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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 4, 2018 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: what a waste. new research finds two thirds of plastic containers still can't be recycled, as councils call for action. three people die from heatstroke in spain as record temperatures hit large parts of europe. harvey weinstein‘s lawyers try to get rape charges thrown out, based on an exchange of emails with one of his accusers. the first test is in the balance after england bowled themsleves back into the game — but they still need to deal with india captain virat kohli. earlier this year he became one of only 10 british climbers to have conquered k2. jake meyer will tell us what it's like to take on the savage mountain. the weather looks hot and sunny for the south—east, but cloudy for north—western parts were temperatures will be closer to normal. and we will also look at the extreme heat with us across spain
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and portugal. more details coming up. it's saturday 4th august. our top story: the majority of household plastic waste is still ending up in landfill despite efforts to increase the amount we recycle. the local government association says manufacturers are to blame, as the types of plastics used in many yoghurt pots, ready meal trays and other containers limit the ability of councils to recycle them. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. the costs to the planet are well documented, but local authorities are warning that despite their best efforts to recycle more plastic, they are being let down by manufacturers. while almost all local authorities collect plastic bottles for recycling, around a quarter refuse to collect other food packaging because of the way it is manufactured.
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the rest ends up here in landfill. it seems totally unfair that the burden of an recyclable plastic, the cost of dealing with that lands with the council taxpayer, when actually manufacturers could do much more to make sure that these plastics are easily recyclable, reducing the cost for council taxpayers and making it easier and better for the environment. while plastic bottles are easy to recycle, their lids aren't, and are not always collected. not all local authorities collect margarine tubs, food trays and yoghurt pots, because of the mix of polymers that make it difficult to recycle. even fewer authorities accept black microwave meal trays because black plastic cannot be easily scanned and sorted. the plastics industry has hit back, saying that with 300 different recycling schemes out there, it is no wonder the public is confused. they believe it is down to local authorities to simplify and standardise the process. but the lga says that if manufacturers are not willing to make a change, they should face a charge to chip in towards the cost of collecting and disposing the products which some councils
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can't. three men have died from heatstroke in spain as temperatures in parts of southern europe continue to rise above a0 degrees celsius. holidaymakers are being urged to stay out of the sun and the portuguese government has declared a "zero tolerance" policy on barbeques to avoid the risk of forest fires. here in the uk we know it's going to be hot, with some places reaching 32 degrees, but that's still more than ten degrees cooler than spain and portugal. the highest temperature ever recorded in europe was in athens in 1977, when the mercury hit 48 degrees. the record in spain is 47 degrees and that was set only last year. that was in cordoba, where our correspondent seema kotecha is for us this morning. i know it is very warm where you are. even though you are by the water, still almost unbearable...
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absolutely. i have the sun blazing to my left, in my face, so if i am honest, it is uncomfortable. many people who live here share this viewpoint. people who don't have air conditioning, for example. yesterday, walking around the great mosque which is in the centre of the city, you can see people immersing themselves in the water fountains, doing anything to keep themselves cool doing anything to keep themselves cool. the highest temperature in the south of spain yesterday was 46.1; celsius, and as you said, three people have died in this country as a result of this horrid weather. it really is uncomfortable, and the fa ct really is uncomfortable, and the fact it is continuing and there is no respite inside, i think people are getting rather exhausted. no respite inside, i think people are getting rather exhaustedm certainly doesn't very warm out there. of course feeding government advice to keep cool. tens of thousands of south korean women are marching on the streets of seoul today to protest against what they say
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is an epidemic of men secretly filming videos of them. we can see the live pictures from the south korean capital here. women have been covertly filmed using smartphones and spycameras at work, on trains and in changing rooms and bathrooms. the videos are often posted online on pop—up pornography sites. last year more than 6,000 women reported being spied on to police. the hollywood producer harvey weinstein is trying to have criminal charges against him thrown out of court. his lawyers say a series of emails that show he was in a consensual relationship with one of the women he's accused of raping, and they weren't shown to a jury during the early stages of his case. the movie mogul has pleaded not guilty to six charges involving three different women. from new york, paul blake reports. he was once the most famous film
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producer in hollywood. but outrage over harvey weinstein‘s alleged crimes have left him infamous and kicked off the me too movement, leading many women to speak out against sexual misconduct in the workplace. mr weinstein has already appeared in court accused of sexually assaulting three women, which he denies. but now, his lawyer is trying to get the whole case thrown out, saying in part that the jury has not been told the full story. the defence says that dozens of emails, dating from weeks up to four years after an alleged rape in 2013 that were exchanged between weinstein and an accuser, show that they had a long—term, consensual, intimate relationship, and at no point reference an assault. they say that these emails should have been shown to the grand jury so they could make an informed decision before they brought charges against him. his defence team is attempting to have the other charges thrown out of court on technical grounds. mr weinstein‘s lawyers claim some charges are not detailed enough and they weren't sufficiently notified about others.
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they also claimed the case was rushed to court under pressure from politicians and the media, as actresses like gwenyth paltrow lined up to say that he had behaved inappropriately with them. harvey weinstein was once a hollywood heavy hitter, but now, with a charge that could see him locked away for life, and nearly 100 women publicly accusing him, fame has turned to infamy. the home secretary has described forced marriage as a "despicable" practice and has promised that the government will double its efforts to prevent it from happening in the future. sajid javid's pledge comes after it was found that his department had granted visas to the husbands of british women who had been forced to marry abroad, with charities accusing the home office of "turning a blind eye" to the practice. 0ur correspondent chi chi izundu can tell us more. sajid javid made his comments in a
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series of twitter posts, describing forced marriage as inhumane and uncivilised, a practice that is no place in britain currently. his comments come after a times newspaper investigation which found that a number of people had tried to block the beazer ‘s of their foreign spies is entering into the uk, and founded last year there were 90 such cases “— founded last year there were 90 such cases —— block the visas. despite objection to those visas, they were still issued. charities have warned that women and girls in particular are living in abusive relationships asa are living in abusive relationships as a result of a home office decision. a campaign told us earlier exactly what should be done or what changes could be made to help vulnerable people. what should be happening first and foremost, where a victim reports this, they have to be spoken to, without the presence of family members. is what people don't recognise is, in this context of abuse, it is the family that are the perpetrators. what officials
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should have done is spoken to the victim, believed them, taking it seriously, and blocked the beazer 's. -- seriously, and blocked the beazer 's. —— block the visas. seriously, and blocked the beazer 's. -- block the visas. one of the charities did say that immigration officials were turning a blind eye to this issue is over concerns about cultural and religious sensitivities, but the home office has denied that accusation. behaviour amongst rival heart surgeons at a south london hospital has been described as "toxic", "tribal" and could have contributed to an increase in patient deaths. a leaked report into lower than expected survival rates at st george's said that the heart unit was consumed by "a dark force" and strong leadership was needed in the department to turn it around. a spokesperson from the hospital said the surgery service was safe, but that urgent and major improvements were required. confectionery giant mars has removed millions of pounds worth of advertising from youtube after its brands appeared before music videos glamorising violence.
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a mars spokesperson said the video placement breached their brand safety guidelines and they were now taking action to remove all advertising on youtube. last year mars spent £5 million advertising on the video sharing site. the record—breaking hydroplane bluebird will take to the water for the first time in more than half a century this morning. the high speed boat arrived on the isle of bute for tests yesterday. a team of enthusiasts has spent the past seventeen years restoring the craft, which crashed at more than 300 miles per hour in the lake district in 1967, killing its pilot, donald campbell. a massive dust storm has passed through phoenix in arizona. a thick cloud blanketed the city on thursday evening with winds exceeding 60 miles per hour. several homes were destroyed and thousands were left without power. the national weather service said the storm was 70 miles wide and 5,000 feet high.
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extraordinary images. and significant damage. it must have been very frightening. that's phoenix, arizona. and as the shot widens it looks even more dramatic. londoners could be forgiven for thinking a newjames bond film was being shot on the thames yesterday as jetskis sped through the capital. but there was no sign of daniel craig — it was a real police chase. scotland yard's marine policing unit was spotted chasing fourjet—skis as they raced past the greenwich peninsula and canary wharf towards central london. police said they were able to make the jet—skis change their course but then had to call off the chase for safety reasons. quite a bit of focus on the weather
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right now. it is warm here, but exceptionally warm across the rest of europe. 48 celsius is the record, but they are talking about maybe 47 degrees possibly in spain. yes, very uncomfortable indeed. good morning, chris. you're just shown uncomfortable indeed. good morning, chris. you'rejust shown because uncomfortable indeed. good morning, chris. you're just shown because of the dust storm in arizona. did you know they were known as haboobs? i did not know that offered us that come from? i have no idea! well, i'm impressed. well, as far as the weather goes, the heat is on again in spain and portugal. this is the peak of the heat wave. yesterday we had highs of 47, one of spain's hottest days ever. we are looking at
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47 today and portugal. the national record for portugal is 47.4. we will get close to that. and we will get pretty close to the spanish and european records as well. we will keep you posted. the weather picture for us this weekend, some hot sunshine but quite a bit of cloud working into the north west. in the middle, in between, across the midlands, that is what the skies looked like earlier today. that was sent into was just over an hour ago, the sunshine poking through thick high cloud. that's what that cloud looks like on the satellite icher. further north, for scotland and northern ireland and the far north of england we have thicker cloud still. for many it has a cloudy start. the cloud will be thick
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enough to give us a few showers across the western isles islands this morning. an isolated light showerfor northern this morning. an isolated light shower for northern ireland, this morning. an isolated light showerfor northern ireland, but this morning. an isolated light shower for northern ireland, but the vast majority will dodge them and stay dry. some brighter spells too. the best of the sunshine will be across southern england and east anglia. here we have the highest temperatures, peeking into the low 30s in the hottest areas. further north of the cloud gets thicker, for northern ireland and scotland will be cloudy but some bright spells. temperatures near normal for the time of year, but showers more frequent for the western isles islands as the day goes by. some rain across these areas as we go through this evening and overnight as well. 0therwise, through this evening and overnight as well. otherwise, a dry night, temperatures slowly drifting back to around 16 celsius by the end of the night, and looking at the weather picture for tomorrow, across north—western areas it stays cloudy, but england and wales having plenty of sunshine with top temperatures reaching the high 20s and low 30s. back to you. you're watching
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breakfast from bbc news, time now for a look at the newspapers. astrophysicist carole mundell is here to tell us what's caught their eye. how are you enjoying this weather?” have celtic genes, so it's a bit too hot for me! it is very, very warm. your pics from the papers will stop yes, this is about a government initiative to stop legal aid fees to solicitors fighting crime and defences for defendants. in fact the high court overturned the government's proposed scheme yesterday by saying that the consultation they had launched lacked transparency for data.
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lawyers have been saying it is a fundamental right for defendants to be able to be defended in a criminal trial situation, so they won't be reinstated as a public service. that will go back to the government and they will have to rethink that. we are shortly to get exam results, gcses and a—levels coming up soon. what's the story about cheating? these are exam board concerns. sir john donne board has taken up the post and this saying that pupils are more tech savvy than teachers and there are concerns that new technologies, use of social media, that could be for pupils to cheat in a way that teachers would not be able to tell. in coursework or... ? may be coursework, or if there is a breach of security on exam papers, and the students started to share those unclosed facebook ages now would know that is happening. it has
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not happened yet, but he just raising concerns that there needs to bea raising concerns that there needs to be a review of technology and future technologies because the kids are more savvy than the teachers. the simplest way, devices taken to the example, that's a new problem, isn't it? it's the same as people taking stuff... there were always ways of doing that. the real problem is of course often we are trying to use technology to revolutionise how we do exams. if you have online exams you then have to have cheat check is that are commensurate with the technology that you're using. it's not just technology that you're using. it's notjust children technology that you're using. it's not just children sitting technology that you're using. it's notjust children sitting exams with pencils and checking them nothing this leaves. 0bviously pencils and checking them nothing this leaves. obviously you would not ta ke this leaves. obviously you would not take an iphone into those exams, but even things like calculator is a pretty sophisticated. three of us are done the maths gcse as a report on mats, whether it has become more difficult or not, and calculator is
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have that extra cover, you have to ta ke have that extra cover, you have to take that cover off and calculator to have that extra cover, you have to have that extra cover, you have to ta ke to have that extra cover, you have to take that cover often that cannot go on. and nothing can be stuck on it, no numbers, writing, anything. and when are you getting the results ? and when are you getting the results? august 23, i think. good luck! he is just results? august 23, i think. good luck! he isjust enjoying the torture. fortunately i was busy for those months... we will get you next year. this next one caught my eye particularly because we were talking about what we might have for brea kfast. about what we might have for breakfast. i think i'm allowed to divulge that one of her top tips for brea kfast divulge that one of her top tips for breakfast is hummus with sugar snap peas. yes, there was some hamas early on, and it has come to debate here with that is appropriate for this time of day. i think you can eat whatever you like anytime of day. this is quite a controversial story. public health england said that we need to go through our processed foods, and this is about
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sugar warnings. if you need healthy fruit and veg, that's fine. when you start appearing them and get rid of the pulp and the fibre, that starts to release refined sugars. but the story is confusing because what the dietician says that they don't want people to stop eating healthy food. you need to have some balance. but they are looking through the amount of processed sugars that come out during the processing of the food. is my hummus this morning fine?m is fine, but there is an argument that parents are using that to encourage children to eat fruit and vegetables, there is a balance, it isa vegetables, there is a balance, it is a bit of common sense. if you are worried about the sugars, look at the packaging and make sure nothing else has been added. 0il the packaging and make sure nothing else has been added. oil and simply raid chip these is properly fine. my thing with hummus in the morning, it is partly taste related, but also to smell related. it's a smell i don't associate with morning food. i using
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i smell? itjust surprised me a little bit. but quite right, you can equally be one. on balance it is healthy. keep on with it, naga. noisy motorcycles? yes, this is a call for new regulations to be brought in. the department for transport and looking at this, particularly because there is a legal limit on how noisy exhaust pipe can be and motorbikes are supposed to be fitted with mufflers. but police are tackling increasing numbers of very noisy motorbikes particularly in rural communities, and bringing in technology that will measure roadside noise. the limits are around 70 decibels. there was one that was found around 101 decibel some and to give you an idea, that's the equivalent of a pneumatic drill at five metre distance. this aid is disturbing the peace and quiet and wrecking the law. this leads nicely into any
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guest. stilton and sprouts. because the heat wave, it is the production of food prices that will be affected. that's right. lots of discussion about how farmers have been hit by the heatwave. cattle are being affected because they don't have the pastures to graze because the grass is too dry. that is limiting the amount of milk available to make stilton for christmas. and crops like carrots, potatoes and sprouts, you will be thinking about christmas town right now, and come christmas there are concerns the potatoes will be small, the carrot will be spindly, and we won't have enough sprouts. add on the theme of anything goes for morning foods, stilton? why not? imagine the smell there. thank you very much. we will get a sense of the weather, extraordinary tempters across europe. met office forecaster is on
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the costa del sol. tim butcher is more bearable therefore is we were talking to our correspondent in cordoba it was most unbearable, tell us cordoba it was most unbearable, tell us how it is where you are. this time of day is lovely, lowest temperature is just after sunrise, we have a refreshing sea breeze coming in from the mediterranean here on the costa del sol. but you only have to travel ten minutes inland and you can feel the heat intensified. the highest bridge yesterday was just to the north of andalusia, 46 celsius. here the temperatures climbed into the mid—30s. still very hot i day and by night uncomfortable. but what you expect this time of year. it is a land where there is an impressive' —— and oppressive heat. land where there is an impressive' -- and oppressive heat. sadly we have heard news of three people
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dying from heat stroke and mainland europe. people need to be careful and authorities are being mindful with their advice. absolutely, it is headline news all across spain today. look at any paper, they are very concerned about this, and inland, temperatures are 46, 47, thatis inland, temperatures are 46, 47, that is just awful. people are really suffering for it. people are suffering because the heat is so intense. along the coast sea where holiday—makers come every year, yes there is a breeze, but the uv levels are very high, and just take extra care, don't go out in the midday sun, don't drink —— drink lots of water, and don't exert yourself. we're used to saying that we have to get away from the uk when summer comes, damp summers, miserable. not at the moment. how much more can be expect of this? for this become habit? there is a lot of talk about
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temperatures rising gradually, and this is not the last of the we will see. absolutely not, the summer we have had in the uk, a lot of people have had in the uk, a lot of people have said, why go abroad when we can find sunshine in the uk. but it is lovely being elsewhere, and the heat across europe has intensified in the last month or so. notjust here in iberia, in scandinavia they had record—breaking temperatures, mainland europe as well. year—on—year global temperatures are rising. with that as a platform, extreme weather will become more and more common across these parts. clare, thanks. a group of parents of children with special educational needs have won a high court case against their local council, after it tried to remove £5 million pounds worth of support.
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yesterday the court ruled that bristol city council was wrong to make the cuts and must now find the money to restore funding without cutting other parts of the education budget or increasing tax. samantha hale is the solicitor who represented the families in this landmark ruling and joins us now. could you explain the principles of the case? what is the help that they we re the case? what is the help that they were hoping to get and now have had restored ? were hoping to get and now have had restored? bristol city council took the decision and lawfully to cut the high needs budget by £5 million which would have had a detrimental impact on the local authority's ability to deliver vital services for children and young people with special educational needs and disability. the decision means they now have to review the decision they made after completing a lawful process , made after completing a lawful process, which means they have to consult and speak to those who have been directly impacted by this decision. can you give us a sense of what your challenge was that were successful? how did you challenge their decision? the main argue it
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was based around their failure to consult, the key points to consider the direct impact it would have on the direct impact it would have on the children and young people, and also theirfamilies, the children and young people, and also their families, who the children and young people, and also theirfamilies, who need the children and young people, and also their families, who need those services. and to be clear, this having been established, does this mean those families will get that money allocated to those resources? it doesn't automatically mean that they will, it is more of a procedural point of the local authority has to go back, complete the consultation and make a decision. there is a risk at the end of that process they could make a similar decision, however, the judgment is relief help for because it heavily criticises the local authority for their ability to meet the needs of children in their area as well as having high rates of exclusions, which is the highest in the country. we hope the local authority will take those comments on board and will make a better decision this time. you are acting on behalf of those families and their needs are foremost in your
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thoughts. the budgets which the councils have to play with, decisions do have to be made about where money is spent, and the court has made an interesting ruling about that aspect of it as well. yes, they have made it clear they only want the local authority to review the pa rt the local authority to review the part of the budget that relates to special educational needs and disabilities from an educational perspective. the rest of the decisions they made about the budget previously, they remain intact and won't be touched. as i understand the point they made as well is if the point they made as well is if the money does end up being allocated to the families you represent, that shouldn't be taken from elsewhere, they have said it shouldn't be ta ken from elsewhere, they have said it shouldn't be taken from elsewhere in the council budget nor should local taxes rise to pay for it. exactly. that's an interesting judgment, because the money has to come from somewhere. of course. the judge was
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very cautious not to open up the budget debate for all areas of the local authority but just to focus on theissue local authority but just to focus on the issue that was brought before him which was the high needs allocated budget. can you give us a sense of how the families responded when they got the news? there has been a lot of delight and excitement, not only because it has a positive impact on the two families that were pursuing the case, also for families across bristol. there are similar cases being run with other local authorities, so we're hoping it will also help those families with success in their areas. thank you. this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. we then having a discussion about what food is appropriate for what time of day. commerce in the morning, specifically. does that work for you? not so much. i go along with it though, you have to eat whatever you want at any time of the data for that i used to eat
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tinned ravioli for breakfast as a kid. for special occasions like christmas, there are no rules. you can do what you want. and leftover ta keaways can do what you want. and leftover takeaways are always better in the morning. absolutely, and the bedside table next to you. our special guest today has starred in some brilliant dramas. sharon, good to have you here. the drama today as food heaven and food health. food heaven, i love fennel aniseed taste. quite unusual. i quite like that. i don't eat enough fennel and married could very well. and chicken, i love chicken. food hell... write a lot about textures. i don't like aubergines, doglike eggs. and sweet and just don't get. don't get it! we have two great chefs here. nice to see you. you could the usual chaos? of
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course, i have a highly paid minion to help me. two things wrong with that, highly paid and minion. i'm doing this very special beef from northern ireland. it is from the rump. we will shred it the lid and bread rolls and gradually fry, nice and hot and punchy full stop it makes an amazing combination. and we have you live in the studio as well, we also have rick. i was surprised when he said northern ireland with all this chilean stuffed up like i'm doing sea bass. not sea bass! iwill talk about that later. we have been having a grumpy old man chat about that! and in charge of drinks we have our wine expert who also happens to be rick's son. i've got some amazing things, really lovely
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beerand a some amazing things, really lovely beer and a nice wine in there. and some ros , maybe... you guys at home or in charge of what sharon eats later on, check the website for details and we will see you at ten o'clock. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. coming up before ten, chris will be here with all the weekend weather, but first, a summary of this morning's main news. two thirds of household plastic waste is still ending up in landfill sites despite efforts to increase
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the amount we recycle. the local government association says manufacturers are to blame and are calling on the government to consider banning low—grade plastics used in many food containers because they can't be recycled. ministers say recycling rates are rising, but have acknowledged that there is much to do. it seems totally unfair that the burden of non—recyclable plastic, the cost of dealing with that, lands with a council tax payer, when manufacturers could do much more to make sure that these plastics are easily recyclable, reducing the cost council taxpayers and making it easier and better for the environment. three people in spain have died from heat stroke is the southern european heatwave continues. a red weather warning indicating a threat to life has been issued in several countries including france, where authorities are urging holiday—makers to stay out of the midday sun. in portugal, police have introduced a zero tolerance policy on barbecues to lower the risk of forest fires. harvey weinstein's lawyers have filed a motion to have the criminal case against him dismissed.
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his lawyers have told a judge in new york that dozens of e—mails exchanged between mr weinstein and an accuser up to four years after an alleged rape showed that the two had a long—term insensible relationship. he denies all the charges against him. earlier on breakfast entertainment attorney jonathan handel told us he was convinced the lawyers would succeed with this appeal. there is some duty in new york unlike most states to represent evidence of innocence, but this really isn't that. this is evidence that may tend to undermine the testimony of one of the women, maybe, but doesn't really negate the question of whether a sexual assault happened, sexual conduct with force or threat of force. so it is very unlikely, highly unlikely, that we will see the charges dropped. behaviour amongst rival heart surgeons at a south london hospital
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has been described as toxic and tribal and could have contributed to an increase in patient deaths. a leaked report into lower—than—expected survival rates at st george's said a strong leadership was needed within the department turn it around. a spokesperson for the department said that surgery was safe, but urgent improvements were required. confectionery giant mars has removed millions of pounds of advertising from youtube after its brands appeared before music videos which appeared to glamorise violence. a mars spokesperson said the video placement breached their brands safety guidelines, and that they are now taking action to remove all advertising on youtube. last year mars spent £5 million in advertisement on the video sharing site. londoners could be forgiven for thinking a newjames bond film was being shot on the thames yesterday as jet skis sped through the capital, but it was a real police chase.
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scotland yard's marine policing unit was spotted chasing fourjet skis, this is them racing past greenwich peninsular and canary wharf towards central london. police said they were able to make the jet skis change their course, but they had to call off the chase for safety reasons. those other main stories this morning. there is a lot to be caught up on the sport. it is going to be a thrilling finish to the first test at edgbaston. it all hinges on virat kohli. they need just 84 more runs to win, so england need to get them out quickly. he is an impressive player, an impressive man, and that will be the key wicket to come later. it still could go either way.
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england youngster sam curran gave england a chance to salvage something from the match, thanks to his first test 50. england need wickets quickly, and the key one will be on captain virat kohli. he is still at the crease, unbeaten on 43, having made a century in the first innings. i have been encouraged the way i have bowled so far, found the edge a few times in the first innings. on another day i could have got him for 20 and then we are not talking about how brilliant he is, we could be in a much different position now, but that is not the case and we have just got to go away and know that he is someone, no one is invincible in world cricket, we can get him out and we'll be trying to do that in the morning. he said it was a possibility — now andy murray has pulled out of his washington 0pen quarterfinal, saying he's exhausted. you might have seen he was in tears
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at the end of his last match. he also posted this on social media. "boring, miserable, no personality... big heart though", with a picture of him crying into his towel after his last match, which didn't finish until after three o'clock in the morning. that exhaustion moving into tears. laura kenny makes it look easy doesn't she — new mum in august last year, back competing in march, and now another gold to add to her collection. it came in the women's team pursuit at the european championships in glasgow. our sports correspondent joe wilson has more. laura turney back on the track, part of the team collecting victory. italy were over two seconds behind. gold is familiar. succeeding as a mum is different. sometimes i think when people ask me this, it sounds like i'm moaning, i don't get sleep, but i wouldn't change it for the world. he is everything to me, and i
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wa nt world. he is everything to me, and i want him to have the experiences, i wa nt want him to have the experiences, i want him to have the experiences, i want him to have the experiences, i want him to be able to travel the world with his mum and dad. three british cycling medal so far. after ten kilometres per emily kay, the difference between gold and silver was this. meanwhile it was just a few miles to hannah miley, the swimmer. the great scottish favourite, loads of friends in the stands. plenty of rivals in the pool the 400 metres individual medley kept us gripped. could she keep in the medals? yes, third. 0nly gold will do the adam peaty today. quickest to qualify yesterday, but in the slowest time for him. he promises his a—game for the 100 metres breaststroke final, which could mean a world record. britain's james wilby will hope to stay close. and here is how you turn the tennis court into a facility for synchronised swimming. russia won
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both synchronised golds yesterday, with the new mixed events. as ever it is teamwork which makes the dream work. the mascot knows that. everyone is getting the idea of these european championships. joe wilson, bbc news, glasgow. great to see everyone enjoying the atmosphere there in glasgow. there are 21 gold medals up for grabs today, and there's live coverage on bbc tv, radio 5live and the bbc sport website. great britain's best chances are in the cycling, swimming and rowing. the new championship season began last night. former england midfielder frank lampard was in the dugout with his new club side derby — and what a dream start to life as a manager. they came from behind to beat reading 2—1, with 15 seconds of injury time remaining. tom lawrence on the end of that one. and after all the success lampard's had as a player, he said this win was "right up there" with the best moments of his career. for celtic, never before has a scottish team won the treble treble, by lifting the league,
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the scottish cup and league cup three seasons in a row. but that's the challenge facing brendan rodgers' side as they begin at home against newly—promoted livingston. celtic are bidding to win the scottish premiership title for the eighth year in a row.. as the champions it is ourjob to not just defend, but go and win again. it is the same idea, we want to develop the squad, that is more of our goals for this year. we want to develop the work that we have already put in over these last couple of years, the development of players. i always think when you work with individuals and teams then there is always room for improvement. england's georgia hall is just one shot off the lead at the halfway stage of the women's british open. she's yet to drop a shot at royal lytham this week and four more birdies took her to 9—under—par, as she looks for her first major title. but canada's brooke henderson hit the shot of the day — a hole—in—one on the 9th.
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and won a case of sparkling wine — which she gave to the reporters at her post—round press conference. i like the look of that. i'm sure they enjoyed themselves! how is one sleeping in the warm weather, john? certainly not under a heavy duvet at the moment. but you sleep all right? i would sleep through anything. i am one of those. iam one one of those. i am one of those as well. a lot of people are struggling at the moment. maybe because of the heat — or maybe you're part of the 30% of the population who are battling with some form of insomnia. the long—term impact of the insomnia was highlighted this week as itv news at ten presenter tom bradby returned to work after reportedly spending almost five months dealing with the condition. we're joined now by dr anna weighall who studies sleep at the university of sheffield. good morning. i don't want to
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speculate about somebody who has had problems with insomnia, but the fact is if 30% of us are struggling with this, what is happening? what is causing this? insomnia can have quite a lot of different causes. but in many cases, it is behavioural, so there is quite a lot that you can do to help, we are all living in a very fast paced kind of time, dealing with a lot of social media. we are in an always on culture. that might be explaining why we are seeing an increasing sleep problems. we are used to being told that blue light isn't good for us, hence don't look at phones or tablets before you go to bed, try to be off the television last thing at night. but the way we live now, trying to get as much
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information, that is proving more difficult. i'm not against technology at all. i think we need to embrace it. but what we need to do is make sure we've got a balance. soi do is make sure we've got a balance. so i think that there can be small changes that we can make that might help with sleep, and really we are just talking maybe about an hour in the run—up to bedtime, just making some small changes can have a really positive impact on your sleep. what is the difference between a sleepless night or a few sleepless nights, bit uncomfortable, don't like the weather being so hot at night, and the condition of insomnia? insomnia is really chronic sleeplessness. it is when you are struggling, not just the sleeplessness. it is when you are struggling, notjust the odd time here and there, and it is important to get across that that is normal. it is normal to have the occasional sleepless night, or even a couple of weeks, particularly if there is a cause for it, you are stressed or there is a lot going on or you are busy. when it becomes a problem is when it is really chronic, you are
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sleeping badly more often than you are sleeping well. so you're talking out bout over a period of weeks? or months. and the key is when it is affecting your daily life. some people do manage on less than others, and if you are happy in life is going well and you feel great in the day, i would say that is fine. it is really when you start to notice you are struggling, feeling tired or grumpy, or miserable, and you kind of think there is a relationship between that and your sleep, and it is causing you problems. so you are starting to maybe not do the things you would like to do, perhaps turning down opportunities to do things because you are tired struggling at work or with your studies because you are too tired. then that is time to think, have i got a problem with my sleep and do i need to do something about it. how easy is it to recognise that you are struggling because of lack of sleep? sometimes if you are busy... exactly. say you
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have a new family or a newjob and you're having to travel a lot, you don't think it is because... no, often it is because of all the other things going on. so i think it is about seeing sleep is part and parcel of that, just like we know we need to eat well and we know we shouldn't be too overweight, i think it is something we are very much trying to get across in our work, the people to start viewing sleep as pa rt the people to start viewing sleep as part of a healthy lifestyle. so really if you are struggling in general with anything, and you are finding life difficult, then it is one of the things you should be thinking about, and my eating well, sleeping well, trying to do too much, suffering from stress and anxiety? sometimes you just can't sleep. i would say that is a chronic problem if you generally feel you can't sleep and it is having a negative effect, then it is really worth going to talk to your gp, and
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they will usually ask you quite a lot of questions to try and get to the bottom of it, because it could be behavioural, but you may have an underlying medical condition that needs dealing with. thank you very much. we are going to go to the weather now. chris, you explaining earlier on, the night—time temperature is in parts of spain are higher than our daytime temperatures here, was that right? that's right. temperatures in the uk got up to 33 degrees yesterday, and that is pretty much what temperatures got down to a four o'clock in the morning across portugal. the biggest problem i have with sleep is the 3:45am alarm clock, that is never a good start to the day! the heat has been building over the last few days across spain and portugal, the hottest areas moving into portugal at the moment, peaking at 47 celsius. a reminder that the portuguese national record stands at 47.4, a record that has stood for 15 yea rs, 47.4, a record that has stood for 15 years, so that looks very
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vulnerable. we're getting pretty close to the spanish, and the all—time european temperature record as well. it will come down two tenths of a degree celsius. we will keep you posted on progress. a lot of dry, hot and sunny weather across the south, but it is cloudy further north. this was the scene earlier on today thanks to one of our weather watchers that spotted all this cloud with the sun poking through. that is how it looks across the midlands, wales and northern ireland, the further north you go generally, the thicker the cloud gets. for most of it it will be a dry weekend, however the odd isolated passing shower possible in northern ireland, mostly to avoid that and stay dry, and the cloud will be thick enough to stay dry into the western isles of the highlands, otherwise we stay fine. with the best of the sunshine across south england and east anglia, widely we're looking at temperatures in the high 20s, low 30s in the very hottest spots. quite a bit of cloud
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bubbling up, but there will be some bright weather around. scotland and northern ireland, quite cloudy, temperatures close to normal for the time of year, but the cloud thickens further later in the day across the western isles and across the highlands, so we will start to see some rain moving in here across the course of the day. the cloud will continue to thicken, so we will see outbreaks of rain pushing into the far north—west of scotland, away from the north—west corner it is a dry night. temperatures not quite as dry night. temperatures not quite as dry as last night. temperatures by the end of the night slowly easing down, but the further north you go, the more comfortable the weather gets as far as sleeping goes. for sunday, a very similar weather picture, the best of the sunshine across england and wales, most of us having a dry day, hot in the south again but across northern ireland scotland, quite a of cloud, and western scotland will probably see areas of rain moving in, turning quite heavy towards the end of the day. temperatures close to normal
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tomorrow, the highs probably reaching 30 again in the south. that is how the weather is shaping up, back to you. k2 is the mountain on earth, and a quarter of those who have tried to reach k2 is the mountain on earth, and a quarter of those who have tried to reach the summit have died trying. it may come second to everest in height, but it is ranked as much more dangerous. jack meyer is one of only a handful of brits to reach the top. you can see what that looks like now. it is 8am and we have just reached the summit of k2, i can't quite believe that we are here, but they are at the top of the second highest point on earth. i guess we had to try and get back down safely. you look surprisingly perky up there. i'm surprised, because it justis there. i'm surprised, because it just is so cold, and you had failed
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a couple of times before, so what did it mean to you? it had been a 10—year journey did it mean to you? it had been a 10—yearjourney for did it mean to you? it had been a 10—year journey for me. ever since climbing everest when i was 21, the dream had been to move on to k2, which moves to a much more challenging adventure. i tried in 2009, and we got beaten back type or snow conditions, then in 2016 an avalanche swept away our camp, so 2018 was what i hoped would be, and it turned out to be third time lucky. we are seeing these amazing images here. you use the word challenging, which is quite often overused in some situations, but when we read at that statistic, is that right, that one in four climbers who tried to do the thing you did die in the course of trying crazy —— die in the course of trying? it is a statistic...
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somebody died this year from a snapped robe, and somebody else fell very high up off the mountain. give us very high up off the mountain. give usa very high up off the mountain. give us a sense as we watch very high up off the mountain. give us a sense as we watch the images, how much to those thoughts, and i know you've got young children, a family. how much do those things, how much to those risks play in your head as you are doing this? they are a lwa ys head as you are doing this? they are always there in the back of your mind, but at the same time you can't let the risks and those perceptions of danger cloud your judgment let the risks and those perceptions of danger cloud yourjudgment and your thoughts. you appreciate them, but the same time you have to treat it any other mountain. yes, it has a history, a pretty infamous history, but actually, a day on the hill is just a day on the hill. it's not, though, isn't it? for most people it might bea though, isn't it? for most people it might be a walk in the peak district, and that is challenging enough. why do you need to set yourself this kind of challenge? mallory famously said of everest, because it is there, and i turn that around and said, because i'm here. i
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have managed to go off all sorts of amazing mountains around the world, so it is a case of setting myself more of a challenge each time, and k2 has just been a more of a challenge each time, and k2 hasjust been a dream more of a challenge each time, and k2 has just been a dream for so long. well, you have done it, what's next? very much getting back to work asa next? very much getting back to work as a management consultant, getting back into my role as an armoured troop leader in the armoured reserve , troop leader in the armoured reserve, and then also a family man, of course. but not necessarily in that order. there will be many more mountains and adventures to be had. and i'm intrigued, because clearly you get a thrill out of doing what you get a thrill out of doing what you do a great sense of pride, but the danger is that you are always looking for something, always looking for something, always looking for something, always looking for the next thing. is that the way your head works? i know you say you are going back to this now, but is there a sense lurking that you need to find something else? there is. you end up spending your time while you're away thinking, why ami time while you're away thinking, why am i doing this, it's miserable,
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it's ridiculous, it's dangerous, i just want to be a home. and then the minute you get home, you get itchy feet again. my dreams are often found poring through the pages of atlases, watching the travel channels and seeing what other adventures can be had. as i understand it, often mountaineers say it coming back down the mountain is more dangerous than going up, and there was an incident on your way down, is that right? that is right, whilst you are going up, that is physically tough, but coming down is mentally exhausting as well and you are that much more exhausted anyway. that is often where the dangers can happen, so for instance both of the deaths this year occurred on the way down the mountain. we were involved in the rescue of another climber on a next—door mountain who was coming down as well. and that is where you have to keep your wits about you. getting to the top is only half the journey. talk to me about mental stamina and people you choose to do
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an expedition like this with. because you have to be of a similar mindset, but you also have to be very aware of where you perhaps aren't as strong and to pick each other up without knowing each other. of course, and i think that often it is just about having that relationship with your fellow climber, some which you might have known for years... so tell us about your group. i was with a mixed international team, i was climbing with a slovenian climber called tomasz, and then we had a canadian tea m tomasz, and then we had a canadian team on another mountain as well, so we had the benefit of a big base camp and lots of people, and that is nice, but you spend a lot of time with them, it is very easy to get boarding camp, and keeping each other mentally stimulated is good, but when you are on the mountain, it is living hand in glove with the other person. there was a wonderful moment where tomasz said to me, have
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you got a spare water bottle? and i said, no, and i said but! you got a spare water bottle? and i said, no, and i said but i have got myp said, no, and i said but i have got my p bottle, and he used that for his water. so you have this relationship with somebody else that is so intense that these few weeks. so mental preparation is key, and you look in great shape, but physical preparation perhaps you didn't do as much as people think you need to do? people assume you train for years, you need to do? people assume you trainforyears, and you need to do? people assume you train for years, and most people do. i'd must admit i'm quite lazy, i don't really do any training to any of my trips, i'm more of a turn up and have a go kind of guy. but you wouldn't that advice to anyone who is watching? of course not, prepare yourself, mentally, physically, emotionally. we are glad you're here as well with your fingers intact, because some climbers are in a pretty bad way without.
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we have got time to talk to ricky bhul eto —— buleto now, he is at the summa social. people havejust entered, all these families, you can wave to everybody on bbc breakfast this morning. 0ne wave to everybody on bbc breakfast this morning. one of the headlining act is here, johnny 0rlando. you have millions of fans, you started out on you tube about eight years ago. and you'rejust 15 out on you tube about eight years ago. and you're just 15 years old. what does it feel like headlining an event like this? it is pretty crazy, it is the first cbbc kids event that i have done, so it is amazing, it feels great to be here, and i'm excited to be here. is it a bit
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overwhelming, you only 15, all this attention? and kind of use it because i've been doing it for so long, but it still blows my mind when i'm on stage and all these people are supporting me, it's amazing. let's quickly come to salmond mark. what is cbbc summer social all about? it is basically a festival that our audience, and for the mums and dads as well. this is literally for the cbbc audience. and johnny orlando is amazing. have a fantastic day. operation ouch we re have a fantastic day. operation ouch were behind as a few moments ago, the mersey girls are here, we're going to have a fantastic day. looks like they're going to have a lot of fun, ricky, thank you very much. you enjoy the rest of your weekend, do be very mindful that is warm out there, take advice, do try to keep
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cool there, take advice, do try to keep cool, and stay hydrated. we will keep you up—to—date with all the weather throughout the news channel throughout the day. victoria and tina will be here from six o'clock tomorrow morning, and from everyone here, have a great weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 10am. new research finds two thirds of plastic containers still can't be recycled, as councils call for action. manufacturers could do much more to make sure that these plastics are easily recyclable, reducing the cost for council taxpayers. a leaked report alleges a toxic row between heart surgeons at a south london hospital contributed to a higher mortality rate among patients. the us secretary of state says he's hopeful north korea's nuclear programme can be stopped, despite a un report which claims it is continuing. also this hour — the record—breaking hydroplane bluebird is relaunched. more than 50 years after it crashed, killing its pilot donald campbell, bluebird will take to the water on the isle of bute. and southern europe swelters —
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spain and portugal could see record temperatures this weekend, as the heatwave continues across parts of the continent.
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