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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 3, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11am. a warning from the governor of the bank of england — the possibility of britain crashing out of the eu without a deal is ‘uncomfortably high‘. it does mean disruption to trade as we know it. and as a consequence of that a disruption to the level of economic activity... ..changes, higher prices for a period of time. zimba bwe‘s opposition vows to challenge the result of the presidential election, after emmerson mnangagwa is declared the winner. also this hour — forecasters say europe could record its highest ever temperature later today. as a heatwave continues across the continent, tourists and locals have been warned to stay out of the sun and to keep hydrated. regular exposure to air pollution — even at low levels — may damage the heart in a similar way to early stage heart failure. deaths from sepsis have risen by more than a third over two years at england's hospitals, according to new figures.
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getting to the root of the problem — why this newborn‘s toothy grin had to be sorted out. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. it's friday, august three. i'm julian worricker. the governor of the bank of england mark carney has warned that the possibility of a no—deal brexit is "uncomfortably high". speaking on radio 4's today programme, mr carney said strenuous efforts should be made to avoid that ‘highly undesirable‘ outcome, and that extensive contingency planning had been conducted to make sure financial institutions were ready for all eventualities. i think the possibility of a no deal is uncomfortably high at the moment, yes.
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so you are saying quite clearly that a no—deal brexit would be a disaster? it is highly undesirable. so it doesn‘t mean potential disruption. certainly it does mean disruption to trade as we know it. and as a consequence of that a disruption to the level of economic activity... ..changes, higher prices for a period of time. now, ourjob at the bank of england is to make sure that those issues don‘t happen in the financial system so people will have things to worry about in a no—deal brexit, which is still a relatively unlikely possibility. but it is a possibility. but what we don‘t want to have is people worrying about the money in the bank, whether or not they can get a loan from the bank, whether it is for a mortgage or a business idea. i‘m joined from our westminster studio by our
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political correspondent tom barton. tom. mark carney, to some extent, on message with the government, using language around the possibility of a no deal by accident. now, that is a turn of phrase which several government ministers have used, including just this week the foreign secretaryjeremy including just this week the foreign secretary jeremy hunt including just this week the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt on visits to europe, really warning european countries that a no deal would be bad for both sides of the brexit divide, both the european 27 members of the eu, the remaining 27 members of the eu, the remaining 27 members of the eu, and for britain. so, mark carney raising that, to some extent, is on message with the government. he did also talk about stress testing that the bank of england has carried out saying that really the
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pa rt carried out saying that really the part of the bank of england which is responsible for financial stability isa responsible for financial stability is a part which is entirely glass half full all of the time. we ran the system a year ago through a stress test which had, and this is not the prediction for what would happen in a no deal scenario, but to give you an idea of what they can withstand, real estate prices going down by more than a third, house prices and commercial real estate. interest rates going up by almost four percentage points, we just raised them 0.25%. unemployment going to 9%, and the economy going into a 4% recession. now, we did that in order to create the kind of hits to their balance sheets and the calls on their capital and liquidity that meant they had to build these buffers to be in a position in case something bad... so you‘ve been sitting there planning for armageddon? uh, we have been planning for very difficult circumstances and the banks are ready. now, it is worth pointing out that
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that stress test exercise was for any shock to the financial system, not just any shock to the financial system, notjust in preparation for a no—deal brexit. in fact, the document that the bank of england published around that stress test didn‘t mention brexit at all. mark carney today pointed out they were testing for shocks from everything from a no—deal brexit to instability that came from overseas, a shock relating to, say, the chinese economy, for example. so this was a broad exercise but certainly one which would come to pass, say, says mark carney, if a no—deal brexit we re mark carney, if a no—deal brexit were to happen. tom, a word on reaction, mostly from brexiteer members of parliament. we have heard from a couple of brexiteers, the former conservative leader iain duncan—smith, said there is no such
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thing as a no deal, calling that the language of project fear. he says that the treasury and the bank of england have struggled to understand how a no—deal brexit would essentially in his view be absolutely fine. he says we are just talking about a free—trade deal on world trade organisation rules. as nothing to worry about. peter bone says he thinks this is all part of a political campaign which is trying to painta political campaign which is trying to paint a picture in which any deal, no matter how bad, is worse than no deal. and he says that is just another example of project fear. studio: thanks very much indeed, tom barton at westminster. theresa may will interrupt her holiday in italy this afternoon to hold talks with the french president emmanuel macron about the brexit negotiations. she‘ll travel to his island retreat in the south of france — and there it‘s expected she‘ll urge the president to soften his stance on security and financial services
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ahead of a crucial summit of eu leaders in salzburg next month. our correspondent lucy williamson is in paris. what chance does theresa may have of changing president macron‘s view of all this, lucy? he is not a man to change his mind easily, and i think it‘s going to be a tricky meeting for theresa may. president macron has stuck rigidly to the eu line all the way through this and even though when i talk to people here who are close to this issue they say the chances of a no deal, yes, they are growing a little bit simply because of the time frame involved but that doesn‘t mean that theresa may is suddenly going to get a big concession from france. i keep asking people here, you know, when it comes down to it, you‘ve got your national economic interest, the integrity of the single market, what is going to give? and they say, you brits just don‘t understand the single market is our national economic interest. does france
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increasingly hold the key to all this, do you think? i think france is very influential in terms of the eu, obviously, and emmanuel macron isa eu, obviously, and emmanuel macron is a pragmatic man but he has made it his mission to build a strong eu that delivers for its citizens and with close integration. i think when you hear sources from the uk saying that if theresa may can crack emmanuel macron that is going to bode very well is probably true. but i think the first part of that is going to be the tricky bit, actually persuading emmanuel macron to make the kind of concessions theresa may is looking for. there are some people here that say that france may well show a little bit of flexibility later on in the game. but not at this stage, probably, and certainly not the kind of flexibility that theresa may is looking for. lucy williamson in paris, thank you. zimbabwe‘s opposition has vowed to launch court action to try to overturn the results of the country‘s presidential election. the president of zimbabwe, emmerson mnangagwa, has been declared the winner and called it "a new beginning". the announcement follows days of deadly violence and allegations of vote rigging,
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as our reporter andrew plant has been finding out. cheering celebrations on the streets of zimbabwe after the country‘s controversial presidential election. zimbabwe‘s president, emmerson mnangagwa, a 75—year—old politician nicknamed the crocodile due to his shrewd, some say ruthless, political manoeuvring, winning zimbabwe‘s first election since the end of robert mugabe‘s rule in november last year. in the days before the announcement, delays and confusion boiled over into protests with security forces using tear gas and water cannon and then opening fire with live rounds. six people died in wednesday‘s violence, with dozens more injured. opposition supporters immediately said they suspected a rigged election, claiming they hadn‘t been allowed to verify the votes. we reject the results because the results have not been verified by the chief election agents of the candidates. zimbabwe saw decades
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of rule by robert mugabe, under whom the country‘s economy imploded and poverty became everyday life for many. mnangagwa was a close ally of mugabe and is now his official successor. today we are witnessing... international observers and voters alike will hope he can now begin to fix a country with deep political divisions and widespread social and economic problems. andrew plant, bbc news. our correspondent nomsa maseko is in zimbabwe and outlined what the options are for the opposition leader nelson chamisa, who is disputing the election result. the only thing he has is particularly to go to the constitutional court and to mount a challenge and he will be asked to bring about evidence, and the type of evidence he is expected to bring
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is what his party agent said in the early hours of this morning at the announcement there where the electoral commission was making the announcement that emmerson mnangagwa had won. the allegation there is that the opposition movement for democratic change was not given the opportunity to verify those results that were announced by the electoral commission and there has also been calls made by some zimbabweans for the mdc to go to the international community and say that they need to not recognise emmerson mnangagwa as the leader, as the new president of this country. but as things stand, that is the only option, go to court. nomsa maseko in harare. forecasters say europe could record its highest ever temperature later today. a heatwave across the continent could see the current record of 48
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degrees celsius broken. tourists and locals have been warned to stay out of the sun and to keep drinking water. our reporter tim allman has more. speaks spanish spanish television warning viewers that temperatures were only going one way, up. aided by a surge of scorching air sweeping in from africa. in madrid, there were some enjoying this summer of summers. others trying to find what shade they could. so i‘ve been trying to drink plenty of water. i put sunscreen on in the morning. ifind shade when i can and try to relax in the shade, but definitely just try to stay hydrated. it was the same story in portugal. the iberian peninsula expected to bear the brunt of this heatwave in the coming days. the country is on high alert as the mercury rises. translation: it's very difficult being outside in this heatwave.
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it‘s impossible to be here, it‘s too hot. translation: it seems we won't have many customers, the tourists want to go to the beach. europe‘s record temperature, 48 degrees celsius, was measured in athens in 1977. forecasters predict there is around a 30% chance the record will be broken. even if that doesn‘t happen, it‘s still plenty hot enough. tim allman, bbc news. with me is our weather presenter, chris fawkes. 30% chance of the record being broken. where do you put it?|j 30% chance of the record being broken. where do you put it? i don't think we will see any records go today, i think tomorrow will be the hot of the two days actually. and for spain temperatures will peak at around 46 celsius, so i don‘t think we will quite get the spanish record. the hottest area is further westwards and we can see what is going on actually. on the satellite sequence, going on actually. on the satellite sequence, talking about the iberian
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peninsula coming here we go zooming m, peninsula coming here we go zooming in, the hottest air is across the western side of spain and more especially into portugal. i think temperatures for portugal will peak during saturday afternoon and the most likely temperatures probably 47 celsius so it‘s going to come down two tenths of a degree as to whether we see the portuguese record go, which is 47.1; celsius and that was set 15 years ago. we can say it is the hottest day portugal has had in 15 years and it could be a national record if we get past 47.1; celsius. a few more tenths of a degree if we got to a8, and i think that is a bit ofa got to a8, and i think that is a bit of a stretch, but if we got there that would be the new european maximum temperature. that record has stood for some ai years. maximum temperature. that record has stood for some 41 years. what is causing all this? to get heat waves you need a mixture of random ingredients to come together. the specific heat wave, we had some warm air, a weatherfront specific heat wave, we had some warm air, a weather front moved into the south—west of europe and we got a watch of subtropical air moving into
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south—west europe. since then the air has moved across france and pulled back across spain and portugal and day by day we have seen temperatures rise because the winds have fallen right so that lump of air has been sat across the high ground of spain over the last couple of days. as it moves westwards it is pulled down off the mountains and gives it a bit of a kick and a bit more heating and that is why we are seeing the highest temperatures across the western side of spain at more especially in portugal where we will see the highs reaching a7 on saturday. temperatures around the globe has risen one celsius in the last 100 years, climate change around the world, that makes the odds of getting these he waves more frequent and when the ingredients come along to make these rare heat waves there is a greater chance of exceeding the temperature records. we are talking about spain and portugal but was reading about scandinavia today, they have had unusually hot weather today. they have had some wildfires there. they have had some wildfires there. they have had some of the hottest weather that‘s ever been recorded in
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stockholm back in may and further afield as well we have equalled the temperature record in algeria this year, 51 celsius there. japan‘s temperature record has gone as has south korea. interestingly with south korea. interestingly with south korea, friday, saturday, sunday, temperatures will reach around ao, sunday, temperatures will reach around a0, a0 one celsius, then your national record that was set earlier this year is ai so we are on record temperatures there as well. —— ai celsius. let's returned to spain for a moment. let‘s speak now to clare nasir, a meteorologist at the met office and presenter of the bbc weather podcast. she‘s currently on holiday on the costa del sol. how is it where you are? incredibly hot, everybody is seeking the shade, it‘s the middle of the day and temperatures have soared quickly and we are likely to see temperatures up in the 30s. it is about acclimatising when we had from the uk to parts where it is so hot. but inland even hotter as chris has said
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and parts of spain are on red alert as alert as well as portugal. red alert meaning a threat to life as well as wildfires. at risk of wildfires exists down here as well because it has been so dry over the last month or so. there you are in bright sunshine but often what is striking about this type of weather is how hot it still is at night time as well, isn‘t it? is how hot it still is at night time as well, isn't it? it is incredible. last night the temperature in the algarve in faro. no lower than 29 celsius, higher than we are likely to get across the uk in many parts today and it‘s that oppressive heat which can be quite tricky even if you are holidaying. obviously it is really ha rd you are holidaying. obviously it is really hard for the locals who have to go about business as usual but for holiday—makers who are not used to the high temperatures and high humidity it is really hard. the sea is really warm, there is a few jellyfish in there where i was swimming yesterday. it is very refreshing. on the coast you do get the refreshing sea breezes but
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anything inland the temperature rockets by five or 10 degrees. 35 today here at inland it‘s going to bea today here at inland it‘s going to be a lot higher than that. how much interest is there in the possibility of this temperature record being broken? there is a lot of interest here. obviously we want to enjoy our holiday as holiday—makers but on the news and in newspapers it‘s the headlines and will continue to be over the next few days. i was here last year when we had the record—breaking temperatures of a7 celsius. we could smash the ao degrees record if it gets higher than that. that was set ao years ago so even the locals aren‘t really used to this really high heat and it really makes doing anything quite tricky. we are not over exerting ourselves and we are drinking lots of water and seeking shade during the middle part of the day. i'm going to let you get back in the shade now. thank you, clare nasir, on the costa del sol, in very warm spain. the headlines on bbc news. a warning from the governor of the bank of england — the possibility of britain crashing
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out of the eu without a deal is ‘uncomfortably high‘ — and that a ‘no deal‘ scenario could mean disruption to economic activity and prices. zimbabwe‘s opposition vows to challenge the result of the presidential election, after emmerson mnangagwa is declared the winner. and, as forecasters say europe could record its highest ever temperature later today, tourists and locals have been warned to stay out of the sun and to keep hydrated. and in sport. play is under way on day three of the first test between england and india, and england have lost an early wicket. keaton jennings out for just eight. england now 2i—2, a lead of 3a. an emotional andy murray broke down in tears after reaching a quarter—final for the first time in over a year — he beat marius copil at the washington open, with the match finishing after 3am local time. and adam peaty began his quest for gold at the european championships in glasgow, by setting a new european record in qualifying fastest
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for the semi finals in the heats for the ioo—metres breastroke. i‘ll be back with more on those stories around half—past. many thanks, john. the sister of the missing midwife, samantha eastwood has appealed for information about her whereabouts. the 29—year—old was last seen leaving the royal stoke university hospital last friday morning. phil mackie has been covering events for us in stafford. what has her sister been saying? as you said it has been a week since she was last seen alive, that was when she was seen alive, that was when she was seen leaving hospital although her car was found at her home so presumably see made a home but it‘s not clear what happened, she was reported missing by colleagues because she was due back at the
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royal stoke university that night for a night shift and today we have heard from her sister who gave a tea rful heard from her sister who gave a tearful and emotional appeal. samantha is a happy, bubbly and smiley woman, she can be very straight and direct. she's my best friend and partner in crime. without her half of me is gone. samantha, if you are listening, please get in touch. we all love you and miss you very much. we just need you home where you belong. samantha isa you home where you belong. samantha is a fantastic woman and friend. she's warm, friendly, loyal and generous with a great sense of humourand generous with a great sense of humour and whoever she is with will always make their times together fun. samantha was determined to become a midwife from a young age and succeeded. all of samantha peart network friends describe her as an amazing midwife, she's caring, gentle, and selfless and would do anything to put some ineos before
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herself. she is 5'3", ginger hair green eyes, freckles her arm, face and neck. if anybody knows where she is please get in touch —— put somebody else before herself. we also heard from detective super and in and duffy who is leading the investigation with staffordshire police and reminded everybody the last positive sighting was cctv pictures that we can show you now which shows samantha maiden the royal stoke university at 7:a5am but she didn‘t return to work that day even though her car was found a home. they would like to hearfrom people who have dash cam footage particularly in the badly green area of stoke—on—trent. they are trawling cctv but they know other footage out there might be able to give them a positive identification at a different time. the hope is they will still find her and that is what you heard her sister gemma say. they
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have talked about in missing purse, a piece of the investigation. we have been given a page and we will circulate it soon as we can. it is dark on outside with the distinctive radley logo, the scottie terrier, pink on the inside. that‘s the only item they haven‘t been able to find, soa item they haven‘t been able to find, so a crucial part of the investigation. and i will remind you that a 32—year—old man was arrested and he has been released on bail. he remains on bail. staffordshire police says there has been a good response from the public over this investigation, lots of positive lines of inquiry there are investigating and trawling through the cctv as well. they say there was no indication about her mental state, there were no concerns about her mental state before she disappeared, she was under no stress and basically don‘t know what has happened to her and they are desperate to find out, which is why they desperately need people to come forward with information. phil mackie, thank you very much. phil mackie, thank you very much. phil mackie in stafford. regular exposure to even low
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levels of air pollution, may affect the heart to such an extent, that it would be similar to the early stages of heart failure. according to a study for the british heart foundation, the changes were comparable to being consistently inactive or having raised blood pressure. our correspondent, jon donnison reports. it‘s estimated air pollution is a contributing factor in the deaths of around a0,000 people in the uk each year. this study looks at how the quality of the air we breathe affects the heart. queen mary university looked at data from a,ooo people. most of those lived outside big cities and in areas where air pollution was below uk government guidelines. still it found those who live near busy roads tended to have slightly bigger hearts, often an early sign of heart disease. the heart tends to get larger when it undergoes a stressful situation, and we often see that in people who are developing heart failure, when the heart is not pumping efficiently. in this individual in the study, they are healthy people,
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so the heart function is still normal, but we start seeing these early signs of enlargement of the heart. the research comes with the government‘s consultation period on its draft clean air strategy due to end later this month. the strategy aims to reduce pollution in order to halve the number of people living in areas which exceed world health organization guidelines by 2025. jon donnison, bbc news. with me is dr nay aung, a cardiologist from queen mary university in london — one of the authors of the report. are we not taking this seriously enough, or have we not until now? we have always known that air pollution is harmful for health, have always known that air pollution is harmfulfor health, and i think people have been taking action to reduce the amount of pollution. what this study shows is that even in
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individuals who are free from cardiac azeez, air pollution exposure appears to be causing very small changes in the heart. what is slightly worrying is the type of changes is consistent with the type we see in people developing heart failure, even though the changes are within normal range is in this healthy cohort. this is telling us something new beyond what we knew already? this is a new contribution to the science because there has never been a very clear link between people who develop heart failure or a heart attack in the future and air pollution, even though we that air pollution, even though we that air pollution may lead to this poor and bad outcomes. but this research shows that the type of link and the type of changes that you may see in the very early stages of structural changes to the heart. clearly there are big policy measures that can be introduced by central government that might over time reduce air pollution problems. if you are an individual, you live in a big city, you walk along a busy road on the
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pavement every day, what can you realistically do about this? that is a veryfair realistically do about this? that is a very fair question. as an individual it‘s very difficult and you are not going to move away from your house because you live in a highly polluted area. as an individual if you live in a heavily polluted area and have other risk factors that you can control, such as if you have high blood pressure can you are inactive or smutty obese, those are the areas you can target as an individual to cou ntera ct target as an individual to counteract the harmful effects of air pollution. for example, if we did more exercise and were fitter and more generally you would be better placed to counter some of the effects of air pollution? it will work together to reduce your risk of heart disease. if you are living in a highly polluted area if you reduce your other personal risks you would be better placed to withstand the air pollution affects. i mentioned wider policy possibilities, if you are able to take to government about wider measures they could take, what would you say? i think the government policy on cleaner strategy is a step in the right
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direction and i think on top of that we need to bring it down to below the who target, and that target should be reached as soon as we can. this is to do with our motoring habits mainly? depends on the type of pollution you look at, for nitrogen dioxide certainly we know that cars and trucks and all that contribute a lot more than the other type of pollution, coming more from heating and burning coal and wood. it depends on what kind of pollution you want to target. realistically, clearly we want to bring everything down but we want to target notjust ca rs down but we want to target notjust cars but other heating and energy generation habits we have in this country. thank you for coming in, dr nay aung. amazon‘s tax bill in the uk fell last year — even though its profits nearly tripled. the full tax bill for the company‘s uk branch £a.6 million, but it has deferred paying the remaining £2.9 million.
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the online firm has faced criticism over the amount of tax it pays — but amazon says it pays all the taxes required by the government, and has invested more than £9 billion in britain since 2010. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. while there is some regular forecast for many of us it is another fine and friday with some sunshine at times and the heat continues to build towards the south and east. we have sunny spells through parts of northern ireland, cloud working into parts of north—west scotland. the best of the brightness in the east with heavy and thundery downpours developing as we head towards this evening. then we head towards this evening. then we have this area of rain straddling northern england, that could be thundery too but it eases through the afternoon and acts as a bit of a dividing line. we have fresh air to the north but down towards the south and east it remains hot and humid with temperatures potentially reaching highs of around 33 celsius.
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those thundery showers through north—eastern scotland will gradually start to ease and fade tonight so it will be largely fine and dry. kit malthouse working in two parts of north—west scotland once again and it will be a touch pressure, more comfortable to sleep in but further south it‘s going to be another muggy night again. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, has warned that the possibility of a no—deal brexit is "uncomfortably high" and that strenuous efforts should be made to avoid that outcome. the main opposition party
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in zimbabwe has rejected the presidential election results — after officials said the man who replaced robert mugabe — emmerson mnangagwa has won. parts of spain and portugal are expected to have record breaking heat in the next few days — as temperatures could break the europe record of a8 degrees — set by greece in 1977. the sister of missing midwife samantha eastwood, who was last seen leaving work at the royal stoke hospital in staffordshire last friday, has made a tearful appeal for help to trace her. research by the british heart foundation suggests regular exposure to — even low levels of air pollution — may cause changes to the heart, similar to those in the early stages of heart failure. and there‘s been a big rise in the number of people dying of the medical condition sepsis in english hospitals — figures show an increase of more than a third in two years. sport now, here‘sjohn watson.
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and resuming 22 runs ahead. king jennings fell forjust and resuming 22 runs ahead. king jennings fell for just eight leaving captainjoe jennings fell for just eight leaving captain joe at the crease. jennings fell for just eight leaving captainjoe at the crease. a jennings fell for just eight leaving captain joe at the crease. a few moments ago. they were 29 for two their second inning. asking for a trial as he bids to revive his career. he was released by essex in 2015 and played briefly for... since then he‘s been out of the game due to problems off the field. he is currently playing in ethics, but says it is still his ambition to play county cricket again. andy murray broke down in tears after reaching the quarterfinals of the
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washington open in the early hours of this morning. he came from a set down to beat this man, just after 3m. he took the deciding settle. he said in his chairfor good two minutes crying into his towel we think from the exhausted of three consecutive matches. he later criticised were do for putting him in that position he said playing at that hour was unreasonable. the mets should not startle after midnight because of rain. sarah has one gold ten months after giving birth to her second child. she won the c five time trial at the paris cycling world championships. that was in italy. and he was an impressive form as he began his quest for gold. he broke the championship record in the breaststroke heat. this is his first international competition since the
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commonwealth games in april. but he was beaten for the first time in four years. he said that was a wake—up call and he was now obsessed with winning again. very controlled. we had a plan. how do we get back to these fast heat swims? how do we control the emotions the last six, seven days? for the olympics is going to be eight or nine days. for me, i went up this morning, just the crowd, enjoyed it. that‘s something i have been missing the last couple of months. this is the real me. tomorrow again. who knows your the ireland coach described his side as an incredible group of people after they reach the semifinals of the hockey world cup for the first time. they produced another world two surprise victory beating india in a shoot out. they are the second lowest ranked team. now they take on spain tomorrow. out for a play stuff i know. such a who would have
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thought? it like christmas has come. no one would have picked us to be here. we didn‘t think ourselves you‘re going to get here. we went straightaway to the quarterfinals and here we are in the semi finals. emotions are unbelievable at the moment. it is a great feeling. what an contrast to england‘s fate. they we re an contrast to england‘s fate. they were being 2—0. it has been a really disappointing event for england who are ranked second in the world. they have eight olympic champions on their side. burnley‘s first european tie in half a century ended with victory. they went ahead in the second leg. lewis for concern scored a brilliant equaliser. that is his first goalfor aberdeen. a brilliant equaliser. that is his first goal for aberdeen. a late penalty gave the premier league side. one more qualifier to
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determine who reaches the play of four ablaze. that is all the sport for now. it is back to you. many thanks to you. deaths caused by sepsis have risen by more than a third over two years at england‘s hospitals. that‘s according to figures given to the bbc s today programme by a leading health expert. campaigners have described the rare but serious complication as a ‘silent killer‘. our health editor hugh pym reports. sepsis is a serious complication which can develop after infections without antibiotics, it can result in organ failure and death. melissa‘s 12—month—old son william died after developing sepsis which was not detected by doctors. along with other campaigners, she has tried to raise awareness among staff and patients. the thing that william wa nts and patients. the thing that william wants more than anything else in the world is his life. and i have mine andi world is his life. and i have mine
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and i cannot waste it. this campaigning and doing this kind of thing is my way of being william‘s mum. iwill thing is my way of being william‘s mum. i will always be his mum, so i will continue. screening of honourable patients has improved the mac improved. figures given to the bbc show that sepsis as an increasingly dangerous problem. experts have said that there are just over 15,700 deaths in quarter to english hospitals recorded the 2016, 2017 year were sepsis with the main diagnosis. previously there we re main diagnosis. previously there were just over main diagnosis. previously there werejust over 11,000 main diagnosis. previously there were just over 11,000 deaths. main diagnosis. previously there werejust over 11,000 deaths. that isa werejust over 11,000 deaths. that is a 38% increase over the course of two years. nhs england says it is trying to increase recognition so that cases classified solely as infection are also the mac is now qualified as sepsis. we have got increasing pressure on the nhs. we
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have fewer patient duke staff providing services to more patients and that has got to influence this. there will need to be a much bigger effort to bring this under control. britain‘s biggest foodbank charity has called for extra donations to ensure children who get free school meals during term—time don‘t go hungry during the school holidays. the trussell trust says that last year thousands more emergency food packs were provided during the summer months. our home editor mark easton reports. the issue of holiday hunger, that is called, has been rising up the political agenda. around 1.5 million children are eligible for free school meals in the uk, but outside term time struggling families must find an additional £30 to £a0 a week. many resort to food banks, with the trussell trust saying emergency provision for children rises significantly during the summer months, when donations cannot meet demand. the trussell trust runs a28 food banks all across the uk.
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so we know thatjust in ourfood banks alone, 7a,000 supplies of food were given out to children in the summer months last year. that‘s an increase on the year before. it‘s a really concerning increase. in scotland, and in wales, some local authorities now provide free school meals throughout the year to counter a problem that teachers say leads to signs of malnourishment when pupils return to classes in september. last week, the government announced a £2 million fund in england to provide around 30,000 poorer children with healthy meals and activities during the holidays. but, earlier this year, ministers refused to support a draft bill that would have placed a duty on local councils to ensure disadvantaged pupils were fed. the government says it is committed to supporting families to improve their lives, but the trussell trust is among those warning that welfare cuts
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and the introduction of universal credit will mean more children go hungry. mark easton, bbc news. the new head of the armed forces has said he will not allow a witch hunt of veterans over their roles during the "troubles" in northern ireland. in his first interview since becoming chief of defence staff, general sir nicholas carter said that it was right that serving and former service personnel were held to account but only if they‘d done something wrong. it is right and proper that if our soldiers have done something wrong then they should clearly be investigated and held to account for it, but only if they‘ve generally done something wrong because we need to have some standards, we need to have values that people are held against, otherwise we would lose the moral high ground. what is fundamentally wrong, though, is if they‘re chased by people making vexatious claims, and that will not happen donald trump‘s used a speech at a rally in pennsylvania to address what he called false reports about what happened
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when he met the queen. the us president complained about the coverage of his recent meeting and first offical visit to the uk. mr trump said he‘d been falsely accused of keeping the queen waiting at windsor castle and then staying too long. he also renewed his attacks on the media despite a warning yesterday from the united nations that his criticsms were putting journalists in danger. but we got along fantastically well and the time went by. you know, like sometimes if you like somebody, you get along, good chemistry, the time goes by? so we were there for about an hour. so here‘s the story. i got there. remember, i got there early and the queen‘s guards waited with me, waited... in fact, we took a helicopter. you see all these secret service guys? they are not late. they don‘t believe in being late. they are incredible. they believe in being early, not late. one of them said to me,
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"sir, we weren‘t late." so here is the story by the fake news. "the president was 15 minutes late for the queen." wrong. and then here‘s the rest of the story. here‘s the rest... here‘s the rest of the story, they said i was late, when i was actually early, number one. number two, i guess the meeting was scheduled for 15 minutes and it lasted for almost an hour. "the president overstayed..." laughter. so i was late and i overstayed. and honestly, folks, it was such a beautiful, beautiful visit and afternoon. but they can make anything bad because they are the fake, fake, disgusting news. president trump their speaking in
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pennsylvania. in a moment we‘ll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... a warning from the governor of the bank of england — the possibility of britain crashing out of the eu without a deal is ‘uncomfortably high‘ —and that a ‘no deal‘ scenario could mean disruption to economic activity and prices. zimbabwe‘s opposition vows to challenge the result of the presidential election, after emmerson mnangagwa is declared the winner. and as forecasters say europe could record its highest ever temperature later today, tourists and locals have been warned to stay out of the sun and to keep hydrated. i‘m here with the latest business news for you this hour. bank of england governor mark carney tells the bbc the chances of no—deal brexit is "uncomfortably high" and "highly undesirable". carney added that if no deal was agreed it would lead to higher prices and cause to disruption to the uk economy.
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sterling fell to an 11 day low on the back of carney‘s comments. the royal bank of scotland announces it will pay its first dividend in ten years, that‘s despite reporting fall in profits to £888 million for the first half of the year. rbs‘s bottom line was hit by a $1 billion settlement with us authorities over mis—selling mortgage—backed securities. and despite a jump in profits, amazon paid less tax in the uk last year. the online retail giant paid £7.a million in tax two year ago, but that dropped to only £1.7 million in 2017. amazon responds by saying the lower amount is because of share—based payments for staff. sterling has fallen to an 11 day low after the bank of england governor mark carney warned of the consquences of a no—deal brexit. he said it was "absolutely in the interest" of the eu and uk
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to have a transition period. carney told the bbc‘s today programme that if a no—deal brexit were to happen, it would cause disruption to the economy. there are a variety of things and we heard a moment in your news bulletin about the contingency plans of various businesses. whether they are selling goods, foods, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing any of those products. that only about a third of them have contingency prions, proper ones. and even those are not fully enacted. —— contingency plans. it does any disruption to trade as we know it. and as a consequence of that, a disruption to the level of economic activity, it leads to higher prices for a limited amount of time. mark
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ernie talking to the bbc. we‘ve had the latest figures from the royal bank of scotland this morning — and they‘ve been watched very closely — so let‘s run you through the numbers... the bank‘s profits fell to £888 million for the first half of the year, compared to £939 million a year earlier. the main reason for the fall was due to rbs paying a £1 billion settlement to the us department ofjustice over mis—selling—mortgage—backed securities. rbs also announced it would be paying its first dividend in ten years, which will be around 2p a share. our busines editor simonjack spoke to rbs‘s chief executive ross mcewan about the bank‘s results. it was a very good day for us to make a profit. we put aside another billion pounds for the department of justice. and dropping to the bottom
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line 888. it has been a good half for us considering what we have gone through. what is happening in the marketplace, there are a lot of other things that way on the share market. this talk of trade wars, brexit itself, what is going to be the outcome for the uk. the good thing for us is the announcement of paying a dividend, the first one in ten years. it is good news for our investors as well. we will start to see some return coming through for the stock. including the biggest share holder which is the taxpayer. on that port, rbs is a very different thing than it was ten yea rs different thing than it was ten years ago. much more uk focus, business and personal focus years ago. much more uk focus, business and personalfocus here in the uk. is it that companies like you are suffering like —— are
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suffering because of brexit because they are scared? they are definitely weighing down on uk stocks like we are now. it just weighing down on uk stocks like we are now. itjust means that we have to stay very stable, very high capital levels. a very strong liquidity so that we are able to look after our customer base. well let‘s get more reaction now on the results, and joining me now is robert murphy, from edison investment research. good to talk to. would you describe these as a landmark set of results? i think the way to look at this is that rbs has put most of the legacy litigation behind it. it has significantly grown in their capital base. they have the highest in the sector as of q2. that is why they can now announce a dividend. overall
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it was a decent set of numbers, better than expected despite the doj settle m e nt better than expected despite the doj settlement charge. they continued to reduce the underlying cost base. provisioning is running at low levels and they are continuing to grow the mortgage business and personal and business banking in the uk. it is the first evidence in ten yea rs, uk. it is the first evidence in ten years, but that money won‘t be paid until the three point £1 billion settle m e nt until the three point £1 billion settlement with the us department of justice is completed. how important was that doj deal to the united states ? was that doj deal to the united states? well, we have seen a number of global banks have been hit with very large charges historically. this is the last one that has had to be settled in the uk. it is important to the us. they have been able to get redress for the issues that banks were involved in the
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mortgage market in the last ten yea rs. mortgage market in the last ten years. as simon jack was asking, we are now seeing a very different kind of bank emerging with rbs, aren‘t we? yes, that is right. the bank has effectively run down most of the legacy assets, there are still a little bit left. it is focusing on the uk, that i mind of ireland. it has got a few small international businesses. it is much safer, simpler bank. focusing on uk mortgages, business lending and commercial banking. thank you. the owner of british airways — international airlines group — has reported pre—tax profits of £789 million in the three months tojune, which is a 6% rise compared to a year earlier. iag‘s bottom line was boosted by a 2.3% rise in passengers and a 2% fall in non—fuel costs. another business during making the
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rounds today... another business during making the rounds today... toyota has surprised analysts by reporting 7.2% rise in quarterly profits to £5.9 billion. the japanese car giant says it had strong sales in asia and its restructuring plans had helped lower costs. and william hill and paddy power have both announced expansion plans in the united states. william hill singed deals with 11 casinos in mississippi, while paddy power‘s subsidiary fanduel, has signed deals to access several us states. let‘s have a look to see what the markets are doing today. we have artie mentioned that the sterling has dropped. the ftse 100 artie mentioned that the sterling has dropped. the ftse100 is climbing higher. it is still on track for the biggest. largely due to brexit... track for the biggest. largely due to brexit. .. these
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track for the biggest. largely due to brexit... these are both doing very well because of investors. that is it for now. more throughout the afternoon. alice, thank you very much indeed. a baby girl born with a tooth has had it removed at just 12 days old. most babies start teething at about six months with some starting as young as four months and others after a year, but isla—rose developed her first tooth at birth. her motherjasmin heasman said she has been recovering well. they told me when she was born, they checked her over, they told me there and then that she had a tooth. i was just shocked and then they told me that they tested to see if it was sta ble that they tested to see if it was stable and they said yes, it would not come out and it was secure in her mouth. but then 12 days later, it started bleeding, it became wobbly, so i had to take her to the
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emergency dentists. they said if it fell out she could have swallowed it. it was weird, once a ticket out they showed me. it looked so weird because i was so used to seeing her with teeth. now that she has had it taken out, with teeth. now that she has had it ta ken out, she‘s with teeth. now that she has had it taken out, she‘s doing a lot better. an to go through. with all the good weather we‘ve been having — it‘s improved the chance of seeing one of our most iconic species — the bat. there are 18 different types in the uk and they‘re becoming tougher to spot. our reporter adrian campbell has been to see a unique monitoring project in the golden cap estate in dorset. chris is setting a most unusual trap. it is almost invisible to bats. a special device plays out that calls to lure them in. normally we would not hear the calls, but another gadget interprets the sound for our ears. chris is specially licensed to
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handle these tiny mammals and with the help of volunteers, he is hoping that after dusk he will be able to identify and then carefully release his latest catch. if i'm a bad, flying around happily in the woodland they will come to investigate the sound eventually katie hopefully not see our minds, tumble down here and all we can do, come along and scoop them out and ta ke come along and scoop them out and take them back to base camp for processing. this is a very rare woodland species. there are 18 types of back in britain. and there are already known to be 12 different species with this charity. so she is very young, which may
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indicate that there is a colony around here. this is exciting, we have seen two. three more have arrived and we‘re just about to have arrived and we‘re just about to have a look at them. hello, you. the bats are painstakingly identified as the experts try to improve their chances here. jim out for the national trust works with volunteers and tenants to promote the best conditions for the bats. they're using the habitat here for roosting, and eating around. the trees are important, the tree—lined? yes. they are really important for them they can navigate around here. it connects them to the this place where they can travel. bats are in
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decline because we have damaged their habitats in part. these creatures can live for 20 or 30 yea rs or creatures can live for 20 or 30 years or more. now if you are tired of the sweltering heat, spare a thought for the citizens of phoenix, arizona. this huge dust storm passed over the us city and the surround area yesterday evening. this second large monsoon storm of the season was the first to reach phoenix. rains and high winds toppled a transmission tower and a number of tree, whilst flights from phoenix international airport were delayed due to the low visability. no injuries have been reported. nothing like that here though, we hope. let‘s check on the weather forecast. thank you, we are seeing
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some contrast. lots of fight and dry weather to be had. there is also some rain in the forecast. it is mainly affecting northern parts of england. there is more clouds in northern scotland. peered barely caught in the skies. it is here the heat continues to build. it will remain hot and continues to build. it will remain hotand humid continues to build. it will remain hot and humid as we had through this afternoon. that is because we are dragging up hot air all the way from africa. it is really affecting the southeast, but it is filtering into central england. the further north and west you go, the stronger the influence of this lower pressure system. that is the case in northwest scotland. we could see a few sharp thundery showers. there‘s also this area of rain that is coming through northern england which could be thundery. it will fizzle out and leave behind some cloud. it is a bit of a dividing line of the fresher conditions in
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the north. in the south and east it is hot humid. temperatures of potentially 33 celsius this afternoon. there will be some sharp thundery downpours as we get into the overnight. and it it will be largely dry story. clear skies, a little bit more clouds coming through northwest scotland. it will bea through northwest scotland. it will be a bit fresher. but the further south and east you go, it will be a muqqy south and east you go, it will be a muggy night. temperatures not going below 19 some. temperature will build —— pressure will build in the west. gradually we will start to lose some of that humidity, but we will hang onto it through much of the southeast. a little bit more clouds or parts of scotland where we could have showers. there is a risk of one or two showers through parts of one or two showers through parts of east anglia. but plenty of sunshine on offer elsewhere. temperatures a bit lower, but still remaining hot, 29 celsius the
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maximum. saturday, and sunday, more clouds through northwestern parts of scotland. that will increase as the day goes on. the rain will come in. temperatures will be a little bit lower on saturday and fresher in scotland. in the south, once again, it remains hot. that will continue as we head into the start of next week. rain will start to make progress south east. temperatures will remain high in the southeast. this is bbc news. i‘mjulian i‘m julian worricker. these are the top stories developing at midday. a warning from the governor of the bank of england —
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the possibility of britain crashing out of the eu without a deal is ‘uncomfortably high‘. it does mean disruption to trade as we know it. and as a consequence of that, a disruption to the level of economic activity... ..changes, higher prices for a period of time. the sister of the missing midwife, samantha eastwood, has appealed to the public for information. she was last seen leaving the royal stoke university hospital a week ago. without her, half of me is gone. samantha, if you are listening, please get in touch. we all love you and miss you very much. we just need you home where you belong. zimbabwe‘s opposition vows to challenge the result of the presidential election, after emmerson mnangagwa is declared the winner. regular exposure to air pollution — even at low levels — may damage the heart in a similar way to early stage heart failure. also this hour — forecasters say
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europe could record its highest ever temperature later today. as the heatwave continues across the continent, tourists and locals have been warned to stay out of the sun. getting to the root of the problem — why this newborn‘s toothy grin had to be sorted out. good afternoon. it is friday, august three. i‘m julian worricker. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the governor of the bank of england mark carney has warned that the possibility of a no—deal brexit is "uncomfortably high". speaking on radio a‘s today programme, mr carney said strenuous efforts should be made to avoid that ‘highly undesirable‘ outcome,
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as he put it, and that extensive contingency planning had been conducted to make sure financial institutions were ready for all eventualities. i think the possibility of a no deal is uncomfortably high at the moment, yes. so you are saying quite clearly that a no—deal brexit would be a disaster? it is highly undesirable. so it does mean potential disruption. certainly it does mean disruption to trade as we know it. and as a consequence of that a disruption to the level of economic activity... ..changes, higher prices for a period of time. now, ourjob at the bank of england is to make sure that those issues don‘t happen in the financial system so... people will have things to worry about in a no—deal brexit,
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which is still a relatively unlikely possibility. but it is a possibility. but what we don‘t want to have is people worrying about their money in the bank, whether or not they can get a loan from the bank, whether it is for a mortgage or a business idea. i‘m joined from our westminster studio by our political correspondent tom barton. although mark carney was talking to a british audience, his message was as much aimed at european leaders, really saying, yes, this would be bad for the british economy, european economies wouldn‘t get off unscathed either if there were no deal with no transition period. he made the point, of course, that the bank of england has been preparing for such an eventuality, ensuring that banks have capital and liquidity within them so that they are resilient, they have contingency plans in place. but he also said that the part of the bank of england
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which is responsible forfinancial stability, their approach is about the class being entirely half empty all the time. we ran the system a year ago through a stress test which had, and this is not the prediction for what would happen in a no deal scenario, but to give you an idea of what they can withstand, real estate prices going down by more than a third, house prices and commercial real estate. interest rates going up by almost four percentage points, we just raised them 0.25%. unemployment going to 9%, and the economy going into a a% recession. now, we did that in order to create the kind of hits to their balance sheets and the calls on their capital and liquidity that meant they had to build these buffers to be in a position in case something bad... so you‘ve been sitting there planning for armageddon? uh, we have been planning for very difficult circumstances and the banks are ready. it is worth underlining that those
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stress tests which the bank of england carried out, were for any shock to the financial system. he said they were as concerned about the chinese economy causing problems around the world, or other influences from overseas, as they we re influences from overseas, as they were about eight no—deal brexit, although a no—deal brexit was of course a serious concern. “— although a no—deal brexit was of course a serious concern. —— a no—deal brexit. the document published around that stress test exercise didn‘t mention brexit at all. what of reaction among pro—brexit mps who have criticised mark carney in the past? brexiteers smell a rat and they see it as an attempt by the establishment to make the idea of a no—deal brexit so unpalatable that any deal, no matter how bad, starts to look better. iain
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duncan—smith, the former conservative leader, saying that there is no such thing as a no deal because both the uk and the european union are signed up to the world trade organisation and there would still be rules that allow trade to happen even if we did leave without a free—trade deal. he says the treasury and the bank of england have struggled to understand how this would work. meanwhile, his fellow brexiteer peter bone has dubbed this another example of the ongoing project via. tom, thank you for that. tom ba nton ongoing project via. tom, thank you for that. tom banton at westminster. —— tom barton. theresa may will interrupt her holiday in italy this afternoon to hold talks with the french president emmanuel macron about the brexit negotiations. she‘ll travel to his island retreat in the south of france. there it‘s expected she‘ll urge the president to soften his stance on security and financial services ahead of a crucial summit of eu leaders in salzburg next month. earlier i spoke to our correspondent lucy williamson who is in paris and asked her if mrs may stood any chance of persuading mr macron to change course.
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he is not a man to change his mind easily, and i think it‘s going to be a tricky meeting for mrs may. president macron has stuck rigidly to the eu line all the way through this and even though when i talk to people here who are close to this issue they say the chances of a no deal, yes, they are growing a little bit simply because of the time frame involved but that doesn‘t mean that mrs may is suddenly going to get a big concession from france. i keep asking people here, you know, when it comes down to it, you‘ve got your national economic interest, you‘ve got the integrity of the single market, what is going to give? and they say, you brits just don‘t understand the single market is our national economic interest. does france increasingly hold the key to all this, do you think? i think france is very influential in terms of the eu, obviously, and mr macron is a pragmatic man but he has made it his mission to build a strong eu that delivers for its citizens and
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with closer integration. i think when you hear sources from the uk saying that if mrs may can crack mr macron that is going to bode very well is probably true. but i think the first part of that is going to be the tricky bit, actually persuading mr macron to make the kind of concessions mrs may is looking for. there are some people here that say that france may well show a little bit of flexibility later on in the game. but not at this stage, probably, and certainly not the kind of flexibility that mrs may is looking for. lucy williamson in paris. the sister of the missing midwife, samantha eastwood has made an emotional for information about her whereabouts. the 29—year—old was last seen leaving the royal stoke university hospital last friday morning. earlier i spoke to our correspondent, phil mackie, who was at the press conference in stafford. it has been a week since she was last seen alive, that was when she left hospital, although her car was then found at her home so presumably
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she made a home although not clearly what happened, she was reported missing by colleagues because she was due back at the royal state university hospital that night for a a night shift. —— royal stoke university hospital. we have heard from her sister gemma who gave a tea rful from her sister gemma who gave a tearful and emotional appeal. samantha is a happy, bubbly and smiley woman, she can be very straight and direct. she‘s my best friend and partner in crime. without her, half of me is gone. samantha, if you are listening, please get in touch, we all love you and miss you very much. we need you home where you belong. samantha is a fantastic woman and friend, warm, friendly, loyal, kind and generous with a great sense of humour and whoever she is with will always make their times togetherfun. she is with will always make their times together fun. samantha was determined to become a midwife from a young age and succeeded. all of samantha‘s work friends describe her
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as an amazing midwife, she is caring, gentle and selfless and would do anything for anyone before herself. samantha is 5‘3", medium build, gingershoulder—length herself. samantha is 5‘3", medium build, ginger shoulder—length hair and green eyes and has freckles on her arms, face and neck. if she‘s out there or anyone knows where she is, please get in touch, get her home. we also heard from detective super ten and simon duffy leading the investigation with staffordshire police and reminded everybody the last positive sighting was some ctv pictures we can show you now —— cctv pictures. it shows samantha leaving the royal stoke hospital at 7:a5am and must have driven home because her car was found but she didn‘t return to work that evening. they would like to hearfrom people return to work that evening. they would like to hear from people who might have dash cam footage, particularly in the baddeley green area of stoke—on—trent because they area of stoke—on—trent because they are trawling cctv but they know
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there is other footage out there that might give them a positive identification at a different time. obviously the hope is they will still find her and that is what you heard her sister gemma says. had talked about a missing purse, key piece of the investigation. we have been given a picture and we will circulate it as soon as we can, it isa circulate it as soon as we can, it is a radley purse, dark on the outside with the distinctive radley logo, the scottish terrier, pink on the inside. that‘s the only item they haven‘t been able to find, so a crucial part of the investigation. i will just crucial part of the investigation. i willjust remind you, a 32—year—old man was arrested and has been released on bail and remains on bail at the moment. staffordshire police say there has been a good response from the public over this investigation, lots of positive lines of inquiry they are investigating. they are trawling the cctv as well and they say there was no indication about her mental state, no concerns about her mental state, no concerns about her mental state before she disappeared, though she was under no stress, and they simply don‘t know what happened to her and they are desperate to find
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out which is why they desperately need people to come forward with information. that was phil mackie in stafford. forecasters say europe could record its highest ever temperature later today. a heatwave across the continent could see the current record of a8 degrees celsius broken. tourists and locals have been warned to stay out of the sun and to keep drinking water. our reporter tim allman has more. weather reporter speaks spanish spanish television warning viewers that temperatures were only going one way, up. aided by a surge of scorching air sweeping in from africa. in madrid, there were some enjoying this summer of summers. others trying to find what shade they could. so i‘ve been trying to drink plenty of water. i put sunscreen on in the morning. ifind shade when i can and try to relax in the shade, but definitely just try to stay hydrated. it was the same story in portugal.
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the iberian peninsula expected to bear the brunt of this heatwave in the coming days. the country is on high alert as the mercury rises. translation: it's very difficult being outside in this heatwave. it‘s impossible to be here, it‘s too hot. translation: it seems we won't have many customers, the tourists want to go to the beach. europe‘s record temperature, a8 degrees celsius, was measured in athens in 1977. forecasters predict there is around a 30% chance the record will be broken. even if that doesn‘t happen, it‘s still plenty hot enough. tim allman, bbc news. with me is our weather presenter, chris fawkes. what chance of a record, chris?m you think 30% chance of the all—time european record, a 70% chance of it not happening, think of it like that. whether it does or it doesn‘t the weather is exceptionally hot
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across spain and portugal. my personal feeling is spain across spain and portugal. my personalfeeling is spain is not going to get the national record, the hottest day is probably today and temperatures will peak at around a5, a0 6 degrees. their record is a7.3 set way back last year! so, yes, it has been a couple of hot summers they have had there. all the while the hottest air is moving westwards, this is what is happening on the charts. we are talking about iberia, south—west europe, spain and portugal, we have clear skies at the moment. in recent days the weather front has moved in bringing subtropical air up from the tropical atlantic, becoming slow moving across france and it has been pulled in across spain and portugal. it has been heated day by day as the winds have fallen light and that is significant because we have seen temperatures rise. yesterday we got up temperatures rise. yesterday we got up to a5 celsius but the hottest day for portugal is going to be saturday when we could see temperatures reach a7 celsius. i think that‘s the most
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likely temperature we will see from portugal. as far as the portuguese national record goes, a7.a celsius is the mark to beat, set in 2003, so it‘s is the mark to beat, set in 2003, so it's 15 is the mark to beat, set in 2003, so it‘s 15 years old this national record but we could easily say it is one of portugal‘s hottest days ever. coming close to that. the wider picture across the whole continent, it has been hot generally, hasn‘t it? yes, we have seen records tumble. in stockholm in may we set record temperatures and they were not just beaten by record temperatures and they were notjust beaten by a bit, they were annihilated. we have seen wildfires reaching parts of the arctic, the fire problems we have seen in greece as well so the weather has been pretty severe this year. and of course we have had barely any rain for many areas and that stretches into parts of germany where i believe even some of the breweries have been struggling to keep up with demand as well. it is notjust europe. we have seen records set further afield. algeria equalled their record temperature of 51
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celsius a few months back and we have seen records tumble in south korea and japan. in south korea the maximum temperature on fridayjust past 39 celsius but this weekend a0, 41, 41 past 39 celsius but this weekend a0, a1, a1 is the national record and we are on the extreme. there are a number of places in the northern hemisphere that have seen incredible heat this year. chris fawkes, thank you for that. earlier i spoke to clare nasir, meteorologist at the met office, who is on holiday in spain. she described the extent of the heat on the costa del sol. it‘s ncredibly hot, everybody is seeking the shade, it‘s the middle of the day but temperatures have soared quickly and we are likely to see temperatures up in the 30s. it is about acclimatising when we head from the uk to parts where it is so hot. but inland even hotter, as chris has said, and parts of spain are on red alert, as well as portugal.
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red alert meaning a threat to life as well as wildfires. at risk of wildfires exists down here as well because it has been so dry over the last month or so. there you are in bright sunshine but often what is striking about this type of weather is how hot it still is at night time as well, isn‘t it? it is incredible. last night the temperature in faro in the algarve dipped no lower than 29 celsius, higher than we are likely to get across the uk in many parts today. and it‘s that oppressive heat which can be quite tricky even if you are holidaying. obviously it is really hard for the locals who have to go about business as usual. but for holiday—makers who are not used to the high temperatures and high humidity it is really hard. the sea is really warm, there is a few jellyfish in there where i was swimming yesterday. it is very refreshing. on the coast you do get the refreshing sea breezes but anything inland the temperature rockets by five or 10 degrees. 35 today here but inland it‘s going to be a lot higher than that. how much interest is there in the possibility of this temperature
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record being broken? there is a lot of interest here. obviously we want to enjoy our holiday as holiday—makers but on the news and in newspapers it‘s the headlines and it will continue to be over the next few days. i was here last year when we had the record—breaking temperatures of a7 celsius. we could smash the a8 degree record if it gets higher than that. that was set a0 years ago so even the locals aren‘t really used to this really high heat and it really makes doing anything quite tricky. we are not over exerting ourselves and we are drinking lots of water and seeking shade during the middle part of the day. clare nasir, on the costa del sol. the headlines on bbc news. a warning from the governor of the bank of england — the possibility of britain crashing out of the eu without a deal is ‘uncomfortably high‘ — and that a no deal scenario could mean disruption to the economy. the sister of the missing midwife, samantha eastwood, has appealed for information about her whereabouts after she was last seen leaving
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the royal stoke university hospital. and, as forecasters say europe could record its highest ever temperature later today, tourists and locals have been warned to stay out of the sun and to keep hydrated. let‘s catch up with sports news. england have lost an early wicket on day three of the first test against india at edgbaston. resuming 22 runs ahead, keaton jennings fell for just 8, leaving captainjoe root and dawid malan at the crease. a few moments ago they were 57—3 in their second innings — a lead of 70. former england spinner monty panesar has written to all 18 english counties asking for a trial as he bids to revive his career. panesar was released by essex
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in 2015 and played briefly for northants the following year. since then he‘s been out of the game due to problems off the field. he‘s currently playing for hornchurch in essex but says it‘s still his ambition to play county cricket again. andy murray said he may pull out of the washington open, after being on court until 3am in the morning. he beat marius copil in three sets to reach his first quarter—final for over a year but he said the timing was unreasonable. he sat in his chair and cried into his towel after the victory — the emotions coming, he said, "at the end of an extremely long day and a long match." and he added that not playing his next match against alex de minaur of australia was possible. adam peaty was in impressive form as he began his quest for gold at the european championships in glasgow. he broke the championship record in winning his 100—metres breaststroke heat. this is peaty‘s first international competition since the commonwealth games in april, when he won gold in the 100—metres but was beaten in the 50 — his first defeat in four years.
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he said that had been a wake—up call and he‘s been working hard with coach mel marshall. very controlled. meandered mel had a plan from the commonwealths, how do we get back to the fast heat swims. for me i went out there this morning, used the crowd, enjoyed it, which is something i‘ve mist the last couple of months. this is the real me and hopefully tonight make a statement again and tomorrow, who knows? you can get the latest from the european championships on the bbc sports site, just head to bbc.co.uk sport, including the latest from the paralympic road cycling in italy where sarah storey has won gold on her return to international competition and gold as well for katie back to you now.
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thank you very much indeed, holly. zimbabwe‘s opposition has vowed to launch court action to try to overturn the results of the country‘s presidential election. the president of zimbabwe, emmerson mnangagwa has been declared the winner and called it "a new beginning". the announcement follows days of deadly violence and allegations of vote rigging, as our correspondent nomsa maseko has been finding out. zimbabweans have spoken but celebrations the morning after an election have been largely absent in the capital harare. a sense of business as usual has returned with shops reopening. but a large police presence still firmly on the ground. the army, which unleashed rounds of bullets on protesting supporters of the opposition movement for democratic change on wednesday in some of the most violent scenes the country has seen in years with at least six people killed,
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was not visible on the streets of the capital. in the dead of night the country‘s electoral commission announced emmerson mnangagwa had retained his seat, legitimising his position following a military coup that ousted former strongman robert mugabe eight months ago. therefore, mnangagwa, emmerson dambudzo, of zanu—pf party is, therefore, duly declared elected president of the republic of zimbabwe with effect from 3rd august 2018. applause we are happy and we are hoping for a lot. our new president has been telling us a lot of things that he's promising us. this is a new zimbabwe, new dispensation. we are happy as the youth and we are also willing to support our president. but the opposition mdc says the vote was stolen. we as mdc allies totally reject
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the results that have been announced so far. we reject the results because the results have not been verified by the chief election agents of the candidates. vote rigging allegations have been denied by the electoral commission and most international observers who were allowed to monitor the election for the first time in 16 years. the opposition now has seven days to challenge the outcome of the election in court. but whatever happens the country‘s massive economic and social problems need immediate attention. nomsa maseko, bbc news, harare, zimbabwe. amazon‘s tax bill in the uk fell last year, even though its profits nearly tripled. the full tax bill for the company‘s uk branch was £a.6 million, but it has deferred paying £2.9 million of that.
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the online firm has faced criticism over the amount of tax it pays, but amazon says it pays all the taxes required by the government, and has invested more than £9 billion in britain since 2010. regular exposure to even low levels of air pollution, may affect the heart to such an extent, that it would be similar to the early stages of heart failure. according to a study for the british heart foundation, the changes were comparable to being consistently inactive or having raised blood pressure. our correspondent, jon donnison reports. it‘s estimated air pollution is a contributing factor in the deaths of around a0,000 people in the uk each year. this study looks at how the quality of the air we breathe affects the heart. queen mary university looked at data from a,000 people. most of those lived outside big cities and in areas where air pollution was below uk government guidelines. still it found those who live near busy roads tended to have
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slightly bigger hearts, often an early sign of heart disease. the heart tends to get larger when it undergoes a stressful situation, and we often see that in people who are developing heart failure, when the heart is not pumping efficiently. in these individuals in the study, they are healthy people, so the heart function is still normal, but we start seeing these early signs of enlargement of the heart. the research comes with the government‘s consultation period on its draft clean air strategy due to end later this month. the strategy aims to reduce pollution in order to halve the number of people living in areas which exceed world health organization guidelines by 2025. jon donnison, bbc news. two men are being treated in hospital after they were stabbed outside glasgow rangers‘ ibrox stadium last night. fans clashed ahead of the europa league match with croatian side osijek.
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the two men — aged 2a and a0 — are in a stable condition. police scotland have appealed for witnesses. a young man fatally shot by police in stockholm had down‘s syndrome and a form of autism, according to local media reports. 20—year—old eric torell had been carrying a plastic toy gun, described by his mother as looking like a submachine gun. his family say he had been reported missing after leaving home hours earlier. police said they‘d opened fire in response to a threatening situation. an investigation is under way. police in north—west london have arrested a man on suspicion of planning acts of terrorism. scotland yard said a pre—planned operation was carried out yesterday evening. a 20—year—old man was detained by officers from the firearms command and is now being held in custody in south london. a three—metre—long whale shark, that lost its way and found itself in a creek in central dubai, has been transported back
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to the ocean by a team of divers. the operation took five hours and involved towing the young shark 13 kilometres under water back to the arabian gulf. experts say whale sharks tend to be more coastal but are attracted to the marina because of the bright lights at night. aren‘t we all? now it‘s time for a look at the weather — with helen. thank you very much indeed, not as hot as dubai in the uk but 30 degrees in the south and east already and the hot weather is here to stay at least across england and wales. if you find itjust a little too much temperatures will be more bearable across scotland and northern ireland, and also we will have fine weather here as well so lots of dry weather on offer this we can. the rain across northern england will move out of the way and we could have thunderstorms in the north—east of scotland this afternoon and evening and they will
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clear out of the way and then it will be a clear night, bit more bearable for sleeping at night across scotland overnight tonight. whilst further south, it will be quite uncomfortable again and quite muggy. it may be a bit misty first thing in the morning, a bit of fog around given the moisture in the air. but not in the north, we will see fine and dry weather the chance of showers northwest in the great glen and the highlands. most of scotla nd glen and the highlands. most of scotland and northern ireland and most of the country will be dry but the outside chance of a shower in east anglia and the south—east with in the high 20s. but a decent day ahead tomorrow. hello. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, has warned that the possibility of a no—deal brexit is "uncomfortably high" and that strenuous efforts should be made to avoid that outcome. the sister of missing midwife samantha eastwood, who was last seen leaving work at the royal stoke hospital in staffordshire last friday, has made a tearful appeal for help to trace her. the main opposition party
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in zimbabwe has rejected the presidential election results — after officials said the man who replaced robert mugabe — emmerson mnangagwa has won. parts of spain and portugal are expected to have record breaking heat in the next few days — as temperatures could break the europe record of a8 degrees — set by greece in 1977. research by the british heart foundation suggests regular exposure to — even low levels of air pollution — may cause changes to the heart, similar to those in the early stages of heart failure. let‘s get more now on our main story and the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, has warned that the possibility of a no deal brexit is "uncomfortably high." he said that was "absolutely in the interest" of the eu and uk to have a transition period and that disruption for buisnesses was likely. there are a variety of things and we
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heard a moment in your news bulletin about the contingency plans of various businesses. whether they are selling goods, foods, pharmaceuticals, or manufacturing any of those products, that only about a third of them have contingency plans, proper ones. and even those are not fully enacted. so it does mean potential disruption. it certainly does mean disruption to trade as we know it. and as a consequence of that, a disruption of level of economic activity, change to prices for a limited amount of time. that was mark carney speaking earlier. meanwhile the government is due to publish 70 techincal notifications for how businesses should prepare for no deal. the bbc undertsand that 20 of those will directly focus on the food industry. our reality check correspondent chris morris has been looking at the impact of no deal on the uk‘s food supply. he is here. what could that impact
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the? the thing about food is roughly a third of all the food we consume comes from farms and factories in the eu. and it is incredibly sensitive to supply trains wood chains. we have more supermarkets than any other country in the world, but they don‘t really store stuff. it is coming in on lorries by the day. thousands and thousands of tonnes worth of food comes from places. any blockage at ports, if there was a no—deal brexit and suddenly there were checks for customs, checks for food safety and other sorts of regulations, the fear in the logistics industry and storage industry is that the ports would seize up. and smaller disruptions we have seen over the last couple of years. for example, when there were strikes in college i think in 2015. we have 30 mike duke
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miles of cues. the fear is that the keys could be longer and last longer. we would not run out of food but there could be gaps of food on our shelves. what would the view of this be from the people behind brexit? i have spoken to about 20 to 30 senior people who are in the logistics industries, that warehouse industry, the retail, supermarkets... and they are all saying pretty much the same thing. they are very worried. they do not wa nt to they are very worried. they do not want to scare customers. they are happy if customers are buying things and consumers are buying things and the system works. if it is project fear organised by politicians, it seems to me unlikely that an entire industry that wants to make a profit and make things move smoothly would
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go along with that. i do not quite buy that. i think there are real issues here because we have developed over the last couple of decades the system that is so dependent on there being no checks at the borders of the european union. supermarkets can look elsewhere for produce. for example, in 2016 there were bad floods in spain and let us started to disappearfrom spain and let us started to disappear from the supermarket. we began to fly in lettuce from other places. if we do that over a long. prices will go up. the industry is very specific and it has written to the eu negotiating team and the prime minister through the... they are saying this is very serious. there will be things missing from shelves, things rotting in sports. it's shelves, things rotting in sports. it‘s time to get serious about this. 0k. thank you very much. more now on the news tha regular exposure to even low levels of air pollution,
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may affect the heart to such an extent, that it would be similar to the early stages of heart failure. according to a study for the british heart foundation, the changes were comparable to being consistently inactive or having raised blood pressure. earlier, i spoke to dr nay aung, a cardiologist from queen mary university in london — one of the authors of the report. we have always known that air pollution is harmful for health, and i think people have been taking action to reduce the amount of pollution. what this study shows is that even in individuals who are free from cardiac disease, air pollution exposure appears to be causing very small changes in the heart. what is slightly worrying is the type of changes is consistent with the type we see in people developing heart failure, even though the changes are within normal range is in this healthy cohort. this is telling us something new beyond what we knew already? this is a new contribution to the science because there has never been a very clear
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link between people who develop heart failure or a heart attack in the future and air pollution, even though we that air pollution may lead to this poor and bad outcomes. but this research shows that the type of link and the type of changes that you may see in the very early stages of structural changes to the heart. clearly, there are big policy measures that can be introduced by central government that might over time reduce air pollution problems. if you are an individual, you live in a big city, you walk along a busy road on the pavement every day, what can you realistically do about this? that is a very fair question. as an individual, it‘s very difficult and you are not going to move away from your house because you live in a highly polluted area. as an individual, if you live in a heavily polluted area and have other risk factors that you can control, such as if you have high blood pressure can you are inactive or smutty
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—— slightly obese. obese, those are the areas you can target as an individual to counteract the harmful effects of air pollution. for example, if we did more exercise and were fitter and more generally you would be better placed to counter some of the effects of air pollution? it will work together to reduce your risk of heart disease. if you are living in a highly polluted area, if you reduce your other personal risks you would be better placed to withstand the air pollution affects. i mentioned wider policy possibilities, if you are able to take to government about wider measures they could take, what would you say? i think the government policy on cleaner strategy is a step in the right direction and i think on top of that we need to bring it down to below the who target, and that target should be reached as soon as we can. this is to do with our motoring habits mainly? depends on the type of pollution you look at, for nitrogen dioxide certainly we know that cars and trucks and all that contribute a lot more than the other type of pollution, coming more from heating and burning coal and wood.
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it depends on what kind of pollution you want to target. realistically, clearly we want to bring everything down but we want to target notjust cars but other heating and energy generation habits we have in this country. deaths caused by sepsis have risen by more than a third over two years at england‘s hospitals. that‘s according to figures given by a leading health expert. campaigners have described the rare but serious complication as a "silent killer". our health editor hugh pym reports. sepsis is a serious complication which can develop after infections without antibiotics, it can result in organ failure and death. melissa mead‘s12—month—old son, william, died after developing sepsis, which was not detected by doctors. along with other campaigners, she has tried to raise awareness among staff and patients. the one thing that william wants
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more than anything else in the world is his life. and i have mine and i cannot waste it. and i won‘t waste it. this campaigning and doing this kind of thing is my way of being william‘s mum. i will always be his mum, so i will continue. screening of vulnerable patients has improved, but figures given to the bbc suggest that sepsis as an increasingly dangerous problem. using official nhs data, experts at imperial college london say there were just over 15,700 deaths recorded at english hospitals in the 2016/17 year where sepsis was the main diagnosis. two years previously, there were just over 11,300 such deaths. that was a 38% increase over the course of two years. nhs england says its efforts to to increase recognition mean cases previously recorded as simple infections are now classified as sepsis. experts say that may account
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for some of the increase but there are other factors that need explaining. we‘ve got the increasing pressure on the nhs. we‘ve got fewer health care professionals delivering more care to ever—increasing numbers of patients, and that‘s got to play a part in these figures. campaigners believe that the struggle to contain sepsis is from over, and it will need a much bigger effort to bring it under control. hugh pym, bbc news. britain‘s biggest foodbank charity has called for extra donations to ensure children who get free school meals during term—time don‘t go hungry during the school holidays. the trussell trust says that last year thousands more emergency food packs were provided during the summer months. our home editor mark easton reports. the issue of holiday hunger, that is called, has been rising up the political agenda. around 1.5 million children are eligible for free school meals in the uk, but outside term time struggling families must find an additional £30 to £a0 a week. many resort to food banks,
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with the trussell trust saying emergency provision for children rises significantly during the summer months, when donations cannot meet demand. the trussell trust runs a28 food banks all across the uk. so we know thatjust in ourfood banks alone, 7a,000 supplies of food were given out to children in the summer months last year. that‘s an increase on the year before. it‘s a really concerning increase. in scotland, and in wales, some local authorities now provide free school meals throughout the year to counter a problem that teachers say leads to signs of malnourishment when pupils return to classes in september. last week, the government announced a £2 million fund in england to provide around 30,000 poorer children with healthy meals and activities during the holidays. but, earlier this year, ministers refused to support a draft bill that would have placed a duty on local councils to ensure disadvantaged pupils were fed.
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the government says it is committed to supporting families to improve their lives, but the trussell trust is among those warning that welfare cuts and the introduction of universal credit will mean more children go hungry. mark easton, bbc news. a baby girl born with a tooth has had it removed atjust 12 days old. most babies start teething at about six months with some starting as young as four months and others after a year, but isla—rose heasman developed her first tooth at birth. her motherjasmin heasman said she has been recovering well. they told me once she was born, they checked her over, they told me there and then that she had a tooth. i was just shocked and then they told me that they tested to see if it was stable and they said yes, it would not come out and it was secure in her mouth. but then 12 days later,
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it started bleeding, it became wobbly, so i had to take her to the emergency dentist. they said if it fell out she could have swallowed it. it was weird, once they took it out they showed me. it looked so weird because i was so used to seeing her with teeth. now that she has had it taken out, she‘s doing a lot better. joining me now from plymouth is alaa jebur, who carried out the extraction of isla—rose‘s tooth. how unusual is this? it is pretty rare. i myself have come across three. so isla—rose is my third child. right, but 12 days old? yes. i actually saw her on the day she was born and i was the one who assessed her. and it was pretty
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sta ble assessed her. and it was pretty stable at the time. it was a bumpy, sort of structure. it was absolutely fine, but we have to give the advise if it becomes wobbly, then the mum should seek a dentist‘s advise. possible consultations or inhalation, or paying, around the time. things like that. so that is what happened in this situation here how difficult was the task of removing it? dun cher it was absolutely straightforward. it was already wobbly. these teeth are neonatal. they tend to have no roots whatsoever. so they stay there things to the dumb attaching to them. once it became exposed to the mouth, there was nothing there to hold it. no problem whatsoever. was there a problem for the 12—day—old baby? no. if it would have stayed there, there is a risk of inhalation. that child could have...
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there is no chance we can make sure the child has swallowed it. it could have gone into the lungs. it was a goodidea have gone into the lungs. it was a good idea to take it out while we can still see it. i can see the sense behind that. ijust wondered how she was? she was absolutely lovely. she was a bit hungry. so as soon as the tooth came out, we gave her... she is taking formula milk so we put the bottle straight into her mouth and she was really happy to have it. she deserved a sticker on the day. yes, we saw the sticker. how was mum while all this was going on? we needed her consent. so she gave us her consent and then she disappeared from the room. left the child with her grandmother and her auntie. the child was sat in the anti—‘s lap. the anti—was in the dental chair. got a little bit of topical gel around the tooth and it
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came out really straight. the child hardly cried. it was brilliant. it was lovely. mum was surprised that her child did not make any noise. she was worried from that. that is why she ran in. it was much more difficult for mum then for the baby. looking forward, does the fact that she has been born with a baby tooth like this, does this have any bearing on how her teeth might develop in the future? absolutely not. no. suejust have one develop in the future? absolutely not. no. sue just have one extra two to give to the tooth fairy and make more money. that is lovely. i guess if she was going to develop a fear of the dentist later advise, that has now been combated. well kind of, i guess it depends if she remembers. her mother will have to tell her that she was really brave and did really well. hopefully that will build up the confidence to come back to see the dentist and the dental team. that should work well for her
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in the future. i'm sure you are correct. thank you so much for coming on. the headlines on bbc news... a warning from the governor of the bank of england — the possibility of britain crashing out of the eu without a deal is "uncomfortably high" and that a "no—deal" scenario could mean disruption to the economy. the sister of the missing midwife, samantha eastwood, has appealed for information about her whereabouts after she was last seen leaving the royal stoke university hospital. and as forecasters say europe could record its highest ever temperature later today, tourists and locals have been warned to stay out of the sun and to keep hydrated. this year marks a hundred years since the end of the first world war so one hundred days before the centenary on 11 november, the royal british legion is launching a movement to honour the generation
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who served in the war. the legion will commemorate the 1.1 million british and commonwealth armed forces who lost their lives, but also the military personnel and civilians who played their part at home. our correspondent is at tate modern in central london. well, today is 100 days before the end of the first world war. i think the message is pretty clear, it is a very big thank you to all of those who took part. now this is notjust about you to all of those who took part. now this is not just about those who fought in the first world war, but the others who also made different contributions. let me take you to have a quick look. here are the ladies of tottenham who took over the football team after all the men went away to the front and they decided they wanted to keep it going. many thousands packed up the stadiums to watch them. memories of the women and children who help to keep the food going while the war
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was continuing. now here we have the memorials to all the different servicemen who contributed. we‘ve got a couple of tommy cyr here a member of the raf and also done here some sailors representing the navy. the contributions of women were significant. this letter remembers all the women who were part of the any missions —— ammunition teams. here is mary curie. she made mobile x—ray devices. a lot of these pioneers and innovators making different inventions that are still used today. here we are remembering those from the commonwealth who volunteered to come to fight in the first world war as well. it is incredibly beautiful colourful work of art. here is the artist sara. why did you want to make it so colourful? i wanted to bring everything to live. i wanted to get
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away from looking at black and white photographs. and yes, just bring people closer. anybody can come up to the illustrations and really relate to them. it feels like you could almost bumped into these people in the street. is that what you wanted to create? absolutely. it was purely by chance. i coloured them in as an experiment and as soon asi them in as an experiment and as soon as i did them in as an experiment and as soon asididi them in as an experiment and as soon as i did i could feel how alive they felt. there is one particularly special person in this montage. and this is your great—grandfather down here. tell me a little bit how you came to find out about him? through my research. i just came to find out about him? through my research. ijust wanted to find out more about him and so i did that and found out where he fought and he died just before the end of the war. i live in brighton and he was from there. so it felt really special to include him in the illustrations.
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and i actually found out he lived just around the corner for me. it just around the corner for me. it just brought it all to live. that is incredible. do you think that is —— as it has been a hundred years since the war ended that it is difficult for people to relate to?|j the war ended that it is difficult for people to relate to? i think yes. people might not think they have a connection and i hope through this campaign people can now... they can look up their great—grandfathers and find out more about them like i did. oreven if and find out more about them like i did. or even if theyjust want to come and look at the illustrations. looking into the faces of these people, they can say thank you without really knowing anyone specifically. thank you very much. this is starting in london, but this memorial will be taken all across the country to six different cities. and people are being asked... have a look down here to live their own mark. this is one of the children‘s that left their own mark. a small thank you for lily. a message from this generation to that great
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generation, room and bring the sacrifices that they made to make this modern britain. that was caroline davis reporting there. with all the good weather we‘ve been having — it‘s improved the chance of seeing one of our most iconic species — the bat. there are 18 different types in the uk and they‘re becoming tougher to spot. our reporter adrian campbell has been to see a unique monitoring project in the golden cap estate in dorset. chris deak from the dorset bat group is setting an unusual trap. it is almost invisible to bats. a special device plays out bat calls to lure them in, normally we wouldn‘t hear them, but another gadget interprets the sound for our ears. chris is specially licensed to handle these tiny mammals, and with the help of volunteers, he is hoping that after dusk he can be able to identify and then carefully release his latest catch. if i am a bat and i am flying around
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happily in the woodland, we can put an acoustic lure to lure them in, they will come to investigate and hopefully not see our lines, fly into that and tumble down here and into the bag and then all we do is we come along, scoop them out and taken back base camp for processing. this is a very rare woodland species. there are 18 types of bat in britain and golden cap is already known to have 12 different species. this is this a long—eared. a little girl. this is this year‘s young, which may indicate there is a breeding colony around here. so it has just got really exciting. we have seen two and now three more bats have arrived and we are just about to have a look at them. the bats are painstakingly
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identified as the experts try to help improve their chances here. gemma barron from the national trust works with volunteers and tenants to promote the best conditions for the bats. they are using the habitats, the grasslands, the hedge rows, the woodlands for foraging and navigating around the landscape. and the trees are important? yes, really important for them. they can navigate along here, it is also a foraging ground, lots of invertabraes. and it connects up to the head roads, which then travels through the landscape. bats are in decline, caused in part because we have damaged their habitats. but these amazing creatures can live for 20, maybe 30 years or more. adrian campbell, bbc news, golden cap, dorset. now if you are tired of the sweltering heat,
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spare a thought for the citizens of phoenix, arizona. this huge dust storm passed over the us city and the surround area yesterday evening. this second large monsoon storm of the season was the first to reach phoenix. rains and high winds toppled a transmission tower and a number of tree, whilst flights from phoenix international airport were delayed due to the low visability. no injuries have been reported. in a moment, it‘s time for the one o‘clock news with jane hill but first it‘s time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello, temperatures have been rising through the afternoon. it has been hot across southern and eastern areas, but largely dry. not as hot as it is across siberia where yesterday we had a5 celsius. over
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the next day or so, if we are expecting it to the record for portugal and parts of spain, that is above a7 celsius. here, as was the heat, we have had a little bit of rain through the day. this is how it looked here. you can see there earlier in the day. this is the fog around some of the coastlines. of course underneath that weather front it feels very different to the hot sunshine further south. sunshine to the north, just a few showers starting to pick up. the cell, the heat will continue throughout the remainder of the afternoon. i would not be surprised to see temperatures around 32 or 33 degrees. it is a little bit cooler weather clouded, but the rain should be clearing away. and it will be pleasantly warm for northern ireland. potentially some showers for the east of scotla nd some showers for the east of scotland for a time in the late afternoon and early evening before they clear out of the way. behind
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they clear out of the way. behind the weather front, i think it will bea the weather front, i think it will be a more comfortable night for scotla nd be a more comfortable night for scotland and northern ireland. but for england and wales, it will feel quite impressive because of the muqqy quite impressive because of the muggy air. saturday, it will be a nice one for many parts. there‘ll be some pleasant sunshine even in the north where it will be fresher. many places will stay dry and fine. in fa ct places will stay dry and fine. in fact for many parts, there might be a shower or so. temperatures will not be quite as high as we have seen today. but it is still hot and obese and strong sunshine wherever you are. on sunday, a greater chance that this weather front will push in. possibly a little bit of rain for the highlands and islands. the majority of the uk looks fine and dry. temperatures trailing off a little bit across southern areas bird it will be a pleasant average temperature of the high teens or low 20s. this is the weather front
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approaching late in the day. high 20s in the southeast. the governor of the bank of england warns the possibility of britain crashing out of the eu without a deal is uncomfortably high. mark carney says that scenario is unlikely but that the uk and eu must do everything possible to avoid it. i think the possibility of a no deal is uncomfortably high at this point, yes. so you're saying quite clearly that a no—deal brexit would be a disaster? it is highly undesirable. supporters of brexit say his comments are part of project fear. we‘ll have all the reaction from westminster. also this lunchtime: zimbabwe‘s opposition vows to challenge the result of the presidential election after emmerson mnangagwa is declared the winner. deaths from sepsis in english hospitals rise by more than a third in two years. those who survive say
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the impact is life changing.
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