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tv   The Travel Show  BBC News  August 4, 2018 5:30am-6:01am BST

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the hollywood film producer harvey weinstein is trying to have criminal charges against him of rape, dismissed. his legal team is arguing that prosecutors should have shared email evidence with the grand jury that indicted him. mr weinstein denies all the charges. us secretary of state mike pompeo has called for pressure to be maintained on north korea as concerns mount about the progress of denuclearisation. speaking at a meeting of southeast asian countries, mr pompeo called on us allies and partners to maintain sanctions against pyongyang. the united states has called on zimba bwe's political leaders to be magnanimous in victory and gracious in defeat following violence after emmerson mnangagwa was declared the winner of the presidential election. the opposition mdc alliance says it plans to challenge the result in court. it's little more than 50 years since donald campbell lost his life, trying to break his own water speed record in the lake district.
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his jet powered vessel was travelling at more than 300mph, when it crashed on coniston water. well, bluebird k7 has since been salvaged and painstakingly restored, and is about to take to the water again. lorna gordon has more. the isle of bute in the firth of clyde has never had a visitor like this. bluebird. the jet—engined hydroplane that held seven world records, restored to its former glory in a journey that has taken 17 years. it's all original material, it has been re—repaired and assessed for strength. modern day rivets, all this kind of thing. just a painstaking and thorough rebuild. donald campbell died trying to break his own record as the fastest man on water, hurtling past at more than 300mph on coniston water in the lake district. his daughter, gina, carrying the teddy bear he had with him, has come to bute to see bluebird take to the water again. i'm tingling.
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i'm not sure how i'm going to feel to see the boat up close. i think the crux will come when i see someone else climb into the pilot seat. i have never seen anyone else in there other than my dad. this time around, bluebird will be travelling across this scottish loch at much lower speeds, the volunteers involved planning to toast success in an understated style. are you going to celebrate? nice cup of tea. do what the british do best. the project has been built on cups of tea. this, a long waited for chance to celebrate donald campbell's achievements, by seeing his record—breaking craft in action. again. lorna gordon, bbc news, on the isle of bute. now on bbc news, it's time for the travel show. this week we are in south africa.
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the country marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of former south african president nelson mandela. i will be injohannesburg, finding out how the city is reinventing itself, and visiting one of the most spectacular regeneration projects in africa. it is something that was built for the few, and it has been repurposed now and is finding its feet is something for the many. and i will be trying out some home cooking with mandela's personal chef. i am making ace -- making the simplest meal you have ever had in your life. the wonderful mr mandela used to love to eat it. plus, i will be hotfooting it down to cape town to meet the young ballroom dancers topping to shape the future of the rainbow nation. the amazing thing about seeing the born free generation, which is, they don't really know what it feels to feel or see segregation.
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iam in i am in johannesburg, iam injohannesburg, the i am injohannesburg, the largest city in south africa, as the country celebrates 100 years since the birth of its most famous son, nelson mandela. joburg is where he found his feet as an anti—apartheid activist, and it is the place he called home once again following his release from prison. situated in the north of the country, the city grew ata north of the country, the city grew at a startling rate after the discovery of gold in 1886. scores came from across africa and beyond to seek their fortune. but while many white prospectors got rich, the black workers suffered in poverty. in the late 1940s, inequality became law under the notorious apartheid at regime, which lasted for nearly 50 yea rs, regime, which lasted for nearly 50 years, until mandela was elected president. by that time decades of
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industrial decline and international sanctions had damaged johannesburg's economy and crime was widespread. the city came to be known as one of the most dangerous places on earth. but in recent years there has been a drive to change all of that, and previously banned as neighbourhoods like this one are now on the tourist trail. -- like this one are now on the tourist trail. —— abandoned. mabunang has been described as one of the most successful urban renewal projects in the world. a network of coffee shops and street art. artists from south africa and beyond have come to transform the city's buildings. and the revival isn't limited to urban areas. this is another example of an open space that used to be considered dangerous. this trail i’u ns considered dangerous. this trail runs right through the heart of johannesburg, and since its revitalisation it attracts more than 4000 visitors each weekend. luckily
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the authorities realised that they needed to getjoburg back in the mix, so there has been various initiatives, starting from the city centre, cleaning it up, getting security in place, and the trail is basically the continuation of the process. it is as you get out of the city centre you've got this beautiful green lung that residents and tourists can use. visitors can see a strong security presence on the trail, and they are encouraged to use a specially created mobile app that can raise the alarm in case of emergency. perhaps the most visible symbol of johannesburg's regeneration, though, is in berea, 80 miles away. towering over the skyline is the continent's largest residential skyscraper, ponte city. at more than 500 feet tall with an
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iconic circular design, ponte offers stunning views overjohannesburg. now tourists can visit a converted apartment on the 52nd floor. all right, good morning, everyone. welcome. my name is frank. before i get into the history of the building, what do you guys know about the building? what are some of the stories you guys heard of the building? quite a lot of poverty, but fantastic views. also, we heard it is very cool to see the whole of johannesburg and see a bit more. we like to provide contacts some of this building that we use, the reason we started here, this building played a huge part in the history ofjoburg. building played a huge part in the history of joburg. the social enterprise that operates the tour is run bya enterprise that operates the tour is run by a former resident. enterprise that operates the tour is
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run by a former residentlj enterprise that operates the tour is run by a former resident. i spent two and years of my life in ponte. i moved here in 2012 after doing a story on what is this infamous landmark on the johannesburg skyline? ponte opened its doors in 1975. it was built for the top 1% of society. there were saunas, wine cellars. this actually was the first floor of a 3—storey apartment. where this building finds itself, it has all is being very cosmopolitan. during apartheid and the government didn't want black people to partake in certain sectors of the economy and imported a lot of skills. so what you had was a lot of german engineers mixing with portuguese artisans, anybody like immigrants, expats, coming here and just making a life for themselves. very, very diverse. what it resulted in was a lot of racial mixing as well. the foreign residence brought with them
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all liberal values and less regard for the apartheid laws. according to nicholas, the government reacted by cutting of services to the building. as many white residents left for the suburbs, ponte's fortunes declined. no running water, no electricity. this is when you hear the really crazy stories that we were brought up crazy stories that we were brought up on in johannesburg crazy stories that we were brought up on injohannesburg in the 80s and 90s, about this building being the place where angels fear to tread, you know? because quite literally, it was just a horrible place. you know? because quite literally, it wasjust a horrible place. no—go territory? exactly. so this place that you guys are standing on now, if these walls could speak they will tell you some of the creepiest things on the planet, 0k? when this was a vertical slum you have 14 stories of rubbish. so the building is 54 stories. and the rubbish pilot as faras is 54 stories. and the rubbish pilot as far asjust two is 54 stories. and the rubbish pilot as far as just two floors above that criss—cross there.
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it is just unbelievable to think of everything that has happened here. it isa everything that has happened here. it is a real haunting feeling down here. my parents moved in here before i was born. what year was that? my parents moved here in 1994. 1994 until 1998. stating he was dangerous, stayed in the building or you were visiting. people would rob people from corridors, the lifts we re people from corridors, the lifts were not working. they were staying on the third floor. it wasn't until the late 2000 is that the building was cleared and renovated. how would you say things have improved now? truth be told, when my friend told me that the building is nice and stuff i would be like, no, i'm not coming. iwas
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stuff i would be like, no, i'm not coming. i was like, dam, stuff i would be like, no, i'm not coming. iwas like, dam, iwant to come back here. now it is home to a diverse range of people, including migrants from all over africa. and is hyperlink some have criticised the tours. initially we were criticised for creating something akin to poverty pawn. the fact of the matter is, people live in silos in south africa and people don't necessarily know how the rest of south africa lives oi’ how the rest of south africa lives or indeed how inner—city johannesburg operates with so many different african migrants, cultures and identities. this is a chance to actually realise what is happening on the ground in your own city, in the city of god. the city eventually provided a safe place for the people who lived in the building, to pretty much go... this building has been through hell and back. and to me,
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ponte signifies, in many ways, the story of a democratic south africa, in terms of trying to find your identity since 1994. it is something that was built for the few. and it has been repurposed now and is finding its feet as something for the many. and if you are planning on coming here any time soon, here are some top tips from the travel show. if you are keen to find out more about nelson mandela's story, there is an app you can download called ponte —— called mandiba's journey. app you can download called ponte —— called mandiba'sjourney. using the applicant find places to stay around south africa, get tips on other attractions close by, and listen to audio guiding you through the story. if you are travelling further afield to the western cape you'll get a sideways take on south african history at petersburg uys theatre.
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that was the first phrase that nelson mandela taught me, you snooze, nelson mandela taught me, you snooze, you nelson mandela taught me, you snooze, you lose. his cross dressing character was a thorn in the side of the apartheid regime during the 19805, the apartheid regime during the 1980s, and used laughter as a weapon in the fight to free nelson mandela. isaid to in the fight to free nelson mandela. i said to him, mr mandela, do you remember what i look like without how? and he said, no. and i said, should i take it off? and he said, yes. slater got evita's where gandhi said, put it back on. and stars will come together in december to perform atain come together in december to perform at a in johannesburg come together in december to perform at a injohannesburg to celebrate the end of this special anniversary year. so far, beyonce, jay—z, chris martin and sarah williams have all signed up. in an interesting twist, most tickets are free but to get one you will need to prove that you are doing something to make the world a better place. still to come on the travel show... i will be meeting the woman who cooked for nelson mandela
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for over 20 years. am by saying it right? i can't say it! and we meet the man taking the foxtrot to the townships. it is because of the dancing, we are all human. we are all south africans. dancers are universal thing. it is open for everybody. the blinkers must be taken. so don't go away. when nelson mandela was released back in 1990, he pretty much went from prison to globetrotting —— globe trotting he wrote and elder statesman overnight. 0ne wrote and elder statesman overnight. one of the things he missed most when he travelled was a spot of home cooking. iam when he travelled was a spot of home cooking. i am off to meet the woman who was his personal spanish —— shep for 20 years. hello. who was his personal spanish —— shep for20 years. hello. nice who was his personal spanish —— shep for 20 years. hello. nice to to. i
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have heard amazing things about your talents as a chef. what are you going to make for us today?|j talents as a chef. what are you going to make for us today? i am making the simplest meal that you have ever had in your life. in our language it is called mpokwa. it is one that mr mandela used to love. he could not go a single week without eating this. he had to have this meal every week. yes. i would use maize mill, sour milk. it has to be sourfor him. so that maize mill, sour milk. it has to be sour for him. so that when he eats a... with water and salt. very simple. that is my kind of meal. 0 whether to bestow. —— let us go over
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to the stove. i will add bread and water. that is mpokwa. am i saying that right? i am just going to zero. tell me what it was like cooking for mandela, just in general? at the beginning ifelt mandela, just in general? at the beginning i felt intimidated, because i was going to cook for him. when i had to meet him the first timei when i had to meet him the first time i was shivering. but he was so warm to me when he received me in his house he stood up for me and he shook my hand and he said to me, "i know you are a great cook, but can you cook our old home food?" i said yes. i knew it was myjob. i had the job immediately. yes! apparently when he went to london, where ever he goes, in any country, at that particular year, that day, that week, hejust decided he had a
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craving for his home food while they we re craving for his home food while they were there already. then they got a call saying that we know you are off, you are home, can you please go back tojo'burg. off, you are home, can you please go back to jo'burg. and off, you are home, can you please go back tojo'burg. and they had to cook this simplest dish for him. what i did, me and my colleagues, we had to wrap it up nicely, it looked like a present, and when we sent it to him we had to write the present‘s medication. and after that i was called that. i smuggled food to him. smuggled his favourite dish into the uk. yes. the milk is about to be ready. exactly. that is how he used to say when he was sitting there waiting for this. is he doing what i am doing now? would he hover? iam going am doing now? would he hover? i am going to try it. come on, it
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was one of mandela's favourite meals. i have to give it a try. laughter. that looks quite yummy. i can see why he liked it. talking with my mouthful. to enter this week, we are in the south of the country in cape town, famed for its spectacular coastline and dramatic landscape. the city has witnessed some of the most momentous events in the country's history. . witnessed some of the most momentous events in the country's history. ij have events in the country's history. i have changed the idea of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony. this a beautiful grabbed an iconic building is at city hall. it is from that balcony that mandela
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gave his first speech after being released from prison. back then, this entire area was completely jampacked with people either to catch a glimpse of the what if he had to say. but almost a quarter of a century after the end of apartheid in 1994, i want to see how far these hopes for the rainbow nation have come. we are on our way to mitchells plain, a township in the suburbs of the city. in the past, people from areas like this would not have got many opportunities. but things are slowly changing, giving the next—generation the chance for their talents to be recognised. at the neighbourhood and studio, children aged as young as four are having their final reeh was all head ofa having their final reeh was all head of a prestigious ballroom condition. -- final of a prestigious ballroom condition. —— final preparations. their footwork is impressive. former dancer champion, arthurjacobs, open
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the school specifically to keep local kids off the streets. this is an area with one of the highest crime rates in the country. every day there is killings, drugs, guns. and our children lived among its evenin and our children lived among its even in their own environment, the housing environment day by day they lived in it. you take them from the street and you show them something better. you saw the little ones?i did. and then you saw the end result. what is your favourite dance move? the cha-cha. i saw you rocking the samba earlier. you are doing a good tango early. dancing is one of the most popular sports in townships, up there with football and boxing. perhaps more importantly, it is bringing young south africans from all backgrounds together. we try not to go for
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racism and saying you are black, you are white, we try to stay clear of that. it is because of the dancing and we are all human, we are all south africans. dance is a universal thing. it is open for everybody. welcome to the south african dancing championships. it is a new day and it is showtime. a dazzling parade of sequence, it is showtime. a dazzling parade of sequence, lycra, and colour. we are here at the super series national championship. people have come from all over the country to compete on this dance floor. there is so much excitement in the air. the guys are looking suave, the ladies are looking suave, the ladies are looking fabulous, but who will take owners trekkies? 400 dancer is from
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27 studios all hoping that their foxtrots a nd 27 studios all hoping that their foxtrots and sambas will lead them to victory. with more than 80 sections to get through, it is a huge operation. 89 and 117. for some of the younger kids from mitchells plain it is the first year competing. all that hard work plays off. —— pays off. hey guys! aru, you guys, you are melting my heart right now! although events like this are now a riddle pa rt events like this are now a riddle part of the calendar across south africa, it is sobering to remember that not so long ago, under apartheid, it was socially to before black and white couples to do together at a regular part. conditions like this would be unthinkable. i remember when we did
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our first unthinkable. i remember when we did ourfirst condition in unthinkable. i remember when we did our first condition in johannesburg and we were the only black children dancing in the competition and we we re dancing in the competition and we were a corner. i remember being invisible. arimura by being a champion, knowing what it means to bea champion, knowing what it means to be a champion, but also not really been recognised —— i remember. i remember them not knowing my name. but thankfully things are different for the generation born free of apartheid. i think the amazing thing about seeing the born free generation, which is they don't really know what it feels like to see or feel segregation. we actually see or feel segregation. we actually see couples that are dancing from two different, a white girl and a black boy dancing together. no one would deny the country still has some way to go before fulfilling mandela's dream, but in their own small way a step by step, the young hopefuls here in cape town are doing their bit to carry his legacy into their bit to carry his legacy into the future. sadly, that is all we have time for
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this week. join us next time when... mike reports from sowrey over on a city that is reinventing itself following the balkan war, which caused so much devastation in the 19905 -- caused so much devastation in the 19905 —— sowrey ovo. caused so much devastation in the 1990s -- sowrey ovo. normally you would pay extra for a bit full view of these ills, it was one of the most dangerous spots to be in this hotel. —— hills. most dangerous spots to be in this hotel. -- hills. 0h most dangerous spots to be in this hotel. -- hills. oh my goodness. this is tiny. fancy taking a private plane without breaking the bank balance? we are in the air. flight sharing on a day trip to northern france. don't forget, you can keep up france. don't forget, you can keep up with us on social media, details are on screen up with us on social media, details are on screen now. up with us on social media, details are on screen now. until lexar, from me, and the rest of the team in south africa, it is goodbye. —— until then. hello there.
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we had a bit of rain around on friday across parts of northern england, north wales, into the midlands as well, but for most places it was another warm and dry day. this is how weak ended the day in topsham in devon. heading towards the weekend we will see scenes a little bit like this, more spells of sunshine around and it is looking dry and warm wherever you are. just the chance of the odd shower across northern and western parts of scotland, but it should be a dry weekend elsewhere. heading through the day on saturday, we have high pressure building its way in from the west, a couple of weak weather fronts pushing further south across the uk, introducing slightly fresher conditions to northern and western parts. down towards the south—east of england, that this where we keep the heat and humidity through the day on saturday. most places dry, best of sunshine towards the south and east, particularly for northwest scotland we will have a bit more cloud, perhaps the odd shower. temperatures not quite as hot, the yellow colours on the map,
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but down towards southern england we will see those red colours returning. the heat building once again in the south—east, temperatures of 33 celsius on fridays at the 29 or 30 degrees by the time it gets to saturday, not quite as hot as recent days and slightly fresher further north. 0vernight into sunday and most of us are staying dry with light winds, pretty warm but not as quiet as humid as it has been recently. a few showers towards the north—west of scotland, dry elsewhere and temperatures falling between 12—16 degrees for most towns and cities as sunday morning. the second half of the weekend and it is high pressure once again that is going to be driving our weather, moving its way in from the west and holding on for the next few days. sunday looks like another dry day for most, northern scotland seeing a bit more cloud, bringing the prospect of a few more showers to the highlands of scotland too. sunny spells for scotland, northern ireland and northern england, on spells of sunshine for england and wales and it is towards the south—east that we see the highest temperatures. generally 18—29 degrees for most of us on sunday. into monday and we will start to see a bit more cloud, with a weak front into northern ireland and the west of scotland, one or two showers and perhaps in the far north of england. further south again,
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a dry day with lots of sunshine and light wind. we could see 31 celsius, a little bit more warmer over time it gets to monday and a touch fresher north. to the middle part of the week and those temperatures will get down a little bit, most places staying dry. a few showers in the west. bye bye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: what a waste. new research finds two thirds of plastic containers still can't be recycled as councils call for action. three people die from heatstroke in spain, as record temperatures hit large parts of europe. lawyers for harvey weinstein try to get rape charges thrown out based on emails from one of his accusers. tackling the stigma of autism. for the first time a study examines the stress and isolation facing mums, dads and carers. the first test is in the balance, after england bowl themsleves back into the game, but they still need to deal with india captain virat kohli.
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