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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  August 10, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello, it's nine o'clock, i'm matthew price. welcome to the programme. more than 1600 people — most of them campers — have had to evacuate because of severe flooding in france. more than 100 children have been rescued from a summer camp and one of the people looking after them is missing. translation: the first thing i did was put in place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees. there were adults and children in particular, and with teams working in pairs we first secured the people to the trees, and little by little we evacuated them. do get in touch if you've been affected. also today — a new app is offering rewards, like free coffee or cinema tickets — for actually talking to each other around the dinner table rather than checking your phone. we look at the anti—tech tech trying to tackle our obsession with our screens. there's a bit of a culture movement about, you know, having a digital detox and having control over your device, and not necessarily being a slave to your device.
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you can watch that full film at 9:15. and, as the world's top professional surfers gather in cornwall for the most high—profile surfing event in the uk, we'll ask why female surfers earn half the prize money their male counterparts do — and discuss whether enough is being done to tackle sexism in the sport. hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. something else you should know about this morning — hundreds of flights have been cancelled because of a strike by ryannair pilots over pay and conditions. it affects five european countries. it's peak holiday season — are you one of the 50,000 passengers who've been affected? are your holiday plans in ruins? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about — use the hashtag victoria live. if you're emailing and are happy for us to contact you — and maybe want to take part in the programme —
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please include your phone number in your message. if you text, remember you'll be charged at the standard network rate. first to our top story this morning, a developing one — the struggling department store house of fraser is to appoint administrators after failing to reach a deal with its creditors. the move could put up to 17,000 jobs at risk. in a statement, the company said it will continue trading — all its stores will be open today as usual. injune, house of fraser said it needed to shut 31 stores and make up to 6,000 people redundant to survive. let's talk to kate ancketill — ceo and founder of retail trend consultancy firm gdr uk. thank you very much for coming back into the studio. you were here earlier speaking about the future of the high street. that future across
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certain towns and cities looks even bleaker this morning. yes, obviously heartbreaking for those 17,500 people and all of their customers, because in this country we love our department stores, big stores where you go on a rainy day. do we love them enough, if the house of fraser is struggling? that's the problem. we love some more than others and figures show the likes of harrods and selfridge's have done very well and selfridge's have done very well and that fits with the market position, which is premium retail, high—end luxury retail doing very well, because obviously there are lots of very rich people who have remained very rich and are probably getting richer, and as a group they are growing, then there are discounts retailers, also doing well, with some exceptions, i know, poundland being one of them. then in the middle you have ones like debenhams and the house of fraser. we have known for some time the house of fraser has been struggling. what does today change, if anything?
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i think it will be a wake—up call, isn't it? what does it mean? they are seeing the stores are not closing at the moment, but what does administration mean. closing at the moment, but what does administration meanli closing at the moment, but what does administration mean. i think no one will know exactly what it means an individual stores in high streets because it depends on the buyer they fight and because it depends on the buyer they fightandi because it depends on the buyer they fight and i am sure they will find buyers for the better stores in the better areas —— —— the buyers that they can find. i wouldn't want to put my money on that, but i hope many of them will be saved, of course, but i don't truly know. usually when these things happen to good locations are bought by somebody else, absorbed into some other chain, and the poor ones... the worst—case scenario is there a boarded—up and a blight on high streets. you mention the high street there. in terms of the 17,000 jobs, people directly or indirectly employed by house of fraser, i mean, the thought must be that many of
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those jobs will the thought must be that many of thosejobs will go back? the thought must be that many of those jobs will go back?” the thought must be that many of those jobs will go back? i would imagine so, yes. 0k, thank you very much, kate, for coming in and bringing us up—to—date on that. julian is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. this morning campsites in the south of france, with more than 1000 tourists, have been evacuated after flash flooding. officials say a german man helping to supervise children was declared missing after being swept away by floodwaters, while some 17,000 homes were left without power. around 100 children were moved to safety from one campsite. 0livia crellin reports. roads turned to rivers. rivers have become rapids. this is what it looks like in some parts of france after a weeks—long heatwave finally gave way to storms. intense rain over the last 48 hours has put central and southern areas of the country on flood alert, while around 17,000 homes are without power. firefighters in the ardeche and drome regions evacuated 1,600
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people when campsites like this one turned into mudbaths in the wake of the storms. translation: the first thing i did was put into place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees, adults and children. with teams working in pairs, we first secured people to the trees and then little by little we evacuated them. 0ver100 german children visiting for summer camp were among the rescued. police and divers continued to search for an elderly german man who was supervising them. he is missing after the nearby river burst its banks, and the caravan he sought shelter in was swept away in the torrents. after heatwaves and forest fires, these floods are the latest in a series of intense weather conditions to challenge europe this summer. 0livia crellin, bbc news. britain's business group, the cbi, is calling for a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end
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to immigration targets — instead the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make a positive contribution to the economy, as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. immigration matters to british industry. the cbi claims that half of all building workers in london are from the eu, british agriculture needs 60,000 seasonalforeign farm workers every year, and the nhs has seen a drop of 87% on the number of eu citizens registering as nurses and midwives. that is why the cbi says that immigration has delivered significant economic benefits to the uk. it also knows the free movement of people between the uk and the eu will almost certainly end after brexit. so it is proposing allowing firms to recruit from the eu after brexit, but limiting those who are not studying or without independent means or a job from staying more than three months.
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eu citizens will also have to register with the authorities, be limited in what in—work benefits they can claim, and companies will have to prioritise the recruitment of british staff in sectors with high levels of unemployment. the cbi also wants to legally guarantee the rights of eu citizens already in the uk. the government says it will announce his plans for post—brexit immigration in due course, and it will be a system that works for all parts of the uk. let's get more from our correspondent matt cole. emigration is of course one of the keyissues emigration is of course one of the key issues debated post brexit. yes, andi key issues debated post brexit. yes, and i think the cbi recognises that in what it is proposing today. it admits there is a fine balance to be struck in giving enough balance the labour to support the economy but at the same time enough control of immigration that it maintains public confidence. and so amongst its proposals, additionally for example, a suggestion that were high
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emigration takes place because of business needs, extra money should be made available to schools and hospitals to support infrastructure so hospitals to support infrastructure so it is not overwhelmed. they see it is this your geography and interconnectedness of our firms across the continent and that means it make sense to give some level of priority to people from the eu but they are so painful that was such a hot topic in the brexit debate. the government —— they are so mindful it was such a hot topic. the government has laid out its white paper on how it was to deal with immigration and thatis it was to deal with immigration and that is due very soon, we understand. businesses and the cbi say they really want to get their hands on that so their proposals can feed into it and then be used in the negotiations. thank you for that, matt cole. thousands of uk air passengers are facing disruption today as ryanair pilots stage a 24—hour strike. nearly 400 flights, up
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to 100 to and from the uk, have been cancelled in the budget airline's worst ever day of industrial action. the pilots are demanding changes to pay and conditions but ryanair says the action is "regrettable and unjustified". the united nations has called for an independent investigation into a missile strike in yemen which killed 29 children. the attack hit a bus in the north of the country. the saudi—led coalition said it targeted rebels in the market after they fired a missile at the kingdom on wednesday. the us state department said the coalition should carry out its own assessment. the blackadder creator rowan atkinson has defended controversial comments made by boris johnson about muslim women wearing niqabs. atkinson said no apology is required for ridiculing religion, and that it had been a "pretty good joke". however, founder of the conservative muslim forum lord sheikh has said he has recieved scores of islamaphobic messages after calling forjohnson to be sacked. the slovenian—born parents of the us first lady, melania trump, have become us citizens. viktor and amalija knavs took part
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in a naturalisation ceremony in new york yesterday. the pair are likely to have became citizens under a process — known as chain migration — that has been heavily criticised by the president. 1a years since the sitcom friends ended, its the most popular show for streaming in the uk. figures published by the industry watchdog 0fcom reveal that the us sitcom is the most popular show to stream in the uk — more popular than newer shows such as the crown and stranger things. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. thanks very much, julian. as we announced earlier, house of fraser has said this morning it is going into administration putting 17,000 jobs at risk. you work for the department store? we would like to here from you, on that and indeed on any of the story is running this morning. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtage victoria live
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and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport... holly is at the bbc sport centre. good morning to you, holly. and great britain are still going well at the european championships. and would you say katerian johnson—thompson guaranteed a medal? not quite guaranteed but she is going well, and that avalon. —— in the heptathlon. katerina johnson thompson happy with day one. she currently leads the heptathlon after a hugely
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impressive performance from the commonwealth champion. expectations have been low for once— battling a calf injury since the gold coast. up against raining olympic and world champion — nafi thiam — arguably the best female athlete on the planet. speed events were strong, her high jump solid and even her normally poor shot put impressive by her standards. shot put is notoriously her weakest area — she was clearly pretty happy with herself because — her celebrations afterwards prompted her to offer a sort‘ve apology to her coach prompted her to offer a sort of apology to her coach after he scolded her for losing concentration. can you blame her? this was thiam running a rather moderate race in this one. i've got my own lane, my own performances on my own strengths, so just trying to focus on that. she goes again today. we have the long jump, javelin and 800—metres to come today. the javelin is of course the weakest
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event, so we will see her she gets on. and the british swimming scorer, they have done fantastic, haven't they? yes, seven medals in the final day of swimming action yesterday, and you can see there are rather proud ben proud, his first european title with gold in the men's 50 metres freestyle, very close in the end, just a fraction in it. a tenth ofa end, just a fraction in it. a tenth of a second in fact, but enough to hold off the greek kristian gkolomeev who was closing in on the final metres to touch him, and what medal haulfor adam final metres to touch him, and what medal haul for adam peaty! final metres to touch him, and what medal haulfor adam peaty! bringing home four in total after producing a superb breaststroke leg to read the men's four by one —— to lead the men's. duncan scott managed to beat russia to the title. the quartet also included
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nicholas pyle, james guy and 200m freestyle champion duncan scott — manged to beat russia to the title. there were also british bronze medals forjames guy, in the men's 100m butterfly final, holly hibbott, in the a00m freestyle and for the women's 4 x 100m team. and that means gb's swimmers finished with nine golds and 2a medals in total which matches their previous best haul in berlin 2014. and britain and northern ireland have plenty to smile about — great britain and northern ireland nowjust one medal behind leaders russia in the medal standings after hitting the big 50 yesterday. more action later — first up it's jack laugher hoping to win his third gold of these championships, in the synchro 3m springboard at 1.30. follow all the action on bbc two and online. holly, thank you so much. and exciting deal sport to look forward to. —— what an exciting day of sport. now, would you stay off your phone
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if it meant winning free stuff? a new app is to offer rewards to families for talking to each other around the dinner table rather than checking their screens. the tech is currently used help students study — and it comes as facebook and instagram release a new tool to limit how much time people spend on their apps. catrin nye has been looking at the rise of anti—tech tech. can i ask you both how much you check your phone? uh... recently? every day. every hour. quite often. quite a lot. probably too much! at work, probably every hour. quite bad, actually. a fair few hours a day. at home, at least every 20 minutes. every couple of hours? i'm always on it. and now i've got a phone call! that is a lot of screen time. a new report by the telecoms regulator 0fcom says, on average, people check their smartphone once every 12 minutes while they're awake. there are now loads of apps offering to get you off your phone. 0ne called mute tracks your screen
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time, space helps you set goals to use it less, moment sets daily limits on your use — it will even send you a barrage of messages if you're on it too much. and one called forest grows you a tree as long as you're not browsing. it is, of course, very debatable whether tech companies are the ones who should be helping us spend less time on tech. facebook and instagram are releasing their own time—limit tools. an app called hold has just launched in the uk, created for students by three students in copenhagen. hey, maths. hello! can you hear me 0k? can you hear me? ican. why was it that you wanted to start this? we were struggling so much about actually focusing. we checked our phones all the time, and we started to give ourselves incentives. the ones that check their phones the least, they get coffee.
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and that really worked out for us three. we saw that this actually kept us not checking the phone. so, ok, then we did some more checks and looked at eight out of ten students struggle with the same problem as us. and by actually doing that, we hope that actually we can help them with the mental health effects, productivity through hold. at their london base, adam kosky is part of an expanding team. but the main part of the app actually sits in a timer... the app allows you to start a timer to put your phone on hold, which means you can't get other apps. so ijust have to keep looking at this, 41 seconds, it kind of gives me the urge to use the phone, actually. really? i presume you have to get past that! i think it's a behavioural shift — the idea is you're putting the phone, ideally, to one side, the phone can then get locked, so having the screen up there can be a distraction. but it can be to one side, and the idea is then to say, "right,
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i'm going to be productive now." once you've done 20 minutes on hold, you start earning rewards — things like cheap cinema tickets, free drinks, donations to charity. and also there's an idea with gamification, when you can actually start to calculate how much you're holding versus your peer group. so users can start to see where they're featuring versus their friends, so this guy has got the highest crown. wow, nailing it. so you can start to see this by school, also breaking this down by month, by week. so someone might have gone on holiday and had a fantastic digital detox, and they might be top of the charts. this app is still doing advertising. it allows brands to market their products to users — but as rewards. companies have previously relied on you being on your phone to sell you stuff. this is a way around that problem. at the moment, people are worried about tech — there's a bit of a backlash.
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how do make sure, when you create this product, that you're on right side of that, not just making money and not doing any good? i think hold likes to refer itself as an app which does mindful marketing, so i think the fundamental use case of this app is the home screen, it's the hold timer, and that is really the core of the business. at the end of the day, this is an opportunity for brands to really be on an innovative platform, and be doing something very creative, i think that is what hold is doing. while everyone is zigging, we are trying to zag as well. and obviously, as you said, there is a commercial element to the app itself. hey, clara — i'm catrin. this app doesn't work overnight, and is currentlyjust for students, like clara, a masters student at the london school of economics from singapore. she's been using it. i made a comment to my friend, and i told her that, you know, "sometimes i wish that i could just throw my phone into the ocean."
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she was like, "why?" and then i kind of told her about how it is quite distracting. i know how hard it was to concentrate when i was studying — a long time ago. do you think it is getting harder as there is more and more tech, more things to play with? definitely. even when i compare myself right now to how i was as a student in, like, primary school and secondary schools, i do see that there's a vast difference, because in terms of my concentration span, it has shortened by a lot, and even when it's not studying, like, reading a book, for instance, i find that i get distracted by my phone a lot more easily. because, you know, when the screen lights up, my attention is just diverted away. what about at home, do you talk about this around the dinner table? yeah, and i have actually voiced my unhappiness to my parents before. about them using their phones? yeah, yeah. cos i really think that it does compromise the quality of the interactions you have with your family members or friends at the dinner table, for instance.
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so i have actually spoken to my parents about it before, yeah. the creators of hold are now developing a version for families to use together. they say since they launched in the uk earlier this year, they've had more than 70,000 e—mails asking for access to the app — most from families. it's a bit of a sorry state of affairs, isn't it, when families are asking for an app? i guess it's a sign of the times, and there is a bit of a culture movement about having a digital detox and having control over your device and not necessarily being a slave to your device. is social media taking over your life? all these concerns have led to the royal public health society announcing what's being called scroll—free september. can't stand to be alone with your thoughts?
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they're worried about our ability to concentrate — and also the effects on our mental health. do you feel like, overall, the kind of tech we carry around with us, our phones, are a force for good or bad? not towards the good, i would say bad. i think it's a good thing, but we should take charge, take control. i think bad. when you go to family gatherings, everyone is on their phone, parties, everyone is on their phone — yeah, it's quite bad. i think it's a necessary thing in this day and age. they are literally like your life in your hand, you can do everything from your phone. so they are amazing. where it is a force for bad, i suppose, is it makes you too accessible. you have to keep in touch with yourself sometimes, keep yourself grounded. you can become a slave to technology and stuff some of the times, so ijust make sure i always make
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space for me — for me to be with me. i like it! thank you. catrin nye with that report. i hesitate to ask you to contact us if you are getting addicted to your smartphone. .. now, it's the peak of the holiday season but a strike by ryannair pilots has led to the cancellation of around 400 flights, affecting up to 50,000 passengers. with me from brussels is our europe correpsondent gavin lee, so thanks forjoining. what's all this about who is affected and wide? it was the base of ryanair first of all. the pilots are not happy with the transfer based system. when they are sent away from home, sometimes for weeks, months, it is a five zone, five days off system, so they could be sent to any of the 80 plus hopes of ryanair has come and they say they want more
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choice. the more senior they are, they want a system where they can pick and choose when they arrived to work, whether or not to go to madrid or the spin. that's how they have it at other companies. when it comes to germany where 250 flights are cancelled, the priority there is money. a very competitive market and the pilots are not happy with their pgy- the pilots are not happy with their pay. here in belgium where there are strikes, as well as sweden and in the netherlands that where there are not strikes. they are unhappy about the way they are under irish legislation. it is quite an anomaly in the system for the aviation industry, what they are arguing for is to have their contracts ruled under the law of the nation they are in. gavin, thanks very much. we will show you the scene at stansted airport earlier this morning. pictures sent in by a viewer, where some passengers are facing long queues waiting for information after cancelled flights. rya nair says queues waiting for information after cancelled flights. ryanair says it has made every effort to resolve this dispute, but that hasn't been good enough for a lot of its
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passengers. 0ne good enough for a lot of its passengers. one of them, in kent now, musician pierre lewis, who got a text saying his flight from london to berlin had been cancelled. gavin, you should have been in berlin today? that's right. i was going there for writing session, but also meeting. i have a marketing company as well. today in fact i would have been negotiating with my client, and i was on the train, on wednesday, actually headed to stansted when i got an e—mail saying my flight today had been cancelled. not really knowing what to do, i had to think quite quickly, you know, do i go there and have to rearrange a flight, there and have to rearrange a flight, and also extend my hotel, andl flight, and also extend my hotel, and i thought, "well, you know, the
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easiest thing was to cancel it," but unfortunately it has had an ongoing effect, with myself having to rearrange meetings, and it has been awkward, very upward. did ryanair offered to rebook you on another flight, offered to rebook you on another flight, did they offer compensation in any way? not as yet, no. the rather cheeky thing is they sent an e—mail saying if you want to change your flight, which is free, supposedly, but when you go on there, and you try to change the date you have to pay the difference and, you know, the fact this has happened, flight on word of the day have spiralled up, as i'm sure you can imagine —— on words of today. i wasn't happy to pay the difference. i don't think it is fair that we should, and i think, you know, ryanair should very much take responsibility for this. a lot of disgruntled passengers like yourself. but will this stop you
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begin with ryanair in the future?” think so, yes. really? i think so. you got price versus quality, and, you know, while being able to get a very cheap and affordable flight for business or leisure is a great thing, you know, when you have problems with management like there are,| problems with management like there are, iassume, with problems with management like there are, i assume, with their not being able to pay... i think you get what you able to pay... i think you get what you pay able to pay... i think you get what you pay for in many respects. and i think that shows in this whole situation. i think if you pay cheap, you get cheap, and there is a saying, if you pay peanutss you get monkeys, and i think that's what they think the pilots are kept of complaining about, and i don't blame them. i blame michael 0'leary. he should really think about standing down, i would say. 0r having some
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change in management, because it is simply terrible. every time they seems to be something like this, you always seems the sort of laugh it off, and it is really not the way to deal with that. off, and it is really not the way to dealwith that. pierre off, and it is really not the way to deal with that. pierre on obviously you are extremely angry about that. ryanair is saying they are making every effort to try to resolve the dispute, and i suppose their point would be able to continue to use their planes. anyway, still to come, we will talk about the demise of house of fraser and what it could mean for you. if you are affected by that news, please get in touch. and is serving sexist? as the sport's most high profile event gets under way in the uk we will be talking to one of the country's top surfers about her experience —— is surfing sexist? take the latest news with julian. good morning. the struggling department store, house of fraser, is to appoint administrators after failing to reach a deal with its creditors.
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the move could put up to 17,000 jobs at risk. in a statement, the company said it will continue trading and all its stores will be open today as usual. injune, house of fraser said it needed to shut 31 stores and make up to 6,000 people redundant to survive. flooding in the south of france has led to 1,600 people being evacuated — most of them tourists on campsites. officials say a german man helping to supervise children was declared missing, after being swept away by floodwaters, and 17,000 homes have been left without power. around 100 children were moved to safety from one campsite. the worst—hit areas are gard, ard che and dr me. a nine—year—old girl has died after suffering serious head injuries in a rock fall in north yorkshire. part of a cliff collapsed onto the beach at seaton garth in staithes yesterday. —— on wednesday afternoon. her
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family say they cannot comprehend the enormity of the tragedy, describing her as the light of their lives. iain duncan smith has defended borisjohnson, after he was accused of islamaphobia for comparing women in niqabs to postboxes and bankrobbers. speaking on the today programme earlier today, he said that the party shouldn't "shut down mps when they speak", and that he hopes the party "will put an end" to the matter. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. julian, thank u. —— thank you very much. here's some sport now with holly. good morning. we start at the european championships were katarina johnson thompson is three events away from a first european outdoor title in the heptathlon. she is in a battle with world champion nafi thiam. she took the lead after a strong 200 metres. the long jump, gels and eight 800 metres still to come. they were two more golds in swimming last night for ben proud
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and the medley relay team, giving adam peaty his fourth title at these games. and everton were busy late in the transfer window with barcelona defender gary mina among their signings. he scored half of colombia's six goals in russia. justin rose is three shots off the lead after the opening round of the us pga championship in misery. leading the way is american gary woodland. more on that coming up at ten o'clock. thank you. more now on our breaking story this morning. the department store, house of fraser, has announced its going into administration, putting up to 17,000 jobs at risk. it's the latest big name shop which has struggled to survive on the high street. our business correspondent, ben thompson, is here. not really unexpected. what does administration mean? sadly inevitable that we have got to this
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point. some brief background. house of fraser thought they had this sorted. they had a chinese buyer lined up. that fell through. now we are in this position where it is struggling to find a buyer. what does this mean? it is often a long, protracted process where they try to find a buyer. administration gives them different rights. they can ignore some things they wouldn't have been before. pension liabilities will be up for debate. it makes it more attractive as a proposition to buy. but less attractive for those who work for the company? absolutely. the staff will find their future is very uncertain. some of the rights they may have taken for granted under the current ownership may not be guaranteed under any new ownership. what we are hearing this morning is that the boss of sports direct, mike ashley, who owns an 11% stake, could be interested in buying it. this is
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where it gets, located. you will know that house of fraser has been in long negotiations to close some stores already. about 31, with the loss of 6000 jobs. its landlord said no, we don't want you to do that. they have now agreed to do that. essentially we are going to have a position whereby cherry picks some of the nicer sites, the more profitable stores, and closes the rest. not looking great if you are employed by house of fraser. in terms of customers, ian has said, he is just terms of customers, ian has said, he isjust asking, terms of customers, ian has said, he is just asking, where do you stand if you have ordered furniture, for instance? he has got something ordered. any idea what that means for him? this will be part of the administration process. his furniture... no guarantees at this point. we have no details for him. essentially this is taking a up by
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administrators who look at what the liabilities are. essentially that is a liability. the administrators will look at that. at the same time they say all of the stores will remain open and staff should turn up for work. customers can buy things. the house of fraser website is not working. they say it is down for maintenance. no indication. very briefly, he may not get it or it may arrive by delivery in the next couple of days? it depends what stage in that process it is. if they have got the stark, that stock should be in store. that will be classed as an asset by the illustrators. -- got the stock. sean on facebook is suggesting, and i don't know if you can handle this, he says, in order to save our high street, because this is a threat, we need to introduce an internet sales tax. people do talk about that. i was getting closer? from the house
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of fraser point of view they have said that business rates are too high. they have seen a massive increase in much they pay. they have got huge stores in prime locations on the high street. incidentally, the big onejust around the on the high street. incidentally, the big one just around the corner from here, the flagship house of fraser store on 0xford from here, the flagship house of fraser store on oxford street in london, the biggest shopping street in europe, that is earmarked for closure. that tells you all you need to know as far as those stores are concerned. high rents, they have been 20 renegotiate them. they have settled on that. that is not too much of a concern. —— there have been trying to renegotiate them. should those internet companies have to pay higher tax? lots of them have questionable tax regimes. we have talked a lot about that a lot. the likes of amazon. concerned there. house of fraser is stuck with big stores like this one on 0xford
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street, the one earmarked for closure, one of 31 set to close under the old arrangement. no details yet is but what happens now given that it is currently in administration. briefly, on a related story, the latest gdp figures, which show the total value of everything produced by all of us, they have just come out. what do they have just come out. what do they show? an increase of 0.4%. pretty much in line with what was expected. the economy is growing slowly. we have seen the economy shrink, of course. it is growing slowly. it is not a huge number. we should not get too excited. a lot of economists will point to it as there are so many headwinds and risks to the economy, lots of uncertainty around brexit, nobody knows what is going to happen. a slowdown in consumer spending. going to happen. a slowdown in consumerspending. people going to happen. a slowdown in consumer spending. people are less money. a general concern about what happens next. 0.4% is the figure that we have got. not bad. not
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great. one of the worst performer? —— one of the worst performers in europe. given the trade war escalating between the us, the uk, the eu and china and japan, there area the eu and china and japan, there are a lot of worries. you are the bringer of doom! sorry. moron house of fraser through the morning. thanks for that now. one of the uk's biggest business organisations is calling for an overhaul of the immigration system for when the uk leaves the european union. at the moment there is free movement for people from the eu, meaning that eu citizens are entitled to look for a job in another member state, and work there without needing a permit. the government says this will end after brexit. currently, there's a cap on the number of people coming from outside the eu. the cbi is calling for an end to this, and the policy on reducing immigration — saying that without enough foreign workers, many employers will struggle to fill roles. a government spokesperson told
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us they are "committed to bringing net migration down to sustainable levels". so what should a new immigration system look like? let's talk to four business people. lee summers runs a building company in london. he employs migrants, but voted to leave the eu. fleur sexton runs an education company based in the west midlands, and thinks there needs to be more migration to filljobs. jack ward is from the british growers association, whose members rely on seasonal staff. and kate shoesmith is from the recruitment & employment confederation, an organisation which contributed to today's cbi report. good morning. good morning. briefly, on the cbi report, what are the headlines? what they are saying is that when you look at every sector of the economy, all the regions across the uk, there is a real need
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for eu workers. so, over half of the employers in our sector, talking about recruitment, when they are supplying people in seasonal and temporary work, they have been using eu nationals because they can't fill those jobs. why not a real need for workers in general? you're they can't fill the jobs any other way. unemployment rates —— rate... you're trying desperately to fill some of those jobs. seasonal trying desperately to fill some of thosejobs. seasonaljobs, out in the field. whether it is in warehousing, agricultural work, retail work. you can't fill them in any other way. jack ward, let's talk about seasonal work. clearly, you need seasonal workers. what is the situation at the moment? the situation is broadly based. the requirement for a seasonal labour in the fresh produce industry, we are looking for 85,000 people each year to help with the
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harvest packing of fresh produce. the reports from various sectors this year suggest we are seeing shortfalls of ten to 15%, potentially getting worse as the season goes on. that is having a serious effect on the fresh produce industry. and on people's ability to invest and go forward in the future. why are you seeing shortages? just seeing a reduction in the number of people wanting to come to the uk for any numberof different people wanting to come to the uk for any number of different reasons. i think ultimately be going to have to look further afield to find the people we need. lee, you run your own building firm in london. do you have the workers you need? we have certainly got the workers. the problem at the moment is the uncertainty. ten to 15 years ago the british government or welcoming eu workers into the uk. then all of a sudden they are
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basically been told to hugger off, thatis basically been told to hugger off, that is how they see it. they might leave ? that is how they see it. they might leave? you say you have got enough at the moment. you fairly might leave ? at the moment. you fairly might leave? -- you fear they might leave? there is a concern. they once uncertainty from the comment to know if they can stay or should they go. 50% of my workforce are from poland. they do a fantasticjob. it would be a shame to see them go. i think they will probably stay that they need to know where they are. first sexton, you have got an education company. what are you seeing in terms of the people coming to this country due is there a gap? there is definitely a 95p~ there a gap? there is definitely a gap. we do a lot of work with companies, helping companies to acquire the skills further workers that they need, so we work with low skilled people, skilling them up and getting people to acquire new skills
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in it and help them to move on. there is a real skills gap. it is ha rd there is a real skills gap. it is hard for a lot of companies to actually recruit people they need. for me, it is always about having that choice. so caps on targets is quite difficult. i think businesses need to be trusted to bring in the staff. the main thing is to have access to the skills they need. it's hard. what seems to be most difficult about all of this, and if ican difficult about all of this, and if i can come back to you tomily, you voted to leave and when it concerns was immigration. i can't help but notice that you have got a company that relies on people coming in from other countries and yet you are concerned about the number of people coming into this country from other countries. how do you square that circle? what is the solution? the problem first of all is that the government has let anybody into the country. you need to have top
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credibility to contribute to society, pay your way. that is the main problem. i do rely on the workers and they are fantastic but they come into this country with a skill set and they pay their way. i've got some polish workers at the moment on £1000 a week. people think we paid pittance. that is not the case. they are great workers. they doa case. they are great workers. they do a greatjob. they have got skills. if you open the doors and let anybody come in, what are you going to get? any country in the world would i want —— would want to open their doors to people who have got skills and want to pay into the system. it isa system. it is a common—sense approach. katie, that is therefore about saying, let's have a skill set, these are the sort of people we need, and therefore they can come in. is that a sensible approach? that makes perfect sense in many sectors, engineering, it, construction, it is across the board in london. half of employers have
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been using eu national team constructionjobs. there been using eu national team construction jobs. there are also other roles. we are talking about agricultural roles, horticulture. retail and warehousing. what we need is to see is that people are valued for what they can bring to the economy. it may not be highly skilled work but it is essential work. so presumably, jack ward, essentially picking fruit is not a particularly skilful job. essentially picking fruit is not a particularly skilfuljob. you need to get strawberries of the vine quickly. how would you measure the contribution the people you want to bring into the country gift your industry? how do you measure that and therefore fit that into an immigration policy? it is enormously important. fresh produce is a huge pa rt of important. fresh produce is a huge part of the food system. we already rely on about 50% imports. and so our contribution is incredibly important. it is very important for the rural economy. if we haven't got
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access to seasonal labour, what is going to happen is we are progressively going to export that industry to other parts of the world. that is not a clever thing to be doing. i wonder whether there needs to be a re—selling of the notion of what immigration, and an immigrant, is? i think notion of what immigration, and an immigrant, is? ithink that notion of what immigration, and an immigrant, is? i think that is a really good point. it has to be skills focus. it has to be that people are valued for what they can bring. and i think having the idea that people are actually coming over to provide a certain service and they are valued for that, that is good for the community and it is good for the community and it is good for the economy. people need to be seen to be bringing value. we do need to prioritise people who are currently uk residents. there are different approach is needed. people coming over is one approach. we need to make sure we are committed to skilling our own people in this country as well. —— up skilling. it isa country as well. —— up skilling. it is a positive way of looking at it.
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case, is there a commitment to improving the skills level in this country? yeah, i think employers across the board have always tried to do that. a number of employers pay into the apprenticeship levy. what is frustrated about that is trying to draw down that money. and actually, we could use that money much more effectively to train people that are uk born, working in temporaryjobs, if people that are uk born, working in temporary jobs, if they were allowed to use that money, it would give them better training opportunities. but we can't. that is frustrating. immigration, the immigrant, has become such a bad word in this country. howdy resell it? how does the cbi resell the notion that immigration is very important for this economy? the cbi report says that every credible report talks about how immigration has a positive net effect. they have spoken to business across the board, including
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powers in the recruitment sector, and we have to have people to fill these jobs. it is and we have to have people to fill thesejobs. it is not and we have to have people to fill these jobs. it is not at the expense of british workers. that message has to be got there. thank you all. a little bit of bad language in that. sorry if you were offended. coming up, are you addicted to your phone? whereby the talk to one psychoa nalyst phone? whereby the talk to one psychoanalyst about the reality of being poked and one app which could pave the way for change. —— hooked. some of the world's top professional surfers are in newquay in cornwall for the most high—profile surfing event in the uk — boardmasters. ahead of the five—day festival, the debate around whether there's sexism in the sport, and the disparity between male and female prize money, has been reignited, with surfing england, the sport's governing body saying something needs to be done.? let's speak now to lucy campbell, who is a uk pro surfer and competing at
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boadmasters this year. sophie hellyer, who is a former competitive surfer. yvette curtis, who is from surfing england, the national governing body for surfing in england. and kerry powell, who has been judging surf competitions locally, nationally and internationally formore than 10 years. they are all speaking to us from newquay in cornwall, where boardmasters is being held. and speaking to us from jersey, we have arlene maltman, a former pro surfer. thank you all very much forjoining us. i want to start with you, lucy. you took part in boardmasters yesterday. how did you do?” you took part in boardmasters yesterday. how did you do? i had a shocker in my heat. it was good fun. the crowd was amazing. how many people turn up? i think there must‘ve been about a thousand people on the beach yesterday. so it really
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popular? really popular. with the live music on the beach, it is a good fun day out for people, especially when the sun is shining. 0k, especially when the sun is shining. ok, so you didn't have a great day yesterday and we are really sorry about that. if you had gone through to the final and win some prize—money, how much would you have won? what is the top prize in your category and for the equivalent male prize? i think boardmasters is actually equal prize money this year, which is incredible to see. actually equal prize money this year, which is incredible to seem that the first time? i think so, yes. world surfing is pushing to get equal prize money has a lot of the events. it is not all of them. it depends what companies are sponsoring the event and how much they are willing to put in. it is amazing to see a few more events on the tour are becoming equal prize money. sophie, you have written a
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lot about sexism in this sport. it is good to hear that there is some improvement in the pay levels? yeah. personally, i don't think it is a debate. the surfing culture is sexist towards women. there have beena sexist towards women. there have been a lot of improvements. the wsl are pushing for equality. but the syste m are pushing for equality. but the system that they use, which means if there is less female participation... a slight drop out as you make your journey. look, we got the gist of what you were saying. definitely sexism, kerry, sophie is saying, in surfing. you have beenjudging international and other surf competitions for years and you are judging at boardmasters. do you
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notice the sexism? in my place of work i guess i have been quite lucky. i am definitely treated as an equal. i have a lot of support from the guys that i work with. looking outside of that, yeah, i would say that maybe the women who are competing are not supported potentially by the sporting terms of sponsorship money, they may be don't get as much as their male counterparts. certainly the prize—money has been discussed. sophie dropped out... the wsl work ona sophie dropped out... the wsl work on a participation level. the surfers are paid the same prize—money, equal prize money, per head, per competing server. 0n the uk's head, per competing server. 0n the uk's pro surf tour we see less women in the sport. there are less numbers
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of women. even to the events that have equal prize money, the irrelevance of numbers. it is a difficult one. arlene, can i come to you? you difficult one. arlene, can i come to you ? you have difficult one. arlene, can i come to you? you have been in the business a long time. i wonder if you have seen things change over the years?” think change is an understatement, matthew. i started surfing in 1974, when surfing as a sport wasn't even a sport. it was a culture, it was a subculture. and it certainly wasn't a sport for women. surfers were regarded as druggies. that is the culture i entered into. i found along my journey of culture i entered into. i found along myjourney of competing, my absolute passion and love surfing ke pt absolute passion and love surfing kept me going. i would do anything to travel and surf. the idea of running any money for men and women in those days was very remote. do
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you think the battle has been won? presumably you don't?” you think the battle has been won? presumably you don't? i do. i think it has come... the sport is a multi—million pound industry. i think there are tremendous opportunities for women out there now. the real test for them is their ability to surfer. and if you've got that now, i think that you can really push the boundaries. i do think that there is still a lot of... the marketing around surfing, and being a marketing person myself, i understand that sponsors are looking for a searching look, which i think that disturbs me a little bit more. there are women that are very good surfers but don't attract that sort of advertising man's trim, if you like. that curtis, it was interesting what arlene was talking about when she started. when was
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billiejean about when she started. when was billie jean king fighting about when she started. when was billiejean king fighting to get equal pay for women in tennis? that was back in 1973. that year, the us open gay men and women equal pain prize—money in tennis at the us open. —— gave men and women. that is decades ago. what needs to change? it was decades ago and we shouldn't be having this discussion in this day and age in my opinion. it should be on equal pay terms. i do think the pay parity thing is a real issue. it puts people off competing. we just need to look, the entire thing about surfing is it is a sport now. thanks to being a national governing body it is a recognised sport. but it is also a culture. we are not just sport. but it is also a culture. we are notjust trying to change things asa are notjust trying to change things as a sport, we are trying to change
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an entire culture. it takes a lot longer to change that. but we are changing. there are more women in the industry. here at surfing england we are on the ground. we are more female heavy than the male heavy. we are a progressive company as far as surfing goes. we need to do so much more when it comes to getting women involved. lucy campbell, do you feel it is unfair, orare campbell, do you feel it is unfair, or are you just enjoying the surf?” think there are unfair parts of it. people don't realise that surfing competitively is an expensive sport, especially with 0lympics competitively is an expensive sport, especially with olympics on the horizon. there is a lot of competing with other competitions before the big competitions. to see equal prize money will support the girls coming
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up money will support the girls coming up and inspire them no end, if it means they can get away and keep training and keep pushing their surfing. it will help surfing completely. wall ride lucy, we will leave it there. thank you all. —— all right lucy. let's get the latest weather. hello. very much a day of sunshine and showers. they are merging to give longer spells of rain. the combination of sunshine and showers means that many places are getting some rainbows. some of those sharers have been heavy and thundering along the channel coast yesterday evening, overnight, into the early hours of this morning. equally, we have got a good bit of sunshine the further east you are. nowhere will be immune from the showers. they are rattling their way further east. already merging to give longer spells of rain across parts of wales, south—west england. northern ingham. spots of sunshine in northern
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ireland. increasing amount of sunshine for the west in the afternoon. a noticeable breeze. particularly along the channel coast. it will feel much cooler. highs between 16 and 18 celsius today. 20 to 21 out of the sunshine. 0vernight we lose these showers from eastern counties. more cloud arriving into the far south—west of england. temperatures holding up to 12, 13 celsius. widely single figures from most. that is ahead of an unsettled weekend. that frontal system pushing towards the uk. it will increase the cloud through tomato and bring outbreaks of rain. for most, plenty of sunshine after a chilly start. cloud increasing across south—west england, wales, northern ireland. 0utbreaks across south—west england, wales, northern ireland. outbreaks of rain through the afternoon. further north than these it stays dry. the
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sunshine will turn hazy as the cloud increases. it should feel warmer tomorrow. rain in the south—west, across wales and northern ireland, slowly tracking north and east. getting into parts of northern england. maybe as far south as scotland. sunday looks like a messy picture. an area of low pressure to the west and north—west of the uk. there will be a brace of rain. that will clear from northern ireland through the morning. it may not reach the far north of scotland. equally some parts of south—east england may not see very much on sunday. 0utbrea ks of england may not see very much on sunday. outbreaks of rain. humidity levels will be rising. quite a muggy day. temperatures in the sunshine up to 23 or 24 sussex. looking ahead to the week, showers around on monday. things turn quieter. most will see sunshine and it will feel warmer. is in
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hello, it's friday, it's 10 o'clock. i'm matthew price. house of fraser is going into administration — following the collapse of rescue talks. 17,000 jobs are at risk, but all 59 stores are set to open as usual today. in good locations are bought by somebody else or absorbed into some other change —— usually when these things happen, the good locations are brought the summit else. and the poor worst—case scenario, they are boarded up and are a blight on high street. news coming and that there are reports that mike ashley's sports direct has if you work for house
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of fraser, or you've been affected, do get in touch. a new app is offering rewards — like free coffee or cinema tickets — for actually talking to each other around the dinner table rather than checking your phone. we look at the anti—tech tech trying to tackle our obsession with our screens. i made a comment to my friend, and i told her, you know, "sometimes i wish that i could just throw my phone into the ocean," and she was like, "why?", and i told her about how it is quite distracting. we'll be discussing this app — and the problems surrounding phone addiction more widely, just after half past ten. it's the first day of the premier league and we're seeing more week day games than ever — we'll be asking fans how this will affect those who want to travel to support their clubs. good morning. it's ten o'clock. let's cross to julian with the day's news headlines. matthew, thank you. there are reports that mike ashley's sports direct has struck a deal to rescue parts of house of fraser out
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of administration for £90 million. the struggling department store has announced it is to appoint administrators after failing to reach a deal with its creditors. the move could put up to 17,000 jobs at risk. in a statement, the company said it will continue trading — all its stores will be open today as usual. injune, house of fraser said it needed to shut 31 stores and make up to 6,000 people redundant to survive. campsites in the south of france, with more than 1,000 tourists, have been evacuated after flash flooding. officials say a german man helping to supervise children was declared missing after being swept away by floodwaters, while some 17,000 homes were left without power. around 100 children were moved to safety from one campsite. 0livia crellin reports. roads turned to rivers. rivers have become rapids. this is what it looks like now in some parts of france after a weeks—long heatwave finally gave way to storms. intense rain over the last 48 hours has put central and southern areas of the country on flood alert,
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while around 17,000 homes are without power. firefighters in the ardeche and drome regions evacuated 1,600 people when campsites like this one turned into mudbaths in the wake of the storms. translation: the first thing i did was put into place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees, adults and children in particular. with teams working in pairs, we first secured people to the trees and then little by little we evacuated them. 0ver100 german children visiting for summer camp were among the rescued. police and divers continued to search for an elderly german man who was supervising them. he's missing after the nearby river burst its banks, and the caravan he sought shelter in was swept away in the torrents. after heatwaves and forest fires, these floods are the latest in a series of intense weather conditions to challenge
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europe this summer. 0livia crellin, bbc news. britain's largest business organisation the cbi is proposing a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end to the immigration target — instead the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make what is described as a "positive contribution to the economy." 0ur correspondent matt cole says the cbi is trying to strike a fine balance. the cbi i think does recognise that in what it's proposing today. it admits there is a fine balance to be struck between giving enough access to labour to support the economy, and at the same time enough control of immigration that it maintains public confidence. and so amongst its puzzles, additionally, for example, suggested that were high immigration takes place because of business needs —— amongst its proposals. that more money be made available for schools and hospitals
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to support infrastructure so it is not overwhelmed. they want plenty of eu immigration to come here and see the sheer geography and interconnectedness of our firms across the continent means it would make sense to give some level of priority to people from the eu, but they are so mindful that was such a hot topic in the brexit debate. the government has delayed and delayed its white paper, its document that will set out how it wants to do immigration. it is due very soon, we understand. it says it is coming soon, and businesses and the cbi say they really want to get their hands on that saw their proposals can then feed into it and be used in the negotiations —— so that their proposals can then feed into it. a nine—year—old girl who died after suffering serious head injuries in a rock fall in north yorkshire has been named. gfx harriet emily nicola forster was visiting staithes with her family when the incident occurred near the south pier at seaton garth on wednesday afternoon. her family says they cannot comprehend the enormity of this tragedy describing her as the light of our lives". figures released this morning show
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the uk economy grew by zero point 4% between april and june. the figures mark an increase in growth after a slump at the beginning of this year — amid frosty weather brought over by the beast from the east. however, the uk's trade deficit has widened — as exports of cars and planes sharply falls. thousands of uk air passengers are facing disruption today as ryanair pilots stage a 24—hour strike. nearly 400 flights, up to 100 to and from the uk, have been cancelled in the budget airline's worst ever day of industrial action. the pilots are demanding changes to pay and conditions but ryanair says the action is "regrettable and unjustified". the slovenian—born parents of the us first lady, melania trump, have become us citizens. viktor and amalija knavs took part in a naturalisation ceremony in new york yesterday. the pair are likely to have became citizens under a process — known as chain migration — that has been heavily criticised by president trump. that's a summary of the latest bbc
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news — more at 10.30. julian, thank you very much indeed. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live. if you're emailing and are happy for us to contact you ? and maybe want to take part in the programme — please include your phone number in your message. perhaps you're losing yourjob at house of fraser and want to those fears. if you text, you'll be charged at the standard network rate. (pres) let's get some sport now... holly is there. let's bring you up to date
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with katerina johnson—thompson's bid for gold at the european championships. she lead the heptathlon with three events to go in berlin — and she's started the first of those, the long jump. she's in a real battle with the world and olympic champion naffi thiam, who's jumped just longer so far. johnson—thompson will be looking to extend her lead, because next it's the javelin — her weakest event — with the 800—metres finishing things off tonight. the medals kept coming for great britain on the final day of swimming in glasgow, as ben proud won his first european title with gold in the men's 50m freestyle. in the end there was just a fraction in it — a tenth of a second in fact.
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but it was enough to hold off greek kristian gkolomeev, who was closing in the final metres. and the swimming came to a climax with another gold for adam peaty — his fourth at these championships. he won the medlay relay along with nicholas pyle, james guy and duncan scott. peaty praised a new generation of "fearless" swimmers in the great britain team with a lot of extremely promising teenagers in the squad. and there were a lot of late deals on transfer deadline day, with fulham spending over £100 million — the most everfor a promoted side — and everton were very busy, pulling off one of the big coups of the day... they paid barcelona over £27 million for yerry mina — the colombian defender who starred at the world cup, scoring three goals. he'd been a target of a few other clubs but he plumped for everton. and manchester united manager jose mourinho wasn't happy that they didn't manage any more signings but the window is closed, now it's time for action — and united welcome leicester city to old trafford tonight in the first premier league game of the season. mourinho says the fans willjust have to be patient. i think by the end of november, december, you will see why, by then, which teams are in a position to win the premier league. in this moment words are not important. let's play football and by the end of november, december, you don't need words.
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you will see which teams are candidates. the american gary woodland is the surprise leader after the opening round of the uspga championship — the last golf major of the season. but there are some well—placed britons in the field — justin rose and ian poulter are in a large group, three shots off the pace, after rounds of 67. johanna konta is out of the canadian 0pen in montreal after a busy day. she completed victory over victoria azarenka in a match delayed overnight because of rain. but she then lost in straight sets to the defending champion elina svitolina. and we should get the second test underway at lord's this morning, after play was completely washed out yesterday — play is due to start at 11. that's all the sport for now. the latest at 10.30. thanks very much indeed, holly. now, these pictures are not what you would expect to see in your camping holiday in france. looks pretty miserable, doesn't it? 1600 people,
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mostly campers, having to evacuate due to severe flooding across the country. more than 100 children have been rescued from a summer camp. 0ne of the people looking after them is still missing this morning and some are being treated for hypothermia. we arejoined by are being treated for hypothermia. we are joined by the bbc weather centre. give us the mighty of what is happening. i was in france until yesterday and the weather was astonishingly good. yes, this time last week, talking about extreme heat, iberia, south—western france, temperatures cooling off a bit but it has been extremely hot, high levels of humidity. yesterday there was an area of low pressure connected to what we saw in south east anglia and south—east england, and that acted as a catalyst for these big storm clouds which can develop at a great height through the atmosphere and they can bring a lot of rain, as we have been seeing. in our last few hours in france, and asi in our last few hours in france, and as i say in our last few hours in france, and asisayi in our last few hours in france, and as i say i was on
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in our last few hours in france, and asisawaas ona in our last few hours in france, and as i say i was on a ferry coming back from normandy yesterday, just an astonishing volume suddenly coming down, but that earth we have been quite happily running around in shorts and t—shirts in the day before was parched. yes, and the summer so it will be very dry. that amount of rainfall on the dry ground, it has nowhere to go. to give you an idea of him amount we saw, and i hope i pronounce this correctly, a place to the north—west of avignon, its seven inches in a 24—hour period. the thing most of that fell within six hours and the average rainfall for that part of france is around 70 millimetres on a month. so they had over two and a half times their monthly rainfall in hours. one place affected badly was the ardeche, and we have a holiday—maker there on the line. what is the situation been like as far as you're concerned? it started,
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yesterday morning, very early, with heavy rain and thunder and storm and halfway through the day the river we nt halfway through the day the river went up very high, it went up seven metres, and i made a video of the bridge that was totally flooded. but today it is totally different. it is sunny and the river is going down again. and your perspective on any problems in the precise area you are in, in terms of campers? i don't think you are camping, but in terms of people... i nor in any case there isa of people... i nor in any case there is a campsite across the river —— i know that in any case. and, yeah, next to the bridge that was gone, so i assume they must have had problems, and furthermore some roads are blocked and swamped, but it is
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especially the area around it. or the water level is going down now or is it still coming down from the mountains? -- are the water levels. i think it is really going down for us as well. it is going down now. that is at least something, jolien van dijk, thank you forjoining us. and obviously those rescue workers in that part of france are still looking for an older man who was looking for an older man who was looking after some german children, who were camping. we will keep you up—to—date if anything more comes of that, but i think the worst is feared, unfortunately. we will move on now, though, to an 11—year—old from los angeles who was bullied and teased about her dark skin complexion by both her white and black schoolmates. the name—calling would often reduce her to tears. to boost her confidence in her appearance, herfamily posted pictures on social media of her posing with the hashtag
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"flexin' in my complexion". well, the pictures — and the hashtag — went viral; so she and her sister decided to set up a business selling clothes with her new catchphrase. they'sveproved so popular they've received endorsements they've proved so popular they've received endorsements from celebrities like alicia keys, snoop dogg and actress lupita nyong'o. she's modelled her clothes on tv and become the youngest ever designer to be featured in new york's harlem fashion week. this is her story: my my name is kheris rogers and angry ceo of flexin' in my complexion! the
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kids would always make fun of me for my skin complexion, and i would a lwa ys my skin complexion, and i would always be crying. but when my mum figured out something was going wrong she started to talk to me about it, she went up to the school, and after that i was at home in the school. my grandmother, she would tell me the same thing. she's the one who came up with flexin' in my complexion originally. i want to be a supermodel, i want to expand more of my company, i want to have my own holding store one—day andi have my own holding store one—day and i want to be an entertainer because i like to sing, dance and act. i would tell girls and boys
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being bullied it doesn't matter what other people think about you, it's what you think about yourself, and you should do the same thing i do, look at yourself in the mirror and see in powering words about yourself. you can say, "i'm smart, special, creative." don't let the words people say about you get into your head, don't let them mess with your head, don't let them mess with your head, don't let them mess with your head at all. what a nice heart—warming story. let's give you some or now on a breaking story this morning. the department store, house of fraser, has announced its going into administration — putting up to 17,000 jobs at risk. it's the latest big name shop which has struggled to survive on the high street. in the last few minutres, sports direct has said it will buy parts of the business. 0ur correspondent emma vardy is in belfast. the story behind you was meant to
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open at 9:30am this morning. has that happened ? open at 9:30am this morning. has that happened? no, it hasn't. just in the last hour while we have been here messages were stocked up on the doors saying it will not open today until 11 o'clock. that of course came after that news this morning that the business is going into administration. i'm sure it has been an anxious wait this morning and in the days leading up to today for those 17,500 staff at the house of fraser who are employed. it has been on of course the business has been in trouble for a while. it was slow to ta ke in trouble for a while. it was slow to take on the internet boom, as it were. that is probably where the problem started, and the failure to reinvent itself, really struggling in the competitive retail environment against brands like debenhams and john lewis. the speculation over the last few days about the house of fraser going into administration has been pretty well—known. this morning, it was
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announced it would be going into administration, meaning its debts now outstripped its assets, that it had failed to reach an agreement with creditors, but also this morning a lot of speculation that mike ashley and sports direct were in discussions about a takeover bid. in the last half—hour that has been confirmed, that sports direct will ta ke confirmed, that sports direct will take over the house of fraser. the deal is worth £90 million. do we know at this stage, and presumably we don't, what that means? we don't know if the story behind you is secure, and we don't know what it means for the workers inside, or what it means for customers? no, exactly. really early days. very unclear. before this point, there we re unclear. before this point, there were 59 stores, house of fraser stores, open in the uk and it has already been announced some 30 of those, half of those, were going to close. whether that still goes ahead, we have to wait and see, but a nalysts ahead, we have to wait and see, but analysts have been saying it is well
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overdue, that actually the house of fraser could have averted some of its problems if it had started to slim down its portfolio much earlier. and if it started to come up earlier. and if it started to come up with a usp to make itself more competitive. it is known that make ashley and sports direct had had ambitions to expand on the high streets of this will be seen as rather coup for him on the high street. of course there will be lots of anxious staff waiting to see what that will mean for the business going forward. emma vardy in belfast, thanks very much, at the start of the story. let's talk to kate ancketill — ceo and founder of retail trend consultancy firm gdr uk. and we were also talked to the chief officer of a retailer who represents
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independent stores on the high street and helps them —— helps them to sell online. alex, starting with you. from your perspective, if you are helping stores to sell online, does that mean house of fraser got into this trouble because it didn't do enough to sell online?” into this trouble because it didn't do enough to sell online? i think that would be too simplified view of what is going on right now on the high street. we know there is a huge transformation going on with higher online penetration, but also a changing consumer behaviour off—line as well. and i think our vision is to bring technologies and economies, with the more small independent shops, help them drive both on and off—line. it is not going anywhere, it is just changing dramatically, off—line, and we need to change our approach as retailers, how we work in that space as well as online. to
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do big, long established, historic businesses like house of fraser manage to adjust to the new economy? welcomer obviously with great difficulty. legacy businesses, they have a very big machine to turn around, a big ship. they know that they have to do it. some are working really ha rd they have to do it. some are working really hard and have tried, for example in america macy's has worked incredibly hard to improve its online services and it is one of the best in that regard and it has helped with its turnaround but it has had difficulties as well. thinking about it, the department store is pretty much the best example of true retail experience. if they get that right, then like harrods and selfridge's they can be very successful, but they have to be a festival of experience. real retail experience is where you pay to get in. even though you don't pay to get in. even though you don't pay to get in. even though you don't pay to get into harrods and selfridge's,
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it is good enough that parts of it you will pay to get in, the cinemas, orto you will pay to get in, the cinemas, or to go to some of the shows, or the fashion events. people do actually pay. there are huge stores for places like samsung gear people pay to go and they rented because it is such an experience —— where people pay to go. nobody would think for paying to go into a shop. how big a deal is house of fraser and what is happening to it? house of fraser exemplifies what has happened to middle market retail that is not differentiated and has not moved with the times. meaning? it appeals to the middle income group in the country, and it is also an differentiated. —— not differentiated. —— not differentiated. it has a premium discount,... alex, i see you're nodding your head. from our perspective, what we have seen with the house of fraser, and i don't think we are done yet, i think we will see more examples of this, where we need the differentiation,
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changing the experience for the customer, really building up that edge that has completely gone missing in this case, and in other big retailers as well. it is very clear with the evidence of time that it doesn't matter what size you are, you really need to rethink your approach. and figure out again who the customer is, and really start talking to them again because they are currently not listening. why do you think mike ashley's sports direct would be interested in some of house of fraser? what sort of stores would they be looking at, do you think, to keep going?” stores would they be looking at, do you think, to keep going? i think there is obviously a lot of opportunity still there. there is an opportunity still there. there is an opportunity to basically remove some of the legacy, slimmed down, and keep some of the key stories then think about how to differentiate, andi think about how to differentiate, and i think that is an approach they can take. that is probably something they are thinking about now. and,
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kate, i wonder, they are thinking about now. and, kate, iwonder, because they are thinking about now. and, kate, i wonder, because sports direct, it is cheap shot, and people go there because they can get cheaply. would you have thought that sports direct‘s interests would be thinking, let's make house of fraser a bit cheaper? 0r thinking, let's make house of fraser a bit cheaper? or do you think they we re a bit cheaper? or do you think they were actively target that middle income market you suggest is not being served so well? if they were going to ask my advice i would say they should take an upmarket. right. so for people who have more money? it should become more experiential, not necessarily more expensive in every respect, but it needs to be full of restaurants, market experiences, full of unique product you can't buy anywhere else. some of that could be very much at the value end, because it could be from start—ups and local makers and so on, but it has to be unique, a really special experience that the whole family would want to go to,
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and it can combine inexpensive with expensive. what you're saying then, that sort of "what to do it?" we haveit that sort of "what to do it?" we have it bill contact on e—mail saying, i should stop blaming the internet for house of the —— for the company's internet for house of the —— for the compa ny‘s filling, saying internet for house of the —— for the company's filling, saying management is to blame. but you're right, if they had thought about this's years ago they could've done something —— the companyfailing. thinking about the companyfailing. thinking about the change, they were none of them fun places to shop, so the management must have realised that, that their competitive audits and seemed they were not keeping up with high street trends, so, yes, it has to be done privately to the management as well of course as the structural situation. alex, another e—mail saying the internet isn't stealing business. this is called competition. we honour what the problem is and that is business rates and read because people are just getting greedy and want to get rich quick.
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odu, greedy and want to get rich quick. 0du, talking to companies about how they can market themselves better online, how do you deal with the reality, the fact that a lot of high street tried a lot of money for those stores to read properties? so obviously there are two respecters to this. firstly, we are a community of older and modern shops, and we hope by helping them we can help them cover their ends, the increases in business rates, and all the other extra costs that come onto them as time goes on. but the other side of the story is that we represent the shops and we are actively looking at how we can, as a group, with 450 shops in the uk, find ways to really talk to government and understand what we can do in terms of both rents and in terms of business rates, because it really hits the small guys. we should neverforget
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that. we always talk about what business rates are doing to the big chains, but let's turn it around a little and think about the decimation going on there, because of the business rates. i think that is actually the bloodline of the economy right now so we need to be thinking more about them and we are here to represent them. thinking about the customers, for obvious reasons, kate, we are talking about jobs in the future of the high street, but we have had an e—mail, "where do i stand as a house of fraser customer? i've got gift vouchers. can i use them?" and i think earlier ian messaged in to say he has some furniture on order and he has some furniture on order and he doesn't know they will get it. where does this whole process leave customers? obviously in a very uncertain position. i would hope, andl uncertain position. i would hope, and i think the way these things usually play out, if something's been bought, as mike ashley has, then they will usually i think be
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able to honour obligations to customers, because let's face it, the customer must come first. that is where i think a lot of retail that has had fallen by the wayside has fallen down, because they have forgotten who their customer is and they have to put them first at every opportunity. so i would be surprised if those kind of things for them. all right, thank you very much, and also thank you too much —— so much to you, alex. coming up... coming up, do you get twitchy if you don't check your phone? we'll speak to one pyschotherapist about the reality of being hooked, and about one app which thinks it could pave the way for change. time for the latest news — here'sjulian. good morning. mike ashley's sports direct has struck a deal to rescue parts of house of fraser out of administration for £90 million. some 17,000 staff are being informed that they will be transferred over from house of fraser to sports direct. house of fraser called in administrators this morning,
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after warning that talks with investors and creditors had failed to find a solvent solution. figures released this morning show the uk economy grew by 0.4% in the three months tojune, boosted by the warmer weather. the figures mark an increase in growth after a slump at the beginning of this year, amid frosty weather brought over by the beast from the east. however, the uk's trade deficit has widened — as exports of cars and planes sharply falls. britain's largest business organisation, the cbi, is proposing a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end to the immigration target — instead the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make what is described as a "positive contribution to the economy". a nine—year—old girl who died after suffering serious head injuries in a rock fall in north yorkshire, has been named. harriet emily nicola forster was visiting staithes with herfamily, when the incident
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occurred near the south pier at seaton garth on wednesday afternoon. her family says they cannot comprehend the enormity of this tragedy describing her as the light of our lives". thousands of uk air passengers are facing disruption today as ryanair pilots stage a 24—hour strike. nearly 400 flights, up to a hundred to and from the uk, have been cancelled in the budget airline's worst ever day of industrial action. the pilots are demanding changes to pay and conditions but ryanair says the action is "regrettable and unjustified". flooding in the south of france has led to 1,600 people being evacuated — most of them tourists on campsites. officials say a german man helping to supervise children was declared missing after being swept away by floodwaters, and 17,000 homes have been left without power. around 100 children were moved to safety from one campsite. the worst—hit areas are gard, ard che and dr me. that's a summary of
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the latest bbc news. gillian, thank you. now the sport from holly. —— julian. we have the latest from katrina johnson—thompson at the european championships after she stormed into the lead in the heptathlon, where she is back in action in the long jump. she opened with a decent firstjob. but the world champion nafi thiam went one centimetre further. still to come today, the javelin, weakest event, with the 800 metres finishing things off. there were two more golds in the swimming pool last night for ben proud in the 50 metre freestyle and the medley relay team. that gave adam peaty his fourth title at the games. everton were busy late on in the transfer window with barcelona defender yerry mina among their signings. he scored half of
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colombia's six goals at the world cup. and ian poulter and justin rose are three shots off the pace after the opening round in the final golf major of the season. the us pga championship. leading the way is gary woodland. that is all your sport. more throughout the day. bye for now. thank you, holly. we will stick with sport. the premier league season begins tonight, with manchester united hosting leicester city at old trafford. last year was the first time the league started on a friday night and the season before was the first time matches took place on a friday. this change is mainly down to broadcasters who invest billions into the league. current rules state three o'clock matches on a saturday can't be shown on tv, so some games have had to move. many fans say this makes it much more difficult to get to away games. next season the number of live matches that can be broadcast will increase from 154 to at least 190 per season. 0fcom says the premiere league needs to strike a balance
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between the preferences of travelling fans and those watching on tv. let's speak now to sandra fixter, who has been a leicester city fan since she was seven years old, akhil vyas, who is a lifelong arsenal supporter and first saw a gunners match when he was four. and alison bender, a sports journalist. we also have malcolm clarke, who is the chair of the football supporters' federation, who joins us from salford. let's start with the supporters, although presumably you are old supporters. sandra, there you are in your leicester city shirt. show me the back. leicester city, you have come to our studio to join us and now you have to get to manchester to watch the game tonight? absolutely. back to leicester, pick my friends up back to leicester, pick my friends up and we are off to old trafford.
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how long have you been travelling to away games to see leicester city? years. has the experience changed? it has because invariably it was used to be a saturday afternoon at three o'clock. and you had the sunday to get over it and it was a weekend. now, like today, there are a lot of people who have got tickets for manchester united. then they change it and the people can't get there because they are working. the game was originally scheduled for? saturday at three o'clock. but they changed it because of the television rights. that means that you are... you have to book time off work. there are people that can't get there because they can't get time off work at short notice. they bought the tickets. you buy your tickets a long time in advance. premier league rules say that you
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can't sell them on. it happens, but legally you don't. do you travel to see arsenal? i yeah. legally you don't. do you travel to see arsenal? iyeah. for legally you don't. do you travel to see arsenal? i yeah. for quite a numberof see arsenal? i yeah. for quite a number of years. as it got more time consuming to do that? it has. as sa nta consuming to do that? it has. as santa rightly mentions, you can get kick—off times all over a saturday, sunday, often monday nights. if there is no public transport back, thatis there is no public transport back, that is when it is really tough. you have to think about hotels. think about driving. the experience is different to taking the train, essentially. it is getting a lot of fur match day fans. as an arsenal fan, more of your games are televised because it is such a popular club? yeah, last year we had about four or five three o'clock kick—offs. partly a wrongful
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throbbing in the europa league, which means our games on sunday. we we re which means our games on sunday. we were playing all over the place. i remember 12:45pm kick—offs of north. __ up remember 12:45pm kick—offs of north. —— up north. it is quite disruptive. there was even a potential christmas eve game against liverpool which didn't happen. but it didn't happen because people kicked up a force, and rightly so. juju both are still committed? yeah. absolutely. malcolm clark, is there a problem for fans? if fa ns clark, is there a problem for fans? if fans are still prepared to travel to away games, is there a problem? there is most firmly a problem. we will never go back to the days of every will never go back to the days of every game will never go back to the days of every game kicking off at 3pm on saturday. but there are things that could be done better than they are at the moment to have the position of fans. i think the important thing here to remember is that the fans in the ground are part of the
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television product. if they want a lively atmosphere with a breakaway following and a full grant, it wouldn't be attractive to the television broadcasters. we like to see the premier league use more of its huge television income to subsidise coach travel for away fans when there are difficult kick—off times. stoke city, for example, and i know we have now been relegated, provide free coach travel to all games and will continue to do that in the championship. we would like to see more flexibility on rail tickets, so that if a game is suddenly moved and people have bought an advance ticket, they can get a refund, which they can't at the moment if it is a cheaper advance ticket. the biggest thing of all, of course, the broadcasters and the football authorities should look at the geography and look at the public transport position when deciding which games are going to be moved into a particular slot. alison
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bender, why is this happening? 0ver time more games are being scheduled not on a saturday at 3pm, but throughout the week, which can get quite difficult for people to get to the games and get back in time for work? absolutely. the biggest thing to say is football, the premier league, is a brand, a global brand. i have massive amounts of sympathy for the die—hard fans like santa and a keel who travel to these games week in and we get. you mentioned the christmas eve one that nearly happened because it fell on a sunday. they changed that to a friday. what must be pointed out is the right money. £5.1 billion a —— we re the right money. £5.1 billion a —— were spent in the last cycle. that is basically saying the broadcasters are spending £11 million a game. there is the three o'clock blackout. they have to put these games on the
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televised slots. it is about to get worse televised slots. it is about to get worse next televised slots. it is about to get worse next season. televised slots. it is about to get worse next season. we'll have a saturday 7:45pm kick—off which will compete with the likes of the x factor and strictly come dancing. the reason it is happening is because of generating so much money, the money goes back into the clubs. that is why you are able as an arsenal fan to invest in lacazette and aubameyang. i understand that refines it is incredibly difficult. of course it is, if you are expecting a three o'clock. category for families, and his schooldays, having to miss work. it is tricky. but it is a brand. —— especially for families. that is why it has happened. daniel has tweeted and said he is glad we're raising the issue. he says, ruining football for real fans. issue. he says, ruining football for realfans. spurs issue. he says, ruining football for real fans. spurs and issue. he says, ruining football for realfans. spurs and newcastle tomorrow at 12:30pm. those who can't be bothered to travel get to watch everything on a television. is
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football being ruined ? everything on a television. is football being ruined? the stadium are still packed, aren't they? they are. ithink are still packed, aren't they? they are. i think it is progressing. football is progressing. you have also got to realise as well, you might think you are a die—hard fan because you travel to the games. there are some die—hard fans who do not have the capacity to travel to games because of their geographical location. i know you made a massive sacrifice travelling up and down the country. i know you have mobility issues and represent disabled fans as well. there are some people who can't get to the games. the broadcasters have a right to actually give football to the many millions of people watching, not just the few thousand travelling fans and the rest that fill the stadium. football is for everyone, notjust if the stadium. football is for everyone, not just if the fans go to the game. which you are the traditional fans. it is. but one of the things that annoys us, and it goes along with a lot of people i know who support other clubs, when they do these
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fixtures, like you said, they have to go to newcastle 412 o'clock, poor quy- “ to go to newcastle 412 o'clock, poor guy. —— that poor guy. can they have a look? leicester against wolves, people only have to travel an hour and a half. it only seems like southampton after greater manchester or somewhere like that. the fixtures are so complicated with champions league, europa league, fa cup... manchester derbies, for example. yes, the game is in manchester. it is a prime—time game. it will be on prime—time television. there needs to be a big alignment between railways, transport, football, police even. you talk about saturday night kick—offs next year. police are needed in the capital and in manchester around the city centre, not particularly at football. they will be stretched.
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with the railway on saturday, you always —— with the railway on saturday, you always — — you with the railway on saturday, you always —— you often reduced service. that cause issues. what matthew said is spot on. when you look at these pictures, you localiser as much as you can. you still get good games, tv is spending a lot of money and we totally understand that as fans. i have seen some great players at arsenal because of that. there needs to bea arsenal because of that. there needs to be a balance. sandra, this is what the premier league are saying. they say the premier league will continue to structure and do option is uk broadcasting rights in the ways that are compatible with applicable competition law. so, they are saying that they have two show football fans... 0fcom, that the blue regular tv in this country, say people want to watch games on tv in the evening. the number of matches on tv and when they are scheduled
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have to be decided by the premier league. the premier league says, clearly it needs to speak —— strike a balance between the preferences of travelling fans and those watching on tv. that is what 0fcom say. they have got this massive audience that wa nts to have got this massive audience that wants to watch your team succeeding on tv. isn't that a brilliant part of this? if they can schedule that in the evening, that would be fantastic. it's great because a lot of people can't get to the away games. but if it's not on television, let's face it, most people stream it. there are streams all over the place. without paying for it. it is illegal to all over the place. without paying for it. it is illegalto do all over the place. without paying for it. it is illegal to do that, but anywhere...! i've been going for it. it is illegal to do that, but anywhere. . .! i've been going for a love of years. we go every match. it is very difficult. we try to get the children involved in football and to follow the team because they are the next generation. they're
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absolutely brokenhearted. we better let you get on the road! the m6 on a friday night, how ridiculous is that? thank you. would you stay off your phone if it meant winning free stuff? a new app is to offer rewards to families for talking to each other around the dinner table rather than checking their screens. the tech is currently used help students study — and it comes as facebook and instagram release a new tool to limit how much time people spend on their apps. catrin nye has been looking at the rise of anti—tech tech. can i ask you both how much you check your phone? uh... recently? every day. every hour. quite often. quite a lot. probably too much! at work, probably every hour. quite bad, actually. a fair few hours a day. at home, at least every 20 minutes. every couple of hours?
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i'm always on it. and now i've got a phone call! there are now loads of apps offering to get you off your phone. 0ne called mute tracks your screen time, space helps you set goals to use it less, moment sets daily limits on your use — it will even send you a barrage of messages if you're on it too much. and one called forest grows you a tree as long as you're not browsing. it is, of course, very debatable whether tech companies are the ones who should be helping us spend less time on tech. facebook and instagram are releasing their own time—limit tools. an app called hold has just launched in the uk, created for students by three students in copenhagen. why was it that you wanted to start this? we were struggling so much about actually focusing. we checked our phones all the time, and we started to give ourselves incentives. the ones that check their phones
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the last, they get the coffee. and that really worked out for us three. the app allows you to start a timer to put your phone on hold, which means you can't get other apps. having the screen can be a distraction. but it can be to one side, and the idea is then to say, "right, i'm going to be productive now." once you've done 20 minutes on hold, you start earning rewards — things like cheap cinema tickets, free drinks, donations to charity. this app is still doing advertising. it allows brands to market their products to users — but as rewards. hey, clara — i'm catrin. this app doesn't work overnight and is currentlyjust for students, like clara, a masters student at the london school of economics from singapore. she says the use of phones is a distraction for her whole family. yeah, and i have actually voiced my unhappiness to my parents before. about them using their phones? yeah, yeah.
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cos i really think that it does compromise the quality of the interactions you have with your family members or friends at the dinner table, for instance. the creators of hold are now developing a version for families to use together. they say they've had tens of thousands of people get in touch, because phones are disturbing their dinner time too. let's speak now to aaron balick, who is a psychotherapist and has researched technonlogy addiction. nathalie nahai, a tech writer and author of webs of influence, who says she's had addiction problems herself and had to leave platforms because of it. and from essex we have mircea rogojan—rush, who says he feels he's addicted to his phone and often spends nine hours a day on it. how does that show itself in your
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daily life? it depends what you think about when you say addicted. addicted in the sense that if, for example, if i find myself in a bank queue and i have not got my phone, i feel that i'm sort of missing an opportunity to check on my e—mails or to respond to a message or something similar. i looked at my phone usage. i have loaded an app called moment, which is really good. it tracks your usage. it tells you what app you are using and how long you spend on them. from a personal perspective, my phone use is centred around what i do for work. i can't really do without it. you can't get
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in touch with people without e—mail. i have to have that. we have got a screen grab of the usage that you do have. we can see it there. an hour and 54 minutes a day. yes. that would be about right. that is one of the least, i think. some of your others have shown up to what? are many hours a day? -- how many hours? the longest was nine hours and 32 minutes. how did you spend that long on your phone in a day? that is a bit misleading. i use my phone as a sap nave and i travel a lot for work. there are a couple of days there were i did a couple of hours travelling. that would be included. —— satis nave. my
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my work e—mails. there are three hours listening to music, which is kind of going on in the background. there is about an hour spent on the e—mails. i spent an hour on the phone because it is my work phone as well. can you do me a favour? i can see your phone down there. can you pick your phone up and put it behind you and don't look at it for the rest of this interview? literally do that. take it away. don't look at the screen again for the rest of this interview! natalie, i've got my phone here. this is a work reason. james on facebook says anything that stops the zombie mentality of walking around looking at a little screen all day to the exclusion of others can't be bad. how did we get
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to that point? we have all done it. what we heard our previous guest talk about is the fact we use these devices are so many different things. the way most interfaces designed to capture and maintain our attention. if you have got notifications, the little red marks that come up, or a new message, these are triggers designed to get us to open up and get a tiny little reward. many of these apps want us to go to them all the time because they earn their money through advertisers. yes, they want you as much as possible on the app. designing for maximising the attention time versus the quality of our attention, house whether it serves your our attention, house whether it serves your life goals or not. if you're trying to be productive and you're trying to be productive and you go on facebook, then you are having the newsfeeds and everything else which distract you from the
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goals that are productive. james, send us another message to let us know if you're listening to this or just on facebook. aaron, we have had another matthew an e—mail saying he is always on his phone. he thinks after him and others this app would be very useful. at the same time he says it is terrible that we are having to be given money and rewards to get off ourfarm. is having to be given money and rewards to get off our farm. is this the right approach? is giving us rewards the right approach to getting us to stop, or should we take greater self—control? stop, or should we take greater self-control? the latter. the issue with technology as people tend to have a passive approach. you use technologies in the ways they were intended when they were given to you. you take your smartphone and you. you take your smartphone and you use the default settings. then we respond to it. in a sense if we are asking to use another wrapped in
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dictate how we use our technology, it is not a bad thing. what we really need to do is have an active relationship with our technology, make personal decisions about when it works and when it doesn't. what are some of the things that he and people like him can do to stop themselves standing in that post offers queue and feeling that they wa nt to offers queue and feeling that they want to go for their phone because they have a couple of moments of staring into space? the post office queue, the tube and the pots maybe all right times to have a look at your phone. —— the boss. the thing that's important to yourself is, is it making me feel good, is it making me feel bad? could have a richer relationship with someone front of me? if you notice that you are coming off your phone feeling agitated and anxious, feeling like you want more, that was probably not
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the best idea in that moment. i would suggest for the —— putting your phone into aeroplane mode, turning it off. make some active choices. right now behind you, on your screen, there are all sorts of m essa g es your screen, there are all sorts of messages popping up from friends and family saying they are watching you on tv. do you want to turn around and look at his? probably i will. keep waiting. natalie, is there something that we could do? we were talking in the office earlier, i have godchildren, the editor of the programme has godchildren and we are both aware of the fact we are looking at our farms in front of her children often. there is an incentive for parents to put it in their pocket and play with them on their pocket and play with them on the swings, isn't there? yes, because you are modelling the behaviour for the child. if you want
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an environment with richer relationships, having certain rules in place that you agree upon can be helpful. for instance, one of my friends has a fishbowl. before dinner everybody puts their phones in there. there is a ritual that takes place that allows them to do that, leader aside and have dinner. if you are going to do it with... turn the notifications. number two, in the settings if you dig around, you can turn your interface so it is just a black and white. bright colours, there is a reason they are chosen. they attract attention. you can use these apps or hide phone is out of reach in a cupboard where they have together still to reach it. those are helpful. we saw in the film, neuro students trying to find a way to wean themselves off. is there a natural process that starts
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we re there a natural process that starts were teenagers hear about this, they know people are getting addicted, they self—medicating and stop themselves being addicted ? they self—medicating and stop themselves being addicted? is that starting to happen? yeah, there is definitely a pushback. the thing thatis definitely a pushback. the thing that is so attractive is the ove rla p. that is so attractive is the overlap. one is novelty and the others stuff about me. when you are getting the identifications it is something about you in your inbox. your eagle loves it. it is like sweets. —— ego. your eagle loves it. it is like sweets. -- ego. have you looked at your screen since you put it away? no. good for you. do you think you will be able not to look at it for the next hour? probably, yes. i will set you that challenge. send us a quick tweaks to let us know if you have managed it. —— tweet. thank you all. fascinating conversation. i'm
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putting the smartphone in my pocket. it is gone away. i'm not looking for five minutes. i differ watching. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. have a good day. bye— bye. hello. it's a day of sunny spells and showers. the showers are already emerging to give longer spells of rain through parts of wales, those we re rain through parts of wales, those were “— rain through parts of wales, those were —— south west and northern england. some torrential rain. moving east. increasing sunshine through the afternoon. a noticeable breeze. ghostly on channel coast. fairly frequent showers and a noticeable breeze means it will feel reasonably cold compared to recently. some showers in eastern
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counties of scotland and england this evening. eventually clearing away. most places become dry. clouding the first photographs —— cloud in the far south—west later. a chilly start tomorrow. bright, some spells of sunshine. it will cloud over south—west england and wales, as well as northern ireland. feeling warmer tomorrow. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11am... mike ashley's sports direct steps in as house of fraser goes into administration.
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he's struck a deal worth £90 million to rescue parts of the department store chain. figures show the economy grew by 0.4% in the second quarter of this year. a german man is missing following flash floods in the south of france. 1,600 had to be rescued from campsites following the extreme weather. ryanair pilots have gone on strike in five european countries, forcing the cancellation of hundreds of flights. citizens advice is urging the government to slow down the roll—out of smart meters in england, scotland and wales, after it received thousands of complaints.

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