has called for international help to dampen down its scorched ground. the country's worst forest fires more than a decade have left its people in a state of collective shock and national mourning. it could yet turn to anger with suggestions the fires may have been started deliberately. the survivors here are now looking for answers. and throughout the morning we will
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speak with our correspondent for the very latest. five men have been charged following a suspected acid attack on a three year—old—boy in worcester. our correspondent jane frances kelly has more details. thank you very much for being with us thank you very much for being with us this morning. can you bring us up—to—date with what police are saying? police are not going to reveal the names of these five men but what we know is that three art in their 20s from london, two from wolverhampton, one is 39, one is 41, they will appear before the magistrates' court later today. they are charged with conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm in connected with a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old. the boy was ina attack on a three—year—old. the boy was in a discount superstore in worcester on saturday when he received burns to his face and arm. he was taken to hospital and
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discharged on sunday. but we don't know the longer term implications, the wider implications of those injuries. but police are keen to stress that they believe this is an isolated incident. thank you very much for talking to us. too many children in england are being excluded from school, according to mps. a report by the education select committee describes the system as a wild west, with league tables being favoured over pupils. the number of permanent exclusions has increased by more than 40% over the past three years. the government says exclusions should only be used as a last resort. we'll have more on this report and the impact of exclusion on children with special educational needs in around ten minutes. another attempt will be made today to break the political deadlock in northern ireland. ministers from london and dublin will meet at the british—irish intergovernmental conference, the first time the forum has been held in eleven years. the power—sharing coalition at stormont collapsed 18 months ago. more than 100 million voters in pakistan go to the polls today
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to elect a new government. the vote comes amid tightened security after violence marred the campaign. the election sees the former cricketer imran khan up against the party ofjailed ex—prime minister nawaz sharif. the american pop singer demi lovato is being treated in hospital in los angeles following a suspected drug overdose. us media reports say the 25—year—old was found unconscious at her home. in a statement, her agent said she was now awake and surrounded by herfamily. richard main reports. demi lovato was in the middle of a world tour when she was rushed to hospital last night, after being found unconscious at home. us media claim she was given medicine to ca ta ra ct claim she was given medicine to cataract overdose. she is believed to be awake and in stable condition.
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—— counteract. the former child star is one of the biggest selling artists and has spoken openly about her previous drug and alcohol abuse, including in her latest single, sober. # i am so sorry i am not so that any more. daddy, please forgive me. fans and celebrities offered m essa 9 es me. fans and celebrities offered m essa g es of me. fans and celebrities offered messages of support on social media, including ariana grande eight and lady gaga. ellen degeneres tweeted: lovato has been widely praised for trying to raise awareness and trying to help those suffering mental illness. herfamily to help those suffering mental illness. her family released a statement thanking everyone for their love, prayers and support.- it wasn't my intention. a woman who was trying to divorce
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her husband of a0 years will find out today if she has won her court battle. she believes her marriage to hugh 0wens broke down but he disagrees and says they still have a few years to enjoy. clive coleman has the details. divorce requires proof of adultery, desertion, unreasonable behaviour, two years of separation with consent of the parties or five without. teeny 0wens says she is in a loveless a nd teeny 0wens says she is in a loveless and unhappy marriage with her husband hugh which broke down after she had an affair. thejudge rejected her claims he'd acted unreasonably in berating her about her infidelity. despite his wife's fling, mr 0wens wants to stay married as he believes the couple still has a few years of old age together. the court of appeal backed him, ruling in fact that being in a wretchedly unhappy marriage was no grounds for divorce. contested divorces are incredibly rare. most couples agree that one side will admit they have acted unreasonably in order
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to get the divorce. many seniorjudges favour a no—fault system where neither party is blamed for the breakdown, but none has dared to change what parliament has decreed. the supreme court will be taking a bold step in doing so. clive coleman, bbc news. we will be talking about that with a lawyer a little bit later. that is correct. thank you. very serious. sally is here. i have missed you. welcome back. happy holidays. sally is here. i have missed you. welcome back. happy holidayslj haven't welcome back. happy holidays.” haven't seen you in yonks. not for a long time! what was that thing that you are doing? 0h, long time! what was that thing that you are doing? oh, yes, the world cup. forget that, brent thomas has a lion and a bunch of flowers. yes, i know. and more importantly a yellow
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jersey, and he is looking really good. it is a tough, tough day for him to date, quite a short stage, but it involves a two—hour climb up the mountain. 0h, but it involves a two—hour climb up the mountain. oh, my gosh. continuous climb, and he then he knows it is going to be difficult. geraint thomas came through a dramatic day at the tour de france to keep the yellowjersey. stage 16 featured roadside protests, wet roads and crashes, but the welshman made it safely to the finish and is still 99 seconds ahead of defending champion chris froome. harry kane's been nominated alongside the likes of ronaldo and messi in the men's player category at fifa's best awards. lucy bronze is on the list for the women's award. england manager gareth southgate's up for the best men's coach, while chelsea ladies boss emma hayes is nominated as one of the top women's coaches. and it's root‘s roses. england captainjoe root‘s best bowling performance helps yorkshire beat their old rivals lancashire. plenty to talk about today. a busy
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day on the tour de france. and the picture of that crash, itjust makes you go ask. i know, and you can see it coming, just below the stonewall and the thing about the tour is over the other side, it could have been arriving in —— gasp. 20 years ago, someone arriving in —— gasp. 20 years ago, someone died in a crash very similar to that. let's show you some of the front pages of the papers this morning. steffey is with us as well. horrible pictures on the front pages. —— steph is with us. 15 blazes begin simultaneously on three fronts outside athens, this was taken on monday, in the town of rafina, and expected death toll of 100, the worst in postwar europe. yes, look at the other pictures, actually. you can really get a sense of the impending danger. that house is just about to be engulfed in
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flames. that is the guardian. and this picture makes a lot of the papers this morning. and desperate stories inside the papers of people trying to escape by car or going into the sea. and trying to escape these flames. and so many of them didn't. and their main story is not what they are talking about, is treason law, saying that it should be updated and used to prosecute jihadis in syria according to a former home secretary and the head of mi5. former home secretary and the head of m15. they are looking at the treason act of 1351 not being used since 19a5, but there are calls for it to be revised. the front of the sun, the world is on fire, the killer heatwaves, hundreds die in europe and japan. and the front of the daily mail, britain's in meltdown, but at least pinilla camilla and dame judi meltdown, but at least pinilla camilla and damejudi keep cool. there is still a lot in the paper
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about retail and what is going on and the impact of all of the store closures we have talked about over the last year or so and that is what the last year or so and that is what the daily telegraph and the business pages are talking about this morning. there is a shopping centre giant called hammerson and they own lots of sites i am sure you will have been to, birmingham's bull ring, vista village, brent cross in london, they own lot of the big centres that the retailers will lease from them. and what they say is they are going to sell £800 million of assets because they are worried about how things are going. they say they are going to pause the extension they were going to do to bring cross in london and they said that the focus is away from retail parks and more premium outlets —— brent cross. this is all about trying to reduce the impact of department store closures that we
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have seen, hanson fraser, and mothercare as well, so they will change the way shopping centres look in the future. can i give you the weirdest business story?” in the future. can i give you the weirdest business story? i wanted you to talk about this. this is... i had to check it april fools. explain it to us. someone has done some research on the infection you can get from cat litter, stick with me, this is a business letter, called toxoplasmosis. apparently this scientific study found if you are infected with this you are more likely to be entrepreneurial. so, people who have had the disease, and it is estimated to affect one quarter of the world's population, are more likely to be entrepreneurial in their life and i have no idea why anyone looks at this in the first place, but also... ido this in the first place, but also... i do know a little bit, not that i ama i do know a little bit, not that i am a scientist, about toxoplasmosis, and it does affect your brain and the way that your brain can work. so
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that must be the link. it is extraordinary. it reduces the fear of failure, so you are more likely to take risks. you shouldn't feel a cat litter when you are pregnant. yes and! cat litter when you are pregnant. yes and i just cat litter when you are pregnant. yes and ijust think... cat litter when you are pregnant. yes and i just think... take care. it is not something that you want to get. a scientist has asked if he is suggesting we should all get it and, no, i don't think that is it. we at business story. compete with that, sally. i don't know ifi can pick up on that. i'm going to show you a brilliant story in the times, the rugby tackles up to be at a lower height. to protect players from a rising concussions that have been recorded over the last five years or so. they are saying they are going to push through this new law, it will be tested next year and a cup competition and will punish players who tackle on the underside of the
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armpit. this is the main picture you'll see on the back page. geraint thomas with this grey in his eyes. it was not aimed at him. there is a farmers protest at the two france yesterday and the police came down the it very, very heavily, spray peppe" the it very, very heavily, spray pepper sway —— the it very, very heavily, spray pepper sway “ pepper spray the it very, very heavily, spray pepper sway —— pepper spray towards the farmers. it then blew onto the cyclists bake —— basically. a lot of had to stop and have water sprayed into their eyes. there is a survey in one of the papers i have lost. people often order takeaway is at seven o'clock at night and two o'clock in the morning. the most popular. is there a difference between what you would order at seven o'clock and two o'clock? peter
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is more popular at seven o'clock. a woman in preston called dorothy has been growing pineapples and a0 years ago she cut off the top of the pineapple. she got one in 2007 and this summer, five. do you have a picture? there she is. this is dorothy and five pineapples. picture? there she is. this is dorothy and five pineapplesm sprouted out of the bathroom. we know that it's warm and we think it might be warmer. a mere 11 degrees, still a beautiful day outside. in
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london, it's a sultry day again. carol has got all the details and she is out and about at a swimming pool she is out and about at a swimming pool, appropriately. it isa it is a cool start of the day although temperature wise, it's 20 celsius but compared to what we have been used to as our maximums, it does feel cool. if you are in parts of rural scotland or wales, your temperatures fallen into single figures. it certainly is a cold start to you. the top temperatures 31.a celsius in suffolk. today we are expecting the temperatures to be higher. of course, this is in the south—east, and it's not everywhere. generally speaking, temperatures will be a little bit higher than they were everywhere yesterday. the forecast for today is a mostly dry one. a sunny one and a warm forecast for today is a mostly dry one. a sunny one and a warm one or a hot one defending on what part of the country you are in. first thing
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this morning, a weatherfront in the country you are in. first thing this morning, a weather front in the north—west, producing showers across the western isles and we will see some of those clip the northern isles but the most of us, clear skies, blue skies, some cloud building and the chance of a shower in essex, kent, east anglia but you'll be lucky if you do catch one. temperatures 32, 33 in the south—east but low to high 20s across the board. there will be sea breezes so if you can get to the coast, it will be cooler here. we still have shunned —— we still have some showers and parts of the south—east. showers across the north—west as well. in between, a lot of dry weather and it will be a muqqy lot of dry weather and it will be a muggy night. temperatures up to 20 in the south. that leaves us into tomorrow. looking at the weather front in the north—west producing showers at times. a lot of dry
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weather but we could see a thunderstorm across parts of central and southern england, into eastern england but there will not be many of them at this stage. tomorrow, temperatures could be 3a35. across—the—board tomorrow, temperatures could be 3a35. across—the—boa rd tomorrow, much warmer than it is today. again, cooler on the coast. 0vernight into friday, thunderstorms coming up. on friday, thunderstorms coming up. on friday itself, the met office has a weather warning out for parts of the midlands and eastern england for this very thing. some torrential downpours. rain coming in from the west but the most disruptive are likely to be thunderstorms. they are going to move across central and eastern parts of england heading up eastern parts of england heading up eastern scotland. we could have half a month worth of rainfall during the course of this period. that could lead to flash floods and power disruption and also travel
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disruption. do bear that in mind. it's not going to be a pretty sight by the time it clears on saturday, some of us could have a month worth of rainfall in that short period of time. if it misses the south—east, we are likely to temperatures of 3a, 35 but for most of the uk, it will not be as hot during the course of friday and is going to cool down a touch but in the middle of next week, temperatures return back into the 30s. we are going to have to watch out if there is that much rain in places. i'm always mesmerised by people doing triathlons. i'm so fascinated, how people swim, i would rather be swimming. you are making my day, to be honest. every day in england, more than 900 children with special educational needs are missing school
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because they've been excluded. it's a figure that's been described as a scandal by a group of mps. they say the focus on league tables discriminates against lower ability children, as brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. you have to send in all the evidence to what you are claiming. just some of the documents from natasha's legal battle against her son ‘s school. he didn't want to be filmed. he has adhd and struggled after changes in his mainstream secondary. suddenly brought in a zero tolerance policy. that does not work with children with send. his first exclusion in year ten for a very minor incident. what like? e actually wore the wrong colour socks to school. colourful socks, swinging on his chair, defiant behaviour. the school said it fullyjustified a series of exclusions but a tribunal said that behaviour was linked to
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his disability and he had been discriminated against. the school told us they have retrained staff and hired an educational psychiatrist. schools can come away from excluding students if things are put into place to support students. if he had that support, he would have shone. today, this report says much more should be done to curb exclusions. that increased a0% in the last three years but almost half of all those pupils with additional needs, over 900 send kids every year. this is in england. in scotland, only one child is permanently excluded. mp robert halfon to lead this report says this has to change. it is in my view discriminatory because the level of it has reached proportions we could never imagine. there is a wild west of exclusions going on and this is wrong, whether it is due to too much zero tolerance in a class or
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resource issues, whether it it is training issues or schools of rolling pupils because they are worried about exam results, whatever the reasons, it is wrong and the government has to act and stop this. here in nice‘s constituency, half of children with send go to this school. at passmore, they say exclusions are in crisis with judgements only dumb and academic standards. there are horror stories from all across the country and its disproportionate because we are rewarded and not being inclusive at the moment. off camera, you used a strong word to me, fraud. i'm sorry, ourfunding agreement strong word to me, fraud. i'm sorry, our funding agreement as an academy says we will serve our whole community. if they are not serving the whole camorra —— community, they are taking money and not doing the job they are being paid to do and the government needs to grow some teeth around it. the department of
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education told us the number of children being excluded is lower thanit children being excluded is lower than it was ten years ago that they should only ever be used as a last resort but today's report says they need to startjudging schools differently and will ward inclusion alongside results. it sticks out in peace. there are concrete recommendations in the report such as forcing schools to be more morally responsible by forcing them to advertise. reminding schools of their duty. they deal with behaviour issues but in—house, not by exclusions. there is also a recommendation here for more research into what they say is a worrying evidence that schools are not identifying children with send because of financial pressures because of financial pressures because to do so would be costly and
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what happens is that these children end up inevitably spiralling down and that's what is fuelling the statistics. another one came out which is hidden exclusions. these figures we are looking at could be the tip of the iceberg. have you heard of off rolling? we hear more and more about it. they do kind of gently encourage parents to home educate. we know those figures are increasing. this report said schools and local authorities can't wash their hands. they should still have a responsibility. let wejust leave you with this. the worst case that robert halfon described as a child with send who was bereaved, they had gone into meltdown because they couldn't cope and didn't have support, they were being educated in a store room at the bottom of the corridor in a school in isolation
quote
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working off worksheets. his call for a bill of rights to children so this type of thing doesn't happen. will any of this be adopted? the department of education said they will look at all these recommendations. something very close to your heart. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alpa patel. london's crossrail project is running 600 million pounds over budget. that's according to government figures revealed today. crossrail or the elizabeth line as it'll be known when it's up and running is 93% complete but the cost of the project has risen to 15.a billion pounds. the line is due to fully open in december 2019. the ministry ofjustice has announced two more courts in london are to close, as part of further cost saving plans. blackfriars crown court and wandsworth county court buildings will close as well as maidenhead magistrates' court in berkshire.
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scientists at kings college found that applying sunscreen to findlay could increase damage. it found if applied with less than the recommended two mg per square centimetre of skin, the sunscreen is not as effective. elderly residents in a reading care home had some surprising visitors this week. a pair of peruvian alpacas dropped by. it's thought their gentle nature makes them perfect for animal therapy visits. it's bonkers, it's bonkers. to have sometimes think of myself, this is what do, it's myjob, how did that happen? it's just a what do, it's myjob, how did that happen? it'sjust a lovely what do, it's myjob, how did that happen? it's just a lovely thing to do. people ‘s reactions arejust amazing. it makes it will file. good morning. it was another very
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warm night last night which is led toa warm night last night which is led to a warm start this morning. a lovely but one, lots of sunshine and yes, we are in for another hot and sunny day today. lots of sunshine around first thing. but more cloud moving up from the south as we had through the afternoon and that cloud may be enough to spark off 12 isolated showers. most places dry, very similar to yesterday afternoon but temperatures touch warmer. a maximum of 31, 30 two celsius. 0vernight tonight, some clear spells and patchy cloud. some western she midair, may be enough to spark off a shower. the minimum temperature not dropping much below 19 celsius so again quite uncomfortable for sleeping. thursday, lots of sunshine, temperatures sneaking up on that or higher. for friday, the chance of a thundery downpour. it clears the overnight leading to a much cooler weekend. temperatures
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feeling a little bit fresher. back in halfan feeling a little bit fresher. back in half an hour. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it's approaching 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: the grounds for divorce are usually straightforward, but what happens when one party disagrees that the marriage is over? the courts will rule today on one case which could set a precedent for others. if you're wondering how long this heatwave will last, carol's at hampton pool getting tips on how to stay safe, and we'll discuss how to get a good night's sleep. it isa it is a gorgeous day, isn't it? and steph will be getting to the bottom of a long—running legal row over the shape of a kitkat. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. greece is beginning three days
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of mourning after wildfires killed at least 7a people. emergency crews have spent the night searching through destroyed communities, and dampening down remaining fires. firefighters say they received dozens firefighters say they received d oze ns of firefighters say they received dozens of phone calls from people looking for missing relatives. authorities have raised the possibility of arson. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is in the coastal resort of mati. 0ne one of the places very badly affected, and what's coming out is, i hope that you can still hear me... apologies, he was here a second ago, but he has gone. we will try to re—establish that for you. five men have been charged in connection with a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy in a shop in worcester. the men, aged between 22 and a1, will appear in court later this morning, charged with conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm. the toddler was discharged
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from hospital on sunday, a day after suffering serious burns to his face and an arm. more than 100 million voters in pakistan go to the polls today to elect a new government. the vote comes amid tightened security, after violence marred the campaign. the election sees the former cricketer imran khan up against the party ofjailed ex—prime minister nawaz sharif. the american pop singer, demi lovato, is being treated in hospital in los angeles following a suspected drug overdose. in a statement, her agent said she was awake and surrounded by herfamily. us media reports say the 25—year—old was found unconscious at her home. a woman who's trying to divorce her husband of a0 years will find out today if she's won her legal battle. tini 0wens believes that her marriage to hugh 0wens has broken down, but he disagrees saying they still have a "few years" to enjoy. the case has led to fresh calls for a no—fault divorce system in england and wales.
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that is a rather telling wedding cake. it is sort of dramatic. let's hope it wasn't on the day of the wedding itself. sally is here with, well, there is potentially something rather special happening for geraint thomas. i know for chris froome as well. and sir chris hoy has written today in the paper to say that if geraint thomas can succeed this week in the tourde geraint thomas can succeed this week in the tour de france, it would be exactly what this sport needs, because he is a hero lots of people can get behind. they are in the south—west france at the moment and it is staff. he had a tough day yesterday. they have a really serious climb today, two hours co nsta nt serious climb today, two hours constant climbing in the mountains. it would be like five hours normal
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people. completely. yesterday was full of drama. first off, farmers blocked the road with hay, then police sprayed the protesters. tour de france has a great history of protest. then the crashes started. britain's adam yates missing out on a stage win, thanks to this late crash, but that was a minor scrape compared to what happened earlier to philip gilbert. and he gets treated as he goes along. amazingly, he carried on with the race. that is a first aid kit, isn't it, on wheels. that is how tough they have to be. yesterday, at the end of the race, stage, the x—ray van was very busy. they have an x—ray van following the tour because of the crashes. britain's gerain thomas still leads ahead of chris froome. i know, it is close.
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a big change to the laws around tackling in rugby and to be trialled next season according to reports in the press this season. at the moment the press this season. at the moment the maximum legal height is the top of the shoulders. the times newspapers as the rfu will trial a law ina newspapers as the rfu will trial a law in a competition where the height will be lowered to the underside of the armpit in an aim to reduce the risk of concussion and other serious injuries. the olympic gold medal winning hockey player sam quek says female athletes should be able to look good without being sexualised. in an article on the bbc sport website, sam, part of the winning team in rio in 2016, said female sports people shouldn't have to perhaps take their clothes off sometimes to be successful, or to get well known. that is something that she says has happened to her in the past. 0ne thing she found very disconcerting was when the papers were doing biographies of the team, lots of
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them suggested she was a swimwear model. it was just, them suggested she was a swimwear model. it wasjust, like, completely... she wasn't. she is a hockey player. whilst most football teams are still in pre—season, there's competitive football for celtic as they try to qualify for the group stages of the champions league. they play norwegian champions rosenborg in the first leg of their second qualifying round tie, but boss brendan rodgers says the games shouldn't be played so early. managers and players expected to be in full flow within one or two weeks, it is unrealistic really, so i feel for all players and managers having to get teams to try and actually win games when really this is the time of the season for fitness. couple of transfers to bring you up to date with, and everton have completed the signing of the richarlison from watford. the deal for the brazilian forward, who's only had one season in the premier league, could be worth up to £50 million. and the portugese revolution continues at wolves. the newly promoted premier league side have brought in midfielder joao moutinho from monaco. he's portugal's third most capped
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player behind luis figo and cristano ronaldo. england captainjoe root‘s always a popular man in his native yorkshire and especially so after yesterday. his bowling helped them to victory over their biggest rivals, lancashire. root‘s known as a batsman but took three of the four wickets the yorkies needed for victory, finishing up with his best bowling figures. finally, have you ever wondered what it's like to fly? sometimes. i think that would be my superpower, flight, the ability of flight. superpower, flight, the ability of flight. it won't be any longer. these pictures give you a pretty good idea. this is what skydiver mike swanson's posted on his instagram page. wow. yes, there you go. who is taking that picture? his friend. that looks like a green screen. it is not. it
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isa like a green screen. it is not. it is a real dive in switzerland with his mate filming it. of course, in a wing suit. you would never get me doing that. would you not, really? so long as you train. do you know what, i have trained to do many things, flying through the sky is not one of them. oh, i love that. it has to be exhilarating, doesn't it? birthday present, please. can you imagine the insurers? quite low! happy to get rid of him.” imagine the insurers? quite low! happy to get rid of him. i didn't wa nt to happy to get rid of him. i didn't want to say that. laughter. we will work on it. step—free access to railway stations, accessible toilets at motorway services, and audio equipment on buses are among new government measures to improve transport for disabled people. up to £300 million will be made available to try and make all types of travel completely accessible by 2030. let's talk to james taylor from the disability charity, scope. good morning. thank you forjoining
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us this morning. fully accessible transport system by 2030, is it good to hear, or are you thinking, why is it taking so long? bit of both. we know that from hundreds of disabled people there are many problems they experience on a daily basis. you don't have to look far to see horror stories on trains, planes and buses so stories on trains, planes and buses so it's good to see government putting money and effort behind this. you talk about horror stories. is there a common theme, is there something that particularly could easily be helped ? something that particularly could easily be helped? lots of things can be easily helped, but what we hear is that it happens at every stage of a journey, whether it is being stuck ona a journey, whether it is being stuck on a plane for 90 minutes because no one knows who is responsible for taking a wheelchair off, or a disabled toilet on a train not working, or know one at the other end to pick you up. some of the solutions are simple and don't need
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much to fix and a lot of it is around changing attitudes of the staff who work on the transport system. can you give us some exa m ples of system. can you give us some examples of the source of things people have to deal with? one journalist was stuck on a plane for 90 minutes... frank gardner. and a paralympian 90 minutes... frank gardner. and a pa ralympian who was 90 minutes... frank gardner. and a paralympian who was stuck on the train because the disabled toilets we re train because the disabled toilets were not working, so had to sit and was unable to use the loo. these are things that happen day in, day out, and on top of that, tanya lee from the weekend who received discrimination on the train journey as well. this kind of investment, will it go far enough and can it happen quickly enough?m will it go far enough and can it happen quickly enough? it is welcomed, to put money into this, 300 million is a lot of money and it will see the instalment of toilets up will see the instalment of toilets up and down the country. we need to keep an eye on it. the government is to look at the impact it will have over the next year or two and the
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next 12 years as well. it is quite an interesting way to play it because you are happy with the announcement of the money and the desire to make the changes, but we are trying to say, yes, it is good, but it is not good enough. how can you best make the argument? the proof is in the pudding. money is one thing. we need to see attitudes shift, and that can'tjust be done with money. we need to see systemwide training and we need to see disabled people using the system like anyone else, to get to work, socialise. i travel on the trains a lot and i see the staff on stations helping a lot. there is a lot of good work out there. there are some fantastic good work out there. there are some fa ntastic staff. good work out there. there are some fantastic staff. it is often the case that if you want to make a train journey, you need case that if you want to make a trainjourney, you need to book a8 hours in advance. which other people wouldn't have to. it is things like that we need to change. can that be changed easily? i don't think it is ha rd to changed easily? i don't think it is hard to change, we need to train operators on board to bring it down
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toa operators on board to bring it down to a more realistic and reasonable timeframe. what, 2a to a more realistic and reasonable timeframe. what, 24 hours? even less, to be honest with you. james taylor, thank you very much. very interesting. let us know what you think. there is always a good discussion going on facebook, so feel free to get involved. it is definitely discussion. this summer's been the driest on record since 1961, we'll find out shortly from carol if it's set to continue. but for many of us how to stay cool is the number one topic of conversation — we've been speaking to people out and about in london's regents park. iam no i am no cds belle and i run cycle training and in the 30 degree heat the kids are absolutely exhausted —— mercedes bell. we try to keep well hydrated. we are finding places in the park where there is shaped. it isa the park where there is shaped. it is a mission. i am sam, i work up
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the road. it doesn't have any air—conditioning, it is quite stuffy but we have all brought in some extra fans. i took a lot of good photos here so i think i would remember this for a long time. i am on holiday and i come from serbia. i didn't expect the weather would be like this. but i was hoping for it. so dreams really come true. so humid and especially travelling on public transport, you feel you are suffocating. our colleague got a new puppy to suffocating. our colleague got a new puppy to distract us in the office from the heat. i am sylvia. i work around the corner. i am from africa. this is normal. i don't see it as a heat wave. the only thing i would complain about is when the air—conditioning is too cold in the office. that is the only bad point. we don't have this that often. so why are we complaining? my name is julia. i work for a charity that rescues dogs and cats from the dog
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meat trade in china. the number—1 rule remember is to hydrate. try to walk them in the cool times, early morning or in the evening. let them sleep on your bathroom or kitchen floor if it is made of stone. let them go outside under the bushes. and just be mindful. them go outside under the bushes. andjust be mindful. my them go outside under the bushes. and just be mindful. my name is ken. i work as a gardner in the park. the challenge is working in the hot weather —— gardener. stay hydrated and be mindful of how you feel. if you are too long in the sun—yu can suffer heatstroke which can take you out of the game for a of days —— if you spend too much time in the sun, you spend too much time in the sun, you can suffer heatstroke. there is one, isn't that? carol is out and about in southwest london this morning. of course, it's a good
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time to door that. taking your dog is for a walk. go out early or late when it is cool. it's going to be a hot day across many parts of the uk. yesterday's top temperature was 31.a. today, we are looking at about 32 celsius, maybe 33 across parts of the south—east of england. take the usual precautions that he would do. today's forecasters bite the drive. a few showers in the north—west. it's going to be warm or hot depending on which end of the country you are in. we've got a weather front producing some showers. sea breezes will develop along the coastline is so it's a lwa ys along the coastline is so it's always good to be cooler here. some of the showers get into the northern isles. the chance of a shower across
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east anglia and kent. temperatures in the south—east getting up to about 33 and much of england and wales into the mid to high 20s. we carry on with the showers across the north—west and it's going to turn breezy. some of the showers migrating northwards by the end of the night, but a lot of dry weather and clear skies as well. temperatures falling to between 12 and 20 degrees. another muggy night in prospect. have got the showers across the north—west and rue the day, we start to import a bit of clout from the south and there is the chance of a thunderstorm. there won't be many very of them at this stage. tomorrow's temperatures to the south—east, 3a potentially. it's
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going to be warm and hotter and tomorrow will feel quite humid. thursday into friday, and during thursday, pushing northwards. gusty winds around them. at the same time, a weather front will bump into those thunderstorms. a weather warning out those thunderstorms that parts of the midlands and north—east england but through the day, the thunderstorms will become more organised as we move across north—east england and eastern scotland. with all that rain, we could have about one month of rainfall in that period. from friday until the clear on saturday morning. there is also the risk of power disruption. saturday will be fresher the next few days and then the
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temperature romps back up again. the next few days and then the temperature romps back up againm could be quite dramatic. it looks like such a lovely day. i'm glad people are out there enjoying it. there is something lovely about an outdoor pool. i have never swum in one. i don't thinki have. outdoor pool. i have never swum in one. idon't thinki have. idid outdoor pool. i have never swum in one. i don't thinki have. i did a brea kfast one. i don't thinki have. i did a breakfast from one in cheltenham. you wanted to go skydiving to your birthday, no. we will go to an outdoor pool. can you trademark the shape of a chocolate bar? later this morning nestle will find out if it can protect its kitkat from copycats. steph's looking at this. today, we are talking about the kitkat. the swiss owner of the kitkat bar, nestle, has been in a battle about the shape since 2010. it's not the first fight about chocolate. the american firm mondelez successfully trademarked the shape and packaging of its toblerone bar,
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arguing that it's sufficiently distinctive to the brand. in 200a, cadbury attempted to trademark the shade of purple it uses for its dairy milk bar packaging. it initially won its case but was later successfully challenged by nestle. now nestle is claiming that kitkat, its four—fingered chocolate bar, is so distinctive that it deserves to be trademark protected throughout europe. this is being challenged by, guess who, mondolez, which already sells a similar shaped bar in norway. sally britton is an intellectual property lawyer and joins me now. why they so about this? it comes down to money. the chocolate bar market is quite simply huge in the uk and the eu so this gives them a huge competitive advantage and there is no doubt this is one of the key elements of their brand. what happens, what are the arguments made? it has to distinguish your
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goods and services from others. it has to be distinctive when it was submitted. it was distinctive enough. the challenge today is, have they shown evidence across enough of they shown evidence across enough of the eu to show that acquired distinctiveness? what happens if it goes further? if it goes in as they's favour, they will be pleased, they've shown evidence which seems to show across 15 states of the eu, and now there is 28, so that is a huge success for them and no doubt cadbury will look at ways to challenge. this will go on for some time. it's interesting. we talked about this argument starting in 2010. why does it take so long and why they bothering for the long?“ you look at the press around this,
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there is a significant benefit. i've eaten a few kitkat is, you might have done as well. money can't buy advertising. what you are telling me is where our falling for it, we are massively advertising the kitkat. maybe partly. they do want the chocolate bar registered but this is an extremely helpful side benefit. you were a brand manager. is it quite common to have these battles about shapes and colours? trademark law is catching up with the reality. there are sounds, smells, covers. people —— people think of trademarks as logos and names but it is catching on. how will this end? . any time soon. have a break, part of the kitkat brand. they fought 30 yea rs the kitkat brand. they fought 30 years to get this registered. this started in 2010. i feelthe need
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years to get this registered. this started in 2010. i feel the need to say other chocolate biscuits are available. and shapes and colours and everything else. a healthy dose of scepticism at 6:50am. it's made me incredibly hungry. that is what the point was. looking back on old photos of loved ones we've lost can be hard, but a new project aimed at dealing with grief is encouraging people to revisit their past. the idea involves returning to the place where a precious picture was taken, as breakfast'sjohn maguire has been finding out. the paul died suddenly in 2016.“ certainly my favourite photo of paul and me because we bothjust look ridiculously happy, which we were. i just love it because it was early daysin just love it because it was early days in our relationship but it really represents the whole of the
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relationship, really. she came back to penzance with a couple used to live to take part in the loved and lost project when a photographer simon bray mitzvah reaped people at the scene of a favourite and much cherished photo. it's up to you whether you smile or not. you are very smiley on this one. as i am. taking part in the loved and lost, really, that was my first step of active grieving, as i call it, because i want to base its head on. we moved to manchester and coming down to cornwall for the first time after paul had passed away when we had spent all these happy years until these happy memories, it felt really important because i think paul could quite easily have become this ghost to me and i think coming down here to do the project prevented that from happening and i'm really grateful that i can take pa rt i'm really grateful that i can take
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part in it. simon started his website after his father died. a photograph he says isjust website after his father died. a photograph he says is just the start, away into a conversation. these classes are significant. these we re these classes are significant. these were paul's classes so maybe get a shot of you holding the glasses.” like the glasses. he knew that i liked them as well. sol like the glasses. he knew that i liked them as well. so i got them made, i've got my prescription lenses in it sol made, i've got my prescription lenses in it so i can wear them for reading. they are precious. a nice memento to think of him. and simon believes that discussion, even just a chat, is a vital help in dealing with treatment. i think itjust sort of opens up a conversation about loss, really, it breaks down those barriers, people are able to share their stories and for the reader, their stories and for the reader, the viewer, to feel like they are not on the road and, some deals has gone through something similar. they are not the only one was grieving and feeling bit lost. that's right
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you like the real value of the project lies. simon is not recruiting and more people into the project hopes to working has done so far will help others. not only to have loved and lost at importantly, to remember and to keep those memories alive. john maguire, bbc news, penzance. if you've got any precious family photos that you've recreated to remember a loved one, and you'd like to tell us the story behind it, do send them in. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk. loved & lost is at the 0riel colwyn gallery in colwyn bay until the 18th of august. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alpa patel.
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london's crossrail project is running 600 million pounds over budget. that's according to government figures revealed today. crossrail or the elizabeth line — as it will eventually be known, is 93 percent complete but the cost of the project has risen to 15.a billion pounds. the line is due to fully open in december 2019. civil liberties campaigners have begun a civil liberties campaigners have beguna campaign civil liberties campaigners have begun a campaign against the use of facial recognition by police. police say it will keep london safe but big brother watch leaves it reaches people ‘s rights under the human rights act. elderly residents in a reading care home had some surprising visitors this week. these peruvian alpacas dropped by. their owner says their gentle nature makes them perfect for animal therapy visits. it's bonkers, it's bonkers. i do have to sometimes think to myself, "this is what do, this is myjob, how did that happen?" it's just. . . it's just a lovely thing to do, and people's reactions arejust amazing. it makes it worthwhile.
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very cute. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube — there's no service on the bakerloo line — between queens park and harrow & wealdstone. severe delays on the district line — at earls court to ealing broadway westbound and earls court to richmond. london 0verground is part suspended between watford junction and euston. 0n the roads usual — northbound traffic building on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. problems at ealing common — in both directions, on the noth circular at gunnersbury avenue, following an accident. let's have a check on the weather now scientists at king's college london have found that applying sunscreen too thinly could half its protection. scientists who studied the dna damage caused by ultraviolet rays found that if applied with less than the recommended thickness it will not be as effective. good morning.
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it was another very warm night last night which has led to a warm start this morning. a lovely bright one, though, lots of sunshine and yes, we are in for another hot and sunny day today. lots of sunshine around first thing. a bit more cloud moving up from the south as we had through the afternoon and that cloud mayjust be enough to spark off one or two isolated showers. most places are dry, very similar to yesterday afternoon but temperatures touch warmer. we're looking at a maximum of 31, 32 celsius in central london. 0vernight tonight, some clear spells and patchy cloud there overnight. some moist and humid air, may be enough to spark off a shower. minimum temperature not dropping much below 19 celsius so again quite uncomfortable for sleeping. for thursday, lots of sunshine, again, temperatures sneaking up a little higher, potentially 33 celsius. then for friday, the chance of a thundery downpour, particularly late on in the afternoon and thefirst part particularly later on in the afternoon and the first part of the evening.
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clears away overnight leading to a much cooler weekend. temperatures still in the mid—20s butjust feeling a little bit fresher. don't forget the sunscreen! bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: greece begins three days of mourning after wildfires destroyed whole communities, killing at least 7a people.
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five men have been charged in connection with an acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester. one of the world's best—selling pop stars demi lovato is in hospital after a suspected drugs overdose. it's a business that makes its money from adverts and selling its programmes around the world. we'll find out shortly how itv has been doing at that, and i'll be talking to the boss, carolyn mccall. in sport, high drama at the tour de france. protests and pepper spray in the pyrenees. spectacular crashes too. but britain's geraint thomas still has the yellowjersey. good morning from hampton pool, where the swimmers are out in force. todayit where the swimmers are out in force. today it will be mostly dry, warm or hot, depending where you are, we shall as in the west and south—east, and tomorrow it will be hot across the board. i will have more in 15 minutes. our top story: greece is beginning
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three days of mourning after wildfires killed at least 7a people. emergency crews have spent the night searching through destroyed communities, and dampening down remaining fires. andrew plant reports. searching among the ashes, rescue teams walking among the still—smouldering ruins of this seaside resort. so far we have found 30 bodies which were dead or burned and we have located, we are trying to locate another four which are so far missing. those who managed to escape from here are now returning to homes destroyed by fire. translation: i am a wreck. a lifetime's work, a lifetime of memories go to waste. it's totally heartbreaking, everything is gone. the flames swept through here after dark, burning everything in their path. many tried to flee by car.
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the road, surrounded by flames, covered by clouds of smoke. this driver escaped. others were killed in their cars, overcome as they tried to leave. seen from above, this coastal village resembles a warzone, its buildings destroyed, the trees here blackened and burned. greece has called for international help to dampen down its scorched ground. the country's worst forest fires more than a decade have left its people in a state of collective shock and national mourning. it could yet turn to anger, with suggestions the fires may have been started deliberately. the survivors here are now looking for answers. so many desperate stories. and we'll be speaking to our reporter in mati in a few minutes' time.
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five men have been charged following a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester. 0ur correspondent jane frances kelly has more details. jane, what more have police been telling us? police are not releasing the 5—man's names but what we do know is three of them are from london, they are their 20s, two are from wolverhampton, they will be appearing before kidderminster magistrates' court later today charged with conspiracy to cause grievous bodily harm in connection with a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy. the boy was in a discount superstore in worcester on saturday when he received burns to his face and his arm. he was taken to hospital. he was discharged on sunday. we don't know what the
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long—term implications of the injuries. police are keen to stress to the public they think it is an isolated incident. thank you very much for that. too many children in england are being excluded from school, according to mps. a report by the education select committee describes the system as a wild west, with league tables being favoured over pupils. the number of permanent exclusions has increased by more than a0% over the past three years. the government says exclusions should only be used as a last resort. we'll have more on this report and the impact of exclusion on children with special educational needs in around ten minutes. the american pop singer demi lovato is being treated in hospital in los angeles following a suspected drug overdose. us media reports say the 25—year—old was found unconscious at her home. in a statement, her agent said she was now awake and surrounded by herfamily. richard main reports. demi lovato was in the middle of a world tour when she was rushed
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to hospital last night, after being found unconscious at home. us media claim she was given medicine to counteract overdose. she is now believed to be awake and in a stable condition. the former child star is one of the world's biggest selling artists, and has spoken openly about her previous drug and alcohol abuse, including in her latest single, sober. # mamma, i'm so sorry i am not sober any more. # and, daddy, please forgive me... fans and celebrities offered messages of support on social media, including ariana grande and lady gaga. ellen degeneres tweeted... lovato has been widely praised for trying to raise awareness, and improve help for those
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suffering mental illness. her family released a statement thanking everyone for their love, prayers and support. # it wasn't my intention # taped conversation has been broadcast on american tv of donald trump and his former lawyer talking about making a payment to a playboy model. in the audio, secretly recorded two months before the us election in 2016, mr trump and michael cohen can be heard discussing making a payment to the woman, who said she had an affair with mr trump. the president's lawyer says no payment was ever made and that no crime has been committed. more than 100 million voters in pakistan go to the polls today to elect a new government. the vote comes amid tightened security, after violence marred the campaign. the election sees the former cricketer imran khan up against the party ofjailed ex—prime minister nawaz sharif. a woman who's trying to divorce her husband of a0 years
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will find out today if she's won her legal battle. tini 0wens believes that her marriage to hugh 0wens has broken down, but he disagrees saying they still have a "few years" to enjoy. divorce requires proof of adultery, desertion, unreasonable behaviour, two years separation with consent of the parties, or five without. tini 0wens claims she's been left in a loveless and desperately unhappy marriage with her husband, hugh, which broke down after she'd had an affair. thejudge rejected her claims he'd acted unreasonably in berating her about her infidelity. despite his wife's fling, mr 0wens wants to stay married as he believes the couple still has a few years of old age together. the court of appeal backed him, ruling in fact that being in a wretchedly unhappy marriage was no grounds for divorce. contested divorces are incredibly rare. most couples agree that one side will admit they have acted
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unreasonably in order to get the divorce. many seniorjudges favour a no—fault system where neither party is blamed for the breakdown, but none has dared to change what parliament has decreed. the supreme court will be taking a bold step in doing so. clive coleman, bbc news. let us know your thoughts on that. we will discuss it in detail later. nothing divides a household quite like ordering takeaway. what is your choice? curry. it is a chicken curry. i can't remember what it is called, i am like, curry. i can't remember what it is called, iam like, can curry. i can't remember what it is called, i am like, can i curry. i can't remember what it is called, iam like, can i have curry. i can't remember what it is called, i am like, can i have that thing? just the normal, please. i don't do the ordering. your minions don't do the ordering. your minions do that for you. laughter. can you bring her the normal please, thank
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you. nope. it is the husband, ok? this is fascinating. you order the same thing, but you don't know what it's called. he goes and does it. anyway, i am embarrassed. it's called. he goes and does it. anyway, iam embarrassed. it it's called. he goes and does it. anyway, i am embarrassed. it doesn't divide the household! we are talking about the division of takeaway... some people get very upset. researchers have analysed google searches from five countries including the uk and found orders of ta keaway including the uk and found orders of takeaway spiked at 7pm at night and 2am in the morning. scientists think it is down to the eating patterns of those who like to go to bed reasonably early and those who like to stay out late. and the answer is chatterley chicken. so is that with source? it has source, it is really nice. and do you have a naan with that. no, i normally have aubergine.
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it is 7:10am. extraordinary scenes in greece yesterday. the prime minister alexis tsipras has described the wildfires near athens as an "unspeakable tragedy". joining us now is gail millin—chalabi. what we have seen in greece, i know that we have seen issues in sweden, areas twice the size of paris has been burned, but the loss of 7a lives as a minimum in greece, i don't want a say incredible, it is horrible to see. terrible, i mean, you know, tragic events we are seeing unfold right now in greece and it is really a reminder ofjust how delicate our ecosystem is and clearly all this hot, dry weather is taking at all when it comes to
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wildfires across europe. let's talk about the issues because we know that people were desperately trying to escape in their cars, towards the sea, and they had nowhere to go. exactly, it is really difficult to prepare for an event such as what we are seeing in greece, but clearly, with the different kinds of technology, with the satellite technology, with the satellite technology, we are learning more about how many wildfires we are getting across the uk and also across the rest of europe, and also looking at the scale of those as well, so the areas that are being burnt. that will help us to better understand wildfire hazard. lots of people got in contact with us yesterday to say that 36 people died in one restaurant and you think, how can it moves so quickly that people can't get away from it, and people meters from the sea as well, the wind was making it moves so fast they were blocked in. yes, one of
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they were blocked in. yes, one of the main things with wildfires and the main things with wildfires and the speed that they move, it is to do with the wind, and obviously there was strong wind over that day, so there was strong wind over that day, so that really given help in terms of the spread. and looking at these satellite images, and trying to help, what is it, is it about infrastructure, can that make a difference to the speed at which fires spread? well, it depends on the different vegetation type, so in mediterranean areas it is the coniferous forest that you see, that is what is being burnt in greece. in the uk, we've been looking at moorland wildfires. unlike other types of hazards such as flooding, you've also got vegetation in the mix, and that can impact on what type of fire we are seeing. so we have seen these really tall, bright
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orange flames with the greek wildfires and that is akin to the vegetation burning, which is more woodland, and the same in sweden. we saw a lot more smouldering that was occurring in the uk wildfires and thatis occurring in the uk wildfires and that is due to the highly organic peat, so our fires tend to smoulder for longer. you see some of the fires that you were talking about in greece and we have a high water table as well, does it make a difference? it does, that wields resilience into the landscape by having the higher water table, but clearly as well there is more work to do in the uk to make the moorland and heathland more resilient. what kind of things? more restoration work of the degraded moorlands, so plug planting, gulli blocking, to increase the water table,
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introducing plans such as moss, which holds 20 times its own weight in water, so that then makes it... it acts as a brake. exactly, it acts like a break, so things like that we can do in the uk. we were speaking to someone in greece yesterday and they were saying that governments over the last few years haven't done enough to prevent things like that from happening. would that be things like firebreaks in vegetation? you are always reading about spraying a wall with water and retaining some of that. yes, this is for when the wildfire is kicking in, what you wa nt wildfire is kicking in, what you want is to prevent getting into that situation. 0bviously one of the issues as well, what are the points of ignition, a lot of the time it is human error. a lot of it is accidental or potentially through
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arson as well. situations like that, it is around educating people to be much more careful in these landscapes when it is very dry and parched, to begin with. and the investigation is going on in greece to find out how that happened. yes, thank you. something we have been talking about a lot over the last few weeks and months. let's have a look at what the weather is doing and we will speak with carol in a moment. this is outside the studios in salford at the moment. it is a blue sky. it was definitely cooler thanit blue sky. it was definitely cooler than it has been. that is salford as well. it is lovely and calm that list. carol, you have been talking this morning, in a minute, that is london, sultry looking, you have been talking about rain, possibly on the weight come but not for a while. that's right, and some torrential rain. i'm at the pool in middlesex, the sun is shining. this is
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christina. what is the water like this morning? it's really lovely. the temperature is going to be really hot. i mean the water temperature. it would be nice and cool temperature. it would be nice and cool. it's a lovely way to cool off. enjoy the rest of your swim. it is glorious you. as i mentioned, around 20 celsius. yesterday's top temperature was in suffolk and it was 31.1dc. today, sudmer in the south—east could hit about 32 celsius. these high temperatures pa rt across celsius. these high temperatures part across the uk. forecast the delay is mostly dry one. it will be warm or hot depending on where you are. later, towards the northern
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aalst. and some hazy sunshine. we could see one or two showers across east anglia in kent. the top temperatures upto 32 summer in the south—east. across england and wales, looking at about the mid— 20s. all this colour on the coasts with sea breezes. showers across kent and east anglia. a lot of dry weather with temperatures between 12 and 20 celsius. another humid night, particularly the further south you are. through the days, more cloud comes up. it could spark off the odd
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thunderstorm. parts of the midlands and the south—east of england. tomorrow is going to be hotter across—the—board tomorrow is going to be hotter across—the—boa rd than today. tomorrow is going to be hotter across—the—board than today. our top temperatures, 3a35 saw in the south—eastern quarter of the uk. we are looking into the 20s, the high 20s for some of us. 0vernight thursday to friday, we import thunderstorms from the near continent. 0n thunderstorms from the near continent. on thursday, they are going to continue to drift to the north. we have weather fronts coming in from the west. there is going to beafair in from the west. there is going to be a fair bit of rain around, particularly so across north—east england and eastern scotland. the met office as a weather warning out for some torrential downpours, thunderstorms, across parts of the midlands and east england. large hail. this is all going to push northwards into the north sea overnight so saturday morning will clear but by then, parts of eastern scotla nd clear but by then, parts of eastern scotland and north—east england
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could see as much as half a month to a full month worth of rain. you can imagine with the dry ground, we will be seeing it after with flash floods. the possibility of power cuts. temperatures closer to what we would expect at this stage of the year. then it warms up back into the 30s from the middle of next week. will be back with you that a bit later. a lovely day for a swim. every day in england, more than 900 children with special educational needs are missing school because they've been excluded. it's a figure that's been described as a scandal by a group of mps. they say the focus on league tables discriminates against lower ability children, as brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. you have to send in all the evidence to what you are claiming. just some of the documents from natasha's legal battle against her son's school. he didn't want to be filmed. he has adhd and struggled after changes in his mainstream secondary. suddenly they brought
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in a zero tolerance policy. zero tolerance does not work with children with send. he got first exclusion in year 10 for a very minor incident. what like? he actually wore the wrong colour socks to school. colourful socks, swinging on his chair, defiant behaviour. behaviour the school said fully justified a series of exclusions but a tribunal said that behaviour was linked to his disability and he had been discriminated against. the school told us they have retrained staff and hired an educational psychiatrist. i think schools can come away from excluding students if things are put into place to support students. if he had had that support, he would have shone. today, this report says much more should be done to curb exclusions. they've increased a0% in the last three years but almost half of all those are pupils with additional needs,
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that's over 900 send kids out of education every single day of the school year. this is in england. in scotland, only one child is permanently excluded. mp robert halfon who led on this report says this has to change. it is in my view discriminatory because the level of it has reached proportions we could never have imagined. there is a wild west of exclusions going on and this is wrong, whether it is due to too much zero tolerance in a class or resource issues, whether it is training issues or schools off—rolling pupils because they are worried about exam results, whatever the reasons, it is wrong and the government has to act and stop this. here in halfon's constituency, over half of all children with send go to this one school. at passmores, they say exclusions are in crisis with judgements only down to academic standards. there are so many horror stories
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from all across the country disproportionate because we are rewarded for not being inclusive at the moment. that's the problem. the word fraud. 0ff camera, you used a strong word to me, the word fraud. i'm sorry, ourfunding agreement as an academy with the government says we will serve our whole community. if they are not serving the whole community, they are taking money and not doing thejob they are being paid to do and actually, the government needs to grow some teeth around it. 0fsted needs to grow some teeth around it. the department of education told us the number of children being excluded is lower than it was ten years ago and that they should only ever be used as a last resort but today's report says they need to start judging schools differently and reward inclusion alongside results. there has been a big response from
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viewers a lot of ideas on to how we can change the statistics. this report has got lots and lots of recommendations. some concrete recommendations. some concrete recommendations like forcing schools to be more morally accountable by making them publish their send exclusion rates, reminding schools of their legal responsibilities. hats they toned down the zero point ——o hats they toned down the zero point ——0 tolerance behaviour policies. so these incidents and infringements are dealt with in—house. there is also called the government to do more research into worrying evidence that schools are deliberately not identifying because to do so, there are financial in vocations. because of financial pressures, they can't do so. they feel this lack of support is fuelling the exclusion
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rate. they just aren't support is fuelling the exclusion rate. theyjust aren't happening in parts of the country. not all exclusions are known about. getting phone calls from school, i didn't realise that was an illegal exclusion. this is the incident where schools are calling parents. saying we are not going to exclude your child that he would be better teaching at home. the report says schools and local authorities. even though they are in school. 0ne schools and local authorities. even though they are in school. one of the terrible cases was a child with a cnd who was briefed. she had a meltdown was being taught in a storeroom at the end of the corridor. to protect them. the
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department for education told us we are going to use all those recommendations. would love to hear your thoughts too. the taliban front pages. the weather is dominating. calling it a biblical disaster. desperate stories of people trying to escape the flames. some people not make it to the beaches. so many stories inside the newspaper today. 7a dead in greek wildfires. 0f
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course, other papers talking about the heat here as well. britain is in meltdown. it's only fair that we go to sally furse. i will do what you did last time. the back page. cheer up, jose mourinho. together fairly downbeat interview over the last couple of days. that manchester united aren't good enough. of all the people to pick on the summer, that probably isn't the person who says, why cannot take the manchester united the way he plays for france? i'm not sure is the right way to go about it. wouldn't you congratulate him. that's not what he is doing.
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some people need a whack on the head. i will stop talking. some people need a whack on the head. iwill stop talking. have some people need a whack on the head. i will stop talking. have got to stories. 0ne head. i will stop talking. have got to stories. one is the cost of broadband set to fall because the company that runs the network is saying it was to encourage more companies to upgrade millions of customers and it's offering a ao% discount certainly cheaper than their broadband. this is a sweet shop owner who printed and displayed some cctv footage in a shop window which was three girls who had stolen things and he is in trouble because the police said he is breaking data protection rules and therefore could face a fine and he just said, he just had had enough, these girls had nicked a lot of drinks and spat at him and he wasjust trying to nicked a lot of drinks and spat at him and he was just trying to find out who they were and shame them. he
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is now the one in trouble.” out who they were and shame them. he is now the one in trouble. i am back, i thought i would do it to be annoying. having a nice time out in singapore? look at that for side exercise? can ask quick question? louise, i asked exercise? can ask quick question? louise, iasked if exercise? can ask quick question? louise, i asked if i should change my tie. she has asked me to get rid of the waistcoat. i did ask him. why did you change your time first place? i looked a bit like an easyj et place? i looked a bit like an easyjet pilot. nothing wrong with that. it's 30 degrees outside. its 32 degrees. no waistcoat. are you all right? i might get rid of it. if you are comfortable... it's
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waistcoat wednesday. i'm glad we cleared that up. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alpa patel. london's crossrail project is running 600 million pounds over budget. that's according to government figures. crossrail or the elizabeth line — is almost complete, but the cost of it — has risen to 15.a billion pounds. civil liberties campaigners — have begun a legal challenge against the use of automatic facial recognition by the police. scotland yard says the technology, which was trialled at the notting hill carnival will help keep london safe — but big brother watch claims it breaches people's rights under the human rights act. elderly residents at a care home in reading — had some surprising visitors this week these peruvian alpacas dropped in. their owner says they help stimulate the senses — and conversation.
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and their gentle nature makes them perfect for animal therapy. it's bonkers, it's bonkers. i do have to sometimes think to myself, "this is what do, this is myjob, how did that happen?" it's just. . . it's just a lovely thing to do, and people's reactions arejust amazing. it makes it worthwhile. now as london basks in soaring temperatures above 30
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degrees, our thermal cameras — like this one — will be measuring just how hot londoners are and how the city is coping as experts warn that climate change is "loading the dice towards extreme weather," and that rising global temperatures are fuelling heatwaves. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it was another very warm night last night which has led to a warm start this morning. a lovely bright one, though, lots of sunshine and yes, we are in for another hot and sunny day today. lots of sunshine around first thing. a bit more cloud moving up from the south as we head through the afternoon and that cloud mayjust be enough to spark off one or two isolated showers. most places dry, very similar to yesterday afternoon but temperatures a touch warmer. we're looking at a maximum today of 31, maybe 32 celsius in central london. 0vernight tonight, some clear spells, some patchy cloud there overnight. some moist and humid air, may be enough to spark off a shower. minimum temperature not dropping much below 19 celsius so again quite
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uncomfortable for sleeping. for thursday, lots of sunshine, again, temperatures sneaking up a little higher, potentially 33 celsius. then for friday, the chance of a thundery downpour, particularly later on in the afternoon and the first part of the evening. clears away overnight leading to a much cooler weekend. temperatures still in the mid—20s butjust feeling a little bit fresher. i'm back in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. let's bring you some of the main stories on this wednesday morning. emergency crews have been working through the night after wildfires tore through coastal towns in greece, killing at least 7a people. firefighters say they've received dozens of phone calls from people looking for their missing relatives. the country is beginning three days of morning. —— the country is beginning three days of mourning. an investigation is underway, with the authorities raising the possibility of arson.
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five men have been charged in connection with a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy in a shop in worcester. the men, aged between 22 and a1, will appear in court later this morning, charged with conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm. the toddler was discharged from hospital on sunday, a day after suffering serious burns to his face and an arm. more than 100 million voters in pakistan go to the polls today to elect a new government. the vote comes amid tightened security, after violence marred the campaign. the election sees the former cricketer imran khan up against the party ofjailed ex—prime minister nawaz sharif. a conversation has been broadcast on american tv of donald trump and his former lawyer talking about making a payment to a playboy model.
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a taped conversation has been broadcast on american television of donald trump and his former lawyer, talking about making a payment to a playboy model. in the audio, secretly recorded two months before the us election in 2016, mr trump and michael cohen can be heard discussing making a payment to the woman, who said she had an affair with mr trump. the president's lawyer says no payment was ever made and that no crime has been committed. the american pop singer, demi lovato, is being treated in hospital in los angeles following a suspected drug overdose. in a statement, her agent said she was awake and surrounded by herfamily. us media reports say the 25—year—old was found unconscious at her home. coming up on the programme, we will have the weather from carol, who is out and about at hampton pool in south—west london. it does look gorgeous. i know that you are jealous. yes. and sally is talking about cycling this morning. a very dramatic day in france and an exciting day today and if we can look at some of the pictures behind us, here we go, did you like them? yes. they were so quick. high drama. the pyrenees is a tough place
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to ride a bike. i used to live there. one of the first things i ever did as a sports journalist and these guys have to be really tough. 0ne these guys have to be really tough. one of the great traditions of the tour de france is protest. first of all yesterday, farmers blocked the road with hay. so police sprayed the protestors with what appeared to be pepper spray, which then got into some of the riders' eyes. they have to pour the water into their eyes to clear it out. you can see the farmers. and that is the after—effects of it. the wind was blowing in a different direction. then the crashes started — britain's adam yates missing out on a stage win thanks to this late crash. he was going for it, he was having a brilliant day. this was the bad one. every time! what is it? the fact that he knows what is going to happen. he is trying to stop... and
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where they are at the moment, lots of these low walls and then on the other side is a ravine. 20 years ago, someone other side is a ravine. 20 years ago, someone died basically doing what he did. 0ne ago, someone died basically doing what he did. one of the things they have to do is learn to fall. if that is coming up, apparently you are supposed to relax your body, crouch into a ball and let yourself fall.” like the way he is getting his arm treated as he is cycling along. the important thing to mention is geraint thomas still leads before chris froome. a big change to the laws around tackling in rugby union are to be trialled next season according to reports this morning. at the moment the maximum legal height for a tackle is the top of the shoulders, but the times newspaper says that the rfu will trial a new law in a cup competition where the height will be lowered to the underside of the armpit. the aim would be to reduce the risk of concussion and other serious injuries. the olympic gold medal winning hockey player, sam quek, says female athletes should be able to look good
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without being sexualised. in an article for the bbc sport website quek, who was part of the winning british team in rio in 2016, says female sportspeople dont need to strip off to be successful. whilst most football teams are still in pre—season, —— couple of transfers to bring you up to date with, and everton have completed the signing of the richarlison from watford. the deal for the brazilian forward, who's only had one season in the premier league, could be worth up to £50 million. and the portugese revolution continues at wolves. the newly promoted premier league side have brought in midfielder joao moutinho from monaco. he's portugal's third most capped player behind luis figo, and cristano ronaldo. 0ne superpower that dan would love to have, flying. i think your dream could potentially become a reality. look at this. this is what skydiver mike swanson's posted on his instagram page. that's him there.
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it's a video of a dive in switzerland. the american holds multiple us national and world championship titles in skydiving. that is amazing. it is really close to the trees. it is terrifying. it must be quite nervous. exhilarating. yes. you can do that on your own. thank you. when you apply for a divorce in england and wales, you must prove that your marriage has broken down, but one case currently going through the courts has been described as "extraordinarily unusual". it's led to fresh calls for a no—fault system, as our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman explains. divorce requires proof of adultery, desertion, unreasonable behaviour, two years' separation with consent of the parties, or five without. tini 0wens claims she's been left in a loveless and desperately unhappy marriage with her husband, hugh, which broke down after she'd had an affair. thejudge rejected her claims he'd acted unreasonably in berating her about her infidelity.
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despite his wife's fling, mr 0wens wants to stay married as he believes the couple still has a few years of old age together. the court of appeal backed him, ruling in fact that being in a wretchedly unhappy marriage was no grounds for divorce. contested divorces are incredibly rare. most couples agree that one side will admit they have acted unreasonably in order to get the divorce. many seniorjudges favour a no—fault system where neither party is blamed for the breakdown, but none has dared to change what parliament has decreed. the supreme court will be taking a bold step in doing so. clive coleman, bbc news. it isa it is a fascinating case. will it change things? let's talk to lawyer emma gill who specialises in family law, and tosh brittan who in an attempt
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to speed up her divorce cited adultery, despite no affair taking place. morning. thank you forjoining us. this is an unusual case to get this far as well. could it change things? it could. you are right, this is really unusual. divorce lawyers around the country have been sent into a bit of a furore with the unspoken pact everyone sends it through on a nudge and a wink, unreasonable behaviour might be somebody‘s teacups hit the laundry basket, but it still went through. and why this is so fundamental is the test of behaviour being unreasonable and in this case that is what thejudge unreasonable and in this case that is what the judge has said. we are in the supreme court today. the judgement is due out this morning. certainly it has the impact to change how divorce operates in
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britain, certainly howjudges interpret it, or we will have this poor lady trapped in a marriage she doesn't want to be in. in terms of attributing blame, that was something you came up against when you're trying to end your marriage. what process did you go through? we made a decision to have an amicable divorce to protect our children and to move on and not the bitter people for the rest of our lives, and it got to the question, it was like, who has been more unreasonable, and that opened up a can of worms and we ended up arguing over it. it was like, what are we doing? ijust was like, what are we doing? ijust was like, i will do it, like, what are we doing? ijust was like, iwill do it, i like, what are we doing? ijust was like, i will do it, i will tick the adultery box and move on and then we don't have to have this conversation. because until that point you know what has gone on and what hasn't been good, or what you have argued about, and it kicked up a lot of stuff that we were... just
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didn't want to go through again. as it stands, the reason why you felt you had to do that, as it stands, there are five specific reasons that will give you grounds for a divorce. that is right. technically there is one ground, irretrievable breakdown, evidenced with one of five fax. adultery, unreasonable behaviour. -- fa cts . adultery, unreasonable behaviour. -- facts. the immediate ones are adultery and unreasonable behaviour, so adultery and unreasonable behaviour, so unless you want to be locked in a marriage for years, then you have to cite one of the grounds. the situation that has been described is not unusual. i have clients who come to me and asked if i can'tjust say that someone has cheated and as an officer of the court lawyer can't agree to that. if couples are going through divorce, doing it themselves, i imagine that is something that is common. is there a case to be made, i am sure many
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people say it is an important part of society, it is a legal contract and we shouldn't be able to say, ok, i don't want to do that without there being a process to go through? i understand that. but the process can be... it can be simpler and i understand that. but the process can be... it can be simplerand not create any more complete and there needs to be. a lot of people when they get the divorce papers, there is high conflict going on and more often than not there are children involved as well. to suddenly start going, you have to go through it again, it is like, no more, we are all done. presumably in front of other people as well, did you find that? not so much, we went through the papers and we were lucky enough to do it together, to work together, but it's a conversation that literally just but it's a conversation that literallyjust said, i don't know
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what to do, it feels very unreasonable, but it doesn't look unreasonable, but it doesn't look unreasonable on paper. and she was in tears. does it need to be in that? divorce, you don't go to divorce thinking it's a walk in the park. it's hard and it's painful and, you know... what about the argument of the devaluation of marriage? to keep people locked in a marriage? to keep people locked in a marriage when they are unhappy does not devalue family values. a divorce process has to take place. it can ta ke process has to take place. it can take place with less sting and we can have a less acerbic process to get people to where they need to be without becoming confrontational. thejudgement is later without becoming confrontational. the judgement is later today, so without becoming confrontational. thejudgement is later today, so it will be interesting to see what happens. thank you very much. very interesting discussion. it has been so warm. interesting discussion. it has been so warm. i think there might be some rain on the way. not where you are now, carol. it's gorgeous you at hampton pool.
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that pool temperature is currently 28 celsius. the maximum temperature this afternoon will be higher because some are in the south—east today will hit 32. we still do have a health warning that public health england and the met office issued the other day. it's a level three heat health alert. these are triggered when the date on which it is 30 celsius, the night temperature is 30 celsius, the night temperature is 15 celsius on two consecutive days. temperatures have been higher than that. basically, the advice is, use your common sense, make sure you are hydrated. if you are holidaying abroad. temperatures here are at
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least a site not higher. yesterday's top temperature was 31 celsius in cavendish in suffolk. what we're looking at today is around 32, summer looking at today is around 32, summer in the south—east. it is not going to be 32 everywhere. the forecast today is a largely dry one. a few showers in the south—east. some hazy sunshine. we start off with a weather front in the north—west. here is where we have got a couple of showers. we can see couple of showers move through the northern isles. across east anglia and kent in particular with the hit and kent in particular with the hit and miss. you will be lucky if you do catch one. in between, a lot of dry, hot and sunny weather. temperatures up to 32 in the
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south—east, widely in the 20s across england and wales. it's always go to be cool on the coast as sea breezes developed. we still have some showers across east anglia and kent. it is going to be another human one, particularly in southern areas. temperatures overnight, 12— 20 celsius. again tomorrow, largely dry. more cloud building up to the course of the day. that could trigger a thunderstorm. they will be the exception rather than the rule. if you are screaming out for water, hats tomorrow isn't today. tomorrow is going to be hotter. hotter across—the—board. even is going to be hotter. hotter across—the—boa rd. even in is going to be hotter. hotter across—the—board. even in north, we are looking at temperatures into the
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mid— 20s. thursday to friday, we start to import some heavy thunderstorms. moving northwards during friday, heading up towards north—east england. at the same time, whether bringing rain in. they are both going to collide. some torrential downpours and gusty winds and large hail. especially across parts of north—east england and eastern scotland. that will move into the north sea early on saturday and by then, parts of north—east england and scotland could have seen as much as half a month to a full month worth of rainfall in that short period. that is likely to lead to some disruption with travel and could also lead to power cuts for example and flash flooding. something to bear in mind. moving away from the south—east, the potential for temperatures hit to reach 3a or 35 but for the rest of the uk, russia into the weekend and the uk, russia into the weekend and the middle of next week, we see
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temperatures rise once again into the 30s. 3a35 on the way. we will have to stay cool. how to stay cool has been a topic of conversation for some weeks. it was there. we did have some good advice. i am mercedes belle and i run cycle training, and in the 30 degree heat the kids are absolutely exhausted. we try to keep well hydrated. we are finding places in the park where there is shaped. it is a mission. i am sam, i work up the road. it doesn't have any air—conditioning, it is quite stuffy but we have all brought in some extra fans. i took a lot of good photos here so i think i would remember
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this for a long time. i am on holiday and i come from serbia. i didn't expect the weather would be like this. but i was hoping for it. so dreams really come true. so humid and especially travelling on public transport, you feel you are suffocating. 0ur colleague got a new puppy to distract us in the office from the heat. i am sylvia. i work around the corner. i am from africa. this is normal. i don't see it as a heat wave. the only thing i would complain about is when the air—conditioning is too cold in the office. that is the only bad point. we don't have this that often. so why are we complaining? my name is julia. i work for a charity that rescues dogs and cats from the dog meat trade in china. the number one rule remember is to hydrate. try to walk them in the cool times, early morning or in the evening. let them sleep on your bathroom or kitchen floor if it is made of stone.
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let them go outside under the bushes. and just be mindful. my name is ken. i work as a gardener in the park. the challenge is working in the hot weather. stay hydrated and be mindful of how you feel. if you are too long in the sun, you can suffer heatstroke, which can take you out of the game for a few days. lots of extremely good advice. some people sleeping outside, some people downstairs. the warm shower than the cold shower before you go to bed. you don't want to call yourself down because your body regulates and throws the temperature backup. the broadcaster itv have just announced their latest results. steph's talking to the boss. it's a tough time for all
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broadasters at the moment with tough competition from the likes of netflix and amazon. itv, the maker of love island, coronation street and bgt has just reported profits. much of that generated by its production base itv studios. the company makes about as much money selling tv shows and formats to other channels as it does from traditional advertising. carolyn mccall is chief executive of itv and joins me now from the london stock exchange. you are looking at a refresh, saying itv is going to be more than tv. 0r to mean from a moneymaking point of view? it's to say the broadcast business is the thing where we have our showcase to everybody for content, our showcase to everybody for co nte nt, we our showcase to everybody for content, we are going to strengthen that. everyone wants to be on itv one or itv to all itv three, itv for. it's a fantastic showcase. they don't put money into marketing, developing the hub, give it a
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personalisation, recommendations, making the destination. a whole range of things we are doing to invest in our broadcast business. the other studio business selling content around the world that has good growth. we expect to do more of that. and we are setting up a new way of making money which is, we have so many fans and those fans wa nt to have so many fans and those fans want to spend more time with us and spend money with us so we are actually going to do something we are calling a direct consumer business that relies on a lot of data and analytics and we are investing that as well. so this is a subscription service. doesn't have to be. we have said we intend to start a streaming service, subscription video on demand, and we are in explorer tree talks for a whole range of different partners. 0ur whole range of different partners. our research says, just to give you
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an example, 92 of the top, 100 programmes, there is a huge appetite in britain for good distinctive quality british content. that is one side of it. we are going to be developing our consumer business. we are going to be doing live events much more. we are ready do things like competitions, a whole range of things, that consumers want to do with us. there are lots of different things at the moment spending content. things at the moment spending co nte nt. if things at the moment spending content. if you look at how much netflix and amazon are spending, it's a staggering amount money. is it's a staggering amount money. is it incomplete? netflix are spending the money globally. that may content the money globally. that may content the country ‘s right across the world. we have a $1.1 billion
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programme budget just the world. we have a $1.1 billion programme budgetjust the uk. and we do that very well and we are the only place you can get commercial mass quality audiences. eight, nine million people are watching our soaps. trauma, 8 million viewers. a liar, 8 million viewers. it's the only place you can get that quality viewers. it's about engaging those and making them come back for compelling content and that helps us get our advertising revenue and we do well on that. total revenue was up do well on that. total revenue was ‘7. do well on that. total revenue was up 3%. love island has been a huge success of your network. what are your thoughts on the criticism from the likes of nhs england to us saying that the adverts you are running during the show are damaging to the mental health of young people because of this hell emphasis on body perfection? we take that seriously. you were a tiny number of
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ads i bought thejuxtaposition seriously. you were a tiny number of ads i bought the juxtaposition was not quite right and we are sensitive to that. the highly regulated, as you know. so we comply with everything. we have done nothing wrong. it's more about our judgement. we are already monitoring and working on that. if they weren't quite right, how did they ever get there? i didn't say... you said some of them weren't quite right. let me be clear. myjudgement is that the juxtaposition of our tiny fraction, a tiny fraction of what we did, that was not on the broadcast channel, make not have been quite right. we are looking at that and we will take our own action. we haven't done anything wrong as far as that is concerned. we also carried huge
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numbers of other advertisers, retailers, superdrug hambrook —— reported a 16% increase in profits —— profits and they said love island is what that is about. we take our duty of care extremely seriously. so no more diet pills or breast enlargement ads. i don't know where you have seen those. you must be an avid viewer. c must be watching it all the time. well done, that's brilliant. i'm not disputing that but i'm disputing the fact you have these ads running. ijust said what ijust said which is that these ads running. ijust said what i just said which is that we are highly regulated and compliant and monitoring that as we speak. thanks three much fewer time this morning, the chief executive of itv. you are watching too much television, staph. i do like television. i watch different television. i watch different television. i watch different television. i was merely reiterating the point you are making by mentioning it once again. thank you
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very much. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alpa patel. london's crossrail project is running 600 million pounds over budget according to government figures. crossrail or the elizabeth line — is almost complete, but the cost of it — has risen to 15.a billion pounds. the line is due to fully open in december 2019. which was trialled at the notting hill carnival, will help keep london safe but big brother watch claims it breaches people's rights under the human rights act. elderly residents at a care home in reading —
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have had some interesting visitors this week these peruvian alpacas dropped by. their owner says they help stimulate the senses — and conversation. and their gentle nature makes them perfect for animal therapy. it's bonkers, it's bonkers. i do have to sometimes think to myself, "this is what do, this is myjob, how did that happen?" it's just. . . it's just a lovely thing to do, and people's reactions arejust amazing. it makes it worthwhile. 0n the tube — minor delays on the district line between earls court and ealing broadway and earls court and richmond, westbound. minor delays between kennington and morden southbound. and the piccadilly line has severe delays between rayners lane and uxbridge due to a signal failure. now temperatures have been soaring in london — today they will reach above 30 degrees in parts. and look
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atjust how hot things are — our thermal cameras — have been measuring how we're coping. experts warn climate change is driving rising global temperatures and fuelling heatwaves. let's have a look at the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it was another very warm night last night which has led to a warm start this morning. a lovely bright one, though, lots of sunshine and yes, we are in for another hot and sunny day today. lots of sunshine around first thing. a bit more cloud will start to move up from the south as we head through the afternoon and that cloud mayjust be enough to spark off one or two isolated showers. most places dry, very similar to yesterday afternoon but temperatures a touch warmer. we're looking at a maximum today of 31, maybe 32 celsius in central london. 0vernight tonight, some clear spells, some patchy cloud there overnight. some moist and humid air, maybe enough to spark off a shower. minimum temperature not dropping much below 19 celsius so again quite uncomfortable for sleeping. for thursday, lots of sunshine, again, temperatures sneaking up
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a little higher, potentially 33 celsius. then for friday, the chance of a thundery downpour, particularly later on in the afternoon and the first part of the evening. clears away overnight leading to a much cooler weekend. temperatures still in the mid—20s butjust feeling a little bit fresher. i'm back in half an hour. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today. greece begins three days of mourning after wildfires destroyed whole communities killing at least 7a people. five men have been charged in connection with an acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester. one of the world's best—selling pop stars demi lovato is in hospital after a suspected drugs overdose. can you trademark the shape of a chocolate bar? later this morning nestle
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will find out if it can protect its kit kat from copy—cats. high drama at the tour de france. protests and pepper spray in the pyrenees. spectacular crashes too. but britain's geraint thomas still has the yellowjersey. good morning from hampton court. the sun is beating down. for most of the uk today, warm or hot but a few showers in the north—west and potentially in the south—east. it's wednesday 25th july. our top story. greece is beginning three days of mourning after wildfires killed at least 7a people. emergency crews have spent the night searching through destroyed communities, and dampening down remaining fires. andrew plant reports. searching among the ashes, rescue teams walking among the still—smouldering ruins of this seaside resort. so far we have found 30 bodies
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which were dead or burned and we have located, we are trying to locate another four which are so far missing. those who managed to escape from here are now returning to homes destroyed by fire. translation: i am a wreck. a lifetime's work, a lifetime of memories go to waste. it's totally heartbreaking, everything is gone. the flames swept through here after dark, burning everything in their path. many tried to flee by car. the road, surrounded by flames, covered by clouds of smoke. this driver escaped. others were killed in their cars, overcome as they tried to leave. seen from above, this coastal village resembles a warzone, its buildings destroyed,
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the trees here blackened and burned. the country's worst forest fires in more than a decade have left its people in a state of collective shock and national mourning. it could yet turn to anger, with suggestions the fires may have been started deliberately. the survivors here are now looking for answers. andrew plant, bbc news. desperate stories of people trying to escape. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is in the small coastal town of mati this morning. these were desperate scenes for people. because it happened so quickly, it was about 5pm. people we re quickly, it was about 5pm. people were watching the local news reporter saying the wind is blowing the other way and the firewood and
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come to mati, this picture postcard seaside town. people say they smelt burning and their windows were smashing, and they run. if we move the camera, this is the centre of mati. lots of pine trees. across the coast in the distance you will see chalk and black edges. 26 people died because they couldn't make it to the water. lots of locals say they huddled together, they embraced with children amongst the dead. this is the area which is ultimately the most devastated in terms of those people that died. 7a people so far according to authorities. the local mayor says he is personally seen more than 100 body bags so we expect this to be the biggest single disaster from wildfires in recent times in greece. the search and rescue operation is still going on
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at the coastal rescue boats. greek media reporting reporting between a0 and 100 people still missing. there isa and 100 people still missing. there is a coordination centre being set up is a coordination centre being set up the fire service have been inundated. secondary fires is the other thing. in the last half an hour we have seen two plumes of smoke in the distance. meanwhile they are trying to investigate what was behind this. police are questioning four suspects with suggestions of suspicious activity before these fires started around the greek coastline. thank you. three days of national mourning has started as well. five men have been charged following a suspected acid attack on a three—year—old boy in worcester. 0ur correspondent jane frances kelly has more details — jane what else are the police saying? the police aren't naming the men but
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we do know that three of the men come from london, they are in their 30s. two of the men from wolverhampton and they are 39 and a1. they will appear at kidderminster magistrates' court later today charged with conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm in connection with a suspected attack ona connection with a suspected attack on a three—year—old. the three—year—old was in a discount store in worcester on saturday when he received acid burns to his face and arm. he was taken to hospital and arm. he was taken to hospital and discharged on sunday but we don't know the long—term implications of the injuries. police are very implications of the injuries. police are very keen to stress they think this is an isolated incident. thank you. the american pop singer, demi lovato, is being treated in hospital in los angeles following a suspected drug overdose.
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in a statement, her agent said she was awake and surrounded by her family. us media reports say the 25—year—old was found unconscious at her home. a taped conversation has been broadcast on american television of donald trump and his former lawyer, talking about making a payment to a playboy model. in the audio, secretly recorded two months before the us election in 2016, mr trump and michael cohen can be heard discussing making a payment to the woman, who said she had an affair with the president. his lawyer says no payment was ever made and that no crime has been committed. a woman who's trying to divorce her husband of a0 years will find out today if she's won her legal battle. tini 0wens believes that her marriage to hugh 0wens has broken down, but he disagrees saying they still have a few years to enjoy. the case has led to fresh calls for a no—fault divorce system in england and wales. let's bring you back to one of the
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stories we've been discussing. the world's first ivf baby is celebrating her a0th birthday today. the arrival of louise brown at 0ldham general hospital changed fertility medicine forever. since 25thjuly 1978, there have been around six million ivf births worldwide, as richard main explains. from the moment she was born on 25th july 1978 brown made history. from the moment she was born on 25thjuly1978, louise brown made history. she was the first of what would become 6.5 million ivf babies around the world. # happy birthday dear louise...#. she was hailed as a miracle child, her every milestone captured by tv cameras. and by the age of ten she was starting to understand why. well, an egg got took out and put in this funny dish... ..and you put it back in and then they told mummy to go home... ..and here i am.
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today ivf treatment continues to give hope to the millions of couples dealing with infertility issues and louise continues to be a vocal advocate for the scientific breakthrough that brought her into the world. ijust say, well, i was just born but i accept there thanks on behalf of my mum. and amazing, amazing lady who would do anything, well, did do anything, and i mean, just did the unknown and went for it. adam balen, a professor of reproductive medicine joins us now, along with catherine hill who had a successful pregnancy after three ivf treatments, and now works for the fertility network charity. we'll come to your case in a moment, but, adam, it's a real milestone for
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ivf. you follow the story of louise brown for many years. it's momentous to think how things have changed in the last a0 years. if we think of the last a0 years. if we think of the pioneering work of those who actually achieved that miracle baby after so many failed attempts. it took them a67 goes to get the birth of louise brown. now, here in the uk, we are doing about 70,000 cycles of ivf a year and worldwide, at least six if not a million babies have been born. it's achieved cou ntless joy for all have been born. it's achieved countless joy for all these families ——8 countless joy for all these families —— 8 million babies. countless joy for all these families -- 8 million babies. with the joy goes a lot of pain for some people. as we know, not every cycle works. what kind of impact did it have? infertility is the most traumatic and distressing thing i've ever experienced. it is for the vast
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majority of people who go through it. we know as a charity that 90% of people are depressed, az% of people feel suicidal. experiencing not being able to conceive month after month after month, your hopes dashed every single month, was terrible. the ivf journey every single month, was terrible. the ivfjourney is every single month, was terrible. the ivf journey is so distressing. for example, i started my treatment, i was so excited and full of hope. we had our first cycle and i got that positive extra pregnancy line, i was pregnant and so full of hope. i went for the first scan and unfortunately my experience was one that many have been through. i knew almost as soon as i was in the room that something wasn't right and i was told sorry, there's no heartbeat. sadly, there will be
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people right now at those early morning appointments who will be experiencing that right now. what sort of strain did it put on your relationship? it put a terrible strain on both my relationship and my life. i experienced not wanting to go out and enjoy life in the same way. everywhere you look, people are having babies and having fun with their families. you feel totally alone. you feel isolated from that. asa alone. you feel isolated from that. as a charity what we would like to say is you are not alone. fertility network is here, we were here to help you to provide support and advice. we have an information line and a support line. there is lots of support people can try and access. adam, from the point of view of the number of cycles not working, will that change over time? it is a
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difficult thing to do. it is difficult thing to do. it is difficult and it has improved significantly over the last few yea rs. significantly over the last few years. one of the key things is not only the effect it has on couples but also ivf is cost—effective. here, we've recently been celebrating 70 years of the nhs yet there is still a postcode lottery. so many couples don't get the funding they should have and actually if all the ccgs provided the three cycles recommended by nice the three cycles recommended by nice the majority of couples would have a realistic chance of having a baby. after 70 yea rs of realistic chance of having a baby. after 70 years of the nhs and a0 yea rs of after 70 years of the nhs and a0 years of ivf, that is a key message. we've got a statement from the department of health saying we are increasing funding by 3.a% per year for the nhs meaning £20.5 billion a year extra. the government has been
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clear ivf services should be accessible to patients set out in nice guidance. it doesn't happen. it would be great but sadly it doesn't happen. it would costjust £77 million of that £2.3 billion. it isa it is a very small percentage to funding fertility services in the uk for all of those that require it and that would give the majority are realistic chance of having a baby. we are here today, ivf is 40, we should be rightly proud that england pioneered ivf but that achievement begins to pale if we are moving towards a society which sadly it looks like we are at the moment where only the most affluent people can access this amazing life changing technology. we need the government to take action now and
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change this otherwise that will happen. you said you had some dark times, how is the family now? absolutely wonderful, they are watching me this money, i have an amazing eight—year—old daughter and ivf is miraculous. good morning to your daughter. what is her name? will 0wen. your daughter. what is her name? will owen. thank you both for that, really good chat —— willow. i've been watching fascinated all morning because i love a swimming pool. good morning from hampton swimming pool good morning from hampton swimming pool, look at this, lots of swimmers here from the crack of dawn and i have a few of them to chat with. graham, do you come here often? every day of the week, fantastic today. that went well, fantastic, you are quite right. barbara, this must be the best time of the day to be here. fabulous, very nice indeed. do you come every day as well? twice a week. how warm is the pool because
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it feels delicious? i think it's 28, sometimes it varies, 26 a lot of the time so very nice. is going to be warmer, the air temperature, later this afternoon than the pool. thank you for stopping to talk to us. that in fact is the case across some parts of the south east today the temperature will rise up to 32 celsius but yesterday's top temperature was in suffolk so a bit warmer today but that's just the south—east, it will be fresher in the north and west. there are some showers in the forecast, the northwest could see some showers and also in parts of the south—east but in between a lot of dry weather and it's going to be warm or hot depending on where you are. on the charts you can see that we have some showers across north—west scotland, breezy here as well, later some of those will get into the northern isles. through the course of the day
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a bit more fair weather clan will build up, turning sunshine hazy at times, and we could see a couple of showers across east anglia and kent, for example, if we're but many of us will miss them all together. always cooler on the coast with sea breezes, temperatures in scotland and northern ireland, high teens and low 20s, for england and wales low 20s to the mid—20s and in the south—east up to 32. this evening and overnight we still have showers across the northwest and also showers across east anglia and kent. a few of these by the end of the night drifting up to yorkshire, in between clear skies. but once again it is going to be a humid night, temperatures falling to 12 in the north but 20 in the south. we start like that tomorrow with showers in the northwest, some of those could be heavy. it's going to be noticeably breezy tomorrow. through the day we will see more cloud developed coming up from the south which could spark off a thunderstorm or two across parts of the midlands and eastern england. again, they
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will be hit and miss. tomorrow, humid wherever you are and hotter than today. the highest temperatures likely to be in the south—east at 3a, possibly 35. 0vernight thursday we start to import some thunderstorms across south—east england, and on friday those thunderstorms will migrate northwards up the coast of eastern england, some of them getting well inland towards the midlands and up towards eastern scotland. at the same time we have weather fronts coming in from the northwest and the two will merge so we are looking at torrential downpours, particularly across parts of the midlands, eastern england and eastern scotland. we will see gusty winds, large hail, frequent lightning as well. this could all lead with the rain to some problems with flash flooding, power cuts, for example, and travel disruption. we expect it to clear early on saturday by which time parts of north—east england and eastern scotland could have had as much as half a month to a full month
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of rainfall. it will be fresher heading through the weekend but temperatures climb back up into the 30s in the middle of next week. studio: thank you, carol. i'm very envious of you sitting by the pool. school holidays as well so it's packed! here's a question — can you trademark the shape of a chocolate bar? you like this sort of question, don't you? i would think you should be able to but i know nothing about the legal argument. steph knows about it. it is about kit kat, there is a bit ofa it is about kit kat, there is a bit of a fight going on between nestle who owns the brand and also another big chocolate maker that owns cadburys. they argue with nestle that the shape of the kit kat should be protected across all of europe and mondelez says it shouldn't because they have a similar one in norway. this is a row that has been going on for eight years. is going to cost a lot of money? yes, there is so many legalities to
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this but the reason they bother this they feel it is distinctive to their brand and if other ones came out that were similar they would lose money so that were similar they would lose money so it's all about money. what is interesting is also by having these continuous legal arguments they are keeping all of this in the public domain. here we are chatting about the kit kat, people at home might be thinking, i haven't had a kit kat for ages. i'm thinking exactly that! some people argue this? i was chatting to a lawyer earlier who worked in brand management and could see both sides of it and she said it keeps it in our consciousness, this continuous chatting about what is happening with this case. it is also the case with this case. it is also the case with lots of money being spent on it. we have had toblerone, mondelez trademarked the shape of the toblerone, the prism shaped and then cadbury dairy milk said the shade of purple wrapper used on a dairy milk should be trademarked but they won
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that and they lost it on appeal. there is lots of fighting going on between the chocolate makers. i don't want to over go on the brand but have you tried the chunky version of the kit kat and sucked tea through it? i don't like tea. i have had other drinks through it. it is magical because the chocolate melts with the tea. there are other chocolate snacks. this is the bbc. it isa this is the bbc. it is a 22 am. looking back on old photos of loved ones we've lost can be hard, but a new project aimed at dealing with grief is encouraging people to revisit their past. ——h the idea involves returning to the place where a precious picture was taken, as breakfast's john maguire has been finding out. maike's husband paul died suddenly in 2016. it's certainly my favourite photo of paul and me because we bothjust look ridiculously happy, which we were. ijust love it because it was early days in our relationship but it really represents the whole of the relationship, really. she came back to penzance
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where the couple used to live to take part in the loved & lost project where photographer simon bray meets bereaved people at the scene of a favourite and much cherished photo. it's up to you whether you smile or not. i will probably smile. you are very smiley on this one as is paul. taking part in the loved & lost, really, that was my first step of active grieving, as i call it, because i want to face it head on. we had moved to manchester and coming down to cornwall for the first time after paul had passed away where we had spent all these happy years and all these happy memories, it felt really important because i think cornwall could have quite easily become this ghost to me and i think coming down here to do the project prevented that from happening and i'm really grateful that i could take part in it. simon started his website
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after his father died. the photograph, he says, is just the start, a way in to a conversation. these glasses are significant. yeah. these were paul's glasses so maybe i'll get a shot of you holding the glasses. yeah, i like the glasses. he knew that i liked them as well. so i got them made, i've got my prescription lenses in it so that i can wear them for reading. great. they are precious. a nice memento to think of him. that's lovely. and simon believes that discussion, even just a chat, is a vital help in dealing with bereavement. i think itjust sort of opens up the conversation about loss, really, it breaks down some of those barriers, people are able to share their stories and for the reader, the viewer, to feel like they are not on their own, somebody else has gone through something similar. they are not the only one grieving
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and feeling a bit lost. that's where i feel like the real value of the project lies. simon is not recruiting any more people into the project but hopes that the work he's done so far will help others. not only to have loved and lost but importantly, to remember and to keep those memories alive. john maguire, bbc news, penzance. that is really powerful, it is a reminder sometimes that image wherever it may be of somebody you have loved and lost can bring back so have loved and lost can bring back so many have loved and lost can bring back so many memories have loved and lost can bring back so many memories of the place, the people you were with, and summary people you were with, and summary people have engaged with that as well. thank you for sending in some of your cherished photographs. here's stephen with his dad watching the open at st andrews in 2005. his dad had been diagnosed with cancer shortly before it was taken and died within a year. stephen says it was a magical weekend and he always keeps the photo close to hand. that is a lovely picture.
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this is james from harrogate and his grandfather on the shores of ullswater in the mid 80s. he went back with his children earlier this year to recreate the snap on the same rock. that is something lots of people do, different generations of the same family going back to the same place and revisiting old family photographs and things you did with family in different generations. and rachel from the wirral sent in this birthday snap of her and her daughter rosie. she says she never realised it would be her last photo of the pair together as rosie died suddenly 12 weeks later. she calls it her most precious photo. ican i can see exactly why. thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings with us this morning. i suppose when you see something like that it's a reminder of, you know you do those surveys sometimes, what would you take if your house
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burned down, people always say photographs. you can keep a mental image but there is something special about it. maybe now that they are out there somewhere else you wouldn't have to ta ke somewhere else you wouldn't have to take them with you but i'm never sure. there is something precious about having that. photographs are very special. thank you for getting in touch with us this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. temperatures are going to get even higher over the next few days. some thunderstorms through friday and behind that something fresher for the weekend. before then, another mainly dry, warm if not hot day with plenty of sunshine around and the far north—west of scotland keeping more cloud and rain through the
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morning. most will be dry and these orange and red colours are showing the extent of the heat and warmth across the country. temperatures widely between 22—28 celsius. sea breeze keeping to the coasts making it cooler. a shower across central and southern england as medium and high level cloud belts. more rain building into the north—west of northern ireland. the north—western —— for western area is a more humid night than it has been recently. tomorrow looking to be the hottest day of the year so far. the breeze strengthening across northern ireland and western scotland with some outbreaks of rain moving into northern ireland by the end of the afternoon. top temperatures tomorrow across a large swathe of england and wales 30—31. some places further
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east perhaps 3a—35. these fronts are making inroads which will bring outbreaks of rain to western scotland, northern ireland into wales, south—west england. ahead of this, some thunderstorms. not eve ryo ne this, some thunderstorms. not everyone seeing this, some thunderstorms. not everyone seeing them but they could bring a lot of rain in a short amount of time. some staying dry and further east still holding onto the heat and humidity. this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and ben thompson. a turbulent day ahead for ryan air with 100,000 passengers affected across europe. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 25th ofjuly. 600 flights are grounded by the lowcost carrier
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as unions call for better pay and working conditions. also in the programme, president trump announces $12 billion for us farmers who're caught in the crossfire of intensifying trade tensions. a mixed picture across europe at the start of the
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