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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 10, 2018 6:00am-8:32am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: flights cancelled for more than 50,000 people across europe. ryanair faces the worst day of strike action in its history. heavy floods hit southern france, forcing the evacuation of hundreds of holiday makers from their homes. a call for a delay in the installation of smart energy meters. citizens advice tells this programme it's received thousands of complaints. it has been a busy record summer of sales for this cream factory, but has the good weather spread to all corners of the economy? we get the latest figures later this morning. raising the bar in burling. —— berlin. katarina johnson thompson is well—placed for heptathlon victory at the european championships. and i am here at the bristol
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international lu nan fiesta, and i am here at the bristol international lunan fiesta, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary. a few showers in the forecast year, and across much of the country. i will bring you the full forecast in about 15 minutes. it's friday the 10th of august. our top story: tens of thousands of ryanair passengers across europe have had their flights cancelled today as pilots stage a 24—hour strike. nearly 400 flights, including some to and from the uk, have been grounded in the budget airline's worst ever day of industrial action. caroline davies reports. it has not been an easy summer holiday for ryanair, winding queues and cancellations blamed on storms and shortages of air traffic control staff. now they face a different sort of turbulence — strikes. some ryanair pilots in five countries will strike from today for 2h hours. it has meant cancellations across europe, nearly 400 of them.
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the netherlands have avoided any, but there are 22 to and from ireland, 22 in sweden, 104 in belgium, and worst affected, germany, with 250 cancellations. it is the fifth time the pilots have been on strike sincejuly last year. they say they want better pay and fairer contracts, and a change to ryanair‘s practice of moving staff between its bases without much notice. ryanair say they have notified all affected customers and most have been put on other ryanair flights. they call the strikes " regrettable and unjustified", and ask the striking unions to continue negotiations instead of more industrial action. the unions say they remain available for talk. as the summer holidays continue, passengers just hope that this is not what awaits them at the airport. caroline davies, bbc news. simon calder, the travel editor for the independent, joins us now to talk about this. simon, how will uk travellers be affected by these strikes? simon, as always, you have been looking at the flights in and out and who might be affected. ryanair
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will not tell me exactly which flights have been cancelled but by trawling through the departure screens across the affected countries i have a good teacher. the main airports in the uk stansted manchester, in terms of cancellations, gothenberg in sweden, berlin in germany. lots of cancellations for places like gatwick, birmingham and bristol going to dublin, as a result of the fa ct going to dublin, as a result of the fact that when ryanair pilots in ireland go on strike there is a knock—on effect. theyjust say, we are going to cancel some of the uk services. and beyond cancellations such as bristol to cologne. crucially, ryanair says five out of six passengers will travel as normal today and if you have not been told about your flight being cancelled then you can assume it is going ahead as normal. people who have been given at least 48 hours of warning have in given the option of a full refund, not much use at this time of year because of course most
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other flights are very full or very expensive, or they can transfer to another rya nair flight expensive, or they can transfer to another ryanair flight or expensive, or they can transfer to another rya nair flight or crucially, ryanair has to buy them a ticket on another airline if it cannot get them to a —— to their destination in a sensible length of time. the united nations has called for an independent investigation into an missile strike in yemen which killed 29 children. the attack hit a bus in the north of the country. the saudi—led coalition said it targeted rebels in the market after they fired a missile at the kingdom on wednesday. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet has this report, and you may find some of the pictures distressing. a conservative peer says he's been sent dozens of abusive emails since he criticised borisjohnson for his comments about women who wear the burka. lord sheikh, who founded the conservative muslim forum, had told bbc newsnight that mrjohnson should have the party whip withdrawn. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker has more on this. jessica, take us through this latest develop and? well, lord sheikh has
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been fairly outspoken in his criticism of borisjohnson since that article in the daily telegraph. he called for the web to be withdrawn but now the senior conservative peer who is, as you say, president and founder of the conservative muslim forum, has told the bbc has been to viyella bews since speaking out. —— subject to vile abuse and speaking out. we know that sources close to borisjohnson had said the former foreign secretary does not plan on apologising, he believes he was speaking up for liberal values in arguing againsta speaking up for liberal values in arguing against a ban on the burqa. but of course it was the language borisjohnson but of course it was the language boris johnson used which but of course it was the language borisjohnson used which offended many people, likening women who wear the full face veil to letterboxes and bank robbers. yesterday we learned that the conservative party had what we understand to be dozens of complaints about this article, and it is looking at whether there needs to be any further action following this article. i think this latest develop and probablyjust
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adds to pressure to the party to look like it is taking this matter seriously. —— and development. campsites in the south of france with more than a thousand tourists have been evacuated after flash flooding. officials say a german man helping to supervise children was declared missing after being swept away by floodwaters, while some 17,000 homes were left without power. around 100 children were moved to safety from one campsite. 0livia crellin reports. roads turned to rivers. rivers have become rapids. this is what it looks like now in some parts of france after a week—long heatwave finally gave way to storms. intense rain over the last 48 hours has put central and southern areas of the country on flood alert, while around 17,000 homes are without power. firefighters in the ardeche and drome regions of actuated 1600
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people when campsite but this one turned into mud laughs in the wake of the storms. —— campsite will like this one. translation: the first thing i did was put into place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees. with teams working in pairs, with those secured people to the trees and then little by little we evacuated them. over 100 german children visiting for summer over 100 german children visiting forsummer camp over 100 german children visiting for summer camp were among the rescued. police and divers continued to search brand nobbly german man who was supervising them. he is missing up to the nearby river burst its banks, and the caravan he sought shelter in was swept away in the torrent. after heatwaves and forest fires, these floods are the latest ina fires, these floods are the latest in a series of intense weather conditions to challenge europe this summer. britain's largest business organisation the cbi is proposing a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end to the immigration target. instead, the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make, what is described as a "positive contribution to the economy."
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an advice charity is warning the government to slow down its plans to have every home fitted with a smart energy meter by 2020. last year citizens advice received 3,000 complaints about the devices, and is calling for the roll—out to be extended until 2023. the government says these concerns account for less than 0.5% of the 11 million smart meters installed so far. those customers, effectively, will be robbed of those savings if we delay the programme. so technologically the solution is there. we are rolling it out as quickly as possible and customers are already saving. frankly i don't wa nt to are already saving. frankly i don't want to do anything which means the energy companies can take their foot off the pedal, because i think this programme is worth a look, both to british consumers and households, it also to be british energy system, andi also to be british energy system, and i think we should have an energy system fit for the 21st century.
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the heatwave may be finally drawing to a close but a flock of rare flamingos has an interesting reminder of the hot spell — a new set of foster chicks to rear. the searing temperatures caused these andean flamingos in gloucestershire to lay their first eggs in 15 years. none of them were fertile but, with the birds in full parenting mode, staff at the reserve gave them a set of chilean flamingo chicks to raise instead. some of the flamingos have been at the slimbridge wetland centre since the 1960s, longer than any of the staff. ididn't i didn't know flamingos lived so long. did you? no, i didn't know that. laughter . you don't need to sound so perturbed about it. mike, what do you think about that? the parents have effect that we adopted other flamingos? or they were tricked into thinking they were bears. even though they are generally monogamous, they have one partner for life. did you notice the chicks we re for life. did you notice the chicks were grey? that is because they turn
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pink in the wild because of their diet. because they eat the shrimp and algae, which is why they turn pink when they are older. when you we re pink when they are older. when you were the flamengo correspondent for the bbc... yes, on the isle of wight. how do you know so much about the mingus? i have always been fascinated. they are beautiful birds. juno there are three types in south america? the andean, be chilean, and the james. the james? yes. by the time we'd do this story next will have researched and even less known fact about flamingos. what do you have for us in sport. well, katarina johnson—thompson has been raising the bar against the oddsin been raising the bar against the odds in berlin. she has a disappointment in the past that major championships, but right now she leaves the olympic champion from belgium by 87 points, with three events to go today. and in context, is that a decent lead, or is that a
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small margin? it is pretty much a personal best for her in some of the discipline so far. if you take a common wealth games performance she would only be six that these european championships. but she leaves. katarina johnson—thompson is three events away from a first european outdoor title in the heptathlon. she's in a real battle, with the world and olympic champion nafissatou thiam, but she took the lead after a strong 200 metres. the long jump, javelin and 800 metres are all to come today. everton were busy late on in the transfer window with barcelona defender yerry mina among their signings. he scored half of colombia's six goals at the world cup in russia, as they reached the last 16 before losing to england. ian poulter and justin rose are three shots off the pace after the opening round of the final golf major of the season, the us—pga championship in missouri. leading the way is the american gary wooodland. and johanna konta is out of the canadian open in montreal, after beating victoria azarenka in a match delayed overnight because of rain. she then lost in straight sets to the defending champion elina svitolina.
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do you like balloons? big balloons? ones that you can fly in? i like looking at them, they are wonderful spectacle. we are going to see lots and lots of them. there is a balloon fiesta. sarah, you are wearing your coat. does that mean it is getting a little bit modular? yes, good morning. it is a bit fresh this morning. it is a bit fresh this morning and we are expecting a bit of rain later on. but it is a beautiful spectacle here this morning at the bristol international balloon fiesta. this year the balloon fiesta. this year the balloon fiesta. this year the balloon fiesta is 40 years old, so it has grown massively since it began. in 1979 there were just 27 balloons. this year there are 200 balloons. this year there are 200 balloons registered here across the weekend from more than 20 countries. to celebrate the 40 years there are
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40 specially shaped balloons. behind me you can see simbalu, the lion balloon. there is a teardrop balloon as well. and there is a rupert the bear balloon, apparently as he inflates he does a little wave. we are expecting a few showers though, thatis are expecting a few showers though, that is how the forecast is looking here in bristol. what about the rest of the country today? i think that theme will be set for many of us through the course of the day. it really is a case of sunny spells and scattered showers today and some of those showers are pretty blustery with easy conditions developing through the course of the day. low pressure sitting out to the east. that put all the rain to the south—east of england yesterday. low pressure is also approaching to the we st pressure is also approaching to the west as well. a couple of low pressure front set to bring some showery rain. the heaviest showers will be from the west of scotland into north—west england, northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england. hit and miss, not everywhere seeing them, but some
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will be have re—entered thundery. those blustery showers drift east as we head into the afternoon. heavy showers, hail and thunderstorms for eastern england and eastern scotland as well. a fairly cool day with temperatures expected only about 17— 19 today. blustery winds, especially along the south coast, where we could see gus is of 40 miles an hour later on. —— gusts. the heaviest of those showers from eastern england into eastern scotland, so a bit of late sunshine for many of us but clear and dry conditions overnight stop so it will be quite a chilly night. overnight lows of around 8— ten in the towns and cities but it could be colder than that in the countryside. to start the weekend, clear skies for many of us. sunshine through the day on saturday and more cloud increasing through the south—west of england, wales, bringing a few showers here and there. also clouding over northern ireland and the west of scotland. central and eastern england and eastern scotland, not a bad day. it should a dry and sunny for much of the day. temperatures a few degrees
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warmun than today. something like 17- 22, the warmun than today. something like 17— 22, the top temperatures on saturday. heading into the second half of the weekend, and is low pressure drifts eastward, many of us will see outbreaks of rain on sunday, with heavy rain for central parts of england and wales. still a few showers the scotland and northern ireland. i think the driest weather on sunday will be reserved for the far south—east of england where there will be some sunshine, and it will be a touch warmer, around 17— 34. again, a fairly breezy picture. it is looking like a mixed story over the next few days. a fairly unsettled weekend. despite those showers around through the data should be some decent of sunshine as well. and some of these balloons, though they won't be taking off today because of the rain in the forecast we are going to be seeing these beautiful thanks very much sarah. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's 6:15. the main stories: thousands of passengers faced
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disruption as ryanair pilots walk out on strike. hundreds of holiday makers are evacuated, as floods hit southern france. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. the daily mail says a poll of patients suggests gps in england are struggling to cope with an ageing population, a recruitment crisis and immigration levels. it says the number of people waiting more than a week to see a doctor has doubled in six years. the times front page says campaigners are angry the interest rate rise has not been passed on to savers. it says only1 of 100 banks and building societies are offering the rates in full to customers. the sun leads with news that tv presenter ant mcpartlin will miss
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this year's i'm a celebrity programme as he continues treatment in rehab. the paper also reports that saturday night takeaway will be postponed until 2020. ant and dec also make the front page of the daily mirror. its lead story reports a "controversial study" suggesting people can consume at least double the amount of salt the nhs advises if they eat a balanced diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables. the most read news story on the bbc news website this morning is the latest update from france, where floods in the south of the country have forced the evacuation of some 1,600 people, many of them holidaymakers. we are all fine. honestly. happy ahead of the new season tonight. manchester united against leicester. jose mourinho is on all of them. he
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says that it is a lie that he is falling out with his staff ahead of the season. also about the fact that they did not really get any deadline day signings of. hoping to bring in a defender or two. it is suggested the owners didn't want any more quick fixes, spending money on cash on players that might not work out. you have to remember they signed fred, the brazilian, early in the tra nsfer fred, the brazilian, early in the transfer window. some fans who are happy are full. they have spent more than any other promoted side in the past. they won the play—off finals, they have spent £100 million, third behind the likes of chelsea and liverpool in this transfer window and they completed it yesterday with
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and they completed it yesterday with a signing from montpellier. something more quirky. you have lots going on. this is a great picture. a former f1 driver riding a bike with hollow wheels. wheels with nose spokes. —— knows. —— no. what kind of vehicle is that?l powerful motorbike. you want to have a look? would you like an update on the wasp situation? they are everywhere. they seem to be everywhere. they seem to be everywhere. we have established that he is the wildlife corresponded. you think they are bad now, apparently
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it will get a lot worse in the autumn that because there is all sorts of information here, all of the pest controllers say it every pest controller they say, there is a lot of nest, last year they were doing one or two per day. currently the number is between 8— 15 days. that is a big difference. you know with spiders you asked us put fresh conkers out. i am going camping from tomorrow and it will be training. —— training. —— raining. to see later. the time is 6:21a.m.. the question of how to manage immigration has been at the centre of brexit discussions over
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the last couple of years. and today britain's biggest business organisation is putting forward its proposals. the cbi wants targets to be scrapped and replaced by a system which will attract workers to the employers who need them most. its deputy director—general isjosh hardie and hejoins us now. what does that mean? this new proposal. firstly, we understand that we accept that freedom of movement is going to end. we have consulted with nearly 130,000 businesses across 18 sectors to say what does your new model look like is that it needs to balance openness because the value that workers coming here, where we have skills shortages, labourshortages, coming here, where we have skills shortages, labour shortages, the value they add is absolutely huge. but at the same time we need control. we need to be able to reflect a nd control. we need to be able to reflect and build public trust and confidence and help those
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communities who may feel impacted by immigration to cope with that. why do you feel the need to rebuild public trust in the immigration system ? public trust in the immigration system? clearly through the referendum there was a big debate about immigration and while it is accepted, if you ask individuals do we wa nt accepted, if you ask individuals do we want people here to do a particularjob? you we want people here to do a particular job? you get we want people here to do a particularjob? you get a huge amount of support. there has been concerned about the impact it can have on public services and the level of immigration. when you talk about people coming here to make a contribution and grow our economy and you have a system that can ensure that is what is happening, that balances both sides of the equation. howell will this balance be addressed in terms of the government? the government is aware from the referendum vote that people are frustrated net migration. and so it is responding to public demand that net migration is kept down. how politically is it going to work if you want net migration to rise?|j politically is it going to work if you want net migration to rise? i am not saying we necessarily want it to
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rise, we need to have a sensitive debate about this because if we have needs in the economy and jobs were we need people from overseas to do them, why would we stop them? is that valid on people on the contribution rather than having a net target. it is a funny situation where every month we have thousands of people from outside of the eu, jobs that we need to do and they are proven to have the skills to do them but there are —— they are not allowed to come here and do them. that deflate our growth.|j allowed to come here and do them. that deflate our growth. i don't understand. if the number is not going to rise, how we get more people to fill the jobs? it will depend on where we are in our economy. at the moment we are lucky. we have near record levels of employment and that means that you have skills needed. the point is exactly that, it is to have a system thatis exactly that, it is to have a system that is flexible for the needs we have as a country, not one that is fixed by an arbitrary target. how
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often do you want that target to be changed, assessed and adjusted in terms of policy? it will flex with the needs we have as an economy. health practical is that? you are saying if people come here and you register them and you say you are welcome to come here, if there is a job that we need you to do. that is something that you can build a system that almost manages itself. we do register people at the moment and that stops us from having any control. if we do them that opens up opportunities to protect labour markets, to protect funds were issues need to be mitigated in terms of health and education. it is not about putting a new target in place every year, is that having a system thatis every year, is that having a system that is flexible and raced on contribution and need. thank you very much. it's been a record breaking summer but has the economy also been hotting up? victoria is at a sun cream factory this morning to find out. morning victoria. morning to you both. it has been a
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record summer of sales here at the sun cream factory. we have had 26 days so far of two bridges over 30 degrees. heavy ever wanted to know what one ton of sun cream looks like? there you go. feels a little bit weird. here we have the factory line and it goes to show you how busy things have gotten. we have the bottles, they get filled about six ata time bottles, they get filled about six at a time in this machine. we have got kelly and angelica putting on the decompresses here. then we get the decompresses here. then we get the different labels that go on depending on what kind of product is going on here. they are squeezed onto the sun cream, boxed up and end up onto the sun cream, boxed up and end up on this pallet. these palettes get to places all over the year —— the uk. has this warm weather extended to the rest of the uk) will find out a bit later on.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. protest has ta ken protest has taken place in boris johnson's constituency, following his comments on muslim women. the former foreign secretary had impaired the appearance to bank robbers and letterboxes. conservatives have received dozens of complaints which will be looked at. he has rejected calls to apologise and his supporters have said he was speaking up for liberal values. lease are concerned for the safety of 214—year—old girls that have gone missing. they have been missing since monday. they told their parents they will be staying over at each other‘s addresses. both sets of pa rents over at each other‘s addresses. both sets of parents realise the girls had not stayed over and contacted police. 67—year—old man from
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pingelly who is completely blind says he feels discriminated against after he was refused patient transport for a hospital appointment. michael ryan was given transport for more than ten years. after a recent change to the criteria he was denied. he says came after a telephone questionnaire in which he admitted being able to use a taxi. the trust have apologised to him and said the assessment was incomplete. isaid i said yes i can get a taxi, a taxi will take me to the hospital, but thatis will take me to the hospital, but that is all they will do. they might drop me at reception but they don't have to do anything else. whereas transport, will and always have, they will take it to the department concerned and they will make sure that you get there all right and make sure you are seated and everything is ok before they leave you. a look at the travel situation. o nto onto the roads, a bit of traffic starting to build on north circular
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road. in fulham, the and rd is is closed southbound. hello. good morning. a few patches of mraround to hello. good morning. a few patches of mr around to start the day but todayis of mr around to start the day but today is essentially a day of sunshine and showers. the best of the sunshine will be this morning, patches of myst will lift, seeing heavy and possibly thundery showers pushing their way east. into the afternoon there could be a few spells of longer range. temperatures not filling party to it warm, 19, 20 degrees with a south—westerly breeze. through this evening into overnight we will tend to see the showers dying out. late sunshine before the sun sets and overnight it will be dry with clear skies but temperatures will fall away into the single figures for some, a much cooler night and we have seen of late. i leave you with the outlook as we move into the weekend. saturday probably looking like the
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better day. sunshine to begin with but that turns hazy as we move to the day. temperatures at a maximum of 22. sunday, a cloudy day without wrecks of showery rain and bridges around 24 celsius. have a good day. i'll be back with you in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 06:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. they promised to revolutionise our energy usage, but do smart meters actually work? we'll hear calls for the government to put the brakes on its plans to fit one in every household. it's nearly a quarter of a century old, but friends is attracting a whole new generation of super fans. it's just been named the uk's most streamed tv show. we'll be looking at the lasting appeal of the ‘90s sitcom.
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and it's all change at bbc radio 1. as nick grimshaw leaves the breakfast show, greg james prepares to set his early alarm. but when does he start? he'll be here to reveal all. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. campsites in the south of france with more than 1000 tourists have been evacuated after flash flooding. officials say a german man helping to supervise children was declared missing after being swept away by floodwaters, and 17,000 homes have been left without power. around 100 children were moved to safety from one campsite. the worst—hit areas are gard, ardeche and drome. roads turned to rivers. rivers have become rapids. this is what it looks like now in some parts of france after a weeks—long heatwave
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finally gave way to storms. intense rain over the last 48 hours has put central and southern areas of the country on flood alert, while around 17,000 homes are without power. firefighters in the ardeche and drome regions evacuated 1,600 people when campsites like this one turned into mudbaths in the wake of the storms. translation: the first thing i did was put into place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees, there were adults and children in particular. with teams working in pairs, we first secured people to the trees and then little by little we evacuated them. over 100 german children visiting for summer camp were among the rescued. police and divers continued to search for an elderly german man who was supervising them. he is missing after the nearby river burst its banks, and the caravan he sought shelter in was swept away in the torrents.
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after heatwaves and forest fires, these floods are the latest in a series of intense weather conditions to challenge europe this summer. thousands of uk air passengers face disruption today as ryanair pilots stage a 24—hour strike. nearly 400 flights, up to 100 to and from the uk, have been cancelled in the budget airline's worst ever day of industrial action. the pilots are demanding changes to pay and conditions but ryanair says the action is "regrettable and unjustified." the united nations has called for an independent investigation into a missile strike in yemen which killed 29 children. the attack hit a bus in the north of the country. the saudi—led coalition said it targeted rebels in the market after they fired a missile at the kingdom on wednesday. the us state department said the coalition should carry out its own assessment. a conservative peer says he's been sent dozens of abusive emails since he criticised borisjohnson
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for his comments about women who wear the burqa. lord sheikh, who founded the conservative muslim forum, claims to have received "vile" islamophobic messages after calling for mrjohnson to be sacked on bbc newsnight. the former foreign secretary is now facing a possible investigation into breaches of the conservative party code of conduct. britain's largest business organisation the cbi is proposing a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end to the immigration target. instead, the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make, what is described as "a positive contribution to the economy." an advice charity says the government should slow down its plans to have every home fitted with a smart energy meter by 2020. last year citizens advice received 3,000 complaints about the devices, and is calling for the roll—out to be extended until 2023. the government says these concerns account for less than 0.5% of the 11 million smart meters installed so far. thousands of people turned out
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in cardiff to give tour de france winner geraint thomas a hero's welcome home. he's the first welshman, and only the third briton, to win the gruelling cycle race. he said he was "blown away" by the support. when asked by fans what he was planning to do next, he replied "have some beers." great scenes. and good news as well, in the next few days he says he hopes to finalise his new contract with team sky, which was going to expire at the end of the year. see he can enjoy the break. there was some discussion about which position he can play. yes, he will be the queen be now. yesterday all those people turned up on their bikes, it was a nice moment. everybody was so pleased when he won, absolutely brilliant. somebody else is looking good, katarina johnson—thompson,
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showers in the heptathlon at the european championships. she has posted her first —— european championships. she has posted herfirst —— her european championships. she has posted her first —— her best ever first—day score and she leaves the best female athlete in the world, the olympic champion. you would have to say she is still the underdog, because the javelin is on today. although she did get her personal best in the shot put, all the best in two years. so she is defying the odds. katarina johnson—thompson leads the heptathlon, with three move events to come. joe lynskey has the latest on her quest for gold and the rest of the action from the european championships. katarina johnson—thompson's career is about consistency, across events and across the year. in five months she is now poised for a third gold medal, and across seven events she drives for the front. i have been aware that the competition is stronger and i will have to add my game. iam stronger and i will have to add my game. i am trying not to be afraid of anybody, i am my own athlete, i
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have got my own lane, i've got my own performances and main strengths. i'm trying to focus on the. else will on the track, nethaneel mitchell—blake will on the track, nethaneel mitchell—bla ke sought the will on the track, nethaneel mitchell—blake sought the spotlight but was edged out in the 200 metres. tu rkey‘s but was edged out in the 200 metres. turkey's ray meagher bully adding to the title he won last year to ove rco m e the title he won last year to overcome a dominant force there is a easy solution. but from berlin back to glasgow, the medals keep coming. the british moon is loud and proud. this is going to be tight, i think it is going to be proud. it is! is first european championship title. with benjamin proud's old came a second in the relay. this success comes from strength and depth and a touch of star quality. adam peaty‘s fourth title this week. if he is now swimming's dominant force, britain's jack lawes has become diving's spinning winner. he won olympic gold to make years ago, and this week has already brought to european titles. medals are one in flashes of
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brilliance, but for others, titles are all patients struggle. three more are all patients struggle. three m o re eve nts are all patients struggle. three more events today will see katarina johnson—thompson to european glory. the transfer window has now closed for english clubs and the big movers on deadline day were everton, who paid barcelona over £27 million for yerry mina, the colombian defender who starred at the world cup, scoring three goals. but it was a record—breaking transfer window for tottenham hotspur for all the wrong reasons. they become the first premier league team to go through a transfer window without making a single new signing. so the squads are sorted, now it's time for the football to get under way. manchester united welcome leicester city in the first premier league game of the new season at old trafford tonight. right on cue, thanks, tracey. this is the new premier league ball. does it look any different to you? it is called the merlin. every year the ball changes. what is so special
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about this? it has only format tunnels. balls used to have 30 to stitch together. this has four, and thejoin is stitch together. this has four, and the join is around the stitch together. this has four, and thejoin is around the blue line. that means that players can be extra tricks and get control of it because there are fewer ridges, if you like. wouldn't really make any difference to us. i am sure footballs are getting smaller. i don't think so, i think it is the same size.|j getting smaller. i don't think so, i think it is the same size. i think you just have the cans. will it produce the magic the manchester united, then? they welcome leicester city at old trafford tonight. but it's not been the happiest of summers for united, who've also missed out on a number of transfers they wanted. the managerjose mourinho says the fans will need to be patient. i think by the end of november, december, you will see why, by then, which teams are in a position to win the premier league. in this moment
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awards are not important. let's play football and by the end of november, december, you don't need words. you will see which teams are candidates. one other football note and there were was a 3—1win for steven gerrard's rangers in the first leg of their europa league qualifier against maribor, while hibs and burnley drew their matches. much more on those games on the bbc sport website. the american gary woodland is the surprise leader after the opening round of the uspga championship, the last golf major of the season. but there are some well—placed britons in the field. justin rose and ian poulter are in a large group, three shots off the pace, after rounds of 67. johanna konta is out of the canadian open in montreal after a busy day. she completed victory over victoria azarenka in a match delayed overnight because of rain. but she then lost in straight sets to the defending champion elina svitolina. and away from the sport, it in wasps news, a great way to deter them, i
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have been told, because conkers are used to deter spiders, apparently don't coffee is used in greece to keep wasps away. as income adjust wafting? this novel that? keep wasps away. as income adjust wafting? this novelthat? how keep wasps away. as income adjust wafting? this novel that? how do you burn copy? professionally made coffee, perhaps. don't burn things when you are camping. not in the tent or anything. outside. away from the trees. i have read all the safety manuals. the government wants every home to be fitted with a smart meter by 2020, but the advice charity citizen's advice has told bbc breakfast it needs to slow down the roll out and extend the deadline by three years. last year the organisation received 3,000 complaints about the devices, with problems ranging from aggressive sales techniques, and some customers still having to send readings to their energy company. graham satchell reports. whenjeff when jeff first got his whenjeff first got his smart metre he was pleased. it allowed him to see how much energy he was using and
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how much it cost in real—time. but then he switched his supplier and it stopped working. i was shocked, really. i had really assumes that these were one type model fits all suits everybody. and there was a state of shock, followed by a slight cynicism, that, oh dear, our government and it are never very good bedfellows. i touch the electric one and we just get nothing. citizens advice told bbc brea kfast nothing. citizens advice told bbc breakfast today they had thousands of complaints about new smart meters. some, like jeff's, of complaints about new smart meters. some, likejeff's, do not work or belief you switch supplier. your meters in the garage? yes, on both sides. there have also been complaints about aggressive sales practices and poor installation. citizens advice as it supports a printable of smart meters, but only if they work. we are calling on the government to extend the rollout
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deadline so the remaining 42 million metres that need to be installed can be done so in the best possible way for customers and in the most cost—effective way. for customers and in the most cost-effective way. up to 53 million smart meters are meant to be installed in every home by 2020, at an estimated cost of £11 billion. smart meters automatically send readings to energy suppliers, putting an end to estimated bills. and because people can more accurately monitor their energy use, the government says they will save us an average of £47 a year by 2030. the government acknowledges there have been problems, but say now is not the time for delay. we are rolling it out as quickly as possible, customers are already saving, and frankly i don't want to do anything that means the energy companies can take their foot off the pedal. because i think this programme is worth a lot, both to british consumers and households but also to the british energy system, andi also to the british energy system, and i think we should have an energy system that is fit for the 21st century. i have employed a stall to get myself up a little bit higher to
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it. the government says by the end of this year, jeff's smartly to should start working again. an upgrade to the network, originally planned for 2015, means that meters will work even if you switch. there is really nothing smart about this. jeff isn't holding his breath. for the time being, he is back to taking manual readings and sending them to his new supplier. something tells me quite a few people would have been through that palaver. indeed. we will be talking about this later in the programme as well. if you have any thoughts, get in touch the usual way. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's 6:43. the headlines: thousands of uk air passengers face disruption, as ryanair pilots walk out on strike. hundreds of holiday makers are evacuated, as floods hit southern france. sarah's in bristol at this year's balloon fiesta with a look at this morning's weather. rather magnificent surroundings.
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your coat is on, so people are expecting a bit of rain, maybe?” have got my coat on today, we are expecting a bit of rain and a cool fuel to the weather but that is not spoiling the weather at at bristol. this has been growing hugely over the years, it is 40 years old. to celebrate 40 years of it, there are 40 special shaped balloons this year, they change from giant allianz, all sorts of balloons. over the course of the four days there is around about 250,000 people expected to flock here. still is synonymous with hot air balloons, really famous worldwide. this is the biggest gathering annually of anywhere in
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europe. quite an amazing spectacle watching these balloons inflated. they will not be taking off because we have got a bit of rain in the forecast and some breezy conditions. how is the weather looking? here that the clouds are gathering. we are expecting a few showers and that picture will be true up and down the country. a day of sunny spells but scattered, heavy, blustery showers and it will feel quite easy for many of us. we have got low pressure to the east and in the west with fronts moving in there will be showery rain. this morning their heaviest showers will be for the west of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and wales and the south—west. some of them heavy with thunder and hail. those heavy showers will drift eastwards, sunshine returning to the west but heavy showers and thunderstorms in the east, particularly breezy on the south coast and quite a caulfield to
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the weather with capita is between 17-19 the weather with capita is between 17— 19 degrees. —— britches. most of those showers clear. —— temperatures. a bit of late sunshine and clear and temperatures. a bit of late sunshine and clearand dry temperatures. a bit of late sunshine and clear and dry conditions overnight. temperatures down to around 8— 10 degrees in the towns and cities but it will be colder than that in the countryside. for saturday morning we have got that fresh start. for many of us there will be dry and sunny weather, but the clout increases from the south on saturday morning with showers for the south—west into wales, cloud for northern ireland and eastern scotland. they should keep sunshine for much of the day. temperatures around about 17— 22 degrees on saturday. it looks like sunday will be the more unsettled day of the weekend as low pressure drifts its way eastwards there will be rain for much of england and wales, some showers for scotland and northern ireland but they should clear away. the south—east of england should be
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the place that keeps the driest weather for the longest on sunday but it will be quite breezy. you will be a touch warmer than saturday. by the time you get to sunday those temperatures are around about 17— 24 celsius. a fairly u nsettled about 17— 24 celsius. a fairly unsettled picture over the next couple of days. it is looking fairly showery in bristol and it looks like the heat of a week ago is well and truly behind us. it really does look lovely there. we will see much more later on. later this morning we'll find out how much the economy grew in the first half of the year. the other is what does a suncream factory look like? victoria is in one for us this morning. it has been a record summer for things like heatwave, the royal wedding, we have had the world cup as well. it is no wonder that we have all been out enjoying the sun. good news for places like this. they
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have been pulling extra shifts it has been at busy. let's talk to the head of manufacturing. how has the heatwave affected your business? head of manufacturing. how has the heatwave affected your business7m has been great. we have seen a huge increase and that is because of the heatwave. we have had to bring in additional agency staff, working overtime during the week and also occasional weekends as well. this yearl occasional weekends as well. this year i have had to put on extra production lines and also an additional packaging line to keep up with the demand. absolutely crazy. if only there was such a thing as smellivision, it smells amazing in here. they are going into the boxes here. they are going into the boxes here and these can put into these pallets six per box and that there are about 2000 bottles on a package at the moment and they are going to places all over the uk. also places
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abroad as well. let's talk to the head of sales. where other suncream is going? literally all over the world. you have resorts such as mauritius, but closer to home in the uk and off it goes to the airport. all parts of the world. what into europe as well, people enjoying theirsummer europe as well, people enjoying their summer holidays but recently staycations, people staying at home with the warmth. i am going to cornwall. let's bring injeremy, an economist and currency specialist. we were talking about the sales going elsewhere around the world and a pound has been cheaper, which means export is going to be more valuable. everything is about 1596 off as to where it was two years ago. exporters are making more money on the export is that they are putting out their. we hope we see them invest and expand into new
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markets, be it into china, into europe, us and australia and new zealand and making sure everybody can take advantage of it to. we are not here this morning because we love suncream, not here this morning because we love suncream , we not here this morning because we love suncream, we are here to talk about the economic growth numbers that are going to be coming out a little bit later on. finding out how manufacturing is doing, how industry is doing. what are your thoughts for what we will see later on today? likely to be double from what we saw in the first quarter this year, due to the fact that we don't have the terrible weather. the retail sector, people back in the shops and spending money over the course of the world cup and the royal wedding. the construction worry —— construction industry everybody is worried about. manufacturers like this, raw material costs may have increased but the weak pound is keeping it very well supported. let's hope so because that is a big
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thing. we haven't seen interest rates go up for sometime. 20 to talk about all throughout the morning, i am going to find out how you make suncream , am going to find out how you make suncream, what goes into it, i have been looking at a massive that around the corner. would you believe that australia is one of their big markets? you would think they have enough suncream but apparently they like rich suncream. at the more going on, we will be working out how this works out and how this relates to the rest of the economy. whether that good weather has spread to all corners of the uk economy and warmed it up. 20 more coming up throughout the rest of the day and those of statistics figures coming out at night 30 a.m.. dashed —— 90 a.m.. —— 90 a.m. —— 90 a.m. —— 9:30a.m. if i mentioned "smelly cat". "how you doing?" or "central perk", would you know what i was talking about?
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it's friends of course, and almost a quarter of a century after it first aired, new research shows it is the most streamed tv show on subscription services in the uk. while netflix spends more than £5 billion a year on original content — like the crown and stranger things — it's the classic 90s sitcom which is actually bringing in the biggest audiences. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been having far too much fun finding out more. friends theme plays. it's 14 years since friends and did. butjulie in chandler's bachelor pad, monica's apartment, the hallway between them, ross group was living room are very between them, ross group was living room are very familiar to a whole new generation. subscription streaming services netflix, don't reveal their figures, has revealed new research of the uk's most spring shows of the 18. at number five, it
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is picky blinders. at four, stranger things. at three, it has already come tv royalty. the crown. at two, you can watch on your pc, but it is not pc, the grand tour. and at one, a show which started in 1994. the year before the dvd was invented. friends. i ross, take the rachel. so why has it enjoyed? who better to ask than comedy central‘s friends fest, it plays every day and this is touring the uk, selling out wherever it goes. just the characters are whole areas, ross is my favourite character. just his facial it
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impressions of. ijust character. just his facial it impressions of. i just watch it over and over. i grew up watching the fresh prince of bel—air, but since i got into friends i thought this is amazing and i haven't stopped watching since the. you were born yea rs watching since the. you were born years after friends and did. why do you like it? because it makes me laugh. who is your favourite character? rachel. why? she is funny. to some, using the device plot to name each episode, friends is still number one. were you a big fan? presumably what that means is some people watched it the first time around, going back to it but they will also be a whole bunch of people who didn't see it before. who are you most like? i don't think it was like that. there
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was about the chemistry. did jennifer aniston is a recently she is tried to organised a reunion? something like that. are you sure you are not like any of them? you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: he's the flamboyant, falsetto—hitting frontman of scissor sisters. now, as he goes solo, jake shears will be here to tell us whether he's cut ties with his old bandmates for good. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. a protest has taken place in boris johnson's uxbridge constituency demanding he step down following comments about muslim women wearing a full face veil. in a newspaper column, the former foreign secretary had compared the appearance of wearers
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of the burka to bank robbers and letter boxes. the conservatives have received dozens of complaints, which will be looked at by an independent panel. mrjohnson has rejected calls to apologise and his supporters have said he was speaking up for "liberal values". a 67 year old man from finchley who is completely blind says he feels discriminated against after he was refused patient transport for a hospital appointment. michael ryan was given transport for more than ten years. after a recent change to the assessment criteria he was denied this service. he says it came after a telephone questionnaire in which he admitted being able to use a taxi. the royal free trust have apologised to him and said the assessment was incomplete. i said yes i can get a taxi, a taxi will take me to the hospital, but that's all they'll do. they might drop me at reception, but they don't have to do anything else. whereas transport, will and always have, they will take you to the department concerned and they will make sure that you get there all right
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and make sure you are seated and everything is ok before they leave you. fulham football club, the first promoted team ever to spend over £100m in the summer transfer window. the white's announced five players had joined. including marseille midfielder andre—frank anguissa in a £22.3m deal. fulham's first match back in the premier league is on saturday at home to crystal palace. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads there is traffic starting to build on the a406 north circular road westbound approaching the crooked billet roundabout at south chingford. in fulham the a3219 north end road is closed southbound between dawes road and the a304. lets have a check on the weather now
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with lucy martin. hello. good morning. a few patches of mist around to start the day, but today is essentially a day of sunshine and showers. the best of the sunshine will be this morning, a few patches of mist lifting fairly quickly, seeing heavy and possibly thundery showers pushing their way east. into the afternoon there could be a few spells of longer rain. temperatures not feeling particularly warm, 19, 20 degrees with a south—westerly breeze. through this evening into overnight we will tend to see the showers dying out. late sunshine before the sun sets and overnight it will be dry with clear skies, but temperatures are going to fall away into the single figures for some, a much cooler night than we have seen of late. i leave you with the outlook as we move into the weekend. saturday probably looking like the better day. some sunshine to begin with, but that turns hazy as we move through the day. temperatures at a maximum of around 22 celcius. sunday, a cloudy day with outbreaks of showery rain and temperatures around 24 celsius. have a good day. all of i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: flash floods hit southern france, triggering a major rescue operation to help hundreds of stranded holidaymakers. flights cancelled for more than 50,000 ryanair across europe, many in the uk, on the worst day of strike action in the airline's history. —— ryanair passengers. a call for a delay in the installation of smart energy meters — citizens advice tells this programme it's received thousands of complaints. it has been a busy summer of record sales here at this suncream factory in trafford. but as the good word spread to all corners of uk economic? we have the official growth figures later on. the transfer window slams shut onjose mourinho. he says he'lljust have to work with the players he has, after manchester united fail to make any more signings.
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they kick off the new premier league season tonight at home to leicester city. and i am here inside the envelope of this lune at the restored international balloon fiesta, showers celebrating its 40th international anniversary. —— bristol. some showers here and across the country, and i will have across the country, and i will have a detailed forecast in about 15 minutes. more than 1,000 tourists in the south of france have been ta ken to safety after ca m psites were hit by flash floods. officials say a 75—year—old german man helping to supervise children was declared missing after being swept away by floodwaters, while some 17,000 homes were left without power. around 100 children were moved to safety from one campsite as olivia crellin reports. roads turned to rivers. rivers have become rapids. this is what it looks like now in some parts of france after a weeks—long heatwave finally gave way to storms. intense rain over the last 48 hours
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has put central and southern areas of the country on flood alert, while around 17,000 homes are without power. firefighters in the ardeche and drome regions evacuated 1,600 people when campsites like this one turned into mudbaths in the wake of the storms. translation: the first thing i did was put into place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees, adults and children. with teams working in pairs, we first secured people to the trees and then little by little we evacuated them. over 100 german children visiting for summer camp were among the rescued. police and divers continued to search for an elderly german man who was supervising them. he is missing after the nearby river burst its banks, and the caravan he sought shelter in was swept away in the torrents. after heatwaves and forest fires, these floods are the latest in a series of intense weather conditions to challenge europe this summer. thousands of uk air passengers face
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disruption today as ryanair pilots stage a 24—hour strike. around 400 flights, up to 100 of them to and from the uk, have been cancelled in the budget airline's biggest ever walkout. caroline davies reports. it has not been an easy summer holiday for ryanair, winding queues and cancellations blamed on storms and shortages of air traffic control staff. now they face a different sort of turbulence — strikes. some ryanair pilots in five countries will strike from today for 24 hours. it has meant cancellations across europe, nearly 400 of them. the netherlands have avoided any, but there are 22 to and from ireland, 22 in sweden, 104 in belgium, and worst affected, germany, with 250 cancellations. it is the fifth time the pilots have been on strike sincejuly last year. they say they want better pay and fairer contracts,
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and a change to ryanair‘s practice of moving staff between its bases without much notice. ryanair say they have notified all affected customers and most have been put on other ryanair flights. they call the strikes " regrettable and unjustified", and ask the striking unions to continue negotiations instead of more industrial action. the unions say they remain available for talk. as the summer holidays continue, passengers just hope that this is not what awaits them at the airport. simon calderjoins us. you have in adding up the flights to and from the uk. what should people do if they are concerned about their flights? i have estimated up to 400 flights? i have estimated up to 400 flights could be affected, because one infourof flights could be affected, because one in four of ryanairflights flights could be affected, because one in four of ryanair flights to and from the uk. no staff here are
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on strike but they could be a disproportionate effect, since all the cancellations from ireland are to and from the uk. looking at the biggest problem, stansted and manchester are worst affected, multiple cancellations to berlin, gothenberg and new bird. —— nuremberg. dublin is missing flights to birmingham, gatwick and bristol. there are also problems between burly nand restored, and bristol and cologne. —— berlin and bristol. passengers should have been given more than 48 hours notice if they have been affected. under european air passenger rights, you are allowed, if rya nair does air passenger rights, you are allowed, if ryanair does not have a seat available, and flights are very full at the moment, to be rebooked on another airline service. at the cost to rya nair? on another airline service. at the cost to ryanair? yes. anecdotally, thatis cost to ryanair? yes. anecdotally, that is not as easy as it might sound is. of course, if you are stuck in germany or sweden or
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something like that and you cannot get back, the airline has to pay for your accommodation and meals until it can fly you home. the united nations has called for an independent investigation into a missile strike in yemen which killed 29 children. the attack hit a bus in the north of the country. the saudi—led coalition said it targeted rebels in the market after they fired a missile at the kingdom on wednesday. the us state department said the coalition should carry out its own assessment. a conservative peer says he's been sent dozens of abusive emails since he criticised borisjohnson for his comments about women who wear the burka. lord sheikh, who founded the conservative muslim forum, had told bbc newsnight that mrjohnson should have the party whip withdrawn. our political correspondent jessica parker has more on this. so, these comments have come out, that lord sheikh has been getting abusive messages since appearing on bbc newsnight, and still the row
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rumbles on about what waris johnson should do in terms of an apology? —— borisjohnson. should do in terms of an apology? —— boris johnson. yes, lord sheikh has been one ofjohnson's more outspoken critics, saying that the party whip should be withdrawn. now the senior conservative peer, who as you mentioned is a member of the muslim conservative forum —— conservative muslim forum, told bbc newsnight he received around 60 abusive emails, some of which were offensive, some of which were islamic obit. we know that sources close to borisjohnson are saying he does not plan on apologising, that he was in fact speaking up for liberal values by saying that they should we know burqa ban in britain as there has been, for example, in denmark. it was the language he used which offended so many people, likening women who wear the full face veil, comparing them to letterboxes and bank robbers. now, lord sheikh is saying that borisjohnson has let the genie out of the bottle. that is what he told newsnight last night. we know the news —— the conservative
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party has received a number of complaints, and it is considering whether further action needs to complaints, and it is considering whetherfurther action needs to be taken. these comments on lord sheikh last night, saying he received these abusive messages, adds pressure to the party to at least look as though it is taking this issue seriously. indeed. thank you, jessica. britain's largest business organisation, the cbi, is proposing a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end to immigration targets. instead, the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make "a positive contribution to the economy," as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. immigration matters to british industry. the cbi claims that half of all building workers in london are from the eu, british agriculture needs 60,000 seasonal foreign farmworkers every year, and the nhs has seen a drop of 87% on the number of eu citizens registering as nurses and midwives. that is why the cbi says that immigration has delivered significant economic benefits to the uk. it also knows the free movement of people between the uk and the eu will almost certainly end after brexit. so it is proposing allowing firms
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to recruit from the eu after brexit, but limiting those who are not studying or without independent means or a job from staying more than three months. eu citizens will also have to register with the authorities, be limited in what in—work benefits they can claim, and companies will have to prioritise the recruitment of british staff in sectors with high levels of unemployment. the cbi also wants to legally guarantee the rights of eu citizens already in the uk. the government says it will announce his plans for post—brexit immigration in due course, and it will be a system that works for all parts of the uk. fancy seeing some fluffy, cuddly flamingo chicks? here you go! this is a rather special and unlikely family. the hot summer encouraged these andean flamingoes in gloucestershire to lay their first eggs for 15 years. even though none of those
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was fertile, the staff at the reserve took advantage of them being in parenting mode and gave them a set of chilean flamingo chicks to raise instead. some of the flamingoes have been at the slimbridge wetland centre since the 1960s, longer than any of the staff. a fa ct a fact for you, some of those flamingos have been less in the 19605, flamingos have been less in the 1960s, longer than any of the staff. anyway, these andean ones are rearing be chilean ones. —— the chilean ones. the ongoing conflict in yemen has claimed more civilian lives. yesterday 29 children were killed after an airstrike on a school bus, in a rebel—held area in the north of the country. since 2015, yemen has been divided by civil war. on one side is the internationally recognised government backed by a saudi—led coalition. on the other side are houthi rebels, allied with iran. nearly 10,000 people have been killed, two thirds of them civilians, and 55,000 others have been injured in what has been described by the united nations
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as the world's worst man—made humanitarian crisis. the fighting and a partial blockade by the coalition has also left 22 million people in need of aid. there have been two previous attempts at peace talks. both have failed. the new un special envoy to yemen hopes to try again next month. joining us now is the chief executive of save the children, kevin watkins. a very good morning to you. thank you for your time. this latest incident, it is so desperate and it isa incident, it is so desperate and it is a slightly confusing picture, but we know many children have lost their lives. what information do you have? you will have seen the images. this is absolutely heartbreaking, and it is really an outrageous violation of international humanitarian law. the double tragedy in all of this is notjust the 29
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children who have lost their lives, but that we have had a statement from the saudi led coalition arguing that the action was consistent with international humanitarian law, and a legitimate military objectives. now, i think this is clearly a country which either doesn't understand the meaning of humanitarian law or believes it can violate it with total impunity, and tragically, that sense of impunity comes from the silence of saudi arabia's allies, including the united kingdom. i mean, given the scale of those injured and killed in this incident, little comfort what happens next in a way, but could this be classified as a war crime?” think if you look at the basic evidence it certainly needs to be investigated as a war crime. this is an attack which clearly appears to have failed to have taken any consideration of the presence of children in the area, to have no
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consideration of the potential loss of life among children, and there is really no attempt on the part of the saudi coalition to suggest that they have taken into account the basic provisions of international humanitarian law. so this ticks many of the boxes which would appear to signal that a potential war crime has been committed, and that's why we are calling for an independent investigation. the saudi led coalition has demonstrated over and over again that it is incapable of carrying out an independent investigation. nobody has been indicted for any of the past crimes committed in this yemen conflict, which is why the foreign office needs to stand upright now and call fran independent investigation and make it clear we need to see the individuals' names. —— foran. and make it clear that there will be consequences no action is taken,
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including a reconsideration of arms sales to saudi arabia. international attention is often drawn when terrible things like this happen, in a place like yemen. i understand you have been there recently. can you give people a sense of what it is like ona give people a sense of what it is like on a day—to—day pacers for the people there? i was in the port area which was under attackjust a few weeks ago, visiting a nutrition and health clinics. really, you see one tragic story after another. children who are on the brink of starvation, hospitals operating without anaesthetic, without essential medicines. there is almost no education taking place in many areas of yemen now, because of the economic strangulation the country is being subjected to. there is something like half a million children who are at immediate risk of starvation in yemen as a result of starvation in yemen as a result of the war, and that is why the peace talks that you referred to earlier, charlie, that will happen
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in the first week of september, are so critical, and why it is so reg retta ble so critical, and why it is so regrettable that the saudi coalition has decided to take this action, this military venture at this particularjuncture. kevin, thank you very much for your time. that was kevin watkins from save the children speaking to us this morning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the is quarter past seven. -- the time is quarter past seven. sarah's in bristol at this years balloon fiesta with a look at this morning's weather. iam here i am here in bristol at the international balloon fiesta and i have managed to get up in the air. i am with steve and you have been a balloon pilot for 38 years of. whenever you fire it is an adventure. what is the perfect conditions? around ten mph with the
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wind. it is down to wind speed and direction, how do you preplan your voyage is? it is like playing a game of chess, you look ahead of you and try to find an area with no animals or damage. you usually carry a gift for the land owner? is courtesy because we are on somebody else's property. today we are tethered here. there is a little bit too much wind to take off and we have a rainy and the forecast. how is the weather looking? a bit of an unsettled thing today of sunshine and blustery showers and it is a pretty breezy day a head too. we have low pressure towards the east, also low pressure approaching from the west and we will see some pretty heavy showers around this morning. the heaviest of the showers will be a cross western scotland, northern ireland, north—western england. some of them heavy and thundery. those heavy showers will drift their way further
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eastwards as we had driven course of the day. some sunshine returning to the day. some sunshine returning to the west but those heavy, thundery showers right across eastern england and eastern scotland. blustery day particularly on the south coast where we see wind gust of 40 mph were. temperatures around 17— 19 degrees, much cooler. those heavy showers in the east should drift across the east coast as we move into this evening. a bit of late sunshine for many of us and overnight it is looking dry and clear. a chilly night ahead in our towns and cities, temperatures around 8— 10 degrees but it will be colder than that in the countryside. the weekend starts on a settled note. lots of dry and sunny weather. the cloud increasing from the west on saturday morning and that will bring showers to wales, the south—west and the cloud push into northern ireland and the west of scotla nd northern ireland and the west of scotland but central and eastern scotland, eastern england looking rather dry. he will be a touch
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warmer than today, less easy with temperatures around 17— 22 degrees saturday afternoon. into the second half of the weekend and as low pressure d rifts half of the weekend and as low pressure drifts eastwards, we'll see more in the way of rainfall on sunday. the area likely to keep the dry weather longest is in the south—east of england. it will be a little bit more human than saturday. temperatures on sunday around 17— 24 degrees. a bit of an unsettled outlook and we are going to be seen that story of sunshine and showers not just today but through the course of the weekend. what a difference the week makes. we had the heatwave, the dry, hot weather this time last week. we are hoping that particularly later on today we will thing some of these balloons flying. back to you both.
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the government wants every home to be fitted with a smart meter by 2020, but the advice charity citizen's advice has told bbc breakfast it needs to slow down the roll out and extend the deadline by three years. last year the cab received 3,000 complaints about the devices, with problems ranging from aggressive sales techniques, and some customers still having to send readings to their energy company. graham satchell reports. when geoff first got his smart metre he was pleased. it allowed him to see how much energy he was using and how much it cost in real—time. but then he switched his supplier and it stopped working. i was shocked, really. i had really assumed that these were a one—type model fits all, suits everybody. and there was a state of shock, followed by a slight cynicism, that, oh dear, our government and it are never very
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good bedfellows. i touch the electric one and we just get nothing. citizens advice told bbc breakfast today they had thousands of complaints about new smart meters. some, like geoff's, do not work if you switch supplier. your meters are in the garage? yes, on both sides. there have also been complaints about aggressive sales practices and poor installation. citizens advice says it supports the principle of smart meters, but only if they work. we are calling on the government to extend the rollout deadline so the remaining 42 million metres that need to be installed can be done so in the best possible way for customers and in the most cost—effective way. up to 53 million smart meters are meant to be installed in every home by 2020, at an estimated cost of £11 billion. smart meters automatically send readings to energy suppliers,
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putting an end to estimated bills. and because people can more accurately monitor their energy use, the government says they will save us an average of £47 a year by 2030. the government acknowledges there have been problems, but say now is not the time for delay. we are rolling it out as quickly as possible, customers are already saving, and frankly i don't want to do anything that means the energy companies can take their foot off the pedal. because i think this programme is worth a lot, both to british consumers and households but also to the british energy system, and i think we should have an energy system that is fit for the 21st century. i have employed a stool to get myself up a little bit higher to it. the government says by the end of this year, jeff's smart meter should start working again. an upgrade to the network, originally planned for 2015, means that meters will work even if you switch. there's really nothing smart about this. jeff isn't holding his breath. for the time being, he's back to taking manual readings and sending them to his new supplier. let's speak now to
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robert cheesewright, director of policy and communications at smart energy gb an independent organisation assisting with the smart meter roll out. citizens advice once the rollout to be slowed down the. what is your ta ke be slowed down the. what is your take on this? already 8096 of people with smart meters would recommend them to family and friends and 90% have a good experience. people with smart meters are already saving 2% of their energy which is enough to power their home forfree of their energy which is enough to power their home for free for weak. the rollout is working well, making really good progress. the citizens com pletely really good progress. the citizens completely agree with that and say it is important and people are benefiting from it. where we have to make sure we get it right is that it is delivered well going forward and citizens advice will make a cotton —— an important contribution to
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that. should the rollout be slowed down? i think every body should get one as quickly as possible, the horrible experience of old meters, is not ok in the 21st century for us to have guesswork on siren blares cost us £1000 per year at least. i have talked to people across the country about smart meters. there was a person who came on and he was quite emotional, i was worried about what he was going to say and he said i doubt that a smart metre and it now means that i can check if he has got enough energy and i can top up his metre and it has changed his life. that, for me sparks what it can do for people. that is one amongst the 11 million people that are benefiting. there are other stories as well. there wasjeff in that report who that there is nothing smart about it because the technology isn't working for eve ryo ne technology isn't working for everyone and there is this issue about first and second—generation smart meters and whether or not the
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smart meters and whether or not the smart metre switch, as you switch supplier, that is not working at what of the time and that is frustrating a lot of people. absolutely. that is frustrating and i sympathise with that experience. that is only happening in 7% of cases and 93% of cases are working really well. can you switch with all of them? we were told to switch to get the energy deals, does the smart metre go along with you as you switch? when you have got a smart metre you can change suppliers all the time, for some of them they will go back into analogue mode which is the experience that some people have. it is a minority. what does that mean? it goes into analogue mode? it stops being a smart metre. it continues to work and count the energy and the display should work as well, meaning people keep their smart service. but it cannot communicate to the supplier. it goes back to the estimated bill system.
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so it is not working? in a small minority of cases. over 90% it works. all of those meters will be rolled out and they all will work sea mlessly rolled out and they all will work seamlessly as smart meters from the next years. this is like all technology, whether it is the step from no internet to dial—up to broadway and —— broadband. all technology improves overtime and thatis technology improves overtime and that is what is happening with smart meters. most people love it, people are saving energy and it is crucial but it will get better. thank you. quite a phuket will getting in touch on that one. —— few people getting in touch. mel got in touch and said i don't know how putting in another electronic device which is always on can possibly save energy. she says i already switched off devices. keep
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them coming in, we'll take a look at them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. a protest has taken place in boris johnson's uxbridge constituency demanding he step down following comments about muslim women wearing a full face veil. in a newspaper column, the former foreign secretary had compared the appearance of wearers of the burka to bank robbers and letter boxes. the conservatives have received dozens of complaints, which will be looked at by an independent panel. mrjohnson has rejected calls to apologise and his supporters have said he was speaking up for "liberal values". a 67 year old man from finchley who is completely blind says he feels discriminated against after he was refused patient transport for a hospital appointment. michael ryan was given transport for more than ten years, but a recent change to the assessment criteria saw him denied the service. he says it came after a telephone questionnaire in which he admitted being able to use a taxi.
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the royal free trust have apologised to him and said the assessment was incomplete. i said yes i can get a taxi, a taxi will take me to the hospital, but that's all they'll do. they might drop me at reception, but they don't have to do anything else. whereas transport, will and always have, they will take you to the department concerned and they will make sure that you get there all right and make sure you are seated and everything is ok before they leave you. fulham football club are the first promoted team into the premier league to spend over £100 million in the summer transfer window. the white's announced five players had joined yesterday including — marseille midfielder andre—frank zambo anguissa in a £22 million deal. fulham's first match of the season is home to crystal palace tomorrow. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the trains, disruption on great northern and thameslink services between peterborough
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and kings cross. on the roads there is traffic starting to build london bound on the a40 western avenue from swa keley‘s roundabout. in fulham, the a3219 north end road is closed southbound between dawes road and the a304. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello. good morning. a few patches of mist around to start the day, but today is essentially a day of sunshine and showers. the best of the sunshine will be this morning, a few patches of mist lifting fairly quickly, seeing heavy and possibly thundery showers pushing their way east. into the afternoon there could be a few spells of longer rain. temperatures not feeling particularly warm, 19, 20 degrees with a south—westerly breeze. through this evening into overnight we will tend to see the showers dying out. late sunshine before the sun sets and overnight it will be dry with clear skies, but temperatures are going to fall away into the single figures for some, a much cooler night than we have seen of late. i leave you with the outlook as we move into the weekend. saturday probably looking like the better day. some sunshine to begin with, but that turns hazy as we move through the day. temperatures at a maximum of around 22 celcius. sunday, a cloudy day with outbreaks of showery rain and temperatures around 24 celsius.
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have a good day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. flash floods in the south of france have forced more than 1,000 holidaymakers to flee from their campsites and triggered a major rescue operation. officials say a 75—year—old german man helping to supervise children was swept away by floodwaters, while17,000 homes were left without power. the worst—hit areas are gard, ardeche and drome. thousands of uk air passengers face disruption today as ryanair pilots stage a 24—hour strike.
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nearly 400 flights, including up to 100 to and from the uk, have been cancelled in the budget airline's worst ever day of industrial action. the pilots are demanding changes to pay and conditions but ryanair says the action is "regrettable and unjustified." the united nations has called for an independent investigation into a missile strike in yemen which killed 29 children. the attack hit a bus in the north of the country. the saudi—led coalition said it targeted rebels in the market after they fired a missile at the kingdom on wednesday. the us state department said the coalition should carry out its own assessment. a conservative peer says he's been sent dozens of abusive emails since he criticised borisjohnson for his comments about women who wear the burqa. lord sheikh, who founded the conservative muslim forum, claims to have received "vile" islamophobic messages after calling for mrjohnson to be sacked on bbc newsnight. the former foreign secretary is now
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facing a possible investigation into breaches of the conservative party code of conduct. britain's largest business organisation the cbi is proposing a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end to the immigration target — instead the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make what is described as a "positive contribution to the economy." an advice charity says the government should slow down its plans to have every home fitted with a smart energy meter by 2020. last year citizens advice received 3,000 complaints about the devices, and is calling for the roll—out to be extended until 2023. the government says these concerns
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account for less than 0.5% of the 11 million smart meters installed so far. thousands of people turned out in cardiff to give tour de france winner geraint thomas a hero's welcome home. he's the first welshman, and only the third briton, to win the gruelling cycle race. he said he was "blown away" by the support. when asked by fans what he was planning to do next, he replied "have some beers." i think he deserves them. lovely to see that support. yes, loads of people turned out yesterday. a big day for him. later on, sarah is that the international balloon fiesta. some lovely images. slightly greyer skies than we have been used to lately. more of that later on. the premier league season kicks off tonight with manchester united hosting leicester, and for the first time it begins after the summer transfer window has closed. premier league managers had until 5:00 last night to get in the players they wanted for the new campaign.
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and the transfer window has closed sooner than it used to? yes, they wa nted sooner than it used to? yes, they wanted it all done and dusted for the season starts. why are you all the season starts. why are you all the way are the there? we have something specialfor the way are the there? we have something special for you, we are joined by sue smith. the reason we are over here, we are going to introduce you to some of the big signings that happened yesterday. we start with a world cup goal scorer. here he is, yerry mina. he scored for colombia against england and in a late deal the defenderjoined everton from barcelona for over £27 million. it was a very good window for everton, with five players coming in — but this is the most eye—catching one. sue, what are your thoughts? they have had a great transfer window, especially in the final, bringing in three players. they have gomes from barcelona as well. byrne art was the other player they brought in. —— barnard. a lot of other clubs did want him, the fact that manchester united was one, and everton really needed that centre—half, they were desperate. i
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watch them in preseason and it was somewhere where you look at everton, they look ok going forward but defensively they needed to improve. six foot five, the box defensively also going forward. enough to put everton into the top four, do you think? not top four, but i think they will challenge much better than they will challenge much better than they did last season. i think the manager has done so well to bring in those players and he has that personal touch, he will phone and go and speak to them, and you will see these huge players that a lot of clu bs wa nt these huge players that a lot of clubs want have wanted to come to everton. it is a credit to the manager and credit to the board that they have backed him. speaking of players who are much sought after and played against england at the world cup, what about the belgian international? leander dendoncker, who has joined wolves from anderlecht initially on loan. they do have a few to a permanent transfer. a real statement of intent from wolves. they came into the
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premier league, and they don'tjust wa nt to premier league, and they don'tjust want to survive, they want to compete. in the champion chip last year they were like premier league in the championship. they played some unbelievable foot all. they we re some unbelievable foot all. they were also very organised. to bring in players like him, like you say, lots of other clubs wanted him. he is very versatile, so he can play in defence if needed, but i think he is brought in for the midfield cover. they've got some unbelievable players already, so to add to that, i think they will definitely compete. another club have done even better in the transfer window. they set a new record forever moated club. fulham also promoted have spent even more, including anguissa from montpellier. now, chelsea have spent big to sign a goalkeeper. because thibaut courtois has gone to real madrid he has been replaced by kepa arriza balaga from athletic bilbao for a world record £71 million for a keeper. a lot of money for a young goalkeeper. lots of potential. you think if he can fit into the premier league straightaway he could be chelsea's number one regan lamble of yea rs.
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chelsea's number one regan lamble of years. but he is young. to the court we re years. but he is young. to the court were was probably the best premier league goalkeeper, if not the best last season. —— thibault courtois. he has big shoes to fill and it will be difficult to him, he is the world's is signing, and a lot of money. a lot of pressure on a young person's shoulders. you look at david de gea who came in, the manchester united goalkeeper who probably to gay couple of seasons to adapt. it is a lot of pressure for him. -- adapt. it is a lot of pressure for him. —— rob woolley took a couple of seasons to adapt. —— probably. manchester united did a bit of business earlier on, they got fred, the brazilian player. what about the lack of defenders coming into united? lack of defenders coming into united ? they wanted lack of defenders coming into united? they wanted the likes of harry lester. i think he was linked
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with every centre—half in the country, jose mourinho, yerry mina was one. they did ring in fred, who is eight very good player. in preseason i have watched him a lot. he is neat, he is tidy. he might allow paul pogba to go further forward so it might help his game. he isa forward so it might help his game. he is a good signing, but of course jose mourinho wanted more players, especially in that centre—half position. what does it say to the defenders they already have? if i was a player in that position and knew he was trying to bring in lots of different defenders i wouldn't be too happy. he will have to now go and speak to them and make sure they perform tonight. so the bigger spenders are liverpool, chelsea and fulham. who do you think will win the title? it is so difficult to look young manchester city. they we re look young manchester city. they were so strong last season and the fa ct were so strong last season and the fact that now, they have brought in marius, and other excellent attacking player, he has lots of different attacking options going forward. the problem position last season was probably full—back, the left back addition, he has recovered from his injury and it is like a new signing theme. it all kicks off
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tonight, manchester united against leicester city. we were talking aboutjose mourinho, would he be worried about the title challenge? this is what he said yesterday. i think by the end of november, december, you will see why, by then, which teams are in a position to win the premier league. in this moment words are not important. let's play football and by the end of november, december, you don't need words. you will see which teams are candidates. they are we go, the thoughts ofjose mourinho. sue, thank you very much. it is so hard to predict this season. so katarina johnson—thompson leads the heptathlon, with three move events to come — joe lynskey has the latest on her quest for gold and the other hightlights from the european championships. katarina johnson—thompson's career is about consistency, across events and across the year. in five months she is now poised for a third gold medal, and across seven events she drives for the front. i have been aware that
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the competition is stronger and i will have to add to my game. i am trying not to be afraid of anybody, i am my own athlete, i have got my own lane, i've got my own performances and main strengths. i'm trying to focus on that. elsewhere on the track, nethaneel mitchell—bla ke sought the spotlight but was edged out in the 200 metres. turkey's ramil guliyev adding to the title he won last year. to overcome a dominant force, there is no easy solution. but from berlin back to glasgow, the medals keep coming. the british loud and proud. commentator: this is going to be tight, i think it's going to be proud — it is! his first european championship title! with ben proud's gold came a second in the relay. this success comes from strength and depth and a touch of star quality. adam peaty‘s fourth title this week. if he is now swimming's dominant force, britain's jack laugher has has become diving's spinning winner.
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he won olympic gold two years ago, and this week has already brought two european titles. medals are won in flashes of brilliance, but for others, titles are a patient struggle. three more events today will see katarina johnson—thompson to european glory. the american gary woodland is the surprise leader so much to look forward to again today in berlin and glasgow. the american gary woodland is the surprise leader after the opening round of the uspga championship — the last golf major of the season. but there are some well—placed britons in the field. justin rose and ian poulter are in a large group, three shots off the pace, after rounds of 67. johanna konta is out of the canadian open in montreal after a busy day. she completed victory over victoria azarenka in a match delayed
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overnight because of rain. but she then lost in straight sets to the defending champion elina svitolina. lots of tweets this morning about wasps, because you are saying earlier there were a lot more of them coming to september. a top tip for distracting them away from your picnic is to get a paper bag, stuff it with other paper bags, put it on a fence, it replicates a wasp's nest, and they will all go that way instead of towards your orange juice. i will be trying that camping tomorrow. so if i get stung, i will be coming back to you. we will find out. mike, thank you very much.” wasjust asking if out. mike, thank you very much.” was just asking if you have a waterproof tent, i was making sure? yes. we have some breaking news this morning. house of fraser, rather sad news for the high street. as long rumoured, it is set to go into administration today. yes, information just
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administration today. yes, informationjust coming in, the troubled department store saying that negotiations with its investors and creditors have failed to reach a deal, just in terms of the numbers, and employees there, it is 17,000 people in all employed. thosejobs are people in all employed. thosejobs a re clearly people in all employed. thosejobs are clearly at risk. back injune, the company said it needed to shut 31 stores. at that point they said they needed to make 6000 staff redundant. a 169—year—old business. a real change on the high street, if that doesn't manage to find a buyer. we will keep you updated. victoria is going to talk about that. she is with the retail analyst, and she will be talking to ben in london as well. time to take a look at the weather. sarah it is in bristol at the balloon fiesta. good morning. i am here in bristol at the international balloon fiesta, celebrating its 40th anniversary. when it started in 1979 there were
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just 27 balloons. now there are 200 looms registered throughout the four days, from 20 different countries around the world, including switzerland, japan, and the united states. it is estimated there will bea states. it is estimated there will be a quarter of a million people flocking here to see this amazing sight of hundreds of looms throughout the course of the weekend. to celebrate the 40 year anniversary, this year there are 40 special shaped balloons. they range from anything like a wine bottle or a big pairof from anything like a wine bottle or a big pair of pants. we have some of these balloons here with us. a giant lion, this is simbaloon. and a feathered friend, albert einstein, the owl balloon. a spectacular sight. there is also rupert the bear, a huge balloon, as was a massive birthday cake to help celebrate the 40th anniversary here as well. this morning the balloons are tethered, so they are not taking off, but it is hoped we will see some of them flying a bit later
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today. this balloon fiesta is a huge economic boost to the local region. it is estimated it makes about £15 million for the local economy. for every £1 spent here at the fiesta, about £20 is spent in the local economy. it really helps the local region here. and of course bristol is famous for the balloon fiesta, the largest annual gathering of hot air balloons in europe. how was it looking out there today? the clouds have been gathering here above ashton court. we are expecting to see some showers and perhaps a future storms as well, and that theme continues across the country. we expect an unsettled day—old weather today, a mix of sunshine and showers and it will be quite a blustery day as well. low pressure brought lots of rain to the south—east of england yesterday, which is now clear the way, but another area of low pressure is approaching from the west. some funds will bring heavier and more
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persistent rain at times this morning. heavy showers this morning across parts of the west of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, wales and the south—west of england. hit and miss, not everywhere catching those showers, but if you do get one that could be hail and thunderstorms mixed in as well. those heavy showers in the west will this morning drift east through the afternoon. eastern parts of england and scotland seeing the heavy showers later on. a cool day, 17— 19. particularly windy along the south coast. there could be gusts of about 40 miles an hour. heavy showers clear to the east through the evening, clear and dry conditions through the course of the night, and it will be quite a fresh night. temperatures falling to single figures, particularly in the north. even close to freezing for rural parts of scotland. for the towns and cities, 8— ten first thing in the morning. saturday, for many of us, not a bad day. dry weather and sunshine to start. cloud increasing force out with england and wales, also clouding overfor northern ireland and the west of scotland. eastern scotland and
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eastern parts of england will keep the sunshine for longest on saturday and it will be a bit warmer than it is today. 17— 22 on saturday. as we roll into the second half of the weekend, low pressure continues to drift further east across the country. rain on sunday across a good part of england and wales. still showers. one and northern ireland. they should be clearing through the day. the south—east of england will keep the driest weather for longest on sunday. it will be quite breezy and it will feel warmer and more humid as well, with temperatures up to 17 or 24 degrees on sunday. things should start to dry out a bit as we head into working week. salai fairly unsettled speu working week. salai fairly unsettled spell of weather as the next few days go by, and it looks like that heat wave is well and truly behind us. it certainly looks very colourful down there. some breaking business news, about the high street. in the last few
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minutes, house of fraser has announced it is set to fall into administration today. victoria is at administration today. victoria is at a sun cream factory in greater manchester. you have been taking in a state of the economy, but this news coming through now looks like 31 of its 59 stores may need to be closed. we had heard that house of fraser was very much on the brink. it follows a spate of difficult times for lots of retailers right across the high street, across britain and it goes against what you would think. we have had amazing weather, a world cup, we have also had the will royal wedding and that should have boosted retail sales. it has boosted sales here at suncream factory. but not everywhere in the economy is doing quite so well. let's bring in a retail expert catherine. we have heard this news about house of fraser ‘s. it is quite a mixed picture opening up. quite a mixed
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picture opening up. quite a mixed picture in terms of how we feel and how confident we feel as shoppers and that is because we don't feel we have quite as much money in our pockets and we are being sensible about the choices we make. we went out, we have barbecues with the good weather and spent money on food. for the next month we don't have the same money. we are being really calm and consistent in what we are spending and we have seen that in loss of retailers figures, but in non— food, the picture on the high street is quite depressing. we are not spending money, we are keeping the money back and we can see that some of this news. lots of stores closing. we will talk more about this with katharine later in the programme. we are going to talk about what is going on in with jeremy because we have the official figures for growth coming out at 9:30 a.m.. what are we expecting to
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see? bounce back from a poor first quarter, hotels, restaurants still driving. manufacturing would have peaked at it. raw material cost would have increased but net trade, the difference between imports and exports may help the uk economy a little bit as well. we are worried about the construction sector, builders have been hurt a lot way the karelian bankruptcy. overall, it is ok. it is not spectacular, running at at about one quarter of the growth we are seeing in the us. we have heard from the governor of the bank of england, he put up interest rates, was that the right thing to do given the speed of the economy at the moment? it is the right thing to do if you believe wages continue rising and that will drive inflation higher. people hopefully get paid more, they can go and spend money. is not about what is happening now but more about what is happening now but more about what is happening now but more about what is happening in the next 12— 18 months and if they are confident
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they raise rates. i want to show you a little bit more of the factory if iama. a little bit more of the factory if iam a. we a little bit more of the factory if i am a. we have about one ton of raw material that will be packaged up and in the two hours that we have been here at this factory in trafford they have already made 5000 unit of suncream that is going to places all over the uk, retailers like aldi and asda. where the real value is is actually in the research and development. this is what it is all about. you can see that this is where they are making suncream. lots of people asking me on twitter how you make suncream , of people asking me on twitter how you make suncream, i have the head of product development to explain it. show me what you are up to. every suncream has an we'll phase and it needs energy and by merging them together a suncream is created. why do you need to spin water? that
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is the energy. we add ingredients to the water and ingredients need to dissolve in and spinning is doing exactly that. what are the ingredients going into the water? things like moisturisers or preservatives. to the oil phase it will be like earth and sun filters. the major difference between different types of suncream is what is going on in the wheel. exactly. the higher dosage of sun filters the higher the spf. how important is the research and development phase to a businesslike is? people are worried about what the future brings in terms of innovation and investment. before any talk of brexit, one hurdle for any company is innovation and research and development. that hurdle has always existed and always will. a company like this, we have two innovate and stay ahead of the game, we have to try to be a market
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leader, niche markets and be rotating otherwise you just stand still. we will leave it there. thank you very much. plenty more from this factory here, learning about what is going on, how the hot weather has affected sales and whether or not that good cheer, that warmth has spread to the rest of the economy. two more coming up in about ten minutes time. —— plenty more. as victoria was saying, that news about house of fraser seeking the appointment of administrators, negotiations with investors and creditors has failed and they employ 70,000 people in the uk. the time is eight minutes to eight a.m.. if i mentioned "smelly cat". "how you doing?" or "central perk", would you know what i was talking about? was that your best? yeah. it's friends of course, and almost a quarter of a century after it first aired, new research shows it is the most streamed tv show on subscription services in the uk. our entertainment correspondent
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colin paterson has more. friends theme plays. it's 14 years since friends aired. chandler's bachelor pad, monica's apartment, the hallway between them, ross' living room are very familiar to a whole new generation. subscription streaming services like netflix don't reveal their viewing figures, but ofcom has revealed new research of the uk's most spring shows of 2018. at number five, it is peaky blinders. at four, stranger things.
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at three, it has already become tv royalty. the crown. at two, you can watch on your pc, but it is not pc, the grand tour. and at one, a show which started in 1994. the year before the dvd was invented. friends. i, ross, take thee rachel. so why has it endured? who better to ask than comedy central‘s friends fest, it plays every day and this is touring the uk, selling out wherever it goes. just the characters are hilarious, ross is my favourite character. why? just his facial expressions.
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ijust watch it over and over. i grew up watching the fresh prince of bel—air, but since i got into friends i thought this is amazing and i haven't stopped watching since. you were born years after friends ended. why do you like it? because it makes me laugh. who is your favourite character? rachel. why? she is funny. to sum up using the device plot to name each episode, this is the one where friends is still number one. used to watch cap —— you use to watch friends, yet? i want you to do the jolly lion. how are you doing? did anyone compare you to ross because of the hair? somebody sent mea because of the hair? somebody sent me a picture and i am seeing it. because of the hair? somebody sent me a picture and i am seeing itm was a long time ago. i don't think
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it is like my hair anyway. it has stood the test of time. has there been a correlation between a character in friends and yourself? it is for friends to make. who might that be? it is monica, right? she gets very exercised about things and worries about stuff. and very conscientious. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. a protest has taken place in boris johnson's uxbridge constituency demanding he step down following comments about muslim women wearing a full face veil. in a newspaper column, the former foreign secretary had compared the appearance of wearers of the burka to bank robbers and letter boxes. the conservatives have received dozens of complaints, which will be looked at by an independent panel. mrjohnson has rejected calls to apologise and his supporters have said he was speaking up for "liberal values". a 67 year old man from finchley
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who is completely blind says he feels discriminated against after he was refused patient transport for a hospital appointment. michael ryan was given transport for more than ten years, but a recent change to the assessment criteria saw him denied the service. he says it came after a telephone questionnaire in which he admitted being able to use a taxi. the royal free trust have apologised to him and said the assessment was incomplete. i said yes i can get a taxi, a taxi will take me to the hospital, but that's all they'll do. they might drop me at reception, but they don't have to do anything else. whereas transport, will and always have, they will take you to the department concerned and they will make sure that you get there all right and make sure you are seated and everything is ok before they leave you. fulham football club are the first promoted team into the premier league to spend over £100 million
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in the summer transfer window. the white's announced five players had joined yesterday including — marseille midfielder andre—frank zambo anguissa in a £22 million deal. fulham's first match of the season is home to crystal palace tomorrow. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the trains, disruption on great northern and thameslink services between peterborough and kings cross. on the roads traffic is starting in fulham, the a3219 north end road is closed southbound between dawes road and the a304. lets have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello. good morning. a few patches of mist around to start the day, but today is essentially a day of sunshine and showers. the best of the sunshine will be this morning, a few patches of mist lifting fairly quickly, seeing heavy and possibly thundery showers pushing their way east. into the afternoon there could be a few spells of longer rain. temperatures not feeling
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particularly warm, 19, 20 degrees with a south—westerly breeze. through this evening into overnight we will tend to see the showers dying out. late sunshine before the sun sets and overnight it will be dry with clear skies, but temperatures are going to fall away into the single figures for some, a much cooler night than we have seen of late. i leave you with the outlook as we move into the weekend. saturday probably looking like the better day. some sunshine to begin with, but that turns hazy as we move through the day. temperatures at a maximum of around 22 celcius. sunday, a cloudy day with outbreaks of showery rain and temperatures around 24 celsius. have a good day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: a new blow for the high street as house of fraser calls in the administrators — putting more
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than 17,000 jobs at risk flash floods hit southern france, triggering a major rescue operation to help hundreds of stranded holiday—makers. flights cancelled for more than 50,000 ryanair passengers across europe — many in the uk — on the worst day of strike action in the airline's history. a call for a delay in the installation of smart energy meters — citizens advice tells this programme it's received thousands of complaints. no shopping joy for jose — mourinho says he'lljust have to work with the players he has got, after manchester united failed to make any transfer deadline day signings. they kick off the new premier league season tonight at home to leicester. and a magnificent site this morning at the bristol international balloon fiesta. the balloons filling the sky and the sound of burners can really be heard all around. i will have all the weather forecast for you in about 15 minutes.
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good morning. our top story: within the past half hour the struggling department store house of fraser has announced it is going into administration. the firm, which announced store closures injune, says negotiations with its investors and creditors have failed to reach a deal, leaving thousands ofjobs at risk. ben is in our london newsroom and can tell us more. of course, house of fraser is a really significant presence on the high street. take us through what's been announced this morning. you'll yes, charlie, the news no one wanted to hear this morning but pretty sadly inevitable. —— to hear this morning but pretty sadly inevitable. -- yes, charlie. news that the firm now falls into administration putting 17,000 jobs at risk on the high street up and down the country. as we said, sadly inevitable, because we have already heard from house of fraser over recent weeks saying it wanted to close a number of stores, announcing
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plans to close 31 with the loss of 6000 jobs, and this might we are told all those could potentially cause if it is not able to find a buyer. 17,500 jobs would also go, but if you read down into the statement there is some good of hope. they say they have made significant progress on sale and they do expect to be able to sell it asa they do expect to be able to sell it as a going concern. all of the stores will open today as planned. they will not close today. staff are still expected to turn up for work, but you will know it has been a pretty difficult time. it did find a buyer a couple of weeks ago, chinese firm saying it was willing to invest thousands into the firm to give it a new lease of life, but that deal fell through, the chinese buyer pulled out, and that has brought us to the current position. 169 years on high street could be coming to an end if they don't find a buyer, but the boss this morning saying he is pretty confident they can, but
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little comfort for those 17,500 staff who this morning are once again facing a very uncertain future. thank you very much, ben. we will pick up on some of those themes inafew will pick up on some of those themes in a few minutes' time with victoria as well who will be speaking to business analysts about what is happening on the high street and what this tells us but with the economy is going. three minutes past eight and other news to bring new... flash floods in the south of france have forced more than 1,000 holidaymakers to flee from their campsites and triggered a major rescue operation. officials say a 75—year—old german man helping to supervise children was swept away by floodwaters, while17,000 homes were left without power. olivia crellin reports. roads turned to rivers. rivers have become rapids. this is what it looks like now in some parts of france after a weeks—long heatwave finally gave way to storms. intense rain over the last 48 hours has put central and southern areas of the country on flood alert, while around 17,000 homes are without power. firefighters in the ardeche and drome regions evacuated 1,600 people when campsites like this one turned into mudbaths in the wake of the storms.
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translation: the first thing i did was put into place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees, adults and children in particular. with teams working in pairs, we first secured people to the trees and then little by little we evacuated them. over 100 german children visiting for summer camp were among the rescued. police and divers continued to search for an elderly german man who was supervising them. he's missing after the nearby river burst its banks, and the caravan he sought shelter in was swept away in the torrents. after heatwaves and forest fires, these floods are the latest in a series of intense weather conditions to challenge europe this summer. olivia crellin, bbc news.
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thousands of uk air passengers face disruption today, as ryanair pilots stage a 24—hour strike. around 400 flights — up to 100 of them to and from the uk — have been cancelled in the budget airline's biggest ever walkout. caroline davies reports. it has not been an easy summer holiday for ryanair — winding queues and cancellations blamed on storms and shortages of air traffic control staff. now they face a different sort of turbulence — strikes. some ryanair pilots in five countries will strike from today for 24 hours. it has meant cancellations across europe, nearly 400 of them. the netherlands have avoided any, but there are 22 to and from ireland, 22 in sweden, 104 in belgium, —— there are 20 to and from ireland, 22 in sweden, 104 in belgium, and, worst affected, germany, with 250 cancellations. it is the fifth time the pilots have been on strike sincejuly last year. they say they want better pay
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and fairer contracts, and a change to ryanair‘s practice of moving staff between its bases without much notice. ryanair say they have notified all affected customers and most have been put on other ryanair flights. they call the strikes " regrettable and unjustified", and ask the striking unions to continue negotiations instead of more industrial action. the unions say they remain available for talk. caroline davies, bbc news. simon calder, the travel editor for the independent, joins us now to talk about this. simon, how will uk travellers be affected by these strikes? sometimes the full picture doesn't emerge until the day of the action. that's right. ryanair emerge until the day of the action. that's right. rya nair wouldn't emerge until the day of the action. that's right. ryanair wouldn't tell me what later it had cancelled. it is emerging that the main basis affected a re of is emerging that the main basis affected are of course in continental europe, merlin schoenfeld, nuremberg, belgium, and also stockholm and gothenberg —— bowlen schoenfeld —— berlin. lots of
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cancellations particularly to berlin, nuremberg and gothenberg. other cancellations, dublin, to and from lots of uk points like birmingham, bristol, gatwick. whenever the dublin pilots go on strike it is always uk flights which are cancelled. what would it tell you, ryanair? he said they wouldn't tell you... you, ryanair? he said they wouldn't tell you. .. ok, they you, ryanair? he said they wouldn't tell you... ok, they say you, ryanair? he said they wouldn't tell you. .. ok, they say five out of six of their flights are going absolutely normally and indeed that is the case and gives you some idea of the sheer scale of the airline. and of course they say that they very much regret the strikes, but having seen the sort of statements they're coming out with saying they are not prepared to tolerate any change to their low—cost high productivity model, and seeing what the attitudes of the unions are, is looking quite tricky for later on in the summer. i am holding six forward
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bookings for ryanair and i am relatively confident those will go ahead but as always with aviation you have to be prepared for destruction. for anyone watching him a have a flight cancelled today, what should they do? you should have been notified at least 48 hours in advance of an alternative flight on ryanair. if you happen to be grounded and gothenberg or stranded in stockholm they should provide hotels and meals until they can get you home, and you're able to get a flight you home, and you're able to get a flight on an alternative airline that isn't available. either way, if you're flying anywhere else today, particularly towards majorca, palma, huge thunderstorm is expected, so evenif huge thunderstorm is expected, so even if you are not hit by the strike you might be struck by the thunderstorm, so to speak. when you are in palma? are those lights will be disrupted today, i'm afraid. nine minutes passed eight. —— all of
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those flights will be disrupted to do. it is nine minutes passed eight. it is nine minutes past eight. the united nations has called for an independent investigation into a missile strike in yemen which killed 29 children. the attack hit a bus in the north of the country. the saudi—led coalition said it targeted rebels in the market after they fired a missile at the kingdom on wednesday. the us state department said the coalition should carry out its own assessment. a conservative peer says he's been sent dozens of abusive emails since he criticised borisjohnson for his comments about women who wear the burka. lord sheikh, who founded the conservative muslim forum, claims to have received "vile" islamophobic messages after calling for mrjohnson to be sacked on bbc newsnight. the former foreign secretary is now facing a possible investigation into breaches of the conservative party code of conduct. those are the main stories this morning and here is one other bit of information for you. it may have cooled off a bit recently, but the heatwave has produced a bit of a summer surprise for a flock of rare flamingoes. a new set of foster chicks to rear.
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the searing temperatures caused these andean flamingos in gloucestershire to lay their first eggs in 15 years. but the summer encourage them to lay eggs, but those were infertile so then they were given these foster chilean chicks to rear so they are now a very chilean chicks to rear so they are now a very happy family! some of the flamingos have been at the slimbridge wetland centre since the 19605 — longer than any of the staff. ten minutes passed eight. —— past eight. back to our main story. the retail chain house of fraser is to go into administration after failing to reach an agreement with its creditors. the stores will trade as usual today but it means 17,000 jobs are at risk. victoria is with the retail analyst catherine shuttleworth. victoria, this is the news house of fraser staff must have been dreading since june. i know you are looking at the the state of economy and you have a retail a nalyst to state of economy and you have a retail analyst to look at is a better man. we're been talking about retail growth and how it feels might
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have been boosted by a result of the good weather. at this factory outside manchester it has been, but not enough for the likes of the house of fraser. we have heard today they will be going into administration. could it is 169 year history be coming to an end? i'm joined by the retail analyst katherine shuttleworth. the think they will find a buyer? think it is unlikely they will find one for the whole of the business. they have been trying to over the last few days. i think it is more likely they will find an investor to buy some of their best sites but it feels as though it will be a real end to the house of fraser as we know it in the uk. what has gone so wrong for this company? they have really struggled with adapting to the modern way in which we shop. 18% of what we buy is now done online and house of fraser has been quick enough to the party to get online and also we have been talking about this morning how we are spending less money on big—ticket items and we are going to different sorts of retailers to buy our clothing. house of fraser has
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had a very expensive store are paying very high business rates, they have already earmarked one of they have already earmarked one of the biggest shopping streets in the world for closure and theyjust can't afford to keep stores like that, lots of flowers and escalators, open, because in modern retail they are just not making money any more —— lots of flowers. and not all high streets are born equal. it will be different depending on where we are in the uk. a devastating effect on some high street. we are creating super retail centres, places like manchester, leeds, super—centres in the north, and that means placesjust outside like huddersfield, people are not going to shop in those places any more, and those high streets are finding it really difficult and we have been hugely impacted by this raft of store closures and administrations we have seen this summer. these big stores, the likes of house of fraser, the sort as linchpins for smaller businesses? yes, once there is a department store other stores, rounded because there is football, and once they go
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it disappears, and that means high street up and down the country are having to reassess how to get people back into stores. this is really bad news. it is the worst news today for the people employed by house of fraser have probably worked there, lots of them, for many years, worked really hard. a devastating piece of news for them. over 17,000 of them but other people will be affected as well, thinking about people in the supply chains. suppliers will be is on this morning about getting paid, being handed over to the administrators of yeah. the administrators of yeah. the administrators will run those stores, open as normal, and you can shopin stores, open as normal, and you can shop in them while they won four of buyer but it is a very nervous time for the supply chain. some of them will have been suppliers for many years, but quite at nervous time —— while they look for a buyer. thank you. i will be back in about half an hour talking about what all this means for the uk growth. we will get the official figures for the uk economy out at 9:30am. we are
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expecting a little bit of a boost but it doesn't look like the good weather has spread to all corners of the uk. victoria, thank you very much. 14 minutes past eight. spice was once a so—called legal high, but it's been illegal since 2016. that hasn't stopped the spread of it's use — especially among the homeless — and the sight of people in a trance after taking it has become increasingly common in towns and cities. so what can be done to tackle a problem that is blighting some of our streets? in a moment we'll speak to a researcher who's been investigating the problem. but first, abbie jones has been looking at schemes to help spice users in manchester. polyphony in the centre of manchester and two women are lying a p pa re ntly manchester and two women are lying apparently high on drugs in a pub doorways. these guys are definitely high on spice, i can see it, being on the streets every day —— high on spice, i can see it, being on the streets every day -- it is in the centre of manchester. another tell—tale signs somebody has taken
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spice. how often have you taken it? five, six times a day. five, six times a day, you're taking spice? testa m e nt to times a day, you're taking spice? testament to the growing problem, greater manchester police is now the only force in the uk to have a state—of—the—art machine that can test for spice in 15 minutes. it used to take six weeks. developed with manchester metropolitan university of the device is so new it is not even dated and. -- not even patented. it gets us the ability to get information at the paramedics and workers on the front line. what about prevention? we're looking at all levels of criminality, not just looking at all levels of criminality, notjust the street dealers. those are the ones approaching and selling all manners of drugs, but these are the ones actually manufacturing and bringing this evil drug onto the streets. manchester city council says it is carrying out extensive outreach work to get people off spice. increasing supported accommodation and using several injunctions and criminal
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behaviour orders to stop begging. abbiejones, bbc behaviour orders to stop begging. abbie jones, bbc news. joining us now is ian hamilton, mental health and substance abuse lecturer at the university of york. good morning to you. are you surprised at how even though since 2016 this was made illegal it doesn't seem to have stemmed its use? well, for the new legislation has been effective i think is in reducing curious and almost spontaneous use. for young teenagers, usually from middle—class backgrounds, they don't have access to the drug. but what has become apparent is for very vulnerable groups, prisoners, homeless people, and other marginalised groups, use hasn't gone away, and in fact what hasn't gone away, and in fact what has happened is because the act has reduced the variety of substances and formats this drug is available in, it's actually made things worse. so we see far more potent varieties
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of synthetic drugs around like spice, which means for vulnerable groups they find it very difficult to monitor them out of the drug taking, so it becomes host experimental, bills by doors, knowing how much today, and the para meters knowing how much today, and the parameters for that between death and barely conscious. -- it becomes almost experimental, dose by doors. this kind of zombie behaviour, can you give us a sense of it. the different ways it can affect people, top us through that.” different ways it can affect people, top us through that. i think most people would recognise in this our other favourite drug, alcohol, people would recognise in this our otherfavourite drug, alcohol, which works in a similar way, slows you down, works on your respiratory system. a lot of people take issue with the word zombie, but this almost static state that you can end up almost static state that you can end up in, it is clearly very dangerous. particularly for... if you andi
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and i get on well, we have the privacy of not having people watching us, but for someone who is street homeless, they don't have that privacy. already vulnerable. yes, highly visible. whether manchester, birmingham, london, whatever city centre, people are commonly seeing people in the states, but they also see them on a saturday night with alcohol. it's a very similar type of presentation. what about prisons? you were seeing it seems to be prevalent are used in prisons, and i think i was reading that actually it's being dealt in prisons is quite a lucrative business at the moment? well, these types of drugs are particularly attractive to prisoners for one because it is really boring in the main, so if you find a drug that numbs things out and makes time passed quicker, you can see the attraction in that. but they are also very difficult to detect, these drugs. in your package you spoke about some new piece of equipment that i guess is a good thing in a way, good to allow people to hamas,
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but you only need something in those drugs for those type of kits not to be able to detect them, a small difference. what i prefer to see is help and treatment given to people who develop problems because spice is only a symptom of a whole range of social problems that people have, so whether it is mental health, housing, a range of complex problems. i think we can get distracted by whatever the new drug is, but the same social problems, further 30 years i have been around asa further 30 years i have been around as a nurse and researcher, they continue, we haven't got to grips with them. so we can keep talking about whatever the latest drug is, but if we failed to tackle the basic social and health problems people have, we will be in another couple of years talking about whatever the next drug is. ian, thank you for your time this morning. ian hamilton, mental health and substance abuse lecturer at the university of. 20 past eight. sarah
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is in bristol at a balloon festival well she takes a look at the morning's weather. good morning! yes, good morning, naga and charlie. the 40 year anniversary of this balloon festival. to celebrate that there are 40 special shaped balloons here over the course of the week in, including one shaped like a house, even with a little cat sitting on its roof. we all saw the giant pair of pants, a big old wine bottle, a lion and an overall. all sorts of balloons here, around 2000, in fact, from 20 different countries, and it is estimated 250,000 people will flock to see this amazing spectacle. that is why today there is a massive group of balloons that are set to ta ke group of balloons that are set to take off. they didn't take off this morning because of the weather but we are hopeful the winds will ease and the showers should clearly the run and we will see some of these flying a little later on. there is also the night glow, so once the sun
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sets at night, and this happened last night and will happen again on sunday, balloons inflate on the burners go off in time to music, so quite a spectacular sight. looking like a load of giant light bulbs lighting up the night sky. this morning we havejust lighting up the night sky. this morning we have just had a few spots of rain. some showers around and really u p of rain. some showers around and really up and down the country that showery theme is set to stick around to much of day. an unsettled day and the heaviest showers this morning will be in the west and they will drift east a little later. we have an area of low pressure that brought all the rain yesterday to the south—east of england, sitting off east. further low—pressure also approaching from the west. this morning's showers are particularly heavy across the west of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and england and wales and the south west of england as well. through the day those heavy showers bring hail and some thunderstorms further east, particularly along the south coast
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for a time with gusty winds up to around 40km/h at times. —— 40 mph at times. not quite as warm as it has been. around about 17—19, feeling cool if you're exposed to that brisk wind in the south. the thundery showers should clear way into the evening hours, a little late sunshine to be enjoyed out there, and then largely clean and dry conditions to the course of the night. quite a chilly night with temperatures around 28—10 in the towns and cities but it will be a touch cold in the countryside —— around 8—10 degrees. saturday, dry and fairly sunny weather but cloud working into the south—west of england and wales. clouding overfor northern ireland and scotland as well. but i think eastern scotland and england keep the sunshine for longest with highs of around 17—22 on saturday, still quite breezy particularly with the showers in the south—west. into the second half of the weekend, more of that rain drifting eastward, with low pressure in charge! drifting eastward, with low pressure in charge i think sunday is set to
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be soggy across much of england and wales. still the odd shower for scotla nd wales. still the odd shower for scotland and northern ireland, but driest weather holding on for longest in the south—east. back to you, though. studio: sarah, thanks very much. 23 minutes past eight is the time. the government wants every home to be fitted with a smart meter by 2020, but the charity, citizens advice, has told bbc breakfast it needs to slow down the roll out and extend the deadline by three years. last year the organisation received 3,000 complaints about the devices, with problems ranging from aggressive sales techniques, and some customers still having to send readings to their energy company. graham satchell reports. when geoff first got his smart meter he was pleased. it allowed him to see how much energy he was using and how much it cost in real—time. but then he switched his supplier and it stopped working.
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i was shocked, really. i had really assumed that these were a one—type model fits all, suits everybody. and there was a state of shock, followed by a slight cynicism, that, "oh dear, our government and it are never very good bedfellows." i touch the electric one and we just get nothing. citizens advice told bbc breakfast today they had thousands of complaints about new smart meters. some, like geoff's, do not work if you switch supplier. your meters are in the garage? yes, on both sides. there have also been complaints about aggressive sales practices and poor installation. citizens advice says it supports the principle of smart meters, but only if they work. we are calling on the government to extend the roll—out deadline so the remaining 42 million metres that need to be installed can be done so in the best possible way for customers and in the most cost—effective way. up to 53 million smart
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meters are meant to be installed in every home by 2020, at an estimated cost of £11 billion. smart meters automatically send readings to energy suppliers, putting an end to estimated bills. and because people can more accurately monitor their energy use, the government says they will save us an average of £47 a year by 2030. the government acknowledges there have been problems, but say now is not the time for delay. we are rolling it out as quickly as possible, customers are already saving, and frankly i don't want to do anything that means the energy companies can take their foot off the pedal. because i think this programme is worth a lot, both to british consumers and households but also to the british energy system, and i think we should have an energy system that is fit for the 21st century. i have employed a stool to get myself up a little bit higher to it. the government says by the end of this year, geoff's smart meter should start working again.
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an upgrade to the network, originally planned for 2015, means that meters will work even if you switch. there's really nothing smart about this. geoff isn't holding his breath. for the time being, he's back to taking manual readings and sending them to his new supplier. graham satchell, bbc news. lots of you have been in touch about smart meters. thank you very much. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. a much coolerfield hello. a much cooler field to end the week. some spells of sunshine today. also plenty of showers. they are moving from the west. they will move eastwards through the day. scotland, northern ireland, england and wales. longer spells of rain at times. increasing sunshine in the west in the afternoon. particularly
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gusty for some channel coasts. with a combination of the showers and the wind, temperatures will not get higher than 18 or 19. through this evening those showers clear from eastern counties. overnight most places become dry with clear skies. a chilly night. many of us in single figures. onlyjust a chilly night. many of us in single figures. only just breaking a chilly night. many of us in single figures. onlyjust breaking double figures. onlyjust breaking double figures. later in the night temperatures rise in south—west england as more cloud moves in. this weather front moves across the uk tomorrow and through the weekend. many will start saturday dry with plenty of sunshine. the cloud, already across south—west england, wales and northern ireland, extends north and east. further north and
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east mainly dry. hazy sunshine. warmer tomorrow. between 17 and 22 celsius. outbreaks of rain across western in south—western areas will continue to work their way north and east through northern england and southern parts of scotland through the evening on saturday. by sunday many of us will see outbreaks of rain before it clears from the west. it will turn increasingly humid. this is business live from bbc news, with ben thompson and maryam moshiri. turkey's currency plunges to new lows, as the european central bank raises fresh concerns over its economy. live from london, that's our top story on friday, 10th august. turkey's government prepares to outline a new economic plan, amid soaring
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debt and runaway inflation. we'll get an expert view on what's at stake. also in the programme... a noteable launch for samsung — the world's number smartphone seller launches its new handset, but is bigger really better? and there's a lot of economic data due today, including the latest growth figures for the uk — we'll have the details. uk retailer house of fraser is in administration. 17,500 jobs are at risk. we discuss that later. and with the pound under pressure as the brexit deadlock grinds on, our economics guru andrew walker will be here to talk us through that and all the other big stories of the week.
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