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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 5, 2018 6:00am-7:01am BST

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head further south and east and, yes, we are hanging good morning — welcome to breakfast with tina daheley and victoria fritz. our headlines today: adults in england will automatically become organ donors unless they opt out, under plans unveiled today. the government says it could save 700 lives a year. police investigating the disappearance of a midwife from staffordshire find a body and arrest three people. more than 700 firefighters battle a major wildfire in portugal, as southern europe continues to swelter in near record temperatures. against all the odds, ireland are into the hockey world cup final after beating spain on penalties. stand to your timber!
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go! mike meets the athletes limbering up for the british timbersports championships. by by good morning, dry day to day. cloudier further north on a bit of rain per western scotland later but most of us, but by date. more in 15 minutes. it's sunday 5th august. our top story. england could have an opt—out system for organ donation by 2020 under plans being published by the government today. a similar system has been in place in wales since 2015, and scotland plans to introduce a similar scheme. currently, less than 40% of adults are on the nhs donor register. catherine burns reports. she was probably better, won't she? a linda weisejordan's parents say
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she was always fun but liked to plan ahead so she was in her 20s when she signed up to the nhs organ donor register. the family thought nothing of it. she is gorgeous. but when hayley was 32 she had a brain haemorrhage. doctors pronounced brain dead and asked her parents about donation. i didn't have no hesitation. we walked hayley to theatre said goodbye and kissed and said, go save some lives, hayley. public support for organ donation is higher. it is thought about 80% support the idea but only 37% have signed up to become donors. in reality only a tiny number of deaths are suitable but the government thinks changing the system could generate hundreds of extra torrents pla nts generate hundreds of extra torrents plants a year. last yearjust over 1500 people donated organs after their death and that is a record high but still, there are just over 6000 patients on waiting lists for transplants so, under the new system, all adults would
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automatically be considered as donors unless they actively opt out. scotla nd donors unless they actively opt out. scotland is planning to do this too and wales already has an opt out system but critics say it's too early to say whether or not that his working yet. some claim a better idea would be to hire more specialist nurses to identify potential donors and work their families. catherine burns, bbc news. police searching for a missing midwife in staffordshire have launched a murder investigation. detectives investigating the disappearance of 28—year—old samantha eastwood found a body near stoke yesterday. our correspondent simon ward is in stoke. what's the latest update? good morning. well although there has been no formal identification, this is what people feared most. officers searching for samantha eastwood made the discovery further down the slain here in this rural pa rt down the slain here in this rural
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part of staffordshire. she was last seen on friday the 27th ofjuly when she was leaving herjob as a midwife at the royal stoke hospital, leaving at the royal stoke hospital, leaving at 7:a5am and it was later that day in the evening when colleagues at the hospital raised the alarm when she didn't turn up for her makeshift and police have been investigating since. on the day she went missing, samantha's neighbours reported hearing a screen that up to route —— that afternoon and on friday her sister made an appeal to the public for more information and described samantha as warm and generous with a great sense of humour. now a 32—year—old man who was previously arrested and released has been arrested and released has been arrested again but this time on suspicion of murder. another 20 82 old man and a 60—year—old man have been arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender. police thanked people for help and asked anyone with information to come forward. labour's deputy leader, tom watson, has said the party faces what he calls "eternal shame" unless it immediately stops its "damaging" arguments over anti—semitism. he's made the comments
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in an interview with the observer newspaper, in which he urged the party to accept the definition of anti—semitism set out by the international holocaust remembrance alliance. or yesterday jeremy corbyn sought to reassure thejewish community in an article for the guardian, in which he promised again to root out anti—semitism from labour. the nhs has been threatened with legal action if it does not offer transgender patients access to fertility services before they start transitioning treatment. the equality and human rights commission says patients should be given the opportunity to store eggs or sperm before starting their treatment, as it can cause infertility. local commissioning groups currently decide whether to provide fertility services, but it's claimed many choose not to for transgender people. an nhs spokesperson said the criticism is misplaced
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and policy responsibility lies with ministers. portuguese firefighters in the algarve are struggling to bring wildfires under control as the southern european heatwave continues. temperatures have climbed to 46 degrees celsius, approaching the all—time european record. fire warnings have been issued across the iberian peninsula, as chi chi izundu reports. portugal. the latest country battling wildfire. some 700 firefighters are still tried to stop fla mes firefighters are still tried to stop flames taking further hold of the eucalyptus forests in the algarve. water dropping our club have been assisting them as well as a 100 fire trucks. already more than 1000 hectares of land has been destroyed and one village has been forced to evacuate. how far were the flames? it was about 500 metres from our kitchen. the terrain is difficult to access and conditions have been
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tough. high winds, dry land and record temperatures. this weekend, seeing more than 45 degrees. it's so hot, people are opting to stay in. but it's not just hot, people are opting to stay in. but it's notjust portugal suffering. a continent wide heatwave in recent weeks has seen deaths in spain, droughts and wildfires from greece to sweden. chi chi izundu, bbc news. the venezuelan president says he has survived an assassination attempt involving drones carrying explosives. nicol s maduro was speaking in the capital, caracas. live footage shows the president suddenly looking upwards — startled — and dozens of soldiers running away. he was unharmed, but seven soldiers were injured. the us first lady, melania trump, has expressed her support for the basketball player lebronjames, hours after her husband made insulting remarks about him on twitter. the los angeles lakers player had said in an interview that mr trump was "divisive" and had "emboldened racists". chris buckler has more.
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lebronjames is without any doubt one of the biggest stars in american sports. when he recently signed for the la lakers, it made the headlines, but he's found himself in the news again because of his criticism of donald trump. on cnn, he accused the president of using sport to split the us apart, and it's not the first time he's spoken out against mr trump. i'm not going to let — while i have this platform — to let one individual, no matter the power, no matter the impact that he should have, or she should have, ever use sport as a platform to divide us. in an angry tweet, donald trump fired back at both the basketball star and the news network, saying: but lebronjames has a surprising
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ally in this latest fight — mr trump's own wife. a statement by the first lady's spokeswoman said melania trump was impressed by lebronjames's work to do good things on behalf of the next generation. he's just opened a new school for at risk students in his hometown in ohio. the i promise school offers a range of extra support for children mrs trump made clear that she was open to the idea of going to visit it. i love you too, man, i really do. that's a sign of support from lebronjames, even as he feuds with her husband. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. the record—breaking hydroplane bluebird has taken to the water again for the first time in more than 50 years. a group of volunteers have spent
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the last 17 years restoring the vehicle, which crashed in 1967 killing its pilot donald campbell. our reporter catriona renton reports from the isle of bute. the final checks. after 17 years of painstaking restoration, as bluebird prepares to get back in the water. tense moments but also exciting. just to be able to touch it is amazing but to be able to privileged enough to actually get in it, that is pretty good. bluebird was salvaged from coniston water in the la ke salvaged from coniston water in the lake district in 2001. around 90% —— 90% of the bodywork has been restored from the original. this is not just a restored from the original. this is notjust a technical restored from the original. this is not just a technical feat to those involved but a personal one. emily's father has been working on this wall of life. this boat has changed his life and made him so proud of his friends and his team and this is really changed our family and i'm really changed our family and i'm really proud of him. bluebird was finally ready to launch, almost...
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there was a need for some assistance. one last push, and she was off. it's more than 51 years since bluebird was last on the water and here she is, willie restored, back where she belongs. donald campbell's daughter clutched her father's mascot was also rescued from the wreckage. i mean, the lump in my throat and electric shocks travelling through my spine is just something almost indescribable. as you say we've waited a long, long time that everything good is worth waiting for. catriona renton reporting there. a family in mexico got a bit closer to nature than they expected on a trip to a drive—through safari park. footage shot by another visitor to the park shows a male rhino chasing and then ramming the door of an suv. it then goes on to try to overturn the vehicle. a spokesman for the park said the aggression was an "isolated case" caused by the presence of a female rhino nearby. no—one in the car was hurt and the family even told a local journalist that the incident was "a good experience that they will never forget".
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you're joking. you'rejoking. imagine that, it looked terrifying. i put myself in that camp, that of extra excitement adding to the adventure. all because adding to the adventure. all because a female rhino was nearby. they are all ok. let's have a look at some of today's papers. the observer frontpage, nhs told, give trans— patients equal access to fertility services. the nhs must offer transgender patient awaiting transitioning treatment with access to fertility services or it risks
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breaking the law and that is the warning to the health secretary by the equality watchdog. brighton pride took place yesterday, britney spears performing. there is a picture there of that happening yesterday. it started in hove and followed a route to preston. i'm sure you realise that is not britney spears. let me show you this one, this is the mail on sunday, leading with this story here. honey trap spies stole secrets of the new raf jet. a serving member of the raf had their online dating profile hack and their online dating profile hack and the perpetrator than attempted to bertone bat and another colleague who knew about this newjet. u nfortu nately very little information was in fact stolen. then of course, this picture here is samantha eastwood, and we are waiting to hear a little bit more in
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terms of the details of that investigation. the murder investigation. the murder investigation has been launched. the sunday mail is leading with meghan to reunite with dad. that picture of meghan with a lot of that date ——a lot of the papers. she attended a wedding yesterday in the daily nurses a secret meeting in the united states could help heal the family rift. ben stokes, crucial really to england winning in india. really tense finish. the court jester, the headline that they are, instrumental to victory. the court case starts next week. a big test cricket probably needed it. as we
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know, test cricket at the moment is struggling for its pace. is there going to be the interest in test cricket going forward and i think this test match at everything you would want and i know it's claimed that can be a bit boring, how interesting is it that you had everything, and english batting collapse, a youngster who hauled england back into it, the indian captain is one of the best batsmen the world. his wicket, crucial. that's what ben stokes got. so non— cricket fans, i think that opening test match. they have been trying to make it sexy for a while. it is different, it is longer. exactly. that is where short forms come into it. it still has its place, the ashes, still so much passion about that. you need big names, ben stokes coming to the fore and that is what test cricket
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needs. the needs -- big news in hockey. it is hard to know where to start. i will come back with that. thank you, john. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: adults in england will automatically become organ donors unless they opt out under plans unveiled today. the government says it could save 700 lives a year. police investigating the disappearance of a midwife from staffordshire have found a body and arrested three people. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. hot, hot, hot by the looks of things. yes, ithought hot, hot, hot by the looks of things. yes, i thought i would bring it up to date to the heatwave that we have ongoing across spain and portugal. looking at the temperatures yesterday, we managed to get to 46.6 in spain. that is
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seven tenths of a degree away from the all—time spanish knack of —— national record. in portugal, 46.4. as more day becomes available, those directors could go up. theyjust mist out on a national record by one degree. however, the heatwave is not finished and it will be hot today. 47 today as we head through this afternoon before the heat eases later in the week ahead. for hot weather to come to spain and portugal. we have quite a bit of cloud for many of us to start the day, more hot weather as well across southern part of the country. let's ta ke southern part of the country. let's take a look at the forecast in more detail. if you mist and fog patches particularly across western areas. for most of us it is a dry day coming up. the exception is western scotla nd coming up. the exception is western scotland where our weather front brings a little bit of light rain. across england and wales, are lots
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of dry weather, and after a cloudy start, things will brighten up. you can see we have the hot weather with temperatures into the high 20s low 30s once again. late yesterday, across northern ireland and scotland, a lot of cloud, temperatures close to normal. some spots of rain in the western islands from time to time. towards evening, the cloud will thicken further across western scotland and we have rain moving in at the head through the evening and overnight. that rain turns heavy and will threaten parts of northern ireland with a few spots of northern ireland with a few spots of rain here through the second half of rain here through the second half of the night. further south, a dry night with temperatures similar to last night, quite warm for sleeping. monday, a similarly day. england and wales having the best of the sunshine and hot weather. we will start off with some murkiness across wales and england, some low cloud. there is the threat of a bit of rain
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across western scotland but that will not be particularly heavy, perhaps some of that rain getting into the north of england as the day goes by. 32 in london, and other hot one. ina goes by. 32 in london, and other hot one. in a week, we will see change in the weather. we start the week dry and sunny and hot across the south of the uk, it will turn u nsettled south of the uk, it will turn unsettled and we will see outbreaks of rain developing. it will be quite heavyin of rain developing. it will be quite heavy in the week ahead particularly across the north and west of the uk and temperatures eating significantly, in southern england the temperatures will be tumbling back to normal as the wind picks up for the middle part of the week onwards. that is how the weapon looks. —— that is how the weather looks. —— that is how the weather looks. —— that is how the weather looks. i'm looking forward to a bit of rain to be honest. i'm trying not to be that person who keeps complaining that it is too hot, but it is too hot. now, it's time for the film review with jane hill and james king. hello and welcome
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to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases, james king is with me. so, james, what do we have this week? well, for comic book fans, there is evangeline lilly creating a buzz in marvel‘s ant—man and the wasp. for music fans, there is nick offerman following his dreams of rock stardom in hearts beat loud. and for gemma arterton fans, there is gemma arterton, just being awesome in the escape. let's start with ant—man. did we need a sequel? is the world crying out for this? apparently so. it is three years
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since the first one. this is ant—man and the wasp. so, paul rudd and evangeline lilly are the title characters returning, better known as scott and hope. michael douglas is back, as well as hope's father, dr hank pym, the science boffin. and this time round, villains are after his secrets. they're after what he knows about shrinking. there is an lot of shrinking in this film. let's look at evangeline lilly as the wasp in action. ok, i wouldn't mess with her. she's cool, actually. there is a slight difference to the first one in that it does feel more like a three—hander. so, paul rudd, who is ant—man, shares pretty much equal screen time with evangeline lilly and michael douglas. so it feels more like an ensemble piece. if you look at the way marvel has been going, they love an ensemble movie now. this fits into that, although the mood is of course much lighter. there are dark marvel movies, there are epic marvel movies.
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there are rebellious and silly marvel movies. this one has its own personality, as it should, and it is the more child—friendly marvel movie. it is a bit more flippant and funny and frothy and pacey, and there is nothing wrong with that. but, ultimately, it is slightly less memorable because of that. so there's nothing wrong with that in august as long as there's something for adults and children, ‘cause that's what we all need at this time of year. absolutely. i was a little disappointed that michelle pfeiffer, who plays hope's mother, is not in it that much. admittedly, she has been trapped in what they referred to as a sub—atomic quantum realm for the last 30 years, so she has essentially been shrunk in amongst the atoms. she's in it a bit, but it's michelle pfeiffer, i would like to see more of her. but if you are an 8—year—old viewer, they probably don't care whether michelle pfeiffer is in it. who is michelle pfeiffer? it is pacey and fun and there are great action scenes
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around san francisco. they have a lot of laughs with it, and that is the main thing. there's a lot of fun to be had with shrinking things and enlarging things, and they make the most of it. hearts beat loud — i am intrigued by this. should we call it a musical or a drama? i suppose it's a musical drama. very big on the festival circuit like south by southwest. it's about a father and daughter, nick offerman and kiersey clemons, who have been playing music together for most of their lives, jamming together as father and daughter. they live in brooklyn and the summer before she is about to go to university, they actually start to take things more seriously and start to write songs together and upload them and get a bit of attention. so what you have is a film about people embracing change and coming out of their shell a little bit. i think it's actually impossible to dislike this film. it is so good—natured, it is so warm—hearted. it's really about the therapeutic power of music and how it can
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bring people together. that's gorgeous, and the music itself, which is original music, is gorgeous. there is a downside in that it's not exactly edge of your seat. i mean, a little bit more threat would not have gone amiss. a little bit more edge. but, ultimately, it's full of good nature and optimism. i love that theme about the power of music. that's terrific. exactly. of course, the music had to be good in it. that is the key thing because if they start playing and we in the audience go, "it's not that great," the whole thing would be over, but the music is genuinely good. i hope it crosses over from the festival circuit into the mainstream. and your third choice this week — is this gemma arterton's bid for an award from what i read? i would love to see her get an award for the escape. dominic savage is the writer and director about what seems to be a very everyday suburban housewife, a wife and mother. got the two cars in the driveway, two children,
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the husband is ok—ish, played by dominic cooper. it's a normal suburban life, but on the inside, she's having a breakdown. she wants to escape and be someone else and somewhere else. i don't care if they finish theirdinner... oi. you don't mean that. you're a mum, that's what mums do. oi, oi, oi. don't care. don't care if they go to school, if they don't go to school. what are you talking about? stop it. but i make myself care, make myself do it. i make myself be funny... alright. ..and happy, silly... alright. like you. i think they hate me. shut up. i think they can feel what's going on. alright, this has got to stop now. is it quite claustrophobic? claustrophobic at the right moments, and then things change and other things happen, that i won't give away. a lot of it is improvised, which really helps. i didn't realise that when i watched
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it, ijust had a sense as a viewer that it felt very natural. it really flowed very casually, actually. and then afterwards, reading about it, a lot of it was improvised, which makes sense and really helps with the realism of it. very believable and just really good at capturing the minutiae of suburban life, of being a parent, the frustrating things, actually, about being a parent. there is this underlying menace throughout the whole thing and the music really helps with this. you just think, yeah, things aren't going to go well. things are going to implode. things are going to go badly. i think it's her best performance. it actually reminded me of films that i seem to associate more with coming out of france, those sort of unhurried character studies, grown—up movies with kristin scott thomas in or isabelle huppert, someone like that. i thought it was just fantastic. it is her best performance and utterly heartbreaking. and we're not giving any plot spoilers, but that sounds like one to watch. in terms of the best out this week, you could feel the money
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in mission: impossible. there was a big budget for that film. and it has made a lot of it back already. the biggest opening weekend for a mission: impossible film in the states, ever. 22 years after the first one, this is number six and it's still doing incredibly well. last week, we talked about the action scenes, which are brilliant. we talked about the realism of it, actually. a lot of it feels very contemporary and plays with the fears we have. iforgot to mention a couple of people — vanessa kirby, who is great. she pays a black—market arms dealer. probably best known from the crown, she plays princess margaret. she really radiates cool in this. you can see her there. and the brilliant sean harris, who returns as solomon lane, the bad guy. lowestoft‘s finest, sean harris. he is spine—chilling, as always. so a couple of very good performances, as well as tom cruise. who still looks about 38. looks 38, throws himself headfirst into the action, has this great relationship with christopher mcquarrie,
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the writer and director. they've worked together many times now. they bring out the best in each other. it is a terrific watch. and a quick thought about a dvd for anyone staying in? l'amant double, the double lover. psychological thriller. real nods to the greats like hitchcock, about a young woman who falls in love with her psychiatrist, suspect that he has a double life and is hiding secrets about his family. lots of mirrors, lots of split screen, lots of references to split personalities, so all the classic psychological thriller stuff is in there. it's hypnotic and mesmerising and pretty seductive. it earns its 18 certificate. it becomes kind of fifty shades of frasier by the end of it. but i think it's really classy and there's a lot of panache there. 0k! you don't look won over. i'm feeling like there's nothing more i can say about that without actually seeing it.
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i was fine until you mentioned fifty shades of grey bit. thank you very much. lovely to see you. thanks for being with us and enjoy all your cinema—going this week, whatever it is you choose to go and see. have a good week. see you next time. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with victoria fritz and tina daheley. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. plans to make everyone in england potential organ donor unless they t potential organ donor unless they opt out will be set by the government. it is hoped the system to the one in wales will save 700 lives per year. currently less than 40% of the england population have signed up to the register. police
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searching for a missing midwife in staffordshi re searching for a missing midwife in staffordshire have launched a murder investigation. detectives dissipate —— investigating the disappearance of cement the eastwood, 28, found a body near stoke. a man, 32, has been arrested on suspicion of murder while two other men have been arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender. the body is yet to be officially identified. the labour deputy leader tom watson says the party faces what he calls eternal shame unless it immediately stops its damaging arguments, he says, of anti—semitism. he made those comments in an interview with the observer newspaper in which he urged the party to accept the definition of anti—semitism set out by the international remembrance alliance. yesterday jeremy corbyn sought to reassure thejewish community in an article for the guardian, in which he promised again to root yesterday jeremy corbyn sought to reassure thejewish community out anti—semitism from labour. the nhs has been threatened with legal action if it does not offer transgender patients access to fertility services before
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they start transitioning treatment. the equality and human rights commission says patients should be given the opportunity to store eggs or sperm before starting their treatment, as it can cause infertility. local commissioning groups currently decide whether to provide fertility services but it's claimed many choose not to for transgender people. an nhs spokesperson said the criticism is ‘misplaced' and policy responsibility lies with ministers. more than 700 firefighters are battling a major wildfire in southern portugal's algarve region, as the european heatwave continues. aircraft have been used to drop water on forest fires and further heat warnings have been issued across the iberian peninsula. temperatures are expected to reach 46 degrees celcius today, close to the all—time european record. the venezuelan president says he has survived an assassination attempt involving drones carrying explosives. nicol s maduro was speaking at a major outdoor military event in the capital, caracas. live footage shows the president suddenly looking upwards — startled — and hundreds
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of soldiers running away. he was unharmed but seven soldiers were injured. the us first lady, melania trump, has expressed her support for the basketball player lebron james, hours after her husband made insulting remarks about him on twitter. in an interview the basketball star had said the president was "divisive" and had "emboldened racists". however, a spokeswoman for mrs trump later said james was "working to do good things" with a new school he opened in his hometown. there were chaotic scenes in brighton last night after police prevented crowds of people attending the city's pride event from entering the railway station. thousands of people trying to get to a pride event and a britney spears concert. they were held on the streets
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after gates were padlocked. a spokesman for govia thameslink said police requested the railway station be closed and train services suspended shortly before midnight to help them deal with growing crowds. the record—breaking hydroplane bluebird has taken to the water again for the first time in more than 50 years. a group of volunteers have spent the last 17 years restoring the vehicle, which crashed in 1967 killing its pilot donald campbell. the craft crashed on coniston water in the lake district in 1967. very impressive. time to get some sport. what a packed morning we have in store. the dream lives on the ireland's women. the second lowest ranked
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team. they will face the highest ranked team. we love an underdog. they came to on penalties against spain. no irish team male orfemale has reached a major world final before. no one would have ever envisaged they would come this far, especially as they are an amateur team. the surprise package, an incredible performance. the dream lives on. we will all be watching the final this afternoon. it really is an incredible achievement, ireland, huge underdogs at the competition, through to the final. they'll take on the defending champions, the netherlands, this afternoon. jo currie reports. island's unlikely heroes, the first irish team male or female to make a final in any sport. their semi—final
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against spain was already uncharted territory and they could have been forgiven permitting nerves get the better of them. flanigan caught the moped or dreams start, putting them ahead but they were pegged in the second half to send the match into penalties. it takes nerves of steel to scorer shootout but gillian pinder scored, taking it to another level in the history books. the journey has been an incredible one, a team of amateurs have turned the hockey world cup on its head and will now face netherlands in this afternoon's final. it is safe to say this is going to go down in history andi this is going to go down in history and i don't know if i will ever play with a better bunch of girls. they deserve this, they deserve it so much and maybe the fact that we are amateur nexus take it even deeper andi amateur nexus take it even deeper and ijust amateur nexus take it even deeper and i just hope amateur nexus take it even deeper and ijust hope that this gets the credit it deserves because we are in the world cup final, like, it doesn't really get much better than that. so it's the world 's number
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one side against the second lowest ranked team in the whole tournament. ireland will begin as huge underdogs but with this fighting spirit, they will be dreaming of doing the unthinkable once again. adam peaty really brought the european championships to life last night. this multi—sports event needed something to put it on the map — and peaty provided that, when he broke his own record, in winning gold in the 100—metres breaststroke in glasgow. our sports correspondent joe wilson was watching. there was one reason to take your eyes off adam peaty in glasgow, to watch the clock. the world record 57.13 he was chasing was a zone. on tv, a red line marks the pc needed. the context, britain's james wilby second over 1.5 seconds behind. adam peaty in disbelief looked to see his time. the crowd already knew. well, you can hear the crowd's crore.
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that's not just you can hear the crowd's crore. that's notjust the result but a record. remember, adam peaty referred to these championships as a kind of mini olympics. what he's done is given a helping status. his performance was unmissable. look past his physique, try it. the mind really matters. i think this season, i want to just enjoy it. be me, really matters. i think this season, i want tojust enjoy it. be me, i'm not trying to pretend to be anyone else and because i do. the crowd is definitely with me tonight. there is more of peaty to come here but if people make cities, world records make championships. there was more gold in the velodrome, with britain's ethan hayter claiming his first major title. the teenager came from fifth place to first with a superb performance in the last of the four disciplines, the points race. he beat a really strong field, including the the reigning olympic, world and european champions — but hayter‘s mother might not be welcomed at future events — hayter said "my mum normally comes but they've gone on holiday, so i've done better being on my own." no invite for mum next time.
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katie archibald couldn't make it five wins in a row in the 3,000m individual pursuit — she lost to lisa brennauer in the final. england all—rounder ben stokes said he hoped their victory over india in the first test would "close some mouths". it came to a thrilling climax on the fourth morning, india needing 84 runs to win, england needing five wickets. when stokes removed the india captain virat kohli, the win looked possible — and he took four of those five wickets for a 31—run win. a match which really was a great advert for test cricket. well, what a grain of cricket, from start to finish. three and a bit days, it made the fabulous spectacle. it was great to be involved in, great to play some fabulous cricket along the way and i am so fabulous cricket along the way and i am so proud of the group. all i
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wa nted am so proud of the group. all i wanted to see was the desire in the belief that we showed in the previous days. leeds rhinos have won the women's challenge cup for the first time, coming from behind to beat castleford. they won by 20 points to 14, a late try from leeds skipper lois forsell settling the match. they're coached by adam cutherbertson, who's expected to line up for the men's side this afternoon in their challenge cup semi—final against warrington. it's only 11 weeks since chelsea won the fa cup at wembley, and they're back there this afternoon to take on manchester city in the community shield. eden hazard was the match winner back in may. he's still with chelsea despite plenty of talk about a move away from the club, but they do have a new man in charge, antonio conte replaced by maurizio sarri as manager. always chasing the big rivals so antonio, maurizio, but i'm delighted
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to play with this style of play, the way you want to play, it will be perfect, i'm so happy he came here. i want to win because it is very important to have immediately a trophy. but i think in this moment of the season, it is very important to the performance. we have to improve, of course. georgia hall has given herself a great chance of winning a first major title. she's just one shot off the pace going into the final round of the women's british open. she wasn't the only one chasing birdies at royal lytham. a local cat was on the prowl in the rough. and after some erratic play on the front nine, hall's putter helped her to 12—under par, just behind leader pornanong phatlum. over on the men's tour,
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rory mcilroy and ian poulter are tied for second place at the world golf championship in ohio. they are both three shots off leader justin thomas who is on 14 under going into today's final round. isaid it i said it was going to be a busy morning, so much to talk about. you have covered golf, hockey, football but not timber sport.|j have covered golf, hockey, football but not timber sport. i will leave it to you guys. sawing wood and chopping logs may not strike you as the most obvious basis for a thrilling sporting contest, but the elite athletes competing at this weekend's british timbersports championships would beg to differ. mike has been to blenheim palace in oxfordshire to find out more and, obviously, don't try this at home! iama i am a lumberjack and i'm ok, i sleep all night and i work all day. wait, stock, let's get one thing clear straightaway. the monty python image and is here. we need music
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that sums up how extreme this sport really is. heavy rock plays. it is at the cutting edge of extreme sport and dangerous and painful if you make the slightest of slips. and dangerous and painful if you make the slightest of slipsm and dangerous and painful if you make the slightest of slips. it is physically exerting on the body. your legs, core, chest, arms, everything. stand to your timber. three, two, one, go! stand your timber is the sport in which you require the swing of a top golfer and the strength of the rugby union pf°p and the strength of the rugby union prop forward. this couldn't be further removed from the image of a lumberjack in a checked shirt. these are elite athletes. all the power comes from the legs... you find that great sporting athlete is not necessarily from and are the culture ora necessarily from and are the culture or a forest or farming background. a
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lot of our roots came from there but fiow lot of our roots came from there but now of course, we lot of our roots came from there but fiow of course, we are lot of our roots came from there but now of course, we are looking further afield. it's notjust getting an axle getting sore and swinging it and hitting it as hard as you can, there is a lot of technique in it, it takes years and years to perfect. having six events, it's a lot like the decathlon. you can'tjust be it's a lot like the decathlon. you can't just be good it's a lot like the decathlon. you can'tjust be good at one, you've got to be good at six it least. and it's those athletes can excel across all the disciplines with sore and axe this weekend of blenheim palace will be picked for the british team world championships resort. no wonder so much training is needed. so we've got a steel sops —— stop saw in the pit if you like this is where the machines are lined up. it's like riding a powerful motorbike but you must have control. of course it is, strong in the wrist, strong in the legs, good balance. maybe not quite a chip off the old block just balance. maybe not quite a chip off the old blockjust yet balance. maybe not quite a chip off the old block just yet and balance. maybe not quite a chip off the old blockjust yet and in contrast, the top competitors in the world heading to the uk the first time this october may have be separated in the sprint events by
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the equivalent of the ai. it can be that close. and going for glory there will be a building contractor from north wales. you've got to imagine there is a bit of a golfer ‘s swing. it's not how big and strong you are but it's a lot to do with the timing. has to connect together and it got to deliver the nanograms all into the block of wood. full straight, ok? rotate or hips, like yourdancing. wood. full straight, ok? rotate or hips, like your dancing. once you can dance, you are ok. all the woodcut cut—off is recycled and please, don't try this on your own. you have to learn properly at your nearest axe club. well done, mate. about half an hour later. the audience have long gone and there is the prize. that looks like grey fun. he is right. you need a really good rhythm, propertechnique.. he is right. you need a really good rhythm, proper technique. a is speaking from experience? rhythm, proper technique. a is speaking from experience ?|j rhythm, proper technique. a is speaking from experience? i am. it
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looks like it would be very satisfying anyway. good for the aggression. the british championships finish today as part of the bbc countryfile live festival. and, if you like what you've just seen, the uk hosts the world championships for the first time at the liverpool echo arena on 19th and 20th october. time to get some more weather. here is chris. very hot? we have been talking about this heatwave across spain and portugal for a talking about this heatwave across spain and portugalfor a number of days. yesterday's top temperatures came in at 46.6 in spain, seven tenths of a degree of way from the all—time national record. portugal got pretty close as well. 46.4. this temperature might get revised as we go through the morning. we have another chance at breaking the national records today. we will see
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highs of 46, 47 in the hottest parts of portugal and the far west of spain as well. it is not out of the question that we could see the records tumble. in the uk we have some hot sunshine across southern parts of the country, but further north, quite a bit of cloud. the most of us, a dry day. we start off with some mist and fog patches. cloud working across wales into east anglia for a time. the biggest cloud across scotland and northern ireland. there will be some spots of rain per western scotland. otherwise, a dry picture. the england and wales, plenty of hazy sunshine coming through in the afternoon. high 20s and low 30s in the hottest spot. the cloud gets thicker and thicker as we had south. patchy rain across western areas on and off through the day, but into the evening, thicker cloud will work
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in. awarm the evening, thicker cloud will work in. a warm front will bring some out outbreaks of rain across the western areas of scotland. the rain turning heavier to go through the evening and overnight and the wet weather will swing its way into what northern ireland as well. a bit of rain here, perhaps into dalloway by the end of the night. a dry night in england and wales. it will be another pretty warm one of getting a decent nights sleep. monday, a band of rain pushes outwards, weakening as it does so. we could pick up a few spot the cross parts of northern england but not really amounting to too much. cloudy but some bright spells. and an northern ireland. in the south, some hot and sunny weather. temperatures higher in wales but reaching 32 in london. we are looking at some changes in the weather pattern for the week ahead as the area of hot air moves out across from the uk into europe and
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we get low pressure moving in from our north and west. that means we will see cloudy skies, the wind picks up and spells of rain as well will stop a real change in the weather pattern. turning unsettled, some heavy rain around in the north and west and temperatures eating towards the middle part of the week and temperatures back to normal across the south. it will turn cooler and fresher in the week ahead. some will like that. me included. the garden needs it. we have the headlines at seven o'clock. now, it is time for the travel show. —— the travel show. this week we are in south africa. as the country marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of former south african president nelson mandela. i'll be in johannesburg, finding out how the city is reinventing itself, and visiting one of the most spectacular regeneration projects in africa. it is something that was built for the few, and it's
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being repurposed now and finding its feet as something for the many. plus, i'll be hotfooting it down to cape town to meet the young ballroom dancers helping shape the future of the rainbow nation. i think the amazing thing about seeing the born—free generation, which is, they don't really know what it feels like to feel or see segregation. i'm in johannesburg, the largest city in south africa, as the country celebrates 100 years since the birth of its most
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famous son, nelson mandela. maboneng has been described as one of the most successful urban renewal projects in the world, a network of coffee shops and street art. artists from south africa and beyond have come to transform the city's buildings, and the revival isn't limited to urban areas. this is another example of an open space that used to be considered dangerous. and this trail runs right through the heart ofjohannesburg, and since its revitalisation, it attracts more than 4,000 visitors each weekend. luckily, the authorities realised that they needed to getjoburg back on the map. so there's been various initiatives, starting from the city centre, cleaning it up, getting security in place. and the trail is basically the continuation of the process. because you get out of the city centre, you've got this beautiful
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green land that residents and tourists can use. visitors can see a strong security presence on the trail, and they're encouraged to use a specially created mobile app that can raise the alarm in case of emergency. perhaps the most visible symbol ofjohannesburg's regeneration, though, is in berea, a few miles away. towering over the skyline is the continent's largest residential skyscraper, ponte city. at more than 500 feet tall, with an iconic circular design, ponte offers stunning views overjohannesburg. ponte opened its doors in 1975. it was built for the top 1% of society. there were saunas, wine cellars. this actually was the first floor of a 3—storey apartment.
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wherever this building finds itself, it has always been very cosmopolitan. during apartheid, the government didn't want black people to partake in certain sectors of the economy. they imported a lot of skills. so what you had was a lot of german engineers mixing with portuguese artisans, anybody like immigrants, expats, coming here and just making a life for themselves. the foreign residents brought with them more liberal values and less regard for the apartheid laws. according to nicholas, the government reacted by cutting off services to the building. as many white residents left for the suburbs, ponte's fortunes declined. no running water, no electricity. now, this is when you hear the really crazy stories that we were brought up on injohannesburg in the ‘80s and ‘90s, about this building being the place where angels fear to tread, you know? ‘cause quite literally, it was just a horrible place. just no—go territory.
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exactly. it wasn't until the late 2000s that the building was cleared and renovated. how would you say things have improved now? truth be told, so when my friend told me that now the building is nice, and stuff, i would be like, no, i'm not coming. the day i came, i visited him, i was like, damn, i want to come back here. now, its home to a diverse range of people, including migrants from all over africa. there is a community centre on the ground floor. this building has been through hell and back. and to me, ponte signifies, in many ways, the story of a democratic south africa, in terms of trying to find your identity since 1994. it is something that was built for the few. and it has been repurposed now
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and finding its feet as something for the many. to end this week, we are in the south of the country in cape town, famed for its spectacular coastline and dramatic landscape. we're on our way to mitchells plain, which is a township in the suburbs of the city. in the past, people from areas like this just wouldn't get many opportunities. but things are slowly changing, giving the next—generation the chance for their talents to be recognised. at the neighbourhood dance studio, children aged as young as four are having their final preparations ahead of a prestigious ballroom competition. their footwork is impressive. former dance champion arthurjacobs opened this school
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specifically to keep the local kids off the streets. this is an area with one of the highest crime rates in the country. every day, there's killings, there is drugs, there's guns. and our children lived among that, even in their own environment, in the housing environment, day by day, they lived in it. you take them from the street and you show them something better. you saw the little ones? yes, idid. start with the first step, and you saw the end result. and what is your favourite dance move? the cha—cha. i saw you rocking the samba earlier. you were doing a really good tango earlier, i saw that. dancing is one of the most popular sports in townships, up there with football and boxing. and perhaps more importantly, it's bringing young south africans from all backgrounds together.
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we try not to go for racism and saying you are black, you are white. we stay clear of that. good day, ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to the south african dancing championships. we are here at the super series national championship. people have come from all over the country to compete on this dance floor. there is so much excitement in the air. the guys are looking suave, the ladies are looking fabulous, but who's going to take home those trophies? the competition is fierce. 400 dancers from 27 studios, all hoping that their foxtrots and sambas will lead them to victory. for some of the younger kids from mitchells plain, it's their first year competing. this is when all that
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hard work pays off. oh, hey, guys! hello! oh, you guys, you're melting my heart right now! i'm in love with them a little bit, i think. although events like this are now a regular part of the calendar across south africa, it's sobering to remember that not so long ago, under apartheid, it was socially taboo for black and white couples to dance together at a regular part. competitions like this would be unthinkable. i remember when we did ourfirst condition in johannesburg, and we were the only black children dancing in the competition and we were a corner. i remember being invisible. i remember being a champion, knowing what it means to be a champion, but also not really been recognised. i remember them not knowing my name. but, thankfully, things are different for the generation born free of apartheid. i think the amazing thing about seeing the born free
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generation, which is they don't really know what it feels like to see or feel segregation. we actually see couples that are dancing from two different — you know, a white boy and a black girl dancing together, and i think that's amazing. well done! no—one would deny the country still has some way to go before fulfilling mandela's dream, but in their own small way, step by step, the young hopefuls here in cape town are doing their bit to carry his legacy into the future. sadly, that's all we've got time for this week. join us next time when... mike reports from sarajevo, on a city that is reinventing itself following the balkan war, which caused so much devastation in the 1990s. normally, you might pay extra for a beautiful view of these hills, but for that reason, it was one of the most dangerous spots to be, in this hotel. oh, my goodness. this is tiny.
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and fancy taking a private plane without breaking the bank balance? we are in the air. kat looks at flight sharing via a day—trip to northern france. welcome to france. until next time, from me, and the rest of the team in south africa, it's goodbye. good morning — welcome to breakfast with victoria fritz and tina daheley. our headlines today: adults in england will automatically become organ donors unless they opt out, under plans unveiled today. the government says it could save 700 lives a year. police investigating the disappearance of a midwife from staffordshire find a body and arrest three people. more than 700 firefighters battle a major wildfire
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in portugal as southern europe continues to swelter

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