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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  August 1, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. a council in financial crisis — northamptonshire introduces emergency measures which mean even essential services could be cut. we are not just we are notjust going to slash and burn all the services. we've got to look very carefully at some of the decisions that we are going to take, and they are going to be very difficult. a qualified apology from jeremy corbyn over the ‘concerns and anxiety‘ caused by his appearance at a meeting where the israeli government were compared to the nazis. anger on the streets of harare as the results suggest that the ruling zanu—pf paerty have retained power in zimbabwe. and going down. a multi—storey car park collapse — sending vehicles and debris crashing onto the ground below. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. engler die regaining control after
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losing alastair cook on the opening day of the test match, they are 93-1. and helen willetts how's the weather. i will tell you more about the heat coming to the uk, but it is nowhere near as hot as the dangerously high temperatures that we are expected gci’oss temperatures that we are expected across spain and portugal. more on that for you this afternoon. thanks, helen. also coming up — calls for greater awareness of mental health issues — and the pressure on young athletes — from the father of snowboarder ellie soutter, who died on her 18th birthday. hello everyone. this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. after imposing emergency spending controls for the second time in six months, northamptonshire county council is warning it may now have to cut even basic services. councillors will meet later today to consider how to save up to £70 million — that's15% of its
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budget — by next march. one of the commissioners appointed by the government to oversee the authority has described the situation as truly perilous, and it's not the only council in trouble. our political correspondent tom barton reports. looking after older people, caring for vulnerable children, repairing the roads, keeping people healthy. all work done by local councils on behalf of local residents. at one authority is warning that soon it might only be able to do the things it is required to by law. northamptonshire county council has warned twice in the last six months that it's at risk of running out of money, and has proposed reducing services to the bare minimum. the suggestion, reducing them to 33 core areas. the council says this is the best service offer it can afford,
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supporting only those most in need. what we have got to do here is spend within our budgets. we have had to make tough decisions about budgets, and we have to make sure that we protect the most vulnerable in both the likes of children's services and adult social care, as well as deliver some of the important other services we do, the likes of highways and highway maintenance. it's a massive, massive ask. the situation is so bad that earlier this year ministers sent commissioners in to oversee how the council is being run. and yet local government experts say other councils are starting to see similar issues. so, could northamptonshire be the canary in the coal mine? northamptonshire has got into a deeper financial hole, and the reason for this is clearly mismanagement locally and unwillingness on the part of councillors to make the tough decisions to bring the budget into balance within the year. other councils have just
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about managed that, but it's not to say there aren't others that are near the same situation, they are not there yet, but they are near it. over the next eight months, northamptonshire has to save more than £60 million. £7.5 million a month, 15% of its annual budget. even if these proposals are approved, that will be a big challenge. jeremy corbyn has apologised for appearing at events alongside people whose views could have caused ‘concern and anxiety‘. the labour leader hosted a meeting in 2010, where a speaker compared the actions of the israeli government to the nazis. our assistant political editor, norman smith, said that some feel mr corybn‘s apology didn‘t go far enough. it hasn‘t addressed the concerns of many in the jewish it hasn‘t addressed the concerns of many in thejewish community who if anything seem even more angered by this written statement, and i
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suspect many in the labour movement, too, will see this as a missed opportunity, a moment when mr corbyn could have got a lot further, maybe done some interviews, because there isa done some interviews, because there is a desire, i think, a groundswell in the labour party, for mr corbyn to ta ke in the labour party, for mr corbyn to take a more active role in trying to take a more active role in trying to address and damp down this whole controversy, to address and damp down this whole c0 ntrove i’sy , m ore to address and damp down this whole controversy, more certainly than issuing written statements. and interestingly we have heard from the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, in the past hour or so, and why his intervention is interesting is because he has been among those pressing for an example for the investigations into margaret hodge and ian austin, two labour mps facing potential disciplinary charges after they clashed with the labour leader over anti—semitism. he has called for those inquiries almost to be scrapped, suggesting there has to be some sort of way found to get over the rows rocketed by the disciplinary process, and
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here in the last hour or so, warning that this crisis is shaking the party to its core. have a listen. none of us fail to appreciate i suppose the way this has upset people, including ourselves, it has shaken us to the core. but we will resolve it, we've got to. the key issue for me has always been, you've got to resolve it within the labour party, certainly, but certainly members of the jewish community are suffering out there. we have had a massive increase in attacks on jewish communities, cemeteries, appalling thatjewish jewish communities, cemeteries, appalling that jewish schools have to have security guards. so we have got to resolve the issue within the party, and then get out there and help the jewish community and campaign against anti—semitism in out campaign against anti—semitism in our society overall. the concern is that mr corbyn either lacks the will oi’ that mr corbyn either lacks the will or the ability to deal with this crisis, with one labour mp, stephen kinnock, a critic of mr corbyn,
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suggesting that the party is now facing a full—blown crisis over anti—semitism, and there are calls for anti—semitism, and there are calls foer anti—semitism, and there are calls for mr corbyn to take a much more aggressive stance, so for example pressing for his friend, pete wilson, long—standing ally of mr corbyn, to be kicked off the national executive committee after his remarks when he attacked jewish people for being trump fanatics at the national executive committee, and also accepting that they need to accept the definitions of anti—semitism rather than contextualise it. in other words, there are things mr corbyn could do pretty quickly which would go a long way to allay the concerns of many in the jewish community, but way to allay the concerns of many in thejewish community, but which for whatever reason mr corbyn at the moment is holding back from. that‘s norman smith. the former leader of the english defence league, tommy robinson, has been freed on bail, after winning
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a challenge against a finding of contempt of court. but he‘ll face a fresh court hearing on the allegations later in the year. our correspondent tom burridge has been at court for us. just explain the ruling to us this morning. tommy robinson is a divisive figure, and there were two groups, one supporting him and one against him, outside court today. it is his supporters that are cheering for now, because he will be released but he will have to be back in court again, and then a judge will look at whether or not his actions in may of this year were potentially prejudicial to a trial at leeds crown court. # tommy‘s coming home! his supporters, celebrating and chanting at antifascist protesters on the other side. news filtered out that tommy robinson was going to be released on bail. i think it‘s great. i believe he was jailed unfairly in the first place, you know? he was jailed incredibly quickly. the high court accepted
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mr robinson‘s appeal for most of his jail sentence, relating to his actions outside leeds crown court in may. he had pleaded guilty and was jailed in a matter of hours. this is why he is walking free today. essentially because the process was flawed. i've caused a breach of the peace and i am being arrested. but a judge will still have to decide whether tommy robinson‘s broadcast, via facebook, outside an ongoing trial at leeds crown court, risked prejudicing the case. his video was watched some 250,000 times and he was accused of breaching a suspended sentence from another broadcast he made outside canterbury crown court months earlier. a personal thank you to each and every one of you... he is a product of the internet age, sites like youtube allowed the founder of the english defence league to reach many more people
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than far right leaders of the past. before his arrest, he had struggled to attract as much support. but mr robinson‘s profile has risen since then, at home and abroad. this was the dutch far right leader geert wilders, addressing his supporters in london last month. free tommy robinson! but while some will celebrate his release on bail, others see a more sinister side. for the right, they will see it as a celebration, they are putting him up as somebody who is a freedom fighter, he is not standing up for ordinary people, he is trying to divide them. anybody that believes in democracy and a multiracial society has to stand up against what robinson believes in. mr robinson will appear soon in front of anotherjudge. if found to be in contempt of court, he could be jailed again. as you and i know, contempt of
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court, the idea that you might prejudice a trial, is a basic lesson in anyjournalistic prejudice a trial, is a basic lesson in any journalistic handbook, prejudice a trial, is a basic lesson in anyjournalistic handbook, and we have to think about it all the time when we cover a legal case or even before a case has gone to trial, but ina before a case has gone to trial, but in a stone age, anyone posting anything online about an ongoing legal case has to be careful, and thatis legal case has to be careful, and that is essentially what the case against tommy robinson is all about. his appeal today is essentially succeeded because he was so quickly relating to his action outside leeds crown court in may, and he didn‘t get the chance essentially to appeal against the idea that some of the parts of the video might not have been prejudicial, or certain parts which could have been in contempt of court, he needed to argue essentially that they weren‘t. that will take place now because there will take place now because there will be another hearing, he will appear before a judge relatively soon, and another condition on his bail is that he cannot now go within 400 metres of leeds crown court. tom burridge high court, thank you very much. more now on our main story —
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that northamptonshire county council has had to impose emergency spending controls for the second time in six months, and is now considering cutting even basic services. our corerspondentjo black is in northampton. cutting basic services is one thing, but also the vulnerable in any society are also going to face problems here? yes, simon. people here in northamptonshire are already feeling the pinch from those cuts, so feeling the pinch from those cuts, so subsidised bus routes have been scrapped, 2i so subsidised bus routes have been scrapped, 21 libraries could be closed by september, although that is subject to a legal challenge. the headquarters i am standing in front of now, this is the headquarters of northamptonshire county council, that has already been sold off, and road maintenance has also been scaled back. but now the leader of the council is saying that it is inevitable that there will be cuts to children‘s services and maybe aduu to children‘s services and maybe adult services as well, and these are services that the council
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legally has to provide, so you can imagine just legally has to provide, so you can imaginejust how much legally has to provide, so you can imagine just how much concerned areas around that issue. at what point does it run out of money? does it stop operating, have to close? that is a very good question, and i don‘t think anyone can answer that at the moment. councillors will be scratching their heads as trying to look at the books. there is a meeting later on today we councillors will be looking at how much money they can save, and there will be protests gathered here later on today, reacting to that. we are told at that meeting today there will be no definite decisions, but of course councils are taking this very seriously, and need to make saving someone. one opposition councillor told me that she is fea rful councillor told me that she is fearful for vulnerable children and vulnerable communities, and she says, my worry is that we would perform our safeguarding duty, and there will be consequences because of that. it is worth pointing out that children‘s services here in northampton are requires improvement
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rated by ofsted, and there is a worry that they will slide back to inadequate. they are the only authority so far to formally declare this measure, but they are and are by no means the only authority facing financial difficulty? absolutely not. no definite decisions is what we are told, but people will be watching this meeting at 5:30pm very closely. members of the media and other politicians, mps, and the local people as well, but other councils will be looking at this really closely, because many of them say that there are financial pressures and they are really struggling. several of them have said they could be the next northamptonshire county council sometime in the next few years. joe black, thank you very much. there are 11,000 more grammar school pupils in england today than in 2010. that‘s despite a 20 year ban on building new ones. figures from a bbc analysis
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of official data also shows a growth in the number of grammars giving priority to poorer children. here‘s our education editor bra nwen jeffreys. like many grammar schools, it has a long history. sir william borlase also wants a bigger future. it‘s among more than 30 selective schools bidding to expand. the deadline to ask for cash to build is tomorrow. it‘s a condition for those selective schools that they have to come forward with a plan of how they are going to widen their access and make sure that, you know, more children from more disadvantaged backgrounds are going to be able to access it. but grammar school expansion has already been happening. there are 11,000 more grammar school pupils than in 2010. by 2021 that means the equivalent of 24 extra grammar schools and that is if intakes stay the same. 93 out of 163 grammar schools give some priority to poorer pupils. but some still fear the effect of expansion. essentially what you‘re doing
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is you are creaming off the top students in that area. and obviously the consequence of that for other schools will be that their average achievement level will go down both in terms of the students entering those schools, will have lower test scores, but also potentially in the progress they make because you are removing some of that high achieving peer group. grammar schools are popular with some parents. but remain controversial with those against selecting at age 11. branwynjeffreys, bbc news. and you can find more details about your nearest grammar school in england, and its pupils, by entering your postcode on the bbc news website. just go to bbc.co.uk/education. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines northamptonshire county council warns it may cut services back to a "bare minimum" because of severe financial difficulties.
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jeremy corbyn apologises for any ‘anxiety and concern‘ caused by his appearance at a meeting where the israeli government were compared to the nazis. anger on the streets of harare as the results suggest that the ruling zanu—pf party have retained power in zimbabwe. and in sport, keatonjennings had to steady the ship after alastair cook fell early, but now he is gone, too, england 98—2. and barcelona‘s lu ka england 98—2. and barcelona‘s luka diyas signs that everton and becomes the second big summer signing. and that everton and becomes the second big summersigning. and it that everton and becomes the second big summer signing. and it is disappointing news for becky downie, the gymnast has had to pull out of the gymnast has had to pull out of the european championships after injuring herself in training. i will be back with more of those stories for you shortly. the electoral commission in zimbabwe says the governing zanu—pf party has won an outright majority of seats in parliament, following monday‘s general election — the first since president mugabe was ousted.
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results from the presidential race haven‘t yet been declared — and eu observers have criticised the delay. our correspondent nomsa maseko is in harare. a lot of people are unhappy with what they have heard so far. indeed. there is also localised violence. there is also localised violence. there are there is also localised violence. there a re protests there is also localised violence. there are protests near the zanu—pf headquarters also which is very close to where the results of the selection is being announced, and also to my left, there are other people that are protesting. they seem to be supporters of the opposition movement for democratic change. as i am speaking to you now, there is also a whiff of tear gas in there is also a whiff of tear gas in the air, and gunshots went off earlier. but we are still trying to verify whether those were live ammunition or it was rubber bullets. but it is fast becoming tense here on the streets of harare. and why is
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there this delay between the parliamentary result and the presidential one? just over and are 90, presidential one? just over and are go, the zimbabwe electoral commission held a press conference in which they confirmed that the ruling zanu—pf party had won by an outright majority, but also said the reason why there is a delay in announcing who the next president of this country will be is because they are still counting and verifying those results, so it is highly likely that zimbabweans will not know by the end of today who their next president will be. at the same time, the opposition movement for democratic change is holding protests because they are alleging that this election has been rigged, and that allegation has been disputed by the electoral commission. so, nomsa, the next few hours could be quite tense? indeed,
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it could be quite tense, already we are seeing localised violence here on the streets. police are spraying water cannons as i am speaking to you now, trying to disburse the pockets of groups of angry zimbabweans who are saying that they believe that the selection has been rigged to the favour of the ruling zanu—pf party. we heard also earlier from the president, emmerson mnangagwa calling for restraint and asking zimbabweans to remain calm until the results of the selection are announced. calling for restraint, but for many, particularly younger, voters, he is pa rt particularly younger, voters, he is part of the problem? indeed, that is what they believe, because he was rubbing shoulders for the longest time with the former president, robert mugabe, who fast became an enemy when the army took over in a military coup last november. mostly urban young voters are in favour of
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the opposition movement for democratic change, but it remains to be seen in terms of those election results what the country‘s electoral commission is going to tell zimbabweans in the next few hours. nomsa maseko, we will be back to you later, thank you very much. the father of the great britain snowboarder ellie soutter, who took her own life on her 18th birthday, has told bbc south east support for young athletes coping with the pressure of top—level sport. ellie won britain‘s only medal at the youth winter olympics last year. in his first interview since his daughter‘s death last week, tony soutter spoke to bbc south east sports reporterjuliette parkin in les gets in france. this was ellie soutter at her very best. she took bronze last year at the youth olympics... and was hotly tipped for a place at the 2022 winter games. standing on the podium was really good.
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it‘s been my first multisport competition, and it was amazing to have so many people watching us. i hope it prepares me for the beijing olympic games. but it was not meant to be. her body was found in a remote part ofj late at night on her 18th birthday. she had been upbeat the day before, but her father believed her past history of mental health issues, coupled with the pressure of elite performance, may have been the catalysts to ending her life. unfortunately, it all kind of... it all came about from missing a flight. which then meant she didn't go training with the gb squad. she felt she'd let them down, let me down, and tragically itjust takes one silly little thing like that to tip somebody over the edge. ellie soutter had spent the last season competing on the free ride junior to her, and just last month was named in the senior gb squad for the snowboard cross europe circuit.
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but training and accommodation at that level comes at a price, over £30,000 a year. as a family and friends, we all thought ellie had come out of the other side of a particularly dark time of her life. that was a lot to do with the fact that she was unable to compete last season and do what she would have loved to have done through total lack of funding. and that's why this foundation is so important to me and the rest of her family, and her mother. it was here in the french alps where her heart lay. she was made ambassador, very unusual for a british athlete. translation: she was like an english ambassador for the town whose snowboarding for the english team and was here for quite some time. she was an ambassador for the time because she was an excellent snowboarder. you don't get that here
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every day of the week. it didn't make a difference to us whether she snowboarding for the english team or for france. ellie love these mountains, it was where she felt most at home. but the pressure of competing at such a high level took its toll. now her family hopes that a foundation set up in her name will help others achieve their goals. i've lost my best friend, my total buddy. she was my rock and everything. i've done nothing but live for her for the last 18 years, and now i have to start again, really. and if i didn't, she would be mortified. the foundation page has just been set up and already donations have come flooding in. ellie‘s funeral will be attended by hundreds here on thursday, a life sorely missed. a bright sporting future, sadly lost. juliette parkin, bbc south east today.
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let‘s talk to andy lane, professor of sport psychology at the university of wolverhampton this is a tragedy on so many levels, but just looking at the this is a tragedy on so many levels, butjust looking at the pictures of a young girl who seems to have everything to live for, and yet, it is something may be those of us who don‘t work in a sports environment don‘t work in a sports environment don‘t understand. don‘t work in a sports environment don't understand. it is truly tragic, and it is heart—wrenching listening to that of watching astori. it is really difficult for the population as they look at sports people, and they see them and their great successes, to imagine or really think through, you have got young people experiencing such massive, massive pressures. it is extremely, extremely difficult environment are thriving, and i can‘t agree more, that that is exactly what is needed, we should be
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looking at developing the resilient emotion regulation skills for young people. young people should be made aware of the destructive effect emotions can have, and contexts such as sport can be utterly damaging. they are great successes, but your whole self worth of self being can be put on the line in such a high public way, it is just devastating. and that is something that is more true now than even perhaps ten years ago because we now have social media, and the pressures increase exponentially, as you get better and more well—known. exponentially, as you get better and more well-known. the pressures for young people at the moment are enormous. in a society where it is very difficult for them to thrive, and social media puts a spotlight on them intensely. and all the negative things that can come out of that are extremely difficult. you want to connect to your fans, see you go on social media, but you also connects
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to all sorts of potential horrible types of comments and criticisms. it is extremely difficult, extremely difficult, so massive pressure. so i absolutely agree we should be looking at ways in which we can support the development of young people so that they are resilient in today‘s society. people so that they are resilient in today's society. do we need to just change the way we think about winning? we used to say, we must win at all costs. perhaps we should rethink that. i don't think we can rethink that. i don't think we can rethink that. i think that an individual will want to be the best, the best version of them they will be, irrespective of what context thatis be, irrespective of what context that is in. so whether it is winning at sport or winning a place of oxford university or doing the best of exams and all those sorts of things, it is human nature to be competitive, and it is human nature to wa nt competitive, and it is human nature to want to beat another person. so whilst we might want to change our view on that, it will be very
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difficult. but what we can absolutely do is change our interpretation of what winning means to us, so that we can contextualise it in what it is, so a sporting event is one thing you are good at, but there are other sorts of areas that you can excel in, by being a good friend, being a good parent, being a good teacher, all sorts of different things where if we encourage people to have different views of themselves, so one of them is an athlete and another is a different version of themselves, then the athlete version is in turmoil, the other version of themselves can be in a safe place. as we heard in that report, it sounds like it was a missed flight that tipped over the edge. you have to have built up quite level of unhappiness to be in that sort of state. so you are saying the important thing is to talk? to have someone around, and maybe this is what sport needs to consider, who should that be. should they lay
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someone on to do that? the two really important things that are releva nt really important things that are relevant here, one is that it is not, that people should be good at opening up when they have got emotional and psychological difficulties. one of the great problems is that you have what might seem a confident, successful person, who internally is going through to torture, and it is very difficult to spot that, so what we should be doing is encouraging people to be able to say i am going through some terrible times, having these terrible times, having these terrible thoughts, and to share that so that it is, and that they do so, not in an environment where you feel that you will be judged. again, that is really difficult within the sport context, because so many people have vested interest in you doing well as an athlete, so while sport might think that they want to put extra support, it is really outside of that support that it is required, so
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access to mental health, which is available for elite athletes but also over anybody in turmoil, should be easily accessible, and the person should be able to identify it, identify themselves as in need and get the treatment really early on. along with that, i think at a really early age, it helps to teach people good emotional regulation skills, and to know what strategies they can haveif and to know what strategies they can have if they are feeling really down to ta ke have if they are feeling really down to take better self—care, so that in the early stages, and i think this should be done with children, that they learn better to be able to deal with their own emotions. andy, good of you tojoin us, thank with their own emotions. andy, good of you to join us, thank you very much indeed. now the weather forecast. helen is here. and in some parts of europe it is going to get too hot. dangerously hot, in fact. yes, they are forecasting for temperatures to get into the high 40s across spain and
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portugal this week. so there are some weather warping out, in force, the highest level, the red warning across portugal and spain tomorrow but croatia and switzerland where the temperatures are going to get such a great deal above what you would normally expect it becomes dangerously hot by night as well. what is the warning? don‘t go out? people deal with the heat in their own way, seeking shade and trying to keep the shutters closed, the window, blinds, those precautions to try and keep the internal temperatures of the house lower as well until the slightly lower night—time temperatures happen, but again they will be into the ‘30s more than likely. really dangerously hot. the temperature of the high 40s, what does that feel like? i have never felt that. i 40s, what does that feel like? i have neverfelt that. i imagine across iberia, it will be dry heat, so the humanity won‘t be high but in
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west wales last week, and you could feel the heat in the sand, that was probably not even 30 degrees, and it was way too holt for me, so this is the level where it becomes so dangerously hot they need to put the warnings out. what about nearer to home? you may have heard we are going for the heat wave here but it is not for all. i had some interesting statistics about july, it wasn‘t the hottest on record here in the uk, injuly, it was only the third hottest, things cooled down with the thunderstorms and that welcome rain at the end of the month. this heat wave, if you haven‘t enjoyed the heat we have had, it isjust haven‘t enjoyed the heat we have had, it is just for southern and eastern uk, for most other areas temperatures will be on a par with where they should be for the this time of year because we will have the weather front, look at this, you can see the rain marching across northern ireland and western scotland. it will be a soggy rush hour, not the best of afternoons for heading out and about. we have sunshine around and about. here we
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are in the midlands, so beautiful weather here, beautiful on the south coast, that is where we will see the best of the sunshine, around the coast, because you tend to find that the cloud bubbles up inland. as we go through the rest of the afternoon and into the evening, it looks soggy in scotland, northern ireland, across the north—west and wales we will find that the low cloud starts to become murky as well, so that will be a difference but in edgbaston we should stay largely fine for the rest of the day‘s play. the difference through the night is the increasing humanity. it has been co mforta ble the increasing humanity. it has been comfortable for most but elsewhere, because we are picking up the south—westerly airflow it becomes muggier, so temperatures will be considerably higher than last night for scotland and northern ireland in particular and there will be a fair amount of drizzly cloud and rain tomorrow morning. it does tend to lift scotland, parts of northern ireland for a time but particularly so in england and wales, again the lion‘s share of the sunshine in the
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south, there will be fair weather cloud mulling round so the irish sea coast murkier than today. more rain to come for northern ireland, brighter weather for to come for northern ireland, brighter weatherfor a to come for northern ireland, brighter weather for a time in scotland. come friday that weather front is straddling the country and it is the dividing line between fair weather towards the north and a few showers is and a fresher feel, very co mforta ble showers is and a fresher feel, very comfortable indeed and that hot humid bright dry weather in the south. that is what we keep over the weekend, we keep that fine mostly dry, fresh weather, then we have the re m na nts of dry, fresh weather, then we have the remnants of that weak weather front, no more than the odd shower, to the southis no more than the odd shower, to the south is where we have that heat wave returning, with temperatures, high 20s, low 30s and sorry around the high 20s low 30s for much of the next four or five days so the coast a bit fresher because you have the sea breezes. i i will this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a cash—strapped local authority will hold crisis talks this evening to work out how to pay for core services. northamptonshire county council needs to save up to £70 million,
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15% of its budget, by next march. we‘re not just we‘re notjust going to slash and burn all the services we have to look carefully at some to decisions we will have to take, and they will jeremy corbyn apologises for any ‘anxiety and concern‘ caused after he hosted an event in 2010 at which a holocaust survivor compared israel‘s government to nazism. there‘s been violence in the past hour in the zimbabwean capital harare — after the electoral commission said the the governing zanu—pf party has won an outright majority in parliament. the country held a general election on monday — the first president mugabe was ousted. sport now on afternoon live. england and india playing in the first test match, england are batting, how are they getting on? how many people are watching, how
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many people are interested in test cricket? people would argue not that many, not enough. there was a crowd in new zealand in a test match that was under 400 people, there are nearer 18,000 at edgbaston for the first of the five test matches that england and india are playing. day one and england are currently 112—3 now. i believe david mullan has gone. let me take you through some of the action. it started well for england. jennings the opener was dropped early on and that sent a message, india‘s bowlers not looking that good and england‘s openers looking comfortable. it was a surprise when alastair cook was out forjust 13 runs, surprise when alastair cook was out for just 13 runs, and surprise when alastair cook was out forjust 13 runs, and that really was to a ball that you could call the ball of the century, maybe. shades of shane warne in 1993 when
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he bowled out mike gatting with a ball that turned to off stump. then england steadied the ship. joe root is still out there, 43 not out. he started to play shots and scored some runs quickly and england got to their 100. jennings is out, bowled by shammy, that was unfortunate. the ball trick together the stumps and just, knocking the bales off and we have had mulan out as well. 112—3. let us look at the score card, you know where we are. and you can follow of course the action on test match special on bbc radio and the website, so it has been a fairly co mforta ble website, so it has been a fairly comfortable morning and not looking as comfortable. we will keep an eye on that one. tennis, johanna konta, wow. wow indeed. it as defeats go as well. an incredible win forjohanna
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konta in california. an incredible defeat for serena williams, let us get the story of the day from this first round of a wta event in california where nobody saw this coming. with the us open looming large, serena william‘s quest to get back into the major winning habits should be in full swing. johanna konta provided the next test on the that road and it proved to be a tough oneful william‘s joy road and it proved to be a tough oneful william‘sjoy in road and it proved to be a tough oneful william‘s joy in san jose reserved for the opening game of the match. it would be own her only success. konta reignited after her second round exit at wimbledon turned it on against the grand slam champion. the first set disappeared ina champion. the first set disappeared in a matter of minutes. williams was far from the powerhouse that reached the all england club finaljust over that reached the all england club final just over two weeks‘ that reached the all england club finaljust over two weeks‘ ago, and konta took full advantage. the win for the british number one sealed in
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underan for the british number one sealed in under an hour. the worst defeat of william‘s career whenning just one game. konta can take a lot from this result but maybe not too much. the grand slams remain the place to beat serena. an incredible story. everton have announced the signing of a player from barcelona, hejoins on a announced the signing of a player from barcelona, he joins on a five year deal £18 million. he has 21 caps for france. he was on stand bay for the world cup. he is the second major summer signing. a disappointing news for becky downie, she has had to pull out of the european championship, she has injured herself in training. she won two gold medals at the commonwealth games in 2014 and is a two time european champion, she be replaced by tasia james. that is it for more now on news that leading
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jewish campaigners have rejected a qualified apology from jeremy corbyn, for appearing at events alongside people whose views could have caused ‘concern and anxiety‘. the labour leader hosted a meeting in 2010, where a speaker compared the actions of the israeli government to the nazis. let‘s get more from ivor caplin, labour politician. it wasn‘t much of an apology. it wasn't much of an apologym wasn‘t and i share the anger across the jewish community about this event took place on holocaust memorial day and it has come to light. an excellent piece in the times this morning, bringing it to everyone‘s attention, and it really is unacceptable. the word crisis, i think steven kinnock was using that today, is the party now in crisis? well, if i put it to you like this,
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that in the 1990s we had to prove to the british public that we were capable of dealing with the economy, we did and we won a general election, the challenge for the labour party today, underjeremy corbyn‘s leadership is to prove to the wider british public, that we can deal once and for all with anti—semitism in our rank, once we have done that we can maybe look to an election at some stage, to form a government, but at the moment, that‘s going to be very difficult. forgive me i have heard that, we have all heard that many times before and it doesn‘t seem to happen. well, there are two simple things thatjeremy corbyn could do now. one, is to ask the national executive committee to reconsider its decision of two weeks‘ ago on the ihrh definition and all the 11 exa m ples the ihrh definition and all the 11 examples and as i have said, once thatis examples and as i have said, once that is fully adopted we can discuss other matters, if that is necessary within the party. the second thing
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he should do, is distance himself from pete wills man whose rant we heard uncovered by thejewish chronicle at that meeting was absolutely out of order, and he really should very seriously consider his position on the national executive today. to be fair to him, parts of what he said were misquoted, and i had an interview with him yesterday, where the word ra pt with him yesterday, where the word rapt was used, and while it was uncomfortable there is a sense that there is such a febrile atmosphere in the party and withinjewish ranks of the party the facts are beginning to get lost. i don't share that view, simon and i think the issue no is this is way beyond the just the jewish community. i was in the north—west of england ten days ago, and speaking to people there, both jews and non—jew, the anger at the labour party was palpable and it is something we have to deal with if we are going to be successful. there is
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no point burying our head in the sand and thinking it will will go away, it won‘t, it is going to run and run unless we deal with it. those two issues i have raised with you today are the way thatjeremy corbyn can at least start to show to the british public that we are serious about dealing with anti—semitism. serious about dealing with anti-semitism. or what? let us cut to the chase, do you want him out?” am not calling for that at all. you know, he is the elected leader of the labour party, he needs to lead and show leadership, that is what i am calling on him to do. great to talk to you, thank you for your time. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live northamptonshire county council warns it may cut services back to a "bare minimum" because of severe financial difficulties. jeremy corbyn apologises for any ‘anxiety and concern‘ caused were compared to the nazis. protesters take to the streets in harare as election results suggest that the ruling zanu pf party have retained
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power in zimbabwe. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. more ppi pain for lloyds after the bank announces it‘s putting aside another £460 million to cover costs mis—selling claims. it comes as half year profits jumped by 23% to £3.1 billion. french drugmaker sanofi says its stockpiled its drugs in preparation of a no—deal brexit between the uk and the eu. reports say the pharma giant is also considering cutting jobs from its current 1,600 strong workforce in the uk. and e.on energy announces it‘s cutting 500 jobs across its uk operations. the energy firm currently employs 9,400 in the country and blamed the competitve industry for the job lossses. e.on says the cuts are part
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of its £100 million savings drive. soa so a lot of talk of this trade war between the us and china escalating. yes, according to us media reports, there is talk that the trump administration is looking to increase those tariffs on chinese goods and it could happen as early as today, simon, reports suggesting that the us may slap 25% tariffs on £152 million worth of chinese goods. that is 15% more than was initially expected. so there we go, that is the threat. 25% tariffs being slapped on that amount of goods. 15% more than was initially predicted to happen. now, in july, more than was initially predicted to happen. now, injuly, the us listed more than 6,000 items at risk of
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having these tariffs imposed upon them. i was looking to see if donald trump had tweeted, he hasn‘t. them. i was looking to see if donald trump had tweeted, he hasn't. that is good, because round this time he does send out a tweet. we have to walk in ready for that one. let us go to the states now and chat to our new york correspondent kim who has more on this. kim, as we were saying, no tweet update from the president yet but what has changed? why do we think the trump administration is considering imposing the higher tariffs? most reports suggest that china and the us have come to an impasse when it comes to this tit—for—tat trade war. the us has been looking for concession from china, there are reports that china offered to increase purchases of us goods by 70 billion us dollar or £52 billion, that wasn‘t good enough according to us officials so they have come to an
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impasse and many observers are thinking that this threat of raising the tariff rate from 10% to 25% on £152 billion worth of chinese imports should be sending a message to china saying the us is getting serious. and these aren'tjust numbers we are talking about, kim, they could potentially have a huge impact on consumers notjust in the us, and in china, but all round the world, couldn‘t they? us, and in china, but all round the world, couldn't they? especially with this list alice, we saw other ta riffs with this list alice, we saw other tariffs announced, they did have an impact on steel, aluminium, so i beans but for the most part the trump administration tried to avoid ta riffs trump administration tried to avoid tariffs on imports. items on this list include things such as dog food, beauty products, chemicals, b i cycles, food, beauty products, chemicals, bicycles, things that you or i will
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notice a cost increase of the we go to buy them later this month and later this yore and the tariffs go into effect. it is a gamble for the trump administration because so far it has been able to issue these threat, tariffs not just it has been able to issue these threat, tariffs notjust on chinese imports but on imports from the european union and mexico and canada, because for the most part american consumers haven‘t felt the pinch. if they notice that the cost of goods are increasing, that could erode political support for this particular trade battle. as you say every day goods that everyone‘s buying. kim, really interesting stuff. we will wait to see if we do get a tweet update from the president on this. for now, on the floor of the new york stock exchange. it has been a great summer weather—wise but not seven happy with that. not the farming community ayou cross the uk, the weather has been really hard on them because it has dried out their field, they have
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not been able to put out animals to pasture so meat and milk producerings, they have all said that yields have been severely affected by what is the driest weather since 1961 and today they managed to voice their concerned, there was a meeting of the national farmers union and they met with the government but for them they heard the response they were hoping for, from the environment secretary michael gove, he said he was prepared to do whatever it take, he was speaking on behalf of the government to help uk farmers. farmers. we are still waiting for more detail as to what that means but helping them to maintain food supply, but helping them to maintain food supply, because farmers were standing up and giving their temperatures, they had —— testimonies, they said they had to put down animals because they couldn‘t afford to feed them. they said they might have to bump up pries because of the escalating cost of production so a grim story coming
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out of the farming community. ok, let us catch up with the markets. yes, so if we look the ftse 100, yes, so if we look the ftse100, again down but ever so slightly, as we have been saying for weeks now, trading operating within the tight margin, a lot being put down to uncertainty over brexit negotiation, so down just over 1% but very much in line with what is happening elsewhere. in focus today, on the ftse100, lots of earnings out today including from high street. bellwether, next, the shares sharply down, they were down as much as 8% earlier, next blaming the summer heat wave, for driving sales of lightweight items, capita also in focus, the contractor, the power provider, also another one issues results today so lots of results out today. talk to you later. farmers say the prolonged hot
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and dry weather is having an unprecedented impact on food production. representatives of the national farmers union had emergency talks with the environment secretary michael gove this morning. the nfu says farmers face major challenges, with too little water for crops and severely reduced grass growth. prices for consumers have already risen, as katharine da costa reports. a long, hard winter followed by a wet spring. and now the driest start to summer on record. farmers often find themselves at the mercy of the weather. but with no significant rain since may, the unprecedented dry spell is having a crippling effect on producers across the country. just look at these satellite images. the left, taken in may before the start of the heatwave. the right shows the impact of weeks of drought. the cows on this dairy farm in cheshire should be grazing on lush green grass. instead, they are eating into winter rations. this is the food store, the fodder should reach right up to the gate.
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supplies that would already be depleted over the winter have not recovered. it‘s highly unusual, and expensive. we are purchasing as much feed as we can at the moment. feed this year that would normally be say £50 or £60 per tonne, that would be straw, is £130 or £140. so at least double the price that it was last year. some livestock farmers are sending their animals to market early to relieve the burden of feeding them. elsewhere vegetable producers are already warning of shortages if the hot weather continues. the extra volatility and pressure on farmers high on the agenda at today‘s emergency summit. it is challenging, i think it is tough for the whole of northern europe. but the most important thing is that we link up the right people and have the conversations and we make sure in all of this that consumers are not disadvantaged.
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the main concern really is about getting straw and fodder to the areas that are in desperate need of it. the red tape is big in farming and we have a lot of regulations to adhere to. and it isjust to be a bit more flexible and a bit more lenient. the environment secretary michael gove said the government would support farmers to put a plan in place. we want to make sure that farmers have access to the water they need in order to make sure the crops can grow. we want to make sure that farmers have access to the feed that livestock need in order to ensure that we can have food production maintained and healthy and successful farm businesses. and we will do whatever it takes. despite rising production costs, experts say retailers are likely to absorb any price rises for consumers. we cannot control the weather, but deciding the right course of action will be crucial to ensure the nation remains resilient in its food production. katharine da costa, bbc news. blaming the summer heat
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now tommy robinson is facing a fresh hearing over an allegation he committed contempt of court by filming people in a criminal trial. before that hearing can take place he is going to be released from prison where we is currently serving a term, which has let‘s go live to our news correspondent phil mackie whojoins me now from onley prison near rugby where tommy robinson has been held. she about to come out, is he? we think so, there has been a lot of movement outside the gates in the last ten minutes or so. some prison staff have come out and told us to get back a little bit further and the people who are waiting to greet him when he is released, a handful of friends have also brought their ca rs of friends have also brought their cars ready to whisk him away back to his family. you mentioned he was jailed for a 13 month prison sentence so if he had served is half that he would be due out new the early autumn but today obviously, that conviction has been quashed pending a retrial so he can face the
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same contempt charges again, and he had a previous contempt conviction as well, you can see one of the supporters here, he has been ranting and raving, his friends and supporters don‘t seem to know who this particular person is, that is the kind of kerrs can you sometimes get when tommy robinson is around. his solicitors we have been told have advised him not to talk to us, however, you never know he may want to say something when he is let out. just explain what has happened, it was the original ruling this appeal court has said was wrong. yes, it was to do with the way that particular case was dealt with, he was jailed for contempt on the same day he was arrested. this was at a court hearing in leeds a couple of months ago, and thejudge court hearing in leeds a couple of months ago, and the judge today found that mr robinson had beenn‘t been given enough time to prepare a
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defence, the matter was dealt with too quickly, under a great deal of pressure at the time so he must have a chance to defend himself in court and that hearing will be held at a later date but there has been a massive campaign, a free tommy robinson campaign, that is why we here, it has become such a big issue, hundreds of thousands of people to support him notjust in this country, but across the world believing he wasn‘tjailed for his at legend contempt of court, but because of his political beliefs. he is freed on bail, do we know what terms? the only term that he has been given other than obviously the usual terms, on bail is he can‘t go within a certain distance of leeds crown court, which is where he was jailed for contempt earlier this year. phil, we will be back to you later on, if there is any movement we will come straight back to you. let us catch up with the weather
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first. here today‘s weather has been a tale of two halves, by far the best of the sunshine has happened across the eastern side of the uk, across eastern side of the uk, across eastern scotland, and much of england and wales, this was the isle of wight earlier in the afternoon, while further north and west we have got more cloud, underneath a weather front that is bringing rain and that will continue its progress northwards and eastwards as we go through this evening as we hang on to some sunshine. what we will notice is because we have picked up this wind, it will be a warmer feeling night, except perhaps for the far south. the humid air culpable homicide until we get into thursday. it is here we see the sunshine and the heat but it is a different story. a lot of dry weather but there is more rain coming into northern ireland you. can see that difference in the temperature. we see the best of the
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sunshine and the highest temperatures in the hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3... a council in financial crisis — northamptonshire introduces emergency measures, which mean even essential services could be cut. we‘re not just we‘re notjust going to slash and burn all of the services. we have to look carefully at some of the decisions we are going to have to ta ke decisions we are going to have to take and they are going to be very difficult. anger on the streets of harare, as election results suggest that the ruling zanu pf party have retained power in zimbabwe. a qualified apology from jeremy corbyn over the "concerns and anxiety" caused by his appearance at a meeting where the israeli government were compared to the nazis. and going down — a multi—storey car park collapse, sending vehicles and debris crashing onto the ground below. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. the latest from edgbaston. yes, where joe root the latest from edgbaston. yes, wherejoe root houses 50 but england
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are on 129—3 on the first day of the first test against india. thanks chris, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. helen willetts has all the weather. the heat is returning for some in the uk in the coming days. not for all. it looks set to become hot across spain and portugal this week. more on that later. thanks helen. also coming up, calls for greater awareness of mental health issues — and the pressure on young athletes — from the father of snowboarder ellie soutter, who died on her 18th birthday. hello everyone. this is afternoon live. after imposing emergency spending controls for the second time in six months, northamptonshire county council is warning it may now have to cut even basic services. councillors will meet later today to consider how to save up to £70 million — that‘s 15% of its
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budget — by next march. one of the commissioners appointed by the government to oversee the authority has described the situation as "truly perilous". and it‘s not the only council in trouble. our political correspondent tom barton reports. looking after older people, caring for vulnerable children, repairing the roads, keeping people healthy. all work done by local councils on behalf of local residents. but one authority is warning that soon it might only be able to do the things it is required to by law. northamptonshire county council has warned twice in the last six months that it‘s at risk of running out of money, and has proposed reducing services to the bare minimum. the suggestion, reducing them to 33 core areas. the council says this is the best service offer it can afford, supporting only those most in need.
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what we have got to do here is spend within our budgets. we have had to make tough decisions about budgets, and we have to make sure that we protect the most vulnerable in both the likes of children‘s services and adult social care, as well as deliver some of the important other services we do, the likes of highways and highway maintenance. it‘s a massive, massive ask. the situation is so bad that earlier this year ministers sent commissioners in to oversee how the council is being run. and yet local government experts say other councils are starting to see similar issues. so, could northamptonshire be the canary in the coal mine? northamptonshire has got into a deeper financial hole, and the reason for this is clearly mismanagement locally and unwillingness on the part of councillors to make the tough decisions to bring the budget into balance within the year. other councils have just about managed that, but it‘s not
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to say there aren‘t others that are near the same situation, they are not there yet, but they are near it. over the next eight months, northamptonshire has to save more than £60 million. £7.5 million a month, 15% of its annual budget. even if these proposals are approved, that will be a big challenge. jo black was in northampton earlier, and spelled out what these cuts mean for local residents. people here in northamptonshire are already feeling the pinch from those cuts. subsidised bus routes have been scrapped. 21 libraries could be closed by september, although that is subject to a legal challenge. the headquarters i am standing in front of now, northamptonshire county council, that has already been sold off. road maintenance has been
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scaled back. now the leader of the council is saying that it is inevitable there will be cuts two children‘s services, and maybe adults services as well. these are services the council legally has to supply, services the council legally has to supply, so you can imagine how much concerned there is. at what point does it run out of money? does it stop operating? does it have to close ? stop operating? does it have to close? that's a very good question andi close? that's a very good question and i don‘t think anybody can answer it at the moment. councillors will be scratching their heads, trying to look at the books. there is a meeting today were councillors will be looking at how much money they can save. there will be protests gathered here later today reacting to that. we are told there would be no definite decisions but councils are taking this very seriously and need to make savings somewhere. one opposition councillor told me she is fea rful opposition councillor told me she is fearful for vulnerable children and vulnerable communities, and she says her worry is that they will not be
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able to perform their safeguarding duty and there will be consequences because of that. it is worth pointing out that children‘s services in northampton are required and proven, a rating from ofsted. if there are cuts there is a concern it will step back to inadequate. they are the only local authority to have declared this measure so far but not the only one facing financial troubles? absolutely not. this meeting later today, no definite decision is what we are told, but people will be watching this very closely. members of the media, other politicians, mps. local people as well. other councils would be looking at this really closely because many of them say there are a financial pressures and they are really struggling. several of them have said they could be the next northamptonshire county council sometime in the next few years. that was jo black. the electoral commission in zimbabwe says the governing
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zanu—pf party has won an outright majority of seats in parliament, following monday‘s general election — the first since president mugabe was ousted. results from the presidential race haven‘t yet been declared, and eu observers have criticised the delay. nomsa maseko is in harare. what is the explanation for that delay? well, zimbabwe's electoral commission says the fact that 23 presidential hopefuls participated in this election is the reason why it is taking them a bit longer to count and verify those results. they are also saying they are waiting for all the party agents of all those 23 participants to come to the election result centre here in harare to make
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sure that they are satisfied with the results before the electoral commission can make that announcement. but of course that has not made members or supporters of the opposition movement for democratic change, it has not made them very happy. they are protesting on the streets of harare. because with this uncertainty comes allegations that this whole thing has been rigged and the anger, as we can see, is coming out on the streets ? can see, is coming out on the streets? indeed. the anger is now coming out on the streets. there are pockets of protestors in parts of harare, particularly where the headquarters of the election results are being announced, and also outside the headquarters of zanu—pf. there was a big police presence. police spraying water cannon, even tear gas. in some cases there was
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also live ammunition. the electoral commission has said zanu—pf has an overwhelming majority in parliament. are there are those who believe that result has been rigged as well? indeed there are people who believe that that election is rigged, particularly supporters of the opposition party, movement for democratic change. they say they voted for change, they voted for a new zimbabwe. but do them a new zimbabwe does not include them a new zimbabwe does not include the current government, which is the ruling zanu—pf party. there is a lot of unhappiness, particularly in urban areas in this country where the mdc is popular. and the new president, whoever it is, the first job they will have to do is calm things down? indeed, they have to calm things down and they also have
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to create jobs, they have to fix the battered economy that crumbled at the hands of robert mugabe, who held a tight fist for 27 years. they acknowledge there is a huge job ahead for this country if they want to ta ke ahead for this country if they want to take it forward. thank you. leading jewish campaigners have rejected an apology from jeremy corbyn, for appearing at events alongside people whose views could have caused "concern and anxiety". the labour leader hosted a meeting in 2010, where a speaker compared the actions of the israeli government to the nazis. norman smith said that some feel mr corybn‘s apology didn‘t go far enough. it hasn‘t addressed the concerns of many in thejewish community who if anything seem even more angered by this written statement, and i suspect many in the labour movement, too, will see this as a missed opportunity, a moment when mr corbyn could have got a lot further, maybe done some interviews, because there is a desire, i think, a groundswell in the labour party, for mr corbyn to take a more active
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role in trying to address and damp down this whole controversy, more certainly than issuing written statements. and interestingly we have heard from the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, in the past hour or so, and why his intervention is interesting is because he has been among those pressing for an example for the investigations into margaret hodge and ian austin, two labour mps facing potential disciplinary charges after they clashed with the labour leader over anti—semitism. he has called for those inquiries almost to be scrapped, suggesting there has to be some sort of way found to get over the rows prompted by the disciplinary process, and here in the last hour or so, warning that this crisis is shaking the party to its core. have a listen. none of us fail to appreciate i suppose the way this has upset people, including ourselves,
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it has shaken us to the core. but we will resolve it, we've got to. the key issue for me has always been, you've got to resolve it within the labour party, certainly, but certainly members of the jewish community are suffering out there. we have had a massive increase in attacks on jewish communities, cemeteries, appalling that jewish schools have to have security guards. so we have got to resolve the issue within the party, and then get out there and help the jewish community and campaign against anti—semitism in our society overall. the concern is that mr corbyn either lacks the will or the ability to deal with this crisis, with one labour mp, stephen kinnock, a critic of mr corbyn, suggesting that the party is now facing a full—blown crisis over anti—semitism, and there are calls for mr corbyn to take a much more aggressive stance, so for example pressing for his friend,
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pete willsman, long—standing ally of mr corbyn, to be kicked off the national executive committee after his remarks when he attacked jewish people for being trump fanatics at the national executive committee, and also accepting that they need to accept the definitions of anti—semitism rather than contextualise it. in other words, there are things mr corbyn could do pretty quickly which would go a long way to allay the concerns of many in the jewish community, but which for whatever reason the former leader of the english defence league, tommy robinson, has been freed on bail, after winning a challenge against a finding of contempt of court. but he‘ll face a fresh court hearing on the allegations later in the year. tom burridge reports. # tommy‘s coming home! his supporters, celebrating
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and chanting at antifascist protesters on the other side. news filtered out that tommy robinson was going to be released on bail. i think it‘s great. i believe he was jailed unfairly in the first place, you know? he was jailed incredibly quickly. the high court accepted mr robinson‘s appeal for most of his jail sentence, relating to his actions outside leeds crown court in may. he had pleaded guilty and was jailed in a matter of hours. this is why he is walking free today. essentially because the process was flawed. i've caused a breach of the peace and i am being arrested. but a judge will still have to decide whether tommy robinson‘s broadcast, via facebook, outside an ongoing trial at leeds crown court, risked prejudicing the case. his video was watched some 250,000
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times and he was accused of breaching a suspended sentence from another broadcast he made outside canterbury crown court months earlier. a personal thank you to each and every one of you... he is a product of the internet age, sites like youtube allowed the founder of the english defence league to reach many more people than far right leaders of the past. before his arrest, he had struggled to attract as much support. but mr robinson‘s profile has risen since then, at home and abroad. this was the dutch far right leader geert wilders, addressing his supporters in london last month. free tommy robinson! but while some will celebrate his release on bail, others see a more sinister side. for the right, they will see it as a celebration, they are putting him up as somebody who is a freedom fighter, he is not standing up for ordinary people,
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he is trying to divide them. anybody that believes in democracy and a multiracial society has to stand up against what robinson believes in. mr robinson will appear soon in front of anotherjudge. if found to be in contempt of court, he could be jailed again. we will take you over to onley prison near rugby, where tommy robinson has been held, serving his sentence. he wasn‘t present in the court this morning. the decision was greeted with a round of applause in the pack courtroom. some supporters gathered outside the prison awaiting his departure. we will keep an eye on events. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines northamptonshire county council
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warns it may cut services back to a "bare minimum" because of severe financial difficulties. water cannon and tear gas are used in zimbabwe as protesters reject election results suggesting that the ruling zanu pf party have retained power. jeremy corbyn apologises for any "anxiety and concern" caused by his appearance at a meeting where the israeli government were compared to the nazis. and in sport, joe root mexes 50 after england‘s opener, alastair cook, falls early. —— makes his 50. an incredible win for out of form johanna konta, who beat serena williams at the wta event in california. williams‘ worst defeat of professional career. and it‘s disappointing for becky downie, the british gymnast. she has had to pull out of the european championships after injuring herself in training. she is a two—time european champion. more on those stories in about 15
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minutes. let‘s return to our main story this afternoon. after imposing emergency spending controls for the second time in six months, northamptonshire county council is warning it may now have to cut even basic services. tom barton is in westminster for us now. yes, a little later this afternoon councillors in northamptonshire will meet to discuss proposals to cuts services to a bare minimum. the conservative run council has identified 33 core areas, essentially all of the things it is required to do by law. it says it cannot afford to deliver any more services. it has also developed a hierarchy where it prioritises those services for vulnerable people over and above ones which don‘t have an impact on whether people are kept safe. in order to help decide which services to carry on delivering. am joined now by rob wightman from the
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industry body for accountancy work in public finances. how serious is the situation in northamptonshire? they are talking about cutting statutory services. it is probably the most serious situation i have seenin the most serious situation i have seen ina the most serious situation i have seen in a long career. for the second time in a few months they haveissued second time in a few months they have issued a statutory notice to give warning that they have two freed expenditure and find more cuts. they are in a very perilous state. they look like they will have to cut to the bone. councils have faced big cuts. we can talk about that. but northamptonshire has been mismanaged in that context. all of local government is finding it hard at the moment. northamptonshire is finding a particularly difficult because it has been badly lead. how worried should residents be about the services they rely on? it is a huge concern. we all know that when
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decisions have to be made in a crisis they are not as well made or as well delivered as if they are planned over a long period of time. it would've been better that northamptonshire made some of these difficult decisions some while i go andla difficult decisions some while i go and i a lengthy period of time, in order that they could implemented properly. now they are against the precipice it will be hard to make those cuts and residents will note is quite big changes in a short space of time to their services. is quite big changes in a short space of time to their servicesm northamptonshire the canary in the coal mine? will we see other councils go the same way? it is difficult to say. local government is spending 25% less than it was eight years ago. it has lost 50% of its government grant. all councils are facing cuts. northamptonshire didn't face more cuts than other councils but it made some bad decisions along the way. it didn't
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increase its council tax for a long time, it spent reserves rather than making savings. it is in a uniquely bad position. other councils will be in the same position if they make the same bad mistakes. the national audit office has said that in three years perhaps 10% of councils with social—service responsibilities could be in the same position. i think the answer to your question is that there is time for those other councils to get themselves out of trouble. but if they make the same bad decisions that northamptonshire did, we will see more councils go that way. we have seen one council already this year, somerset, saying they may have to issue a statutory notice because they are at risk of running out of money, potentially imposing emergency spending controls. where, if it does happen elsewhere, where are we likely to see them? probably counties. counties have social services, adult social care and children's social
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care. these are the areas on the most pressure because of democracy —— tomography. more people are elderly and in need of care, and more vulnerable children are in need of care. other councils have a wider range of services. they are able to balance some of the money that is needed for social services, by cutting other things. i would say at the moment if another council does go the way of northamptonshire, it is more than likely to be a county. thank you very much indeed. northamptonshire say that they have to say between 60 and £70 million this financial year. that means essentially they have to save £7.5 million every month between now and march in order to not run out of money, even if these changes, these cuts, do go ahead. that would be a pretty big challenge. thank you. we arejust
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we are just hearing that the government will take responsibility for the grenfell tower once the metropolitan police release the site asa metropolitan police release the site as a crime scene. this announcement comes from the ministry of housing committees and local government. it comes a couple of days after there was anger among grenfell residents at suggestions the tower block would be handed back to kensington and chelsea council. the police investigation into the fire which happened last june is investigation into the fire which happened lastjune is expected to come to an end in the next couple of days, after which the site, which is no longer considered a crime scene, will then be handed over to the government. detectives have carried out three interviews under caution as they look at allegations of manslaughter and potential health and safety breaches. the police say
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their enquiry has moved into a new phase while the interviews take place. there have been calls for the tower itself to be demolished. that isa tower itself to be demolished. that is a decision that will be taken now by the government. the tower itself has been covered. a decision that caused some disquiet among residents in the last few weeks. that is the news coming in from the communities and local government ministry, which says they will be taking over responsibility for grenfell tower once the metropolitan police release the site, when it ceases to be a crime scene. more on that later. there are 11,000 more grammar school pupils in england today than in 2010. that‘s despite a 20 year ban on building new ones. figures from a bbc analysis of official data also shows a growth in the number of grammars giving priority to poorer children. here‘s our education
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editor bra nwen jeffreys. like many grammar schools, it has a long history. it wants a bigger future. it is among more than 30 selective schools bidding to expand. the deadline to ask for a cash to build is tomorrow. those selective schools have to come forward with a plan as to how they are going to widen their access and make sure that more children from more disadvantaged backgrounds will be able to access them. but grammar school expansion has already been happening. there are 11,000 more grammar school pupils than in 2010. by grammar school pupils than in 2010. by 2021, that means the equivalent of 24 extra grammar schools. and thatisif of 24 extra grammar schools. and that is if intake stays the same. 93 out of 163 that is if intake stays the same. 93 out of163 grammar that is if intake stays the same. 93 out of 163 grammar schools give some priority to poorer pupils. but some still fear the effect of expansion.
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essentially what you are doing is you are creaming off the top students in that area. the consequence of that for other schools would be that their average achievement level will go down. both in terms of the students entering those schools, but also potentially in the progress they make because you are removing some of that peer group. grammar schools are popular with some parents but remain controversial with those against selecting at age 11. and you can find more details about your nearest grammar school in england, and its pupils, by entering your postcode on the bbc news website. farmers say the prolonged hot and dry weather is having an unprecedented impact on food production. representatives of the national farmers union had emergency talks with the environment secretary michael gove this morning. the nfu says farmers face major challenges,
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with too little water for crops and severely reduced grass growth. prices for consumers have already risen, as katharine da costa reports. a long, hard winter followed by a wet spring. and now the driest start to summer on record. farmers often find themselves at the mercy of the weather. but with no significant rain since may, the unprecedented dry spell is having a crippling effect on producers across the country. effect on producers just look at these satellite images. effect on producers the left, taken in may before the start of the heatwave. the right shows the impact of weeks of drought. the cows on this dairy farm in cheshire should be grazing on lush green grass. instead, they are eating into winter rations. this is the food store, the fodder should reach right up to the gate. supplies that would already be depleted over the winter have not recovered. it‘s highly unusual, and expensive. we are purchasing as much feed
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as we can at the moment. feed this year that would normally be say £50 or £60 per tonne, that would be straw, is £130 or £140. so at least double the price that it was last year. some livestock farmers are sending their animals to market early to relieve the burden of feeding them. elsewhere vegetable producers are already warning of shortages if the hot weather continues. the extra volatility and pressure on farmers high on the agenda at today‘s emergency summit. it is challenging, i think it is tough for the whole of northern europe. but the most important thing is that we link up the right people and have the conversations and we make sure in all of this that consumers are not disadvantaged. the main concern really is about getting straw and fodder to the areas that are in desperate need of it. the red tape is big in farming and we have a lot of regulations to adhere to. and it isjust to be a bit more flexible and a bit more lenient. the environment
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secretary michael gove said the government would support farmers to put a plan in place. we want to make sure that farmers have access to the water they need in order to make sure the crops can grow. we want to make sure that farmers have access to the feed that livestock need in order to ensure that we can have food production maintained and healthy and successful farm businesses. and we will do whatever it takes. despite rising production costs, experts say retailers are likely to absorb any price rises for consumers. we cannot control the weather, but deciding the right course of action will be crucial to ensure the nation remains resilient in its food production. katharine da costa, bbc news. all eyes on the forecast. here is helen. hello. the weather today has been a tale of two halves. the best of the sunshine is in the east of the uk, eastern scotland,
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eastern england and wales. this is the isle of wight. further north and west we have got more cloud underneath a weather front bringing some rain. that will continue its progress north and east across scotla nd progress north and east across scotland this evening. we hang onto some sunshine before the night falls further south and east. what we will notice tonight is that because we have picked up this wind with more cloud, it will be a warm feeling night. except perhaps the far south. it is here, in southern and eastern areas, where we see the sunshine and the heat. a different story further north and west. a lot of dry weather. rain coming into northern ireland later in the day. you can see the differential in the temperature. highest temperatures in the south—east once again. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a cash—strapped local authority will hold crisis talks this evening
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amid concerns that it will no longer be able to pay for services for vulnerable children and adults and meet its legal budgetary duties. northamptonshire county council needs to save up to £70 million, 15 percent of its budget, by next march. we‘re notjust going to slash and burn all the services. wwe have to look carefully at some to decisions we will have to take, and they will be very difficult. on person has been shot dead in clashes between police and opposition protesters in the zimbabwean capital harare — after the electoral commission said the the governing zanu—pf party has won an outright majority in parliament. it‘s the first general election since president mugabe was ousted. jeremy corbyn apologises for any ‘anxiety and concern‘ caused after he hosted an event in 2010 at which a holocaust survivor compared israel‘s government to nazism. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell has called on labour to resolve its problems over anti—semitism — he said things needed to change. sport now on afternoon live.
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england and india playing in the first test match, england are batting how are they getting on? it is up and down, i tell you what the england captain is doing very well. joe root steadying the ship, he has just reached well. joe root steadying the ship, he hasjust reached his well. joe root steadying the ship, he has just reached his 50s, well. joe root steadying the ship, he hasjust reached his 50s, he is on 63 now, not out, that is his 12th 50 ina on 63 now, not out, that is his 12th 50 in a row for england. earlier they had luck whenjennings was dropped, things going england‘s way early on the first day, but alastair cook was out early on forjust 13 ru ns to cook was out early on forjust 13 runs to a brilliant ball from ash wan, the indian spinner. shades of 1993 when making was out to shane warne. joe root has played some brilliant shot, looks like he could be there all day and all day tomorrow. thenjennings was out, and
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then malan followed after. england we re then malan followed after. england were teetering a bit. 156—3 right now. so they haven‘t pulled away from india, but the indian bowling doesn‘t look that difficult, and ba i rstow doesn‘t look that difficult, and bairstow at the crease with joe root playing shots, just hitting another ball to the boundary. somebody who is not teetering, and that isjoan that konta who has had quite a victory. amazing, johanna konta‘s form has been dreadful. she has dropped from world seven to 449. she can‘t get a win. she went to california to play in the wta event there, she is drawn against serena williams, what a difficult draw, not at all, johanna konta has thrashed serena williams last night. it is an incredible story and
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with the us open looming large, serena williams‘ quest to get back into the major winning habits should be in full swing. johanna konta provided the next test on the that road and it proved to be a tough one. williams‘ joy in sanjose reserved for the opening game of the match. it would be own her only success. konta reignited after her second round exit at wimbledon turned it on against the grand slam champion. the first set disappeared in a matter of minutes. williams was far from the powerhouse that reached the all england club finaljust over two weeks‘ ago, and konta took full advantage. the win for the british number one sealed in under an hour. the worst defeat of williams‘ career winning just one game. konta can take a lot from this result but maybe not too much. the grand slams remain the place to beat serena. everton have announced the signing of left—back
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luca digne from barcelona. the 25—year old joins on a five—year deal for 18 million pounds. he has 21 caps for france and was on standby for the world cup winners earlier this summer. digne is marco silva‘s second major signing this summer, following the arrival of brazilian richarlison from watford. england captain dylan hartley will return to the international set—up this weekend as he continues his comeback from concussion. hartley hasn t played since march, after missing the end of the regular season and thejune series defeat in south africa. he will now be part of a three—day camp after training with northampton over the summer and being monitored by the club‘s medical team. it‘s disappointing news for becky downie. the british gymnast has had to pull out of the european championships after injuring herself in training. downie won two gold medals at the commonwealth games in 2014 and is a two—time european champion. she‘ll be replaced by tayzya ?james, who joined up with the squad in glasgow on wednesday. that‘s all the sport for now.
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we all know that oily fish is good for us, but the levels of omega—3 in farmed salmon are falling. now researchers in the highlands are giving salmon food made with genetically modified crops, in an attempt to increase the fish‘s nutritional value. but critics say gm technology is propping up an unsustainable system of industrial food production. our science correspondent, pallab ghosh, reports. two different types of salmon here, we‘ve got wild and we‘ve got the farmed here. chefs will tell you that salmon is one of the healthiest foods you can eat, but it‘s not as good for you as it once was. tests have shown that levels of an oil called omega—3 have halved in farmed salmon in recent years. there‘s still enough to be beneficial, but levels are continuing to drop. to reverse the trend, these fish are being given a feed high in omega—3 oil
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produced by gm crops. the feed has worked in the lab but the big question is whether it will do just as well on a real fish farm. like this one in the highlands of scotland. if it does, it will be commercially produced and make salmon more nutritious in farms all across the world. we have also trialled this with sea bass and sea bream, which are the two main species farmed elsewhere in europe. but it can also be used in all farmed fish. and not only that, it can be added to feeds for other animals like pigs and poultry. because not everyone likes eating fish, like my wife! this is quite an efficient little production factory for making oil. researchers believe that these genetically modified plants are the solution. their seeds contain omega—3 oil. consumers in many parts of the world would be happy to eat the salmon fed on the oil that‘s crushed out of them, but there is consumer resistance in europe. i think the technology has got
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a great deal to offer. it is not necessarily a silver bullet, but i think we should use that along with all the other approaches that we could adopt. especially now that we're going be leaving the eu, maybe there is an opportunity for us to consider how we regulate gm. we‘re going to cook them in the same pan and then we‘re going to taste. because they taste completely different. we‘re going to cook them in the same pan and then we‘re going to taste. because they taste completely different. aldo zilli is one of the country‘s foremost chefs. so he knows a thing or two about fish. the scientists are saying that it is healthier, it‘s got more omega—3 in it. do we believe that? oh, i believe them. i personally don‘t agree with it, but if they think that there is going to be more omega—3, is it natural, is it good for us? you know, all those things are worrying when you start messing around with force—feeding animals. aldo is not alone in having his doubts. he is sticking to wild salmon, while i try the farmed. it‘s a stronger flavour. it‘s a completely different fish. but this isn‘t bad. it‘s not bad, but this is a different fish.
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palab ghosh, bbc news. the father of the great britain snowboarder ellie soutter, who died on her 18th birthday, has called for more support for young athletes coping with the pressure of top—level sport. ellie won britain‘s only medal at the youth winter olympics last year. in his first interview since his daughter‘s death last week, tony soutter spoke to bbc south east sports reporterjuliette parkin in les gets in france. this was ellie soutter at her very best. she took bronze last year at the youth olympics... and was hotly tipped for a place at the 2022 winter games. standing on the podium was really good. it‘s been my first multisport competition, and it was amazing to have so many people watching us. i hope it prepares me for the beijing olympic games. but it was not meant to be.
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her body was found in a remote part of les gets late at night on her 18th birthday. she had been upbeat the day before, but her father believed her past history of mental health issues, coupled with the pressure of elite performance, may have been the catalysts to ending her life. unfortunately, it all kind of... it all came about from missing a flight. which then meant she didn't go training with the gb squad. she felt she'd let them down, let me down, and tragically itjust takes one silly little thing like that to tip somebody over the edge. ellie soutter had spent the last season competing on the free ride junior tour, and just last month was named in the senior gb squad for the snowboard cross europe circuit. europae circuit. but training and accommodation at that level comes at a price, over £30,000 a year. as a family and friends, we all thought ellie had come out of the other side of a particularly
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dark time of her life. that was a lot to do with the fact that she was unable to compete last season and do what she would have loved to have done through total lack of funding. and that's why this foundation is so important to me and the rest of her family, and her mother. it was here in the french alps where her heart lay. she was made ambassador, for les gets — very unusual for a british athlete. translation: she was like an english ambassador for the town whose snowboarded for the english team and was here for quite some time. she was an ambassador for the town because she was an excellent snowboarder. you don't get that here every day of the week. it didn't make a difference to us whether she snowboarded for the english team or for france. ellie love these mountains, it was where she felt most at home. but the pressure of competing
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at such a high level took its toll. now her family hopes that a foundation set up in her name will help others achieve their goals. i've lost my best friend, my total buddy. she was my rock and everything. i've done nothing but live for her for the last 18 years, and now i have to start again, really. and if i didn't, she would be mortified. the foundation page has just been set up and already donations have come flooding in. ellie‘s funeral will be attended by hundreds here on thursday, a life sorely missed. a bright future, sadly lost. juliette parkin, bbc southeast today. with me is sports psychologist kevin george. we assume young people, this sort of
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fitness, this sort of life, they are 0k, fitness, this sort of life, they are ok, butfor fitness, this sort of life, they are ok, but for many of them they are not. they are managing so much pressure to compete, to be chosen, but also they are very wear of the investment their parents make in their live, whether it be financial, emotional, labouring them to and from training, so they are carrying a lot, the young people. we heard ellie was tipped over the edge by a missed flight, she felt she was letting people down that is what can send you over the edge. what should be done and well, how many othererly ellis are there out there do you think? loads, across all sports but in day—to—day life. the biggest thing question do is educate young people so they can self intervene, acknowledge that the situation is and separate herself from it so we can never get rid of the pressure but we can acknowledge what it is and think how can i manage the
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situation tragically ellie can't, and those that find it difficult to cope, there is that added pressure that there wasn‘t on a few years ago social media, other pressures. there will be more and more things that add to mange it worst but if we develop emotional literacy with young people, people in general we can manage our situations more better. does that include, would that include a sports coach saying, winning isn‘t the most important thing. a thousand percent but it will need more than that, i feel that staff working within the professional arena need, i feel, some qualification round therapy, not a lot of spaces do have psychologists but they spend a lot of time with their coach. sometimes their coach could be the one bringing the problems so i feel that definitely, coaches within those spaces need to maybe have it as part of their badges. so no coach should
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turn round and say if only i‘d known? exactly. what short of help should be offered to youngsters who are fairly ince invincible, at the top of their game. how do you tell if the mind is not as, well, ready for everything as the body is? when you say how do we tell, in terms of the staff, how do the staff tell? it is difficult because we all play a different role. it is difficult for them to tell. if they are very aware of potentially the pressures young people carry or the lack of confidence, all of those things it becomes an education, where it walking to the training field, going to the places where they compete. it could be little conversation and they might pick up little sign, how they might pick up little sign, how they see, when the parents drop off they see, when the parents drop off the children, it is all these ling little things. what to you say, and
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say hang on there may be a problem? sometimes you can look at and there is, i, maybe a parent, the relationship between parents and children but if you look at an intense relationship between a pa rent intense relationship between a parent and child and that is not replicated in other area, if it is just round the sport, that child might think, i don‘t know if i want to compete in this sport but my mum and dad invested so much money, time, and their critiquing me more than my coach, i want to leave but they have put more so much into this. a coach might see this, it could be little sign, when you are trained it sharpens your eye. eye. there is something especially tragic, if you look at the picture, who dies on their 18th birthday, seems to have everything to live for. i mean, there is so many ellis out there. outside of sport but also within sport. we have it in
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football, boxing, you have it all over the place, ideally in an ideal situation i think i wouldn‘tjust be in sport, within education we will be talking about emotional literacy, not just a be talking about emotional literacy, notjust a case of be talking about emotional literacy, not just a case of we be talking about emotional literacy, notjust a case of we are talking about her because there are so many children in general. someone needs to hear you. yes, yes, exactly someone needs to hear you, if you are competent in actually acknowledging your emotions and managing them, you probably don‘t need anyone to hear you because you will be skilled in managing that yourself, it is about empowering the individual. it is good to talk to now more on let‘s go live to our news correspondent phil mackie whojoins me now from onley prison near rugby where tommy robinson has been held. in the last few minutes he has left phil? yes, about 0, 15 minuting a he
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came out of prison carrying a couple of bag, he was met by a couple of friends of his who drove him away but walked through a phalanx of reporter, he was asked what he had to say about what had happened and about this latest development, in this case against him, he said that all the mainstream media are liars and although he had plenty to say he wouldn‘t be talking to us about it. it was a very brief moment, about a my opinion‘s walk before he got in the car and went away, he will still have to face charges of contempt of court, relating to that case at leeds crown court for which he was jailed. what the court of appeal said today was that the case had been dealt with too quickly, hadn‘t been dealt with too quickly, hadn‘t been given a chance to prepare a defence, he will get that, so the original conviction has been quashed but it is a retrial. he will still have to face the same charges, co nte m pt of have to face the same charges, contempt of court of at leeds, we don‘t know when that will be,
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presumably he has gone often to to see his family and friends and seek further legal advice. thank you more now on news that leading jewish campaigners have rejected a qualified apology from jeremy corbyn, for appearing at events alongside people whose views could have caused ‘concern and anxiety‘. the labour leader hosted a meeting in 2010, where a speaker compared the actions of the israeli government to the nazis. let‘s get more from labour mp john mann, who joins were you convinced by the apology? well i heard the apology, i am pleased he did, but the, you know, this is a, to have such an event on the united nations day of commemoration across the world, is wholly unacceptable, it is extraordinary there were 400 such events for mps to go to, including one national event, and, ifind that
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rather bewildering, but the way for him to move forward, and move the labour party forward, is to start to actually give something back to the jewish community, that starts with his definition of anti—semitism that the labour party agreed to two years ago, he announced it and the labour executive backtracked from recently. that would be an important step and i thinkjeremy needs to act immediately and use the authority of his leadership to do that. when you talk about an apology, if you apologise for the concern and actions, you are not apologising for the actions. what we need to be seeing, is for the labour party to be taking a holocaust education day seriously across the country, with people attending, as have many labour mps have done, jeremy corbyn i believe did so, over the last
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couple of years as well. and to highlight that, to do so at conference, to do so in our policy, and to do so by definition of anti—semitism, that is the way forward , anti—semitism, that is the way forward, and that then, i think, begins to open a dialogue, which has really closed down at the moment with the jewish community, really closed down at the moment with thejewish community, which is an awful place, for the labour party, the party that throughout history has been open to all people, sees all people as being equal. it isa sees all people as being equal. it is a horrible place for us to be in. stephen kinnock says this is a full blown crisis. john mcdonnell says this goes to the core. how much trouble is your party in? a huge a of trouble. it is about the soul of the labour party. the the labour party is seen by virtually entire community to be at war with it, to be excluding it, to have large numbers ofjewish members resigning
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from the labour party, including people i have known throughout my 40 yea rs people i have known throughout my 40 years and more membership of the labour party, good friends leaving the labour party, if we don‘t act appropriately now, then what is the point of the labour party? we cease to have a point. that is why it‘s so vital, so important, it is about our soul, and frankly, what is happening out there, out there meaning for example on social media, is that the anti—semites are being encourages by the prevaricating that the labour party is doing, when it comes to the jewish community, and defining anti—semitism, that is why some effective leadership, john mcdonnell is not the only one, most of the shadow cabinet want to see this resolved appropriately and quickly and to the satisfaction of the jewish community. it seems just a handful of people round jeremy corbyn who is holding him back, i
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say listen tojohn mcdonnell, listen to your other shadow cabinet members, and let us get this mess sorted and do so promly. members, and let us get this mess sorted and do so promlym members, and let us get this mess sorted and do so promly. if he doesn‘t do that and do what you have said he should do today, how long as he got as leader of the labour party? welll am he got as leader of the labour party? well i am sure he got as leader of the labour party? welll am sure he will stay as leader of the labour party, the question is how long has the labour party got as a credible political force in this country? that is the real question. the labour party ceasings to exist, it will be a slow death, if it is incapable of incorporating all parts of british society, if one part of british society, if one part of british society, the jewish society, if one part of british society, thejewish community society, if one part of british society, the jewish community walks away from the labour party, then the labour party‘s reason for existing is no longer there. so this really is, i use the term soul, this is about the soul of the labour party. that is why it will take a long time for that to work all its way through, but we will stagger on, from crisis to crisis on this,
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u nless we from crisis to crisis on this, unless we see effective decisive and appropriate action, jeremy corbyn has the authority to do that, it is not about him staying as leaders, it is about him having the authority and using that authority like many of his shadow cabinet, and many backbenchers like me are asking him to do today. thank you we will have what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live northamptonshire county council warns it may cut services back to a "bare minimum" because of severe financial difficulties. water cannon and tear gas are used in zimbabwe as protesters reject election results suggesting that the ruling zanu pf party have retained power. jeremy corbyn apologises for any ‘anxiety and concern‘ caused by his appearance at a meeting where the israeli government were compared to the nazis. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. more ppi pain for lloyds after the bank announces it‘s
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putting aside another £460 million to cover costs mis—selling claims. it comes as half year profits jumped by 23% to £3.1 billion. french drugmaker sanofi says it‘s stockpiled its drugs in preparation of a no—deal brexit between the uk and the eu. reports say the pharma giant is also considering cutting jobs from its current 1,600 strong workforce in the uk. and e.on energy announces it‘s cutting 500 jobs across its uk operations. the energy firm currently employs 9,400 in the country and blamed the competitve industry for the job lossses. e.on says the cuts are part of its £100 million savings drive. so we have had some results out from
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the clothing store next in among a flurry of results we have had out today, next often referred to as a bellwether of the state of the high street can tell us about how the health of the retail sector is, let us talk more now on this and get sophie willmott up, a senior retail a nalyst sophie willmott up, a senior retail analyst at global data sophie, interesting isn‘t it, that despite next having this strong second quarter, thanks largely to hot weather we have experienced, their shares plummeted on the ftse, down at one point at much as 8%. yes, the performance has been strong for the last couple of months and it has overperformed other retailers in the market but shareholders have been disappointed with the full year guidance not changing, so next till expects profits to below last year,
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it is wise to be cautious in its forecast. it is still going to be a ricky environment for them. they make the point in this cautious statement from the management they have sold a lot of the lightweight summer stock they would usually hope to sell in august they might run out of stock. when we dig down, on line sales are up 12.5%, retail within the actual stores themselves, trade fell by 5.9%, again what does that tell us about how people are shopping at the moment? well, the performance across the online and off line channels reflects what we are seeing overall in retail. spend is shifting online adds consumers turn to the convenient channel. next isa turn to the convenient channel. next is a strong play e a mature player has done well to achieve such strong growth in the last quarter. great stuff. many thanks.
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i think that is all we have time for. talk now the weather. #207 hello. today‘s weather has been a tale of two halves. the best of the sunshine has happened across the eastern side of the uk, across eastern side of the uk, across eastern scotland, and much of england and wales, this was the isle of wight earlier in the afternoon, while further north and west we have got more cloud, underneath a weather front that is bringing rain and that will continue its progress northwards and eastwards across scotla nd northwards and eastwards across scotland and the far north—west of england as we go through, as we hang on to sunshine before the night falls further south and east. what we will notice is because we have picked up this wind, with more cloud round it will be a warmer feeling night for most, except for the far south, more humid air doesn‘t come until we get into thursday, here, across southern and eastern areas where we see the sunshine and heat, but it is a different story. a lot
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of dry weather, there is more rain coming into northern ireland, you can see that differential in the temperature here, so we see the best of the sunshine and the highest temperatures in hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4: a council in financial crisis — northamptonshire introduces emergency measures which mean even essential services could be cut. we‘re notjust going to slash and burn all of the services. we have to look carefully at some of the decisions we are going to have to take, and they are going to be very difficult. anger on the streets of harare, as election results suggest that the ruling zanu pf party have retained power in zimbabwe. the former leader of the english defence league, tommy robinson, is freed on bail, after winning a challenge against a finding of contempt of court. and going down — a multi—storey car park collapses, sending vehicles and debris crashing onto the ground below. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with chris mitchell. the latest from edgbaston. yes, they
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arejust finishing their the latest from edgbaston. yes, they are just finishing their team. the england captain, joe root, deserved a big slice of cake for his 65 not out. he probably didn‘t have it! thanks chris. it is warming up? yes, it is, first some of us. in the south and the east the heat wave returns. even hotter in parts of europe. more in a while. calls for greater awareness of mental health issues — and the pressure on young athletes — from the father of snowboarder ellie soutter, who died on her 18th birthday. good afternoon. i‘m simon mccoy.
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after imposing emergency spending controls for the second time in six months, northamptonshire county council is warning it may now have to cut even basic services. councillors will meet later today, to consider how to save up to £70 million — that‘s 15% of its budget — by next march. one of the commissioners appointed by the government to oversee the authority has described the situation as "truly perilous". and it‘s not the only council in trouble. tom barton reports. looking after older people, caring for vulnerable children, repairing the roads, keeping people healthy. all work done by local councils on behalf of local residents. but one authority is warning that soon it might only be able to do the things it is required to by law. northamptonshire county council has warned twice in the last six months that it‘s at risk of running out of money, and has proposed reducing services to the bare minimum.
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the suggestion, reducing them to 33 core areas. the council says this is the best service offer it can afford, supporting only those most in need. what we have got to do here is spend within our budgets. we have had to make tough decisions about budgets, and we have to make sure that we protect the most vulnerable in both the likes of children‘s services and adult social care, as well as deliver some of the important other services we do, the likes of highways and highway maintenance. it‘s a massive, massive ask. the situation is so bad that earlier this year ministers sent commissioners in to oversee how the council is being run. and yet local government experts say other councils are starting to see similar issues. so, could northamptonshire be the canary in the coal mine? northamptonshire has got into a deeper financial hole, and the reason for this is clearly
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mismanagement locally and unwillingness on the part of councillors to make the tough decisions to bring the budget into balance within the year. other councils have just about managed that, but it‘s not to say there aren‘t others that are near the same situation, they are not there yet, but they are near it. over the next eight months, northamptonshire has to save more than £60 million. £7.5 million a month, 15% of its annual budget. even if these proposals are approved, that will be a big challenge. our correspondent, jo black, in northampton spelled out what cuts could mean for local residents. people here in northamptonshire are already feeling the pinch from those cuts. subsidised bus routes have been scrapped, 21 libraries could be closed by september, although that is subject to a legal challenge. the
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headquarters of northamptonshire cou nty headquarters of northamptonshire county council in angel square, bad has already been sold. road maintenance has been scaled back. now the leader of the council is saying it is inevitable there will be cuts two children‘s services and maybe adult services. these are services the council has two provide legally. there is much concern. at what point does it run out of money, does it stop operating, does it have to close? a very good question. i don‘t think anybody can answer that question at the moment. councillors will be scratching their heads, trying to look at the books. there isa trying to look at the books. there is a meeting later today where councillors will be looking at how much money they can say. there will be protests later today reacting to that. we are told at the meeting today there will be no definite decisions but of course cancelled are taking this very seriously and
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made —— need to make savings. one councillor is fearful for vulnerable children and vulnerable communities. she says, "my worry is that we won‘t perform are safeguarding duty and there will be consequences because of that." it‘s worth pointing out that for children‘s services in northampton, it has a required improvement rating from ofsted. there are concerns if it‘s lights —— if there are cuts it would slide back to inadequate. they are by no means the only authority facing problems at the moment? absolutely not. this meeting at 5:30pm, no definite decision is what we are told, but people will be watching this really closely. members of the media, other politicians, mps. of course, the local people as well. other councils will be looking at this very closely because many of them safe there are financial pressures and they are really
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struggling. several of them have said they could be the next northamptonshire county council at sometime in the next few years. northamptonshire county council at sometime in the next few yearsm black. police in the zimbabwean capital harare have fired water cannon and teargas at stone—throwing opposition supporters alleging fraud in the country‘s elections. one person is reported to have been killed. the electoral commission says the governing zanu—pf party has won an outright majority of seats in parliament, in the first election since president mugabe was ousted. results from the presidential race haven‘t yet been declared, and eu observers have criticised the delay. our correspondent, shingai nyoka, is in the zimbabwean capital harare. we have been seeing quite a considerable amount of violence on the street in the last hour? yes, we have also seen protestors burning and throwing projectiles at the electoral results centre. the
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tensions have been building. they say they want the result is announced as soon as possible and they see a delay in the announcement as an attempt by authorities to tinker and deny them a victory. parliamentary results were announced, all but one, a short time ago. the presidential results have not been announced. what we have seen on the streets are soldiers and police patrolling. we also heard some live gunfire. there was one person we can confirm shot and critically injured. there are unconfirmed reports that at least one person has died. why is there this delay between the parliamentary result and the presidential results? well, it‘s just been over 24 hours since polling closed and vote counting began. the electoral commission says there are still, the
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results are still being verified. it is waiting for the 23 presidential candidates to meet and agree that they are happy with these results. by they are happy with these results. by law they are supposed to have announced them by saturday. still a few more days to declare a winner. but the opposition supporters say that given the parliamentary results have been announced, they should have been announced, they should have also by now given them results for the presidential elections. whatever the result is, there are plenty of people in zimbabwe and where you are, love lost all faith in the electoral system anyway? that is one of the observations that was made by the international monitors, the european union and those from the european union and those from the united states. they say that this country has, over the years, lost faith in the electoral commission and that this body could have done more to raise the confidence in its ability. what the
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electoral commission is saying is that they are doing their best and they will produce these results as soon as they can. they have called for patients and have said this election is not raped and that they are not here to subvert the will of the people. thank you very much. the former leader of the english defence league, tommy robinson, has been released from prison on bail, after winning a challenge against a finding of contempt of court. but he‘ll face a fresh court hearing on the allegations later in the year. tom burridge reports. # tommy‘s coming home! his supporters, celebrating and chanting at antifascist protesters on the other side. news filtered out that tommy robinson was going to be released on bail. i think it‘s great. i believe he was jailed unfairly in the first place, you know? he was jailed incredibly quickly.
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the high court accepted mr robinson‘s appeal for most of his jail sentence, relating to his actions outside leeds crown court in may. he had pleaded guilty and was jailed in a matter of hours. this is why he is walking free today. essentially because the process was flawed. i've caused a breach of the peace and i am being arrested. but a judge will still have to decide whether tommy robinson‘s broadcast, via facebook, outside an ongoing trial at leeds crown court, risked prejudicing the case. his video was watched some 250,000 times and he was accused of breaching a suspended sentence from another broadcast he made outside canterbury crown court months earlier. a personal thank you to each and every one of you... he is a product of the internet age, sites like youtube allowed the founder of the english defence league to reach many more people
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than far right leaders of the past. before his arrest, he had struggled to attract as much support. but mr robinson‘s profile has risen since then, at home and abroad. this was the dutch far right leader geert wilders, addressing his supporters in london last month. free tommy robinson! but while some will celebrate his release on bail, others see a more sinister side. for the right, they will see it as a celebration, they are putting him up as somebody who is a freedom fighter, he is not standing up for ordinary people, he is trying to divide them. anybody that believes in democracy and a multiracial society has to stand up against what robinson believes in. mr robinson will appear soon in front of anotherjudge. if found to be in contempt of court, he could be jailed again. let‘s go live to phil mackie, whojoins me now from onley prison near rugby, where tommy robinson has been held.
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he left a short time ago? yeah, probably about 40 minutes ago. he came out with a couple of prison guards escorting him. he was given a couple of big bags and met by a small group of friends and supporters who had spent the last couple of hours waiting. in the meantime he was met by a phalanx of members of the press, including myself, asking questions. what he thought of the ruling, what would happen next. he said he thought all of the mainstream media were liars. the public had completely lost their faith in broadcasters like the bbc. and that was the pledged to say, he would not be telling us what he thought about what happened today. they still has to be another hearing in front of anotherjudge. the reason for that is that he still faces the charges of contempt of
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court as leeds earlier this year. it is simply that the court of appeal today ruled that the original judgment had been done too hastily. in essence, that he had not been given enough time to prepare his descent —— defence. there were technical flaws and that is why there needs to be a new hearing. hence he was released from his prison sentenced today on bail. the main bill condition is he cannot return to the precincts of leeds crown court, but he will have another day in court as a result of what happened. thank you. you‘re watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: northamptonshire county council warns it may cut services back to a "bare minimum" because of severe financial difficulties. water cannon and tear gas are used in zimbabwe as protesters reject election results suggesting that the ruling zanu pf party have retained power. former leader of the english defence
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league, tommy robinson, is freed on bail after winning a challenge against a bail after winning a challenge againstafinding bail after winning a challenge against a finding of contempt of court. and joe root is 63 not out as england are 173—3 after alastair cook falls early on day one of the first test match against india. england captain dylan hartley will return to international rugby this weekend as he continues his comeback from concussion. he has not played since march. and becky downie has pulled out of the european gymnastic championships after injuring herself in training. i will be back with more on those stories in 15 minutes. president trump‘s former campaign manager, paul manafort, has gone on trial, accused of hiding millions of dollars from the tax authorities. it‘s the first case stemming from the investigation into alleged russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. the charges, which mr manafort denies, relate to his lobbying activities on behalf of the former russian—backed government of ukraine.
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our washington correspondent, gary o‘donoghue, has the latest. you don‘t need to wonder for a very long what donald trump thinks because he has been tweeting again? yes, he has. he has been attacking the special counsel again, calling for him to be fired by the attorney general, jeff sessions. in fact, i don‘t think the attorney general can don‘t think the attorney general can do that because he recruits himself from the russian investigation. —— recruits himself. the president not happy. this is not directly related to the business of the robert mueller investigation. it relates to a whole range of charges that paul manafort, the former campaign chairman, is facing to do with tens of millions of dollars that he is accused of hiding in offshore accounts, keeping from the taxman in the united states, in order to spend
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ona the united states, in order to spend on a pretty lavish lifestyle. fast cars, on a pretty lavish lifestyle. fast ca rs, lots of on a pretty lavish lifestyle. fast cars, lots of property. and would you believe it, even a $21,000 jacket made out of an ostrich. sorry? a $21,000 jacket made out of an ostrich. are there any pictures of this? i would imagine they are online if you‘re looking at getting one, simon! would not recommend it! very quickly, what donald trump is saying basically is that this is a total hoax and the azazjeff sessions to stop the enquiry? he has. jeff sessions cannot do that because he recused himself from the process of the russian enquiry because of his meetings, not least with the russian ambassador during the campaign. it would have to be a directive to the deputy attorney general. there is no sign of wanting
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to do that. the president, if you wa nted to do that. the president, if you wanted to fire the special counsel, may end up doing what richard nixon had to do when he fired his special counsel in the early 70s, when he had to get rid of a whole bunch of people in thejustice department before he could find somebody who could carry out the instruction for him. gary o‘donoghue, thank you. leading jewish campaigners have rejected a qualified apology from jeremy corbyn, for appearing at events alongside people whose views could have caused "concern and anxiety". the labour leader hosted a meeting in 2010, where a speaker compared the actions of the israeli government to the nazis. our assistant political editor, norman smith, said that some feel mr corybn‘s apology didn‘t go far enough. it hasn‘t addressed the concerns of many in thejewish community who if anything seem even more angered by this written statement, and i suspect many in the labour movement, too, will see this as a missed opportunity, a moment when mr corbyn could have got a lot further, maybe done some interviews, because there is a desire, i think,
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a groundswell in the labour party, for mr corbyn to take a more proactive role in trying to address and damp down this whole controversy, more certainly than issuing written statements. and interestingly we have heard from the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, in the past hour or so, and why his intervention is interesting is because he has been among those pressing for an example for the investigations into margaret hodge and ian austin, two labour mps facing potential disciplinary charges after they clashed with the labour leader over anti—semitism. he has called for those inquiries almost to be scrapped, suggesting there has to be some sort of way found to get over the rows rocketed by the disciplinary process, and hearing him in the last hour or so, warning that this crisis
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is shaking the party to its core. have a listen. none of us fail to appreciate i suppose the way this has upset people, including ourselves — it has shaken us to the core. but we will resolve it, we've got to. the key issue for me has always been, you've got to resolve it within the labour party, certainly, but certainly members of the jewish community are suffering out there. we have had a massive increase in attacks on jewish communities, daubing of cemeteries, appalling thatjewish schools have to have security guards. so we have got to resolve the issue within the party, and then get out there and help the jewish community and campaign against anti—semitism in our society overall. the concern is that mr corbyn either lacks the will or the ability to deal with this crisis, with one labour mp, stephen kinnock, a critic of mr corbyn, suggesting that the party is now facing a full—blown crisis over anti—semitism, and there are calls for mr corbyn to take a much more aggressive stance, so for example pressing for his friend,
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pete willsman, long—standing ally of mr corbyn, to be kicked off the national executive committee after his remarks when he attacked jewish people for being trump fanatics at the national executive committee, and also suggesting the party need to accept the definitions of anti—semitism rather than contextualise it. in other words, there are things mr corbyn could do pretty quickly which would go a long way to allay the concerns of many in the jewish community, but which for whatever reason mr corbyn at the moment is holding back from. there are 11,000 more grammar school pupils in england today than in 2010. that‘s despite a 20—year ban on building new ones. figures from a bbc analysis of official data also shows a growth in the number of grammars giving priority to poorer children. here‘s our education editor,
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branwen jeffreys. like many grammar schools, it has a long history. sir william borlase also wants a bigger future. it‘s among more than 30 selective schools bidding to expand. the deadline to ask for cash to build is tomorrow. it‘s a condition for those selective schools that they have to come forward with a plan of how they are going to widen their access and make sure that, you know, more children from more disadvantaged backgrounds are going to be able to access it. but grammar school expansion has already been happening. there are 11,000 more grammar school pupils than in 2010. by 2021 that means the equivalent of 24 extra grammar schools and that is if intakes stay the same. 93 out of 163 grammar schools give some priority to poorer pupils. but some still fear the effect of expansion.
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essentially what you‘re doing is you are creaming off the top students in that area. and obviously the consequence of that for other schools will be that their average achievement level will go down both in terms of the students entering those schools, will have lower test scores, but also potentially in the progress they make because you are removing some of that high achieving peer group. grammar schools are popular with some parents. but remain controversial with those against selecting at age 11. branwynjeffreys, bbc news. and you can find more details about your nearest grammar school in england, and its pupils, by entering your postcode on the bbc news website. farmers say the prolonged hot and dry weather is having an unprecedented impact on food production. representatives of the national farmers union had emergency talks with the environment secretary, michael gove, this morning. the nfu says farmers
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face major challenges, with too little water for crops and severely reduced grass growth. prices for consumers have already risen, as katharine da costa reports. a long, hard winter followed by a wet spring. and now the driest start to summer on record. farmers often find themselves at the mercy of the weather. but with no significant rain since may, the unprecedented dry spell is having a crippling effect on producers across the country. just look at these satellite images. the left, taken in may before the start of the heatwave. the right shows the impact of weeks of drought. the cows on this dairy farm in cheshire should be grazing on lush green grass. instead, they are eating into winter rations. this is the food store, the fodder should reach right up to the gate. supplies that would already be depleted over the winter have not recovered.
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it‘s highly unusual, and expensive. we are purchasing as much feed as we can at the moment. feed this year that would normally be say £50 or £60 per tonne, that would be straw, is £130 or £140. so at least double the price that it was last year. some livestock farmers are sending their animals to market early to relieve the burden of feeding them. elsewhere vegetable producers are already warning of shortages if the hot weather continues. the extra volatility and pressure on farmers high on the agenda at today‘s emergency summit. it is challenging, i think it is tough for the whole of northern europe. but the most important thing is that we link up the right people and have the conversations and we make sure in all of this that consumers are not disadvantaged. the main concern really is about getting straw and fodder to the areas that are in desperate need of it. the red tape is big in farming and we have a lot of regulations to adhere to. and it isjust to be a bit more flexible and a bit more lenient. the environment
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secretary michael gove said the government would support farmers to put a plan in place. we want to make sure that farmers have access to the water they need in order to make sure the crops can grow. we want to make sure that farmers have access to the feed that livestock need in order to ensure that we can have food production maintained and healthy and successful farm businesses. and we will do whatever it takes. despite rising production costs, experts say retailers are likely to absorb any price rises for consumers. we cannot control the weather, but deciding the right course of action will be crucial to ensure the nation remains resilient in its food production. katharine da costa, bbc news. two sections of a multi—story carpark in irving in texas have collapsed, sending vehicles and rubble down onto floors below more than 20 cars were damaged when the second floor of the car park fell through. the irving fire department described the incident as "catastrophic", but said no injuries were reported after an initial search was completed.
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not so catastrophic. time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. it is getting really hot in southern europe? it is. there are red warnings out, the highest level warning you can get. 47 degrees is dangerously high. it is coming off the north of africa. it is a dry heat. 47 by day. our temperatures seem nothing by comparison. hot overnight. uncomfortably hot. the humidity is not that high. the warmer the air, the more moisture it can hold. it will not drop that much. how unusual is it? it is fairly unusual. you often see 40 degrees on the spanish —— in spain at this time
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of year. in spain they had their record temperature last year, just shy of 47 degrees. this is going to be quite widespread across much of portugal as well. it looks like the whole of europe! absolutely. we have got red warnings in croatia and switzerland today because it is hot. they have to exceed by five to 10 degrees what you would expect. in sweden we have had a record—breaking june and july. arctic circle temperatures have been into the 30s. across much of western europe. finland has had a warning. —— greenland. it has been very hot. what about us? talk about the return of the heatwave but not for everybody? no, not for everybody. this time it is mostly the south and east of england, east anglia and the midlands. here in the uk we are
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expecting temperatures to get up to 30 degrees celsius on friday. not a story for all. half an inch of rain already across northern ireland. it is marching its way towards scotland. it looks like a pretty 5°99y scotland. it looks like a pretty soggy rush hour to come. scotland. it looks like a pretty soggy rush hour to come. here scotland. it looks like a pretty soggy rush hour to come. here is the science and we have got further south. a tale of two halves. the north—west and the south and east. with the rain we are picking up the humidity. it is coming off the atlantic. it will be a muggy evening and night. soggy across scotland and northern ireland. the western extremities of england and wales will see a little bit of that rain. it will stay fair in edgbaston. into tomorrow as well. we are on the cusp of that weather front. this evening and overnight the rain clears from northern ireland, marches across scotland. we do not lose the humidity. misty no cloud. —— low
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cloud. it will be warmer away from the south and east night. just about co mforta ble the south and east night. just about comfortable enough for sleeping. the humid airgoes comfortable enough for sleeping. the humid air goes across the country tomorrow. still a fair deal of sunshine. fairweather cloud. temperatures nudging towards 30. the more rain coming from northern ireland in the afternoon. after the dry slot in scotland, it comes in in the evening. the risk of weather fronts close by. at times they will sink further southwards into the borders. northern england and perhaps the western and northern fringes of words. those weather fronts the dividing line between the co mforta ble fronts the dividing line between the comfortable wearing the north, lots of dry, bright and warm weather. 22 for the central lowlands on friday. 32 with the heat and humidity are further south. similar story on saturday. always the greater risk of showers in the north. the fresh breeze will make it feel more co mforta ble. breeze will make it feel more
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comfortable. we have the stifling heat began building inland across the south and east. it will be much more pleasant if you are on the coast because you get the sea breezes. on the beach itself it feels pretty hot and the sun is pretty strong. there is the evidence. it stays with us through the weekend. cloudier skies but more co mforta ble the weekend. cloudier skies but more comfortable air temperatures in the north compared with 30 in the south. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the former leader of the english defence league, tommy robinson, has been freed on bail after winning an appeal against a finding of contempt of court. the far—right activist received a 13—month jail term in may after he filmed outside leeds crown court during a trial. a cash—strapped local authority will hold crisis talks this evening amid concerns that it will no longer be able to pay for services for vulnerable children and adults. northamptonshire county council needs to save up to 70 million pounds , 15 percent of its budget , by next march. we‘re notjust going to slash and burn all the services. wwe have to look carefully at some to decisions we will have to take, and they will be very difficult.
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one person has been shot dead in clashes between police and opposition protesters in the zimbabwean capital harare — after the electoral commission said the the governing zanu—pf party has won an outright majority in parliament. it‘s the first general election since president mugabe was ousted. jeremy corbyn has apologised for any ‘anxiety and concern‘ caused after he hosted an event in 2010 at which a holocaust survivor compared israel‘s government to nazism. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell called on labour to resolve its problems over anti—semitism — he said things needed to change. sport now on afternoon live, with chris mitchell. the latest from edgbaston? yes, england are doing very well. 199—3. they are beginning to take the day away from the tour list, india, it could have gone the other way, there
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was a wobbly start when alastair cook was out for 13 runs, but that broughtjoe cook was out for 13 runs, but that brought joe root to cook was out for 13 runs, but that broughtjoe root to the crease, the captain, and he is in great form once again, this is his 12th 50 in a row in actualfact, once again, this is his 12th 50 in a row in actual fact, against india. he is currently 79 not out, so a captain‘s innings forjoe root. they have had their tea, they are into the afternoon session. david mall was the last man out for england at 112-3. was the last man out for england at 112—3. they have pushed on, they we re 112—3. they have pushed on, they were teetering a bit. it could have gone india‘s way but bairstow and root going along nicely indeed. let us look at the score card so you know where we are. 199—3. they are just reached the 200 mark as we speak. a good day so far for england. and good news for the england. and good news for the england rugby team, there are fares he would never play
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again, he would not take to the field again, he hasn‘t taken to the field again, he hasn‘t taken to the field since getting a blow to the head in the final six nations match against ireland at twickenham. england‘s form has suffered since he has been out. they didn‘t suffer a single defeat 2016/17, three victories in nine matches, lately, so, he will now be part of a three day camp, he will be welcomes bad, he had been training with northampton, they had been monitoring him with their medical tea m monitoring him with their medical team and they say it is all right for him to start playing. he should be back for england‘s autumn campaign and that begins on november 3rd against celtic are in norway tonight hoping to take a step closer to champions league
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group stage qualification. brendan rodger‘s side lead hosts rosenborg 3—1 going into the second qualifying round decider, with aek athens waiting the winner next. it isa it is a very good pitch, it will be a tough game, but of course we come with an advantage, and we feel we can come here and play well, so like every european game away from home you have to defend well, you have to be strong and we know as we have seen we can everton have announced the signing of left—back luca digne from barcelona. the 25—year old joins on a five—year deal for 18 million pounds. he has 21 caps for france and was on standby for the world cup winners earlier this summer. digne is marco silva‘s second major signing this summer, following the arrival of brazilian richarlison from watford. it‘s disappointing news for becky downie. the british gymnast has had to pull out of the european championships after injuring herself in training. downie won two gold medals at the commonwealth games
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in 2014 and is a two—time european champion... she‘ll be replaced by tay—zya ?james, who joined up with the squad in glasgow on wednesday. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. thank you. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go tojenine machin in cambridge, who‘s been looking at a story we‘ve been examining for some time on nationwide, as northamptonshire county council prepares for crisis talks over where to make £70 million in service cuts. amy cole is in birmingham, where ahead of the 2018 british transplant games set to take place in the city in the coming week, they‘ve been speaking to one
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young tennis player, and the mum, whose son‘s sacrifice allowed him to compete. we will be with you in a moment amy. janine, this is something for the last six month, we have been talking about and it seems things are coming toa about and it seems things are coming to a head. they really are. if i bring you up—to—date in a nutshell, this has come about because councils cannot spent more money than they have, they are not allow to do that. it looks like northamptonshire council would have to find ways of saving £40 million to come in on budget. they went back through the spending plan, they figured out they weren‘t £40 million wide of the mark they were 70 million adrift. that led to a second spending ban in six month, if we fast forward to today, in about half an hour they will start this extraordinary meeting, where basically they put every service they offer on the table and they have to decide which ones are
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priorities and which they can no longer afford to do. it is difficult to see, there is that much of a choice, the most expensive service, safeguarding children, the adult services they have to provide by law and there is very little left in the pot for anything else. the council is being criticised for not paying some bills properly. nurseries have said they never know when they will be paid back for free said they never know when they will be paid back forfree childcare places or how much they will get. they say they dread hearing from the council at all. we interact with the council at all. we interact with the council via a portal. every early years adviser in the county, every time they get a message from the portal their heartbeat raises slightlily and we don't want to open it. that is where we are at the moment. janine, do we have any idea what the council is going to do? i'm not sure they do yet. they won‘t make any
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concrete decisions tonight but there is talk about having to scale things back and in fact offering the minimum. some economists are saying they are not sure they will be able to do that, they are trying to save 15% of their budget and some think that might force them to breach their legal duties. the council says it is confident they can find a way forward , it is confident they can find a way forward, the leader has said those co re forward, the leader has said those core services will be given less money. and that is a particular worry here that, service isn‘t performing well so there is concern that cuts could leave children at whisk. yes, they have a legal duty to provide certain services but how well, it seems a grey area and if fa ct well, it seems a grey area and if fact there is still a big question mark over who is checking to see if councils are providing them as they should be. of course the councillors wa nt to should be. of course the councillors want to please the people who voted for them, ultimately, though, government commissioners are overseeing the decisions now, they we re overseeing the decisions now, they were brought in because it was
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decided the council had been mismanaged, that is why they were in this mess and the commissioners priority is very much the money, so, you know, a lot of people in that cou nty very you know, a lot of people in that county very worried about what whole process will mean but the concern starting to spread. while it is true northamptonshire is in the worst possible position, the national audit office says around 10% of councils with these same responsibilities for adult o shoeshl care, they are sliding in the same direction, so i think it is fair to say we have spoken a lot about it, i don‘t think it is the last time we will. other councils will be watching this closely too. let us go to amy cole. you have had a chance to amy cole. you have had a chance to meet young christophe from the black country, he is raring to compete at the transplant games, this is a dream come true because he is fit and healthy enough to take part. he is an amazing little boy with energy and reserve. he was born
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with energy and reserve. he was born with a rare genetic disease that meant he couldn‘t eat, walk, talk until he was matched with a live from a deceased donor, chris stof started playing tennis, he has developed a passion for it and trains several times a week, never farfrom his mind is person who has made it all person, the person he credits with saving his life is justin. hejoined the register before his death at the age of 21. his organs have saved the lives of five people, and christophe realises his liver is a gift he will always be thankful for. his liver is a gift he will always be thankfulfor. i felt his liver is a gift he will always be thankful for. i felt very thankful and happy, because when i first met, i wanted to say thank you, and she thought ability other people as well. transplant games are like, we come together as a hospital
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and celebrate the gift of life. i feel lucky some aren't as lucky as me. and interestingly, the donor's mother was very keen, to meet christophe? yes, she was, how wonderful is that, angie sees how much good her own son has done by donating his organs and is full of i°y donating his organs and is full of joy to see christophe living a healthy life they are strong friends seven healthy life they are strong friends seve n yea rs healthy life they are strong friends seven yea rs on healthy life they are strong friends seven years on and she will support him at the transplant games and she speaks fondly of her bond with him and she knows how great he is. plenty more on the programme tonight. thank you. p you will have full coverage after that meeting, maybe it is finished by 6.30, who knows? it might go on way beyond that but if not 6.30, 10.30. thank you very much.
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that is we all know that oily fish is good for us, but the levels of omega—3 in farmed salmon are falling. now researchers in the highlands are giving salmon food made with genetically modified crops, in an attempt to increase the fish‘s nutritional value. but critics say gm technology is propping up an unsustainable system of industrial food production. our science correspondent, pallab ghosh, reports. two different types of salmon here, we‘ve got wild and we‘ve got the farmed here. chefs will tell you that salmon is one of the healthiest foods you can eat, but it‘s not as good for you as it once was. tests have shown that levels of an oil called omega—3 have halved in farmed salmon in recent years. there‘s still enough to be beneficial, but levels
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are continuing to drop. to reverse the trend, these fish are being given a feed high in omega—3 oil produced by gm crops. the feed has worked in the lab but the big question is whether it will do just as well on a real fish farm. like this one in the highlands of scotland. if it does, it will be commercially produced and make salmon more nutritious in farms all across the world. we have also trialled this with sea bass and sea bream, which are the two main species farmed elsewhere in europe. but it can also be used in all farmed fish. and not only that, it can be added to feeds for other animals like pigs and poultry. because not everyone likes eating fish, like my wife! this is quite an efficient little production factory for making oil. researchers believe that these genetically modified plants are the solution. their seeds contain omega—3 oil. consumers in many parts of the world would be happy to eat the salmon fed on the oil that‘s crushed out of them, but there is consumer resistance in europe.
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i think the technology has got a great deal to offer. it is not necessarily a silver bullet, but i think we should use that along with all the other approaches that we could adopt. especially now that we're going be leaving the eu, maybe there is an opportunity for us to consider how we regulate gm. we‘re going to cook them in the same pan and then we‘re going to taste. because they taste completely different. aldo zilli is one of the country‘s foremost chefs. so he knows a thing or two about fish. the scientists are saying that it is healthier, it‘s got more omega—3 in it. do we believe that? oh, i believe them. i personally don‘t agree with it, but if they think that there is going to be more omega—3, is it natural, is it good for us? you know, all those things are worrying when you start messing around with force—feeding animals. aldo is not alone in having his doubts.
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he is sticking to wild salmon, while i try the farmed. it‘s a stronger flavour. it‘s a completely different fish. but this isn‘t bad. it‘s not bad, but this is a different fish. palab ghosh, bbc news. in a moment, we‘ll have the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. northamptonshire county council warns it may have to cut services after imposing emergency spending controls for the second time in six months. water cannon and tear gas are used in zimbabwe as protesters reject election results suggesting that the ruling zanu pf party have retained power. the former leader of the english defence league, tommy robinson, is freed on bail, after winning a challenge against a finding of contempt of court. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the future of house of fraser is in doubt after its potential new owner — c banner — pulls out of the deal. the loss making department store chain is now talking to new potential buyers.
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more ppi pain for lloyds after the bank announces it‘s putting aside another £460 million to cover costs mis—selling claims. it comes as half year profits jumped by 23% to £3.1 billion. e.on energy announces its cutting 500 jobs across its uk operations. the energy firm currently employs 9,400 in the country and blamed the competitve industry for the job lossses. e.on says the cuts are part of its £100 million savings drive. french drugmaker sanofi says its stockpiled its drugs in preparation of a no—deal brexit between the uk and the eu. reports say the pharma giant is also considering cutting jobs from its current 1,600 strong workforce in the uk. so there is a lot of talk of the trade war escalating
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between the us and china? yes, according to media reports coming out of the states, rumours are that the trump administration might now slap tariffs of 25% on 152 million worth of chinese goods, that isa million worth of chinese goods, that is a 15% increase. next, publishes good results yet the share price goes down. yes, bizarre, the strong second quarter result, next is often seen as a bellwether for what is going on on the high street. the reason there was the share decline is because of this cautious note from the company saying we don‘t expect this pace of sales to continue, and that is because of the unseasonably warm weather we have had, a lot of what we have been buying earlier in the year, next would normally expect customers to be buying in august, lighter summary
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clothes so they are sigh saying they might have a run of stock so they are remaining cautious. breaking news about house of fraser and it is bad news. it came in over an hour ago, this is a department store in trouble. it had been expecting a rescue deal from this company, which owns hanleys called c banner, they had been planning to take a controlling stake in the department store, we learned they are to longer planning, they are pulling out so the company say they are look for a new bayer new bayer and new bayer and they new bayer and they need new bayer and they need one new bayer and they need one if new bayer and they need one if they new bayer and they need one if they bayer and the are new bayer and they need one if they are to stay in business. let us talk to tom stephenson. good to talk to you, let us begin with house of fraser, that news in over an hour ago, what are they going to do? well, house of fraser's position looks precarious at the
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moment, as you say, c banner was going to inject £70 million and take majority stake, the reason they are not doing that is is because at the same time, house of fraser is trying to renegotiate its releases, with various landlords, it is planning to shut 31 of its 59 stores but on the once its will keep open it wants to lower the rate, the landlords are saying we are not prepared to do that, they are fighting that volu nta ry that, they are fighting that voluntary arrangement is what it is called. c banner have said we are walking away. house of fraser said we are talking to other bayer, we can only assume that is mike ashley and sports direct. he owns 11% of house of fraser, he said he is prepared to put in more than 50 million, so we will see how that develops. again part of this wider ongoing discussion about business rates and rents for a lot of high street sta ple rates and rents for a lot of high street staple out there. let us stick with the retail theme for now.
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i want to talk to you about next. as soon monday said, it comes out with strong second quarter results and then we see the shares plummet. what do you make of it all? well, i think what happened there was that next announced the figures and they were good and they attributed that to the good and they attributed that to the good weather, we are buying summer clothes, and the market looked at that and said the best summer weather with have had for years and thatis weather with have had for years and that is the best you can do, so they weren‘t impressed, and the company made it worse by saying we think that buyers shoppers are bringing forward their purchases from later in the year, so what that means is that the growth will evaporate, down the track. so, as you say, this is a general story of malaise on the high street, even next, one of the strongest players can‘t shrug it off. let us talk macroeconomic new, the kind of news that does affect
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consumers on high streets across the grope, this ratcheting up of the trade war between china and the us, despite lots of cautionary words from around the globe, everybody saying let us calm down, tariffs aren‘t the way forward. we are hearing rumours that far from ta riffs hearing rumours that far from tariffs getting decreased they might get increased. what do you make of it, what could be the potential impact to consumers in the states and china and else we are?” impact to consumers in the states and china and else we are? i think this really is a big deal, so almost no—one accept donald trump thinks that tariffs are a good idea, he is using them as a negotiating tool with the chinese. what he has suggested is that proposed 10% tariff on $200 billion of chinese export, he is saying we are going to slap a 25% tariff on those, on those imports rather than 10%, that is an
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enormous acceleration of ratcheting up enormous acceleration of ratcheting up as you say of the tension, he hasn‘t left it there, he said he is prepared to put tariffs on all $500 billion of imports from china, to the us. that would have an enormous effect on global trade. ok, the us. that would have an enormous effect on globaltrade. ok, we the us. that would have an enormous effect on global trade. ok, we will have to leave it there. that is the business for this hour. thank you. see you there. the father of the great britain snowboarder ellie soutter, who died on her 18th birthday, has called for more support for young athletes coping with the pressure of top—level sport. ellie won britain‘s only medal at the youth winter olympics last year. in his first interview since his daughter‘s death last week, tony soutter spoke to bbc south east sports reporterjuliette parkin in les gets in france. this was ellie soutter at her very best. she took bronze last year at the youth olympics... and was hotly tipped for a place at the 2022 winter games. standing on the podium was really good.
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it‘s been my first multisport competition, and it was amazing to have so many people watching us. i hope it prepares me for the beijing olympic games. but it was not meant to be. her body was found in a remote part of les gets late at night on her 18th birthday. she had been upbeat the day before, but her father believes her past history of mental health issues, coupled with the pressure of elite performance, may have been the catalysts to ending her life. unfortunately, it all kind of... it all came about from missing a flight. which then meant she didn't go training with the gb squad. she felt she'd let them down, let me down, and tragically itjust takes one silly little thing like that to tip somebody over the edge. ellie soutter had spent the last season competing on the free ride junior tour, and just last month was named in the senior gb squad
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for the snowboard cross europa cup circuit. but training and accommodation at that level comes at a price, over £30,000 a year. as a family and friends, we all thought ellie had come out of the other side of a particularly dark time of her life. that was a lot to do with the fact that she was unable to compete last season and do what she would have loved to have done through total lack of funding. and that's why this foundation is so important to me and the rest of her family, and her mother. it was here in the french alps where her heart lay. she was made ambassador, very unusual for a british athlete. she was made ambassador for les gets, very unusual for a british athlete. translation: she was like an english ambassador for the town whose snowboarding for the english team and was here for quite some time.
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she was an ambassador for the town because she was an excellent snowboarder. you don't get that here every day of the week. it didn't make a difference to us whether she snowboarded for the english team or for france. ellie love these mountains, it was where she felt most at home. but the pressure of competing at such a high level took its toll. now her family hopes that a foundation set up in her name will help others achieve their goals. i've lost my best friend, my total buddy. she was my rock and everything. i've done nothing but live for her for the last 18 years, and now i have to start again, really. and if i didn't, she would be mortified. the foundation page has just been set up and already donations have come flooding in. ellie‘s funeral will be attended by hundreds here on thursday, a life sorely missed. a bright sporting future, sadly lost. juliette parkin, bbc southeast today. the site of grenfell tower
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is to be handed over to the government from this autumn. it comes after residents reacted angrily to the original plan to give responsibility back to kensington and chelsea council. the metropolitan police are now preparing to release the site of the disaster in west london, in which 71 people died, as their work at the tower comes to a close. a dog has been found hiding underneath a barbeque in mati in greece, where he had crawled to seek refuge from the devastating wildfire last month. the white poodle—cross, named loukoumakis, was singed yellow from the smoke and flames of the fires and had difficulty breathing when he was found. rescuers lured him out with a tin of dog food, and he has since been groomed, is on antibiotics and is slowly recovering. next at the news at five, let us
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catch up with the weather. today‘s weather has been a tale of two halve, the best of the sunshine has happened across the eastern side of the uk, across iron scotland, and much of england and wales, this was the isle of wight earlier in the afternoon, while further north and west we have more cloud, underneath a weather front bringing rain and that will continue its progress northwards and eastwards across scotla nd northwards and eastwards across scotland and the far north—west of england as we go through this evening. while we hang on to sunshine. what we will notice is because we have picked up this south—westerly wind, with more cloud round it will be a warmer feeling night for most of us, except the far south, the more humid air couldn‘t come in until we get into thursday, it is here where we see the sunshine, and the heat, but it‘s a different story, a lot of dry weather, but there is more rain coming into northern ireland, you can see that differential in the temperature, so we so the best of the sunshine and the highest
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temperatures today at five — northamptonshire county council prepares for crisis talks about cuts to services — but vows to protect vulnerable people. £70 million must be cut by march — the council is meeting to decide which services it can afford to keep. we‘re notjust going to slash and burn all the services. we‘ve got to look very carefully at some of the decisions we‘re going to have to take and they‘re going to be very difficult. we‘ll be live as protestors gather outside the council‘s headquarters. the other main stories
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on bbc news at five. anger on the streets of harare as election results suggest the ruling zanu—pf party has retained power in zimbabwe. former leader of the english defence league, tommy robinson, is freed on bail after partially winning an appeal against a contempt of court finding.
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