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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 10, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11am... mike ashley's sports direct steps in as house of fraser goes into administration. he's struck a deal worth £90 million to rescue parts of the department store chain. figures show the economy grew by 0.4% in the second quarter of this year. a german man is missing following flash floods in the south of france. 1,600 had to be rescued from campsites following the extreme weather. ryanair pilots have gone on strike in five european countries, forcing the cancellation of hundreds of flights. citizens advice is urging the government to slow down the roll—out of smart meters in england, scotland and wales, after it received thousands of complaints. good morning.
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it's friday 10th of august. welcome to bbc newsroom live. mike ashley, owner of sports direct has struck a £90 million deal to rescue parts of house of fraser. earlier the department store had called in the administrators, but now sports direct has acquired all of the uk stores and stock in the business. prior to its collapse, mike ashley had held an 11% stake in the department store chain. there are reports that some of the stores will become sports direct outlets and others will become flannels stores house of fraser employs 17,500 people. of these, 11,500 work for concessions for other brands within the stores and there are 59 stores across the uk — this morning the stores have just opened —
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after delaying to hear what was going on. we are joined via webcam by retail expert kate hardcastle. an assessment from you of this morning's development. it is interesting that mike ashley is adding toa interesting that mike ashley is adding to a bizarre retail portfolio. he is involved with sports direct. he has the upmarket fashion brand flannels and he has a lot of interest in other stores, also debenhams. this is a big move and i'm sure a lot of people will be breathing a slight sigh of relief that the name house of fraser is not disappearing from high streets altogether but i cannot imagine that the business or its offer of going to be similarof the business or its offer of going to be similar of that people know or recognise as being house of fraser. this is someone who trades very much in the discounts market and really
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has brands that do just that. that is where the success has been. we do not want huge gaping holes in the uk's high street because that does not help other retailers surrounding these big departmental stores but it is clear to see that the success of online and changing in consumer buying habits are having to affect in uk high street up and down the country. what you think is in this him? i think this money is very ambitious to see growth with in his retail portfolio. he understands the uk consumer and he has had success in the sports direct brand. he wants to widen it and have a house of his own brands may be. house of fraser was a house of brands. he has traded out of house of fraser quite successfully with some of those brands. i think it is interesting as a development because i do not think it will be the full portfolio of property. i think he will carry
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forth the stores that are trading well. i cannot see it being the traditional department store that we all know and reflects on. we think of house of fraser is very much a heritage brand in the high street and asa heritage brand in the high street and as a middle market department store. it needed to be exemplary with its service and have brands that had cut through, something with a unique selling point that was very different for its consumers and it has lost its way partly. a lot of the time that has been because of the time that has been because of the management and often because of new entries into the market place in fashion and health and beauty which has seen it really fall by the wayside. what is intriguing that what we're hearing from mike ashley is that some of the stores may become sports direct outlets and some might become flannels stores. they're very much at opposite ends of his portfolio, aren't they? that is right. he is driving up both
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sides of the market place. everything about retail the big challenge has been on the middle market and he understands that. he can see that the middle market is quite vanilla like. it is not adding very much. people very much like discount brands, and we have seen the rise and rise of brands like prime arc, and they'd like the luxurious brands to give them something more interesting to them. but all of this aside, all of the displays in traditional retail, bricks and mortar stores, know how tough the next few years are going tough the next few years are going to be ahead. we saw not very long ago bhs have a race to rescue it and it was not capable of turning that around around. i don't want to ring the bell of failure already but this is no easy road ahead for mike ashley. this will be a really tricky retail turnaround. thank you very much for your thoughts. we can cross to glasgow to speak to our correspondent
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catriona renton. this will be being watched very closely where you are. of course. this is where it all began in 1849. the corner of the street here, argyle street and buchanan street. it is where a small shop called arthur and fraser was set up and thatis arthur and fraser was set up and that is what went on to be what we have here today which is an institution of a department store in glasgow. it is very famous shopping experience are people that come here. it is part of what glasgow call its style mile and there are lots of fashion shops and people come here to do high—end shopping. as well as a lovely browsing experience,. at 11am this morning a crowd of people were waiting to get in. it opens at that time and not at its usual time of 9:30am. i assume staff are being briefed about what
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was happening this morning with the ta ke over was happening this morning with the takeover from sports direct. we heard earlier today that business as usual was going on. certainly staff we re usual was going on. certainly staff were turning up at their normal time for work. the brass plate outside are still being polished. certainly right now it is business as usual. we do not know what the reaction is from staff to what they have been told but we will be spied in that out for you shortly. there is a sense that department stores in the middle of the city is notjust about that piece of real estate but the shops around it as well. absolutely. asl shops around it as well. absolutely. as i was saying this is part of the style mile. there is many shops in this area which are seen to be the shopping experience in the centre of glasgow. people come from all over to see it. glasgow is one of the main shopping centre of the uk outside of london. so of course that house of fraser, which is an
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institution here, my grandmother eustace shop here, it is still an extremely exquisite building and is always worth a look but it has suffered at the hands of online shopping. it did not offer the same online experience that many other retailers have offered. this is very important to the economy of this city and i'm sure staff this morning will have been very interested in what they have had to hear about this takeover. thank you, katrina in glasgow there. we can cross to belfast and speak to our correspondent emma vardy. another significant place there. compared to what we have heard in glasgow, it matters to people in belfast as well. yes, it really does. house of fraser opens here in 2008 and that marks the opening of the victoria square shopping centre as well. that was ten years after
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the good friday agreement when the city was still very much in its rebuilding process. part of the peace process. it was seen as particularly significant that this big department store had come to the city to open along with the opening ofan city to open along with the opening of an indoor shopping centre as well. of course, any threat that the belfast store could be lost would be extremely damaging to the high street here and a big loss to shoppers because it is always a very busy store right at the very heart of the belfast city centre, at the heart of belfast indoor shopping centre here. as we have been hearing in previous weeks and months we knew that some half of the house of fraser stores would be closing, 31 of the 59 stores across the uk, and belfast was not one of them. but perhaps all bets are off now would be takeover from sports direct. we'll have to wait and see what mike ashley's plans might be for the brand. just like other stores across the uk, the belfast store hasjust
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opened its doors this morning at 11am, one and a half hours after it was due to open, presumably so that staff could have some conversations about the news that came out this morning of the administration. that last hour has in the takeover of sports direct announced as well. as i say, the sports direct plans for the house of fraser brand are unclear but it really is a very important part of belfast life. figures released this morning show the uk economy grew by 0.4% between april and june this year. the figures mark an increase in growth after a slump at the beginning of this year — amid the extreme cold weather snap. however the uk's trade deficit has widened — as exports of cars and planes sharply falls. thousands of air passengers across europe are facing disruption as some ryanair pilots and staff stage a 24—hour strike over pay and conditions. around 400 flights — up to 100 of them to and from the uk —
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have been cancelled in the budget airline's biggest ever walk—out. caroline davies reports. it has not been an easy summer holiday for ryanair, winding queues and cancellations blamed on storms and shortages of air traffic control staff. now they face a different sort of turbulence — strikes. some ryanair pilots in five countries will strike from today for 24 hours. it has meant cancellations across europe, nearly 400 of them. the netherlands have avoided any, but there are 22 to and from ireland, 22 in sweden, 104 in belgium, and worst affected, germany, with 250 cancellations. it is the fifth time the pilots have been on strike sincejuly last year. they say they want better pay and fairer contracts, and a change to ryanair‘s practice of moving staff between its bases without much notice.
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ryanair say they have notified all affected customers and most have been put on other ryanair flights. they call the strikes " regrettable and unjustified", and ask the striking unions to continue negotiations instead of more industrial action. the unions say they remain available for talk. caroline davies, bbc news. a nine—year—old girl who died in a rock fall in yorkshire has been named as harriet forster. harriet, who was from in oxford, was killed in an incident on seaton garth beach near whitby on wednesday. in a statement harriet‘s family say she was the "light of our lives". after weeks of hot weather in france torrential downpours have caused flash flooding and flood alerts across the country. thousands of homes are without power. 1,600 people have been evacuated from three campsites in the ardeche and drome regions just north of marseille. 0ne german man in his 70s
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is still missing and a few people have been taken to hospital following the rescue. 0livia crellin reports. roads turned to rivers. rivers have become rapids. this is what it looks like now in some parts of france after a weeks—long heatwave finally gave way to storms. intense rain over the last 48 hours has put central and southern areas of the country on flood alert, while around 17,000 homes are without power. firefighters in the ardeche and drome regions evacuated 1,600 people when campsites like this one turned into mudbaths in the wake of the storms. translation: the first thing i did was put into place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees, adults and children in particular. with teams working in pairs, we first secured people to the trees and then little by little we evacuated them. 0ver100 german children visiting for summer camp
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were among the rescued. police and divers continued to search for an elderly german man who was supervising them. he's missing after the nearby river burst its banks, and the caravan he sought shelter in was swept away in the torrents. after heatwaves and forest fires, these floods are the latest in a series of intense weather conditions to challenge europe this summer. 0livia crellin, bbc news. the united nations has called for an independent investigation into a missile strike in yemen which killed 29 children. the attack hit a bus in the north of the country. the saudi—led coalition said it targeted rebels in the market after they fired a missile at the kingdom on wednesday. the us state department said the coalition should carry out its own assessment. the headlines on bbc news... mike ashley's sports direct steps in as house of fraser goes into administration. figures show the economy grew by 0.4% in the second
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quarter of this year. heavy floods force the evacuation of more than 1,600 people in south—eastern france — one man is missing after being swept away. and in sport england's cricketers have made a great start to the second test match against india, jimmy anderson bowling in the first over. katarina johnson thompson has w011 over. katarina johnson thompson has won the long jump to extend her lead in the heptathlon. there are two elements are still to go today, javelin which is her weakest event and 800 metres this evening. ian poulter and justin rose are three shots off the pace after the opening round of the final golf major of the season, the us—pga championship in missouri.
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leading the way is the american gary wooodland. i'll be back with more on those stories at 11.30am. a conservative peer says he's been sent dozens of abusive emails since he criticised borisjohnson for his comments about women who wear the burqa. lord sheikh, who founded the conservative muslim forum, claims to have received "vile" islamophobic messages after calling for mrjohnson to be sacked on newsnight. the actor rowan atkinson has written to the times in support of the former foreign secretary who is now facing a possible investigation into breaches of the conservative party code of conduct. joining me now from westminster is our political correspondentjess parker. bring us up to date on who has said what. as you are saying the president and founder of the conservative muslim forum has revealed that he received abusive e—mails following what were quite strong words earlier in the week when he said that the whip should be
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withdrawn from boris johnson after his comments likening women who wear the burqa two bank robbers. since that comment he says he has received a number of abusive e—mails. this issue five days on from that article continues to divide and cause a lot of discussion. notjust in the wider public but in the conservative party as well. we know they are looking as to whether there should be an investigation into borisjohnson whether he might have breached the code of conduct. that is in its very early state stages at the moment but a number of mps i have spoken to and think that should happen at all. they think the... ben duncan indeed said that internal party procedures should not be used to shut down debate or mps and their views. is there potential timetable for less? we do not have a
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potential timetable at the moment. the disciplinary process in this case runs over three stages. where in the very first stage and what is happening at the moment is the complaint that have been made to the conservative party of which there have been dozens. people will be invited to give evidence including borisjohnson invited to give evidence including boris johnson himself. invited to give evidence including borisjohnson himself. if the process goes a step further then, an independent panel will be appointed to look at this matter. right at the end of this process it is theoretically possible that somebody can be suspended or expelled from the party but that is a long way off and that is not being talked about at the moment. as far as some people are concerned, at the moment. as far as some people are concerned , one at the moment. as far as some people are concerned, one mp i spoke to this morning, say that if complaints made the party must investigate them. but some saying that this should not be happening. some mps think this is all being done to undermine worse johnson. boris
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johnson says he will not apologise and he was standing up for liberal values. and he was arguing against a full ban, let's not forget, he said that was not the case in the uk as it is in denmark. the government wants every home to be fitted with a smart meter by 2020, but the charity citizen's advice has told the bbc it needs to slow down the roll out and extend the deadline by three years. last year the organisation received 3,000 complaints about the devices, with problems ranging from aggressive sales techniques, and some customers still having to send readings to their energy company. graham satchell reports. when geoff first got his smart metre he was pleased. it allowed him to see how much energy he was using and how much it cost in real—time. but then he switched his supplier and it stopped working. i was shocked, really.
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i had really assumed that these were a one—type model fits all, suits everybody. and there was a state of shock, followed by a slight cynicism, that, oh, dear, our governmentand it are never very good bedfellows. i touch the electric one and we just get nothing. citizens advice told bbc breakfast today they had thousands of complaints about new smart meters. some, like geoff's, do not work if you switch supplier. your meters are in the garage? yes, on both sides. there have also been complaints about aggressive sales practices and poor installation. citizens advice says it supports the principle of smart meters, but only if they work. we are calling on the government to extend the roll—out deadline so the remaining 42 million metres that need to be installed can be done so in the best possible way for customers and in the most cost—effective way. up to 53 million smart meters are meant to be installed
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in every home by 2020, at an estimated cost of £11 billion. smart meters automatically send readings to energy suppliers, putting an end to estimated bills. and because people can more accurately monitor their energy use, the government says they will save us an average of £47 a year by 2030. the government acknowledges there have been problems, but say now is not the time for delay. we are rolling it out as quickly as possible, customers are already saving, and frankly i don't want to do anything that means the energy companies can take their foot off the pedal. because i think this programme is worth a lot, both to british consumers and households but also to the british energy system, and i think we should have an energy system that is fit for the 21st century. i have employed a stool to get myself up a little bit higher to it. the government says by the end of this year, jeff's smart meter should start working again. an upgrade to the network, originally planned for 2015, means that meters will work even if you switch. there's really nothing smart about this.
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jeff isn't holding his breath. for the time being, he's back to taking manual readings and sending them to his new supplier. and coming up after 11:30am — we'll be speaking to robert cheesewright from smart energy gb which promotes understanding of smart meters. britain's business group, the cbi, is calling for a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end to immigration targets — instead the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make a positive contribution to the economy, as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. immigration matters to british industry. the cbi claims that half of all building workers in london are from the eu, british agriculture needs 60,000 seasonalforeign
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farm workers every year, and the nhs has seen a drop of 87% on the number of eu citizens registering as nurses and midwives. that is why the cbi says that immigration has delivered significant economic benefits to the uk. it also knows the free movement of people between the uk and the eu will almost certainly end after brexit. so it is proposing allowing firms to recruit from the eu after brexit, but limiting those who are not studying or without independent means or a job from staying more than three months. eu citizens will also have to register with the authorities, be limited in what in—work benefits they can claim, and companies will have to prioritise the recruitment of british staff in sectors with high levels of unemployment. the cbi also wants to legally guarantee the rights of eu citizens already in the uk. the government says it will announce his plans for post—brexit immigration in due course, and it will be a system that works for all parts of the uk. the deputy director—general
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of the cbi, josh hardie told the bbc there should be a shift of focus to migra nts' contribution to the economy. we understand and accept that freedom of movement will end so we have consulted with nearly hundred and 30,000 businesses across 18 sectors saying, "watch at the model looked like?" in needs to balance openness because the value of workers coming here where we have skill shortages and labour shortages, the value they add to the economy is huge. but at the same time we need control so we can reflect a nd time we need control so we can reflect and build public trust and confidence and help those communities that may feel impacted by immigration to cope with that. joining me now is giles derrington, head of policy for brexit and international and economics at tech uk, the trade body for the uk tech industry. with the cbi putting forward its
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suggestions, where do you stand? we think it is a really good report from the cbi and that they talk about a system with trust in it. one that the public and the industry can trust. tech industry is growing twice as fast as the rest of the economy and a huge amount of that success story is built on people. it's about getting people in from all around the world but particularly the eu. why can't more british people do the jobs you are talking about? we do have domestic skills pipeline need and we are doing an awful lot of work on that but this is about an institution thatis but this is about an institution that is growing faster than anything else and it will need more and more people from all over the world. but particularly needs cutting edge skills in advanced ai and sometimes those skills only exist in very small pockets. we need to make sure that companies that are investing in the uk are getting people they need
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right here, right now. this is changing the language of the debates, isn't it? how much is that been lacking bus far do you think? it has been a slow process. the government committee is due to report in september looking at the evidence. we don't think it is important that the bait is driven by the evidence. there has been a gap at the moment. what the cbi is saying about having people registered and trusting businesses to do some of that registration rather than an overly bureaucratic system but we have the non—eu systems at the moment, is the way to go. so you acknowledge that freedom of movement have to go here because thatis of movement have to go here because that is how people have voted in a referendum? ultimately, the referendum? ultimately, the referendum result is how it was and we think that is right, we need to have a system that people can trust because people do not trust the system then it makes it harder and potentially creates more of a hostile environment which makes it harderfor hostile environment which makes it harder for us hostile environment which makes it
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harderfor us to hostile environment which makes it harder for us to attract the talent here in the first place. how soon do you need clarity? as soon as possible. today only daily! they will have to move quickly to get the clarity they need. for big international investors in the uk tech economy, they need to know that they're going to be able to get talent in three or four or five yea rs' talent in three or four or five years' time and they need to know that pretty sharpish. the day of sunny spell and showers. some of the showers have started to emerge to give a heavy prolonged period of rain. all the time it is moving eastwards, after a spell of heavy rain will see some sunshine. gusty winds at time particularly for the channel coast. some fairly frequent showers and it will feel
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cooler than it has done recently. there will be some late spells of sunshine across many western and central areas. finally there's showers will clear away. most places dry with clear skies and lighter winds. more cloud into the far south—west of england later tonight. it isa south—west of england later tonight. it is a chilly start to the day tomorrow but there will be a good deal of sunshine. cloud building all the work royal across wales and south—west england. further north and east it is mainly dry with hazy sunshine in the afternoon and feeling a little bit warmer tomorrow. goodbye. hello good morning. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... mike ashley's sports direct has struck a deal to rescue house of fraser out of administration for £90 million. ashley paid cash to buy the high street department store chain. some 17,000 staff are being informed that they will be transferred over from house of fraser to sports direct. the economy grew by 0.4% in the second quarter of this year, accord to the office
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for national statistics. —— that's according to the office for national statistics. the organisation reported from between april and june, gdp growth picked up, benefiting from a warm weather boost. 1,600 people had to be rescued from campsites after flash floods hit the south of france. officials say a german man who was helping to supervise children at a summer camps is missing. 400 flights will not take off as planned today because of a strike by ryanair pilots. the walk—out by staff in ireland, germany, sweden, belgium and the netherlands, will affect 75,000 passengers. sport now, here's holly hamilton. good morning, howley. good morning. england's cricketers have made a spectacular start to the second test against india at lord's 24 hours after it was due to begin, play got under way around half an hour ago — and jimmy anderson bowled murali vijay in the first over,
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without a run on the board. england won the toss and their decision to put india into bat looks to have been a good one. the tourists are now 10—1. katerina johnson—thompson has extended her lead in the heptathlon at the european championships in berlin. she's in a real battle with the world and olympic champion naffi thiam, but she won the long jump, to pull further away, with two events remaining. and she'll be relying on that advantage later, in the javelin, which is her weakest event. the heptathlon concludes tonight with the 800—metres at 8:20pm. and you can watch it live on bbc two. the medals kept coming for great britain on the final day of swimming in glasgow, as ben proud won his first european title with gold in the men's 50m freestyle. in the end there was just a fraction in it — a tenth of a second in fact. but it was enough to hold off greek kristian golomeev,
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who was closing in the final metres. and the swimming came to a climax with another gold for adam peaty — his fourth at these championships. he won the medley relay along with nicholas pyle, james guy and duncan scott. peaty praised a new generation of "fearless" swimmers in the great britain team with a lot of extremely promising teenagers in the squad. among the medal hopes for great britain today are jack laugher and chris mears, in the men s synchro 3m springboard final. the pair are the reigning 0lympic champions and they successfully defended their commonwealth title in april so they're in good shape, and laugher has already won two gold medals at these championships. the final starts at 1.30pm, and you can follow it across the bbc. there was a late burst of activity on transfer deadline day but nothing came close to the excitement of santi cazorla's presentation at villareal. take a look. the ex—arsenal player's return to the spanish club was marked by an extravagant magic trick
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on the pitch, as shown on their tv channel. cazorla came through the youth ranks at villareal and said he felt he was home — although presumably we can expect a rather more conventional entrance on match days. manchester united manager jose mourinho wasn't happy that they didn't manage any more signings in the transfer window, but it's closed, now it's time for action and united welcome leicester city to old trafford tonight in the first premier league game of the season. and after conceding that he'll have to work with the squad he's got, mourinho says the fans willjust have to be patient. i think by the end of november, december, you will see why, by then, which teams are in a position to win the premier league. in this moment, words are not important. let's play football and by the end of november, december, you don't need words. you will see which teams are candidates. golf now.
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the american gary woodland is the surprise leader after the opening round of the uspga championship — the last golf major of the season. but there are some well—placed britons in the field — justin rose and ian poulter are in a large group, three shots off the pace, after rounds of 67. johanna konta is out of the canadian 0pen in montreal after a busy day. she completed victory over victoria azarenka in a match delayed overnight because of rain. but she then lost in straight sets to the defending champion elina svitolina. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. 0k, holly, thank you very much indeed. 0k, holly, thank you very much indeed. there are calls for the deadline for installing smart metres to be extended. the devices are designed to replace traditional gas and electricty metres and the government wants 53 million of them installed by 2020. but citizens advice says it's received 3000 complaints and wants the roll—out extended for another three years. some customers say their metres have
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stopped working completely. the government says its committed to the current timetable. robert cheesewright is from smart energy gb which promotes the understanding of smart meters welcome. good morning. we have two exa m ples welcome. good morning. we have two examples on the desk here between us. give us a sense of what we're talking about and how they work?m our homes at the moment, we have metres and they are hidden under the stairs. to get to them, we have to crawl under the stairs get all the stuff from out of the cupboard and all of that stuff. the alternative is we get estimated bill which means we can run in debt, which is disastrous. 0r we can run in debt, which is disastrous. or we can beat a situation where the suppliers have some of our money. what smart metres do is they communicate directly the supplier. it means we are no longer in that situation of owing extra money. when we all get off of these.
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this will put you in control of your energy use and it shows you in pounds and pence how much you are using. it shows you the history also how much he views last week, last month, last year. you get to come to grips with your energy. it's not in kilowatts which i don't understand. it is in pounds. in theory everyone wins because the companies are more in conversation with the consumer and vice versa and the consumer can understand that more easily than he or she can when you get something online or in the post that does not talk to you in the language that you referred to these things by. exactly. what we're seeing is that it is working. people who have smart metres are saying that they are lowering their energy. three quarters of people recommend them to family and friends. that is a really high bar codes we don't tend to recommend many things. 0n high bar codes we don't tend to recommend many things. on top of that, they are the basis for a smart
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grid. we now have to bring on board lots of new generation vehicles and we need infrastructure that can cope with that. if we have a system that is not digital, we are locked into a dirty, more expensive, bad for that climate future. it is crucial for infrastructure as well.|j climate future. it is crucial for infrastructure as well. i understand what you say about the vast majority ofan what you say about the vast majority of an approval rates in all of that. there are problems. what do they tend to be with mac the vast majority have a good experience. its technology and technology does not a lwa ys technology and technology does not always behave. that is frustrating. the biggest thing is that some people say when you switch the metres... with the traditional mode? it means they stopped communicating with the supplier. they start acting like your traditional metre. it is annoying. you had something good and then you lost it. however there is
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good news. you can still switch. there's no barrier. all of them are going to be upgraded into a national infrastructure. this is a temporary problem. anyone at home with their metres not working as they hoped, their solution is coming and they will be ok. their solution is coming and they will be 0k. 0k, thank you for coming in and bringing your profs with you. robert with those smart metre issues. the slovenian—born parents of the us first lady, melania trump, have become us citizens. viktor and amalija knavs took part in a naturalisation ceremony in new york yesterday. the pair are likely to have became citizens under a process known as chain migration that has been heavily criticised by the president. us vice president mike pence has laid out plans to create a sixth branch of the military, a so—called space force. he suggested russian and chinese threats justify the military expansion and he promised that a space force department would be ready by 2020.
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the white house is asking the public to vote for a logo and they'll be asking congress for about billion dollars to fund the project. now the time has come to write the next great chapter of our armed forces. the new chapter where americo's gratis will be called to defend the next threats to our people and our nation. the time has come to establish the united states space force. setting up this military branch would not be without its challenges... 0ur correspondent in washington chris buckler explains. there is a little bit of concern about just how this there is a little bit of concern aboutjust how this would work in terms of bureaucracy. how this would be sliced up. they have monies to getjames be sliced up. they have monies to get james madison on be sliced up. they have monies to getjames madison on board, he was somewhat cynical not that long ago and now he says that he sees the
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merit in it. certainly, the argument is that you have to have a dedicated organisation that is looking at this. you have to have a space command which they are looking to set up in order to address these problems going forward. certainly, they were saying if you take a look at the technology developed by other countries, in the next few years, thatis countries, in the next few years, that is going to become very important. donald trump seems very committed to this. his action campaign has already got new space force logos which they are asking people to vote on. he might get the logo and the space force. that was chris buckley there in washington. a new app is to offer rewards for families for talking to each other around the dinner table rather than checking their screens. the idea was originally designed to help students study. this comes as facebook and instagram release a new tool to limit how much catrin nye has been looking at the rise of anti—tech, tech. can i ask you both how much
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you check your phone? recently. every day. every hour. quite often. every hour. too much! it is quite bad. at least every 20 minutes. every couple of hours. i am always on it, now i have got a phone call! there are now loads of apps to get you off your phone. 0ne called mute tracks your screen time, space helps you set goals to use it less, and moment is its daily limit on your use and will even send you a barrage of messages if you are on it too much. and one called forest grows you a tree as long as you are not browsing. it is of course, very debatable whether tech companies are the ones who should it helping us to spend less time on tech. facebook and instagram are releasing their own time limit tools. an app called hold was created in the uk, created by three students in copenhagen.
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why was it that you wanted to start this? we were struggling so much about actually focusing, we checked our phones all the time and we started to give ourselves incentives. the ones that checked their phones last get a coffee and that has worked for us. it allows you to start a timer to put your phone on hold, which means you cannot get on other apps. the idea is you are putting in the phone to one side, it then gets locked, having the screen can be a distraction, but it can be to one side and the idea is to say i am going to be productive now. once you have done 20 minutes on hold you start earning rewards, things like cheap cinema tickets, free drinks, donations to charity. this app is still doing advertising, it allows brands to market their products to users, but as rewards. it doesn't work overnight and is currentlyjust for students.
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like clara, a masters student at the london school of economics. she says the distraction of phones is a problem or her whole family. i have voiced my unhappiness to my parents before. about them using the phones? yeah. because i really think that it does compromise the quality of the interactions you have and the depth of interactions you have with family members or friends at the dinner table, for instance. the creators of hold are now making a version for families to use together. they say they have had tens of thousands of people get in touch because phones are disturbing their dinner time too. catrin nye, bbc news. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... mike ashley's sports direct steps in as house of fraser goes into administration.
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figures show the economy grew by 0.4% in the second quarter of this year. heavy floods force the evacuation of more than 1,600 people in southeastern france. one man is missing after being swept away. hello. i'm ben thompson in the business news. sports direct has bought house of fraser for £90 million. the deal comes after the department store chain called in the administrators this morning. there are few details at this stage about sports directs plans for house of fraser, but it will take over the 59 stores, its brand and entire stock. the summer heatwave and england's world cup run help the uk economy grow by 0.4% in the second quarter. there was also a boost from strongerfigures in construction and services. those gdp numbers have had little effect on sterling, which has fallen below 1.28 against the dollar for the first time in more than year,
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as those doubts over a no—deal on brexit keep investors concerned. and more turbulence at ryanair, after it's pilots walk out across five european countries. the airline has cancelled 400 flights and around 50,000 passengers are likely to be affected. let's get more on the news that has been breaking this morning. mike ashley's sports direct is to buy the ailing department store chain house of fraser. here are the details we know so far... sports direct will pay £90 million for house of fraser. sports direct already owned 11% of the retailer, but will now take full control. that means it will take over all 59 stores, all stock and the brand name. joining us now is laith khalaf, who's the senior analyst, hargreaves lansdown. nice to see you. look, this is sort
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of changing over the course of the morning. it was an administration. still now big questions about what mike ashley will do with house of fraser. yes, a lot has happened. you are right, we need to hold our horses a little bit about what this means for house of fraser. 0n the face of it, mike ashley is able to continue with the brand if he wants. we have no clear official statement from sports direct as to what they plan to do. they scooped up the assets. he's got all of them and now it is about what he's going to do with that. it has been an interesting couple of weeks, a few yea rs. interesting couple of weeks, a few years. house of fraser thought they had a buyer two weeks ago that would come in, chinese firm, that was going to invest some money and safeguard its future. that deal fell through and it put them in a perilous position. yes, as you said, that was about two weeks ago and they were saying yesterday they were
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trying to put together a rescue deal. this morning it fell into administration and then an hour later mike ashley said he is going to buy them. that is a microcosm of the last ten years for them. 0wnership the last ten years for them. ownership and management changes. it has lacked a clear sense of direction which is why it is in such decline. their flagship was marked for closure in the previous round of cuts. no indication yet of course, which stores may stay open. whether mike ashley will close some, cherry pick the good ones. so much concern for the 17,000 staff. absolutely and legitimately so. hopefully we will get some response from sports direct on that later in the day. as you said 59 of those stores, we don't know how much of that is going to stay open. for instance, mike ashley holds stakes in a lot of retailers.
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he owns 30% of debenhams as well through sports direct. the question is what is the overall strategy. it is what is the overall strategy. it is one that the investors of sports direct have been asking for some time because the main business is doing relatively well in a challenging atmosphere, but recently had to take a big profit rundown because of its stake in debenhams. hopefully a bit more clarity later on today. enqueue very much. our retail correspondent is staying right across that as well she is trying to get the answers and we will bring that to you as soon as we get them. but let's move on. the summer heatwave and stronger perfomances by the construction and services sectors helped boost the uk economy in three months to june. according to the office for national statistics, the uk economy expanded by 0.4% in the second quarter. during that period, the service sector grew 0.5%. that is an important sector. the construction sector also showed signs of growth, growing by 0.9%. however, industrial production fell
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0.8% during the quarter. it felt pretty sharply. —— it fell pretty sharply. —— it fell pretty sharply. joining me now is sylvia dall‘angelo, senior economist at hermes investment management. what do you make of this first reading. sylvia, i'm not sure if you are able to hear me. i'm going to try again. hi, what do you make of those figures is smacked the update that we've had about the gdp? i think that tells us all we need to know. she cannot hear us, she can hear a buzz and that is not me. we will try to get back to her later. let us run you through a few of the other stories that are happening. that are happening. the confederation of british industry says net migration targets should be scrapped after brexit. the business group claims, "targets should be replaced with a system that ensures people coming to the uk make a positive contribution to the economy'"
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however, the home office said it had no plans to scrap immigration targets. the deadline for installing smart metres across the uk should be extended for another three years according to citizens advice. up to 53 million smart metres — designed to replace traditional gas and electricity metres — are due to be installed in 30 million homes and businesses by the end of 2020. but citizens advice said it would be "more realistic" to aim for 2023. the turkish lira has fallen sharply against the us dollar today because of concerns over the country's high debt levels. the currency, which has fallen 40% so far this year, was down as much as 12% at one point today. it's also contending with soaring inflation with prices of every day items rising sharply by about 15% a year. and new zealand has become the latest country to ban the use of single plastic shopping bags.
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—— single use plastic shopping bags. currently, around 750 million plastic shopping bags are used across the country each year. that's roughly 150 bags per person. a complete ban in new zealand. let's ta ke a complete ban in new zealand. let's take you back to sylvia because i think she can hear us now. nice to hear you —— nice to see you and i hope you can hear us now. i wonder what you make of the figures. gdp growth bounce back in the second quarter after a very sluggish performance earlier this year. gdp growth came in at 0.4% on the quarter which is double the growth rate that was recorded for the first three months of 2018. overall, it is still fairly a sluggish performance. but this is probably as good as it gets. going forward, we will probably see singular growth rates
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for the coming quarters of 0.4. still consistent with this new normal of lower potential growth. how much can we read into these figures? ultimately there are so many things changing right now. trade wars between eq and the us and russia. there's also brexit to contend with. a lot of firms say they're unsure contend with. a lot of firms say they‘ re unsure about contend with. a lot of firms say they're unsure about what happens next. can we read too much about what these numbers tell us about the economy? well, i agree with you that at the moment there is an unusual degree of uncertainty surrounding the economy, but for the uk, there is genetic story with the brexit uncertainty. and no clarity about where the negotiations are heading. 0n where the negotiations are heading. on top of this, we have political uncertainty in europe. we see budget
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negotiations with italy and other countries starting in september. and more generally, we have a bigger issue of production extensions rising and rattling the international economy. i agree the baseline going forward is that the uk economy will continue to grow around .3, .4%. but there is an unusual degree of uncertainty. very good to talk to you thank you. thank you for bearing with us while we plugged in all the wires to be able to speak to you. a quick look at the numbers. they are looking at that gdp figure. a macroeconomics as well. also turkey with the high debt levels soaring in turkey. they could
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have a similar situation as to the greek debt crisis. so the markets are all offa greek debt crisis. so the markets are all off a little bit. the ftse 100 down as you can see. you are up—to—date. we will see you later. ben, thank you very much indeed. spice was once a so—called legal high, but it's been illegal since 2016. that hasn't stopped the spread of it's use — especially among the homeless and the sight of people in a trance after taking it has become increasingly common in towns and cities. abbiejones has been looking at schemes to help spice users in manchester. 11amin 11am in the 11 a m in the centre of manchester and two women are lying, apparently high on drugs, in a pub doorway. these guys are definitely on spice. ican these guys are definitely on spice. i can see. being out on the streets working every day. these two men run a outreach for homeless. and they know the signs for people having
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taken spice. how many times you take it? five or six times a day. five or six times a day? . greater manchester believes is the only place in the uk that contest spice in15 place in the uk that contest spice in 15 minutes. it takes us 15 minutes to get information out there. what about prevention. operations are ongoing at the moment. it is notjust the street dealers those of the ones who are approaching people selling on matters of drug. these other people we re matters of drug. these other people were actually manufacturing the drugs. they're the ones who are bringing the street. manchester city is doing what they can to get drugs off of the street. using criminal
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behaviour orders to stop begging. fourteen years since the sit—com friends ended, it's the most popular show for streaming in the uk. figures published by the industry watchdog 0fcom reveal that the us sitcom is the most popular show to stream in the uk, more popular than newer shows, such as the crown and stranger things. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins. hello there. very much a day of sunshine and showers. there are a good bit of sunshine around. particularly in the eastern coast. like yorkshire here. a very good example. however, in between we have got a lot of showers. they are merging to give a more prolonged heavier rain. this is what happens over the coming hours. heavier spells of rain across parts of wales, northern england. gradually transforming their way to the ease.
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brighter skies are behind. some sunshine to end the day. it's a gusty breeze. it could get 35 or 40 miles an hour. combination of the gusty brisk breeze means temperatures won't get very high. 19 or 20 celsius. it should be a fine evening for most of the country. the showers will clear away from eastern counties and we are left with a dry night, lighter winds, no counties and we are left with a dry night, lighterwinds, no more counties and we are left with a dry night, lighter winds, no more clouds arriving. temperatures here up to 12 or 13. single figures for many. it isa or 13. single figures for many. it is a chilly start to the day on saturday, ahead of this front. it will be coming towards the east over the weekend. increasing the cloud and bringing rain. actually, for many to start today, dry and lots of sunshine. cloud will be building across southwest england, wales and north east england. the sunshine is
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a little hazy through the afternoon as the cloud builds. 19 to 23 celsius. typically 15 or 16 for the far north of scotland. rain will continue to the north. 0vernight and tomorrow evening. moving into parts of northern england. sunday looks very messy. there's an area of low pressure here. it will continue on to the east. there will be some rain around it will clear for northern ireland. maybe not getting all the way up to the far north of scotland. a bit of hit and miss with the rainfall on sunday. it will be warmer. more she made. temperatures up warmer. more she made. temperatures up to 23, maybe 24. we will keep the warmth and humanity into the early pa rt warmth and humanity into the early part of next week. still some showers around on monday, but
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turning a little bit quieter through the week. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm julian worricker. these are the top stories developing at midday... mike ashley's sports direct steps in as house of fraser goes into administration. he's struck a deal worth £90 million pounds to rescue parts of the department store chain. iam in i am in glasgow where it all began almost 170 years ago. sad and shoppers have been learning about this morning's takeover. figures show the economy grew by 0.4% in the second quarter of this year. we are pleased to see a recovery of the economy in the second quarter, a robust growth figure that points to the underlying fundamental strength of the british economy. also this our... a german man is missing following flash floods in the south of france. 1,600 people had to be rescued from campsites following the extreme weather.
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ryanair pilots have gone on strike in five european countries, forcing the cancellation of hundreds of flights. still there for you — it's been 14 years since friends ended — but the us sitcom has topped a list of the uk's most—watched streaming shows. good afternoon. it's friday the 10th of august. welcome to bbc newsroom live. mike ashley, owner of sports direct has struck a £90 million deal to rescue house of fraser. earlier the department store had called in the administrators, but now sports direct has acquired all of the uk stores and stock in the business. prior to its collapse, mike ashley had held an 11% stake in the department store chain. there are reports that some
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of the stores will become sports direct outlets and others will be rebranded under the luxury fashion store, flannels, also owned by mike ashley. house of fraser employs 17,500 people. of these, 11,500 work for concessions for other brands within the stores and there are 59 stores across the uk. this morning, stores opened late, after delaying to hear what was going on. in a moment we will talk to emma vardy who's at a house of fraser store in belfast. first, to catriona renton, who's outside the founding house of fraser store in glasgow. what is the mood there, katrina? here we are. this is where it all began almost 170 years ago. it was actually just crossed the began almost 170 years ago. it was actuallyjust crossed the road there that arthur and fraser was set up in 1849. a small drapery shop which of course then grew and grew into what
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we know today as house of fraser. that actual building has been in use since the 1950s. this morning when i had been talking to people outside the shop they have been telling me about that in the star—ledger and memories of fraser's over the years and have they hope it will continue to carry on as a department store as it is an institution. we understand that the shops opened late today because staff are being briefed this morning about the £90 million ta keover morning about the £90 million takeover by sports direct. where yet to get reaction from staff about how they're feeling about that but i'm sure there will be much talk about that inside the today. fraser's in scotla nd that inside the today. fraser's in scotland has four outlets, the flagship one here, one in edinburgh thatis flagship one here, one in edinburgh that is due to close, another institution in edinburgh that was taken over institution in edinburgh that was ta ken over by institution in edinburgh that was taken over by fraser ‘s several yea rs taken over by fraser ‘s several years ago. this is a big business in scotla nd years ago. this is a big business in scotland and of course it affects
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many scotland and of course it affects ma ny staff scotland and of course it affects many staff and people that work in the concessions. the criticism has been that things like the internet, house of fraser just been that things like the internet, house of fraserjust hasn't managed to embrace that in the way that some other retailers have. certainly a feeling of trepidation and wondering what is going to happen next here with the store in glasgow. thank you. let's go to emma vardy in belfast. what is the picture there? the house of fraser store is particularly important landmark store here in belfast. it was opened ten yea rs store here in belfast. it was opened ten years ago in 2008 and it was great fa nfa re ten years ago in 2008 and it was great fanfare when this store opens because it was also the launch of belfast‘s brand—new indoor shopping centre. that was in the ten years after the good friday agreement when belfast as a city was rebuilding and the peace process was developing importantly during that time. when big—name brands began to be
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attracted to belfast, it was seen as attracted to belfast, it was seen as a turning point. the way that the city was moving on from the conflicts of the past. people we have been speaking to this morning remember that very clearly and say that any uncertainty over the future of house of fraser here is a real problem for the city centre because it is such an integral part of the big indoor shopping centre here for sub as we had previously it was already announced that half of house of fraser stores across the uk were to close, some 3951 stores. belfast was not one of them to the delight of many shoppers that go to shop there. —— 39 of 51 stores. there is some speculation that some staff may be moved over to sports direct. it is unclear how staff feel about that but shoppers we have been speaking to in town to say it is important belfast to have this house of fraser store so it needs to be done, was
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the general feeling this morning. store so it needs to be done, was the generalfeeling this morning. so lots of fond memories of house of fraser coming to belfast particularly because of the context of belfast‘s history and it was seen asa sign of belfast‘s history and it was seen as a sign that the city was moving forward. 0nce as a sign that the city was moving forward. once upon a time, in the height of the troubles belfast city centre was a dangerous place to be. with the introduction of house of fraser and other big brands, it was seen as that peace process taking shape and ten years on there is great uncertainty about what it might mean for the future. thank you very much for the time being. the impact of those business developer and is in glasgow and belfast, surrounding house of fraser today. figures released this morning show the uk economy grew by 0.4% between april and june this year. the figures mark an increase in growth after a slump at the beginning of this year — amid the extreme cold weather snap. however, the uk's trade deficit has widened — as exports of cars and planes sharply falls. the chancellor phillip hammond gave us his reaction
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to the latest statistics on the economy. we are pleased to see a recovery of the economy in the second quarter, robust growth figure that points to the underlying fundamental strengths of the british economy. we are not complacent. we are here today for me to announce nearly £1 billion of new investment in high—tech manufacturing and research to ensure that british businesses remain cutting—edge. across the world we have seen trend rates of growth lower since the financial crisis and we have two invest in our productivity in order to restore economic growth rates so we can see growth rates a re economic growth rates so we can see growth rates are rising sustainably in the future. that is why we have to keep investing in our economy, our infrastructure, our skills and our infrastructure, our skills and our businesses. that is why we are making the announcement is that i am today of this huge additional
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investment into technology. 0bviously investment into technology. obviously we want economic growth to be higher and we could do that by investing skills in infrastructure, in technology. there is no alternative but to keep investing in our economy, improve our performance and deliver the sustainably higher wages that we want to see in this country. philip hammond on those latest gdp figures. a conservative peer says he's been sent dozens of abusive emails since he criticised borisjohnson for his comments about women who wear the burqa. lord sheikh, who founded the conservative muslim forum, claims to have received "vile" islamophobic messages after calling for mrjohnson to be sacked on newsnight. the actor rowan atkinson has written to the times in support of the former foreign secretary who is now facing a possible investigation into breaches of the conservative party code of conduct. joining me now from westminster is our political correspondentjess parker. another day and some more observations on either side of the
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borisjohnson debate. observations on either side of the boris johnson debate. this article written by borisjohnson where he describes women who wear the full race vale comparing them to letterboxes and bank robbers in their appearance. five days on it is still causing controversy. lord sheikh, a senior conservative peer and president and founder of the conservative muslim forum, was quite outspoken during the week saying that the party whip should be withdrawn. and he revealed last night on newsnight that he has received dozens of e—mails some of which are abusive and offensive and islamophobic as well. this really does continue to divide opinion. as you say, rowan atkinson has intervened defending iris johnson, the former foreign secretary. —— defending borisjohnson. the former foreign secretary. —— defending boris johnson. there the former foreign secretary. —— defending borisjohnson. there has been no suggestion that he will
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apologise any time soon and he has said he was standing up for liberal values. it is worth remembering that he was arguing against any kind of bad of the burqa in public prices as happened in denmark. there have been a number of complaints made to the conservative party. they are looking at those complaints and whether they need to investigate further. philip hammond has been asked about the celebrity remained tight—lipped. hammond has been asked about the celebrity remained tight-lipped. we have a process within the conservative party for dealing with concerns and complaints that arise about members of our party. that process is now engaged and under way andl process is now engaged and under way and i will not send you more about that issue. 0n the idea of investigating further, is there some sort of timetable in place or plan? we haven't been given a timetable yet. this procedure starts off with the complaints and we understand there
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are dozens of them, they will be examined and those who have made the complaints will be invited to give further evidence. and the respondent borisjohnson will be invited to give evidence as well. is it seems that there is some merit in these complaints that he has breached the code of conduct, our panel will be appointed, one of those panel needs to be independent in some way. the 19 22 committee also has to be on the panel. it is a three stage process and it can in theory leads to someone being expelled from the party but we are a long way from that at the moment. we're just looking at the initial stages of the procedure and it has divided opinion somewhat in the conservative party. some mps think the matter should be dropped including iain duncan smith. he thinks there should be internal party processes and they shouldn't be used for shutting down mp's
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views. 0thers be used for shutting down mp's views. others think that they have no choice but to examine these complaints. after weeks of hot weather in france torrential downpours have caused flash flooding and flood alerts across the country. thousands of homes are without power. 1,600 people have been evacuated from three campsites in the ardeche and drome regions just north of marseille. 0ne german man in his 70s is still missing and a few people have been taken to hospital following the rescue. 0livia crellin reports. roads turned to rivers. rivers have become rapids. this is what it looks like now in some parts of france after a weeks—long heatwave finally gave way to storms. intense rain over the last 48 hours has put central and southern areas of the country on flood alert, while around 17,000 homes are without power. firefighters in the ardeche and drome regions evacuated 1,600 people when campsites like this one turned into mudbaths
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in the wake of the storms. translation: the first thing i did was put into place a plan to quickly identify where people were clinging to trees, adults and children in particular. with teams working in pairs, we first secured people to the trees and then little by little we evacuated them. 0ver100 german children visiting for summer camp were among the rescued. police and divers continued to search for an elderly german man who was supervising them. he's missing after the nearby river burst its banks, and the caravan he sought shelter in was swept away in the torrents. after heatwaves and forest fires, these floods are the latest in a series of intense weather conditions to challenge europe this summer. 0livia crellin, bbc news. a nine—year—old girl who died in a rock fall in yorkshire has been named as harriet forster. harriet, who was from oxford, was killed in an incident
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on seaton garth beach near whitby on wednesday. in a statement harriet‘s family say she was the "light of our lives". the headlines on bbc news... mike ashley's sports direct steps in as house of fraser goes into administration. figures show the economy grew by 0.4% in the second quarter of this year. heavy floods force the evacuation of more than sixteen hundred people in south—eastern france — one man is missing after being swept away. time to catch up with the sports news now with chris mitchell. good afternoon. england's cricketers have made a spectacular start to the second test against india at lord's 24 hours after it was due to begin, play evetually and jimmy anderson has teken two early wickets...
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murali vijay in the first over and kl rahul. england won the toss and their decision to put india into bat looks to have been a good one. the tourists are now 11—2... although the rain has returned and play is currently suspended. katerina johnson—thompson has extended her lead in the heptathlon at the european championships in berlin. but she's in a real battle with the world and olympic champion naffi thiam. johnson—thompson won the long jump, to pullahead, with two events remaining. that advantage key though because it's the javelin next — her weakest event. the heptathlon finishes tonight with the 800—metres at 8:20pm — and you can watch it live on bbc 2. laura muir won her 1500—metres heat to make it through to sunday's final with ease. after an achilles injury put paid to her chances of competing in the 800m, this is muir's sole shot at a european title. fellow briton laura weightman willjoin her afterfinishing second in the other heat.
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there was a late burst of activity on transfer deadline day but nothing came close to the excitement of santi cazorla's presentation at villareal. the ex—arsenal player's return to the club was marked by an extravagant magic trick on the pitch, as shown on their tv channel. cazorla came through the youth ranks at villareal and said he felt he was home — although presumably we can expect a rather more conventional entrance on match days. the american gary woodland is the surprise leader after the opening round of the uspga championship — the last golf major of the season. but there are some well—placed britons in the field — justin rose and ian poulter are in a large group, three shots off the pace, after rounds of 67. johanna konta is out of the canadian open in montreal. she completed victory over victoria azarenka in a match delayed
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overnight because of rain. but she then lost in straight sets to the defending champion elina svitolina. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the england cricketer ben stokes continues to give evidence at his trial in bristol today. the all—rounder is accused of affray after a fight outside a nightclub last year. he's pleading not guilty. let's go now to our correspondent andy moore, who's live outside bristol crown court. what has been heard so far today? ben stokes admits being involved in the fight but he says he was acting in self defence and to protect two 93v in self defence and to protect two gay men who were being homophobic lee abused. he was tested and challenged today by the prosecution under cross—examination. he and the
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jury under cross—examination. he and the jury was shown a still image of one of the men, mr ali, lying unconscious on the ground. mr stokes was asked can you not remember hitting a man with such force that you knocked him unconscious? mr stokes said he could not remember the details, he simply remembered that the man was a threat in some way. the jury was shown cctv evidence of what happens on that night and the prosecution says that mr stokes flicked a cigarette but in the face of one of these gay men and mr stokes looked at that video and says i made a motion of some sort but i'm not sure what was happening, that he can't remember flicking the cigarette but. he was asked why he could not remember and he admitted that he was not unconscious. he was asked about his drinking and by his own admission he said he had at least ten drinks, several beers and vodka over the course of the evening. he also said he might have
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had several yager bombs in addition to that but said he was not drunk in that time of this incident. finally he was asked about the nasty homophobic abuse that he claimed these two men were getting. he was asked what was actually said and some of the words that we use. he said he simply could not remember. the trial is continuing today. both mr stokes and his co—accused mr ali deny affray. the trial is expected to come to an end sometime next week. thousands of air passengers across europe are suffering disruption as some ryanair pilots and staff stage a 24—hour strike over pay and conditions. around 400 flights — up to 100 of them to and from the uk — have been cancelled in the budget airline's biggest ever walk—out. caroline davies reports. it has not been an easy summer holiday for ryanair, winding queues and cancellations blamed on storms and shortages
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of air traffic control staff. now they face a different sort of turbulence — strikes. some ryanair pilots in five countries will strike from today for 24 hours. it has meant cancellations across europe, nearly 400 of them. the netherlands have avoided any, but there are 22 to and from ireland, 22 in sweden, 104 in belgium, and worst affected, germany, with 250 cancellations. it is the fifth time the pilots have been on strike sincejuly last year. they say they want better pay and fairer contracts, and a change to ryanair‘s practice of moving staff between its bases without much notice. ryanair say they have notified all affected customers and most have been put on other ryanair flights. they call the strikes " regrettable and unjustified", and ask the striking unions to continue negotiations instead of more industrial action.
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the unions say they remain available for talk. caroline davies, bbc news. 0ur europe reporter, gavin lee is in brussels — and has been following the story for us. it is interesting because there are different reasons for different countries. the irish staff it is about basic transfers, they could go to any of 18 destinations across europe and the thousands of miles away from their family. what they are saying is that sometimes pilots are saying is that sometimes pilots are therefore months, instead of five days on and five days. in the 02 they say it is not like that. if you are more senior or more experienced you can decide on a monday morning whether or not you have to go to madrid or closer to your home base. germany decided to join two days ago and those 250
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flights cancelled is due to the demand for new —— more pay. dozens of ryanair demand for new —— more pay. dozens of rya nair staff in demand for new —— more pay. dozens of ryanair staff in belgium as well. staff in the netherlands as well although we are told there are no cancellations. in sweden are up to 20 flights cancelled, that is about having the right to have conditions in the country that sets the law, rather than being stuck with conditions of irish legislation. ryanairsaid it is conditions of irish legislation. ryanair said it is unacceptable, they are some of the best paid staff of any they are some of the best paid staff ofany airline. they are some of the best paid staff of any airline. the reality is that whilst we're not seeing many people coming to european airports, i've heard stories of people planning big trips being cancelled because they we re trips being cancelled because they were notified too late and could not block anything else. ryanair are saying that their policy is to try and find other flights and try to refu nd and find other flights and try to refund people who cannot make that
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flights. there will be compensation. different countries have different policies. the uk advice is to go to ryanairand speakto policies. the uk advice is to go to ryanair and speak to the staff themselves, if not go to your insurer and follow it up with consumer advice agents. a lot of people will be in line for big condensation. britain's business group, the cbi, is calling for a new post brexit immigration system, to ensure that the british economy can still attract the workers from the eu that it needs. the proposals call for an end to immigration targets — instead the new system would be designed to ensure that people coming to the uk make a positive contribution to the economy, as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. immigration matters to british industry. the cbi claims that half of all building workers in london are from the eu, british agriculture needs 60,000 seasonal foreign farm workers every year, and the nhs has seen a drop of 87% on the number of eu citizens registering as nurses and midwives. that is why the cbi says that immigration has delivered
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significant economic benefits to the uk. it also knows the free movement of people between the uk and the eu will almost certainly end after brexit. so it is proposing allowing firms to recruit from the eu after brexit, but limiting those who are not studying or without independent means or a job from staying more than three months. eu citizens will also have to register with the authorities, be limited in what in—work benefits they can claim, and companies will have to prioritise the recruitment of british staff in sectors with high levels of unemployment. the cbi also wants to legally guarantee the rights of eu citizens already in the uk. the government says it will announce his plans for post—brexit immigration in due course, and it will be a system that works for all parts of the uk. the deputy director—general of the cbi, josh hardie told the bbc there should be a shift of focus to migra nts' contribution to the economy. we understand that freedom of
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movement to end. we have contacted thousands of businesses across different sectors asking what the model should look out. it needs to balance openness because the value of workers coming here where we have skills and labour shortages, the value added to our economy is huge but at the same time we need to control. we need to be able to reflect a nd control. we need to be able to reflect and build public trust and confidence. and help those communities that may feel impacted by immigration to cope with that. spice was once a so—called legal high, but it's been illegal since 2016. that hasn't stopped the spread of it's use — especially among the homeless — and the sight of people in a trance after taking it has become increasingly common in towns and cities. abbiejones has been looking at schemes to help spice users in manchester. 11am in the centre of manchester and two women are lying apparently high on drugs in a pub doorway. these guys are definitely on spice.
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i can see it, being on the streets, working here every day. damian and his boss mick run a homeless outreach projects. they know the addicts and the dealers, and the tell—tale signs somebody has taken spice. how often have you taken it? five, six times a day. five or six times a day, you're taking spice? testament to the growing problem, greater manchester police is now the only force in the uk to have a state—of—the—art machine that can test for spice in 15 minutes. it used to take six weeks. developed with manchester metropolitan university, the machine is so new it is not even patented. it gets us the ability withing 20 minutes, half an hour, to get information at the paramedics and ourselves on the front line. what about prevention? there are operations going on at the moment, and we're looking at all levels of criminality, not just the street dealers. those are the ones approaching persons and selling all manners of drugs, but these are the ones
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actually manufacturing and bringing this evil drug onto the streets. manchester city council says it is carrying out extensive outreach work to get people off spice, increasing supported accommodation and using several injunctions and criminal behaviour orders to stop begging. abbie jones, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. the weather is very changeable today. some of us have blue skies. in other parts of the country it is pouring. it does feel like summer has come to an end but it certainly hasn't but it is very mixed. this story applies to the weekend. it won't be pouring all the time today. showers are crossing central and southern areas now but by the time and get to the evening, you can see the showers are out of the way. later this evening and into tonight
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the skies will clear and it will be plenty of stars out. it will be a chilly night, most major towns and cities into single figures. even in london, barely double figures. tomorrow starts of sunny but it will be chilly. many eastern and northern areas tomorrow will hang on to the sunshine for much of the day but in the south—west and the west clowns will increase in the afternoon and we are expecting some rain in wales and the west country. it looks like sunday is pretty mixed as well. hello, good afternoon. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... mike ashley's sports direct has struck a deal to rescue house of fraser out of administration for £90 million. ashley paid cash to buy the high street department store chain. the economy grew by 0.4% in the second quarter of this year, according to the office for national statistics. the organisation reported from between april and june, gdp growth picked up, benefiting from a warm weather boost.
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what we have seen today is the underlying strength of that economy because even in the phase of the uncertainty caused by the negotiations, we have seen a bounce back to about point 4%. 1,600 people had to be rescued from campsites after flash floods hit the south of france. officials say a german man who was helping to supervise children at a summer camps is missing. 400 flights will not take off as planned today because of a strike by ryanair pilots. the walk—out by staff in ireland, germany, sweden, belgium and the netherlands will affect 75,000 passengers. more now on our top story... mike ashley, owner of sports direct has struck a £90 million deal to rescue house of fraser. earlier the department store had called in the administrators, but now sports direct has acquired all of the uk stores, the brand and all of
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the stock in the business. there are reports that some of the stores could become sports direct outlets and others flannels stores bbc look north spoke to some shoppers outside house of fraser in hull this morning to gauge their reaction. it isa it is a shame because it is a nice shop. but it is like a lot of the shops, they are not getting the sales a ny shops, they are not getting the sales any more. are you confident it could be saved? i'm hoping, but i'm not very confident, to be honest. could be saved? i'm hoping, but i'm not very confident, to be honestm is expected, really. it is too big. not with the internet coming and everything. you can get everything on the internet. there is no need to come here and shop. if i like... you can get off—line. come here and shop. if i like... you can get off-line. we do not want it
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to go. where are we going to shop? at ourage? 0ur to go. where are we going to shop? at our age? 0ur age. to go. where are we going to shop? at ourage? 0urage. nowhere. to go. where are we going to shop? at our age? our age. nowhere. that is of you in hull. earlier retail expert kate hardcastle told me what she made of the rescue deal. it is interesting that mike ashley is adding to a very bizarre and broad retail. he has the upmarket fashion brand flannels and he has a lot of interests in other stores. actually, also debenhams. this is a big move and i think people will breeze a sigh of relief knowing the house of fraser is an disappearing altogether, but i can't imagine the business or the offeror going to be similarto business or the offeror going to be similar to that what people knows duke no or recognise as fraser. it has brands that have discount
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market. that is where the success has been peered we don't want gaping holes in the high street because that does not help other retailers surrounding the department stores. it is clear to see that the success online and the change in consumer buying habits are really having big effects on the uk high street and down the country. what do you think is in this for him? i think he is someone who is very ambitious to see growth in his retail portfolio. he understands the uk consumer and he has had success with the sports direct brand. i think he wants to widen it and have a house of his own brands, maybe. he has traded out of house of freighters —— house or phrases with those brands. it is an interesting development because i don't think it will be the full portfolio of properties. i think it
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will be the stores that are trading well that he carries forward. i can't see it being that traditional department store that we all know and reflect on. we think of it as a heritage brand in the high street. asa heritage brand in the high street. as a middle—market department store, it needed to be exemplary with that service. it really needed to have brands that cut through. it needed to have something as a unique selling point that was very different for the consumers and really it has lost its way. partly because of revolving door of management who have not had its best interest at heart. there have been new entrances into the marketplace in health and fashion. new entrances into the marketplace in health and fashionlj new entrances into the marketplace in health and fashion. i think what is intriguing is that some of the stores may well become sports direct outlets and some may become flannels stores. they are very much at the opposite ends. that is right. as
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someone who is trading up both sides of the market place. if you think about the retail space here about the belt—tightening has been on the retail market. he understands that. he understands that the middle—market is not really adding very much. people very much like discount brands. we see rise and discount brands. we see rise and discount brands. we see rise and discount brands like primark. they like the luxury brands to bring something interesting difference to them. all of this aside, even the biggest players in traditional retail, bricks and mortar stores now are going to be ahead. we saw not that long ago another store had it hero raised to rescue it, but it was not capable of turning that brand around. i don't want to ring the bell of failure already, this is no easy road ahead for mike ashley. this is going to be very tricky. the government wants every home to be fitted with a smart meter by 2020, but the charity citizen's advice has
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told the bbc it needs to slow down the roll out and extend the deadline by three years. last year, the organisation received 3,000 complaints about the devices, with problems ranging from aggressive sales techniques, and some customers still having to send readings to their energy company. graham satchell reports. whenjeff when jeff first got his whenjeff first got his smart metre, he was very pleased. but then he switched to supplier and it stopped working. i was shocked really. switched to supplier and it stopped working. iwas shocked really. i had assumed that these were a one type model fits all, suits everybody. there was a state of shock followed bya there was a state of shock followed by a slight cynicism that, oh, dear, our government and it are never very
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good bedfellows. i touch electric money wejust get good bedfellows. i touch electric money we just get nothing. citizens advice told bbc today that they've had thousands of complaints about the smart metres some that don't work properly if you switch suppliers. there have been complaints about aggressive sales practises and poor installation. they say they support the principle of smart metres but only if they work. we are calling on the government to extend the roll—out deadline so the remaining 42 million metres can be done so in the best possible way for customers and in the most cost—effective way. possible way for customers and in the most cost-effective way. up to 53 million smart metres are meant to be installed in every home by 2020 atan be installed in every home by 2020 at an estimated cost of £11 billion. smart metres automatically send readings to energy suppliers putting an ad to estimated bills and because people can more accurately monitor their energy use, the government says they will save us an average of
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£47 a year by 2030. the government acknowledges there have been problems and say now now —— is not the time for delay. we are rolling it out as fast as possible. i think this programme is worth a lot both to british consumers and house lows, but also to the energy system. i think we should have an energy system fit for the 21st century. i've employed a stool to get myself up i've employed a stool to get myself upa i've employed a stool to get myself up a little bit higher. the government says by the end of the year his smart metre should start working again. an upgrade is planned at which means they will work even if we switch over. there is nothing smart about this. jeff is now holding his breath and in culled for the time being, he is back to taking traditional readings. earlier i spoke with robert cheesewright from smart energy gb which promotes the understanding
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of smart metres. in our homes at the moment, most of us we in our homes at the moment, most of us we have traditional metres and their hidden under the stairs and they don't do anything useful. to get to them we have to get on our hands up —— hands and knees and take out all the other stuff. 0r hands up —— hands and knees and take out all the other stuff. or the alternative is to do estimated bills we re we alternative is to do estimated bills were we can run into debt or the suppliers have extra money of hours. the smart metres means that they talk directly to the suppliers and we have accurate readings. this will put you in control of your energy use. it shows you in pounds and pence how much energy you are using. it also shows you historical amounts. so you can start to budget and make comparisons and really start to get to grips with your energy. it's not until out lots —— it's nine kilowatts. it's an pounds.
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in theory everyone wins because the companies are in conversation with the consumers and vice versa. and you can understand that more easily than you can from the readings you get online. what we're seeing is it really works. the average person is saving 3% on their energy with smart metres. that is a good start. that is enough to power your home for free for a week. 0ver is enough to power your home for free for a week. over three quarters would recommend them. that is a very high bar. we know that the vast majority of people are having really good experiences in saving energy. they are the basis of smart grid. we are now bring on board lots of electric vehicles. we need a grid that can handle that. if we're stuck with the analogue system we are locked into a dirty, more expensive, bad the climate future. it is very crucial for national infrastructure.
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i get what you are saying about the approval rates. there are still problems. when problems arise, what are they normally? the vast maturity have a good experience, but it is technology and technology does not a lwa ys technology and technology does not always behave. some metres when you switch suppliers going to additional mode. what does that mean? they stop being able to contact with the supplier, they act like your traditional metre did. 0 are no worse off. it's annoying because you had something good and you have lost it. there is good news, you can still switch. there is no barrier to switching. and all of them are going to be upgraded over the air. this is a temporary problem. so anyone who is at home with a metre that is not working as they had hoped, their solution is coming and they will be working. robert was speaking to me a little bit earlier on.
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australia's most populous state, new south wales, is battling the worst drought in living memory. a warm, dry winter has left many outback farmers struggling to survive, and little rain is expected in the months ahead. 0ur correspondent, phil mercer. this family is determined to beat the drought. keeping the herd alive is exhausting and expensive. the monthly fee bill is £25,000. it is a daily grind that is taking its toll. everybody is a bit stressed. we are under more pressure financially and therefore you are stressed in your relationships. we are trying to keep it together. we can see that our seasons are no longer what we would call normal. we have had the lowest rainfall and a years of recording. so this is the worst this should be
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some of austria's prime and cultural lands. in good times this would have crops up to your knees. look at it now. it is bone dry and barren and many farming communities are struggling like never before as the big dry eastern up straighter strengthens. the lack of rain has altered the landscape. all of new south wales is officially in trout. for many, it is a disaster. the small town of manila is in the heart of the drop zone, but the local schools —— at the local school with children of farming communities they share the pain. it is pretty heartbreaking for them to watch their animals starve to death in front of them. it is stressful for
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me. i have to wake up earlier, and go to bed later as well as working on the farm. to make sure everything gets done. the money is held very tightly. we're not spending it on unnecessary things. we're counting every dollar that we spend. australia's climates can be cruel. it concerns for tile grout into a wasteland. money from the government is helping, but what is really needed is rain and lots of it. the forecast does not look good. south korea's customs agency has revealed the country violated un sanctions, after three companies imported coalfrom north korea. authorities have been investigating nine cases of possible imports of north korean coal, brought into the country disguised as products from russia. laura bicker has more from seoul. south korean import officers have
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been investigating this case for ten months. what they found is that 35,000 tonnes of north korean coal entered here between april and 0ctober entered here between april and october this year. they discovered that the documents for the shipments we re that the documents for the shipments were forged. and they had a different port of origin. it seems that they have come from north korea via russia. and that is where the documents may have been forged. three people and companies have been reported to prosecutors. this apparent breach of sanctions comes as the un will leak the report last week which suggested that north korea had made $14 million by exporting goods that were supposed to be banned under the un sanctions. that included oil and coal to the likes of china and to india. the un sanctions but sanctions on august
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last year to put pressure on pyongyang to prevent them from building nuclear missiles and to try to get them to stop the missile programme and talk handover and disarm the nuclear weapons. china and russia have since called for those sanctions to be lifted because now kim jong—un has those sanctions to be lifted because now kimjong—un has halted nuclear tests a nd now kimjong—un has halted nuclear tests and he is engaging in talks with the us and south korea. it will be interesting to see how long those sanctions to stay in place, but according to not just sanctions to stay in place, but according to notjust this report, but previous reports from the un, it appears that north korea is making money through exports and perhaps things aren't travelling across the border through china according to some reports. the headlines on bbc news... mike ashley's sports direct steps in as house of fraser goes into administration. figures show the economy grew by .4% in the second
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quarter of this year. heavy floods force the evacuation of more than 1600 people in south—eastern france — one man is missing after being swept away. a new app is to offer rewards for families for talking to each other around the dinner table rather than checking their screens. the idea was originally designed to help students study. this comes as facebook and instagram release a new tool to limit how much time people spend on their apps. catrin nye has been looking at the rise of ‘anti—tech, tech.‘ can i ask you both how much you check your phone? uh... recently? every day. every hour. quite often. quite a lot. probably too much! at work, probably every hour. quite bad, actually. a fair few hours a day. at home, at least every 20 minutes. every couple of hours? i'm always on it.
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and now i've got a phone call! there are now loads of apps offering to get you off your phone. 0ne called mute tracks your screen time, space helps you set goals to use it less, moment sets daily limits on your use — it will even send you a barrage of messages if you're on it too much. and one called forest grows you a tree as long as you're not browsing. it is, of course, very debatable whether tech companies are the ones who should be helping us spend less time on tech. facebook and instagram are releasing their own time—limit tools. an app called hold has just launched in the uk, created for students by three students in copenhagen. why was it that you wanted to start this? we were struggling so much about actually focusing. we checked our phones all the time, and we started to give ourselves incentives. the ones that check their phones the last, they get the offee.
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—— they get the coffee. and that really worked out for us three. the app allows you to start a timer to put your phone on hold, which means you can't get other apps. i think it's a behavioural shift, the idea is you're putting the phone, ideally, to one side, the phone can then get locked, so having the screen up there can be a distraction. but it can be to one side, and the idea is then to say, "right, i'm going to be productive now." once you've done 20 minutes on hold, you start earning rewards — things like cheap cinema tickets, free drinks, donations to charity. this app is still doing advertising. it allows brands to market their products to users — but as rewards. hey, clara — i'm catrin. this app doesn't work overnight and is currentlyjust for students, like clara, a masters student at the london school of economics from singapore. she says the use of phones is a distraction for her whole family. yeah, and i have actually voiced my unhappiness to my parents before. about them using their phones? yeah, yeah.
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cos i really think that it does compromise the quality of the interactions you have with your family members or friends at the dinner table, for instance. the creators of hold are now developing a version for families to use together. they say they've had tens of thousands of people get in touch, because phones are disturbing their dinner time too. and now some breaking news coming in from canada. canadian police are saying that at least four people have been killed in a shooting. this is in the eastern canadian city of fredericton. there isn't a great deal more being reported. the police are saying that the incident is ongoing and a reference to multiple fatalities. that figure of four, it
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might end up being higher than that. those are the only two lines we have at the moment. four people dead according to the canadian police. a shooting incident still ongoing. more of course on that as we have it. the slovenian—born parents of the us first lady, melania trump, have become us citizens. the pair are likely to have became citizens under a process — known as chain migration — that has been heavily criticised by the president. us vice president mike pence has laid out plans to create a sixth branch of the military, a so—called space force. he suggested russian and chinese threats justify the military expansion and he promised that a space force department would be ready by 2020. the white house is asking the public to vote for a logo and they'll be asking congress for about eight billion dollars to fund the project. now the time has come to write
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the next great chapter of our armed forces. to prepare for the next battlefield where america's best and brightest will be called to deter another generation of threats to our people, to our nation. the time has come to establish the united states space force. setting up this military branch would not be without its challenges... 0ur correspondent in washington chris buckler explains. there is a little bit of concern aboutjust how this would work in terms of bureaucracy, how this would be sliced up. they have monies to get secretary of defence james mattis on board. he was somewhat cynical not that long ago and now he says that he sees the merit in it. certainly, the argument is that you have to have a dedicated organisation that is looking at this. you have to have a space command, which they are looking to set up, in order to address these problems going forward. certainly, they were saying if you take a look
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at the technology being developed by other countries, in the next few years, that is going to become very important. donald trump seems very committed to this. his reelection campaign has already got his website new space force logos which they are asking people to vote on. so, he might get the logo and he might get the space force. around 25 hot air balloons lit up the sky last night to mark the opening day of the bristol international balloon fiesta. more than 130 balloons have come from across the globe for the four—day annual event, which is celebrating its 40th year. the event is expected to attract hundreds of thousands of people over the course of the four days. now — if i mentioned smelly cat or "central perk", would you know what i was talking about? the chances are that you would, of course, because they're all phrases from the tv show friends — which it's just been revealed is the most streamed tv show on subscription services in the uk — even though it's nearly a quarter
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of a century since it first aired. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson has more. it is 14 years since friends ended. butjoey it is 14 years since friends ended. but joey and chandler's it is 14 years since friends ended. butjoey and chandler's bachelor pad, monaco's apartment, the hallway between them, ross's living room are very familiar to a whole new generation. subscription streaming services netflix, amazon prompt don't reveal their viewing figures, but industry have the lease their numbers. at
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numberfive, have the lease their numbers. at number five, it is have the lease their numbers. at numberfive, it is peaky blinders. maybe all of this is happening for a reason. stranger things. society in britain has changed. at number three, it has already become tv royalty, the crown. at number two, you can watch on your pc, but it is not pc, the grand tour. and at one, a show that started in 1994, the year before the dvd was invented. friends. take the rachel... so why has endured. who better to ask then those at comedy central‘s friends fast. it shows friends every day and the celebration is touring the uk, selling out wherever it goes. the characters are hilarious. ross is my favourite. because of his facial
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expressions. i just watch it over and over if no one is in, that is all i have on. i'm notjoking. and over if no one is in, that is all! have on. i'm not joking. since i got into friends, i thought, this is amazing i have not stopped watching it. you were born years after it ended. why do you like it? because it makes me laugh. who is your favourite character? rachel because she's funny. to sum up, this is the one where friends is still number one. in a moment, it's time for the one o'clock news with ben brown but first it's time for a look at the weather with tomas schafernacker. to some of us today it really feels like summer has come to an abrupt end. it is fairly cool. it has been raining. very changeable weather.
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the week and will remain this way as well. this evening will be very chilly. it will be very cold. the atla ntic chilly. it will be very cold. the atlantic is very active. 0ne weather system coming out of north america and another one in the north atlantic. we have clouds covering parts of the country today. we will keep seeing these weather systems coming in over the course of today and into the weekend. the winds are coming from their too. breezy and cool at times. today, temperatures will peak around the high teens or 20s in the south, but for many of us it is the maid or the high teens. lots of showers around may be more than we were expecting. this evening will be cool. —— this evening will be clear. there is a sparkling sky on the way for us. in the countryside it could be as low as 4 degrees. in london barely double figures. we will be waking up to sunny but chilly weather. there is a weather front approaching us,
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sunny but chilly weather. there is a weatherfront approaching us, but ahead of it, you can see the country is in the clear for the most of us. 0n is in the clear for the most of us. on saturday it is looking beautiful, cold but sunny. the clouds will increase. the rain will reach the west cou ntry increase. the rain will reach the west country and wales by the time we get to the afternoon. for many of us we get to the afternoon. for many of us in the east in the north, it is not looking bad on saturday. it will feel warmer as well. there will be more sunshine. 0n feel warmer as well. there will be more sunshine. on saturday night, expect the clouds to increase. saturday night most of us will see a little bit of rain here and there. as we go through the course of the weekend. saturday into sunday, the low pressure is over us, so that means we're going to see outbreaks of rain spreading across the country. pretty unsettled. sunday, the winds will be coming in from the southwest. a southerly component. and temperatures will rise. it will feel a little bit more humid. temperatures back into the 20s. and
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outlook into next week, you can see that temperatures rising a little bit in the self, but generally speaking, it is a mixed bag. a rescue deal for house of fraser, one of britain's biggest and oldest department store chains. mike ashley, the business tycoon and owner of sports direct, buys it for £90 million. for now house of fraser stores around the country are still open, but 17,000 staff wait to find out what the future holds for them. i think we'rejust i think we're just all doing to keep each other up, we are all trying to stay motivated and hope for good outcome. we hope they will find some solution. finally. nothing is finished yet. we'll be analsying what today's deal means for the house of fraser, and the future of the high street. also this lunchtime. britain's feel—good summer boosts the economy. the warm weather and the world cup bring improved growth figures of 0.4%. hundreds of holiday—makers evacuated as flash floods hit the south of france.
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