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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 11, 2018 6:00am-7:01am BST

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good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. our headlines today. a daring new frontier for space exploration. it's lift—off for nasa's mision to the sun. the shutters come down on seven more m&s shops as the retailer battles to improve its fortunes. paul pogba unveils a new penalty technique as manchester united open the new premier league season with a win over leicester. # daddy cool. and we meet the men making dad dancing cool. good morning, it's saturday august the 11th. our top story — nasa will this morning launch one of its most ambitious space missions — sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. a rocket carrying the parker solar probe will blast off from cape canaveral in florida just after 8.30. it will travel at speeds of more than 100 miles per second. that's the equivalent of london to sydney in 88 seconds,
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making it the fastest man—made object in history. scientists hope it will gather data to help understand the solar storms which can disrupt satellite communications. will batchelor reports. liftoff! address rehearsal for a journey into the sun. for more than 60 years, nasser has wanted to gather data from inside the sun's atmosphere. —— nasa. this morning's launch of the parker solar probe cup —— cape canaveral in florida will achieve humanity's first look at the star. achieve humanity's first look at the sta r. protected by achieve humanity's first look at the star. protected by a shield nearly five inches thick, it will orbit the sun 2a times over the next seven yea rs, sun 2a times over the next seven years, travelling at speeds of 430,000 mph, making it the fastest ever man—made object. at its closest point, parker will be at around 380
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million miles from the sun, seven times at nearer than any previous probe. the prize is to understand the physics that drives the sun's great outbursts, the solar storms which can play havoc with technologies on earth, disrupted —— disrupting communications and satellites. and, nasa says, the chance to explore the last key region of our solar system to be visited by a spacecraft. an explosion at a military factory in wiltshire has killed one person and left another in a critical condition. chemring countermeasures which is based near salisbury makes products to protect military ships and aircraft from attack. the police said the incident was under control and there was no risk to the public. seven marks and spencer stores will shut today as part of a major restructuring plan. it comes a day after house of fraser was bought out of administration, and as more and more high street stores face pressure from rising costs and online retailers. our business correspondent joe lynam has more. this story northampton will close
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its doors for the last time today. it's been trading for almost half a century. yet another victim of intense condition from web retailers. in 2006, marks & spencer announced a restructuring plan to cut costs to include the closure of more than 100 stores by 2022. by the end of today, they will have closed down 28 stores. today, it shops in these areas will trade for the last time. these closures join an ever growing list of retailers are facing threats from the internet. 2018 has been a tough year for retailers. we have seen quite a few retailers go into administration or announce they
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are closing and significant number of stores. this is in reaction to consumers spend by shifting online and holding back where consumer confidence is low. out of fraser was bought out of administration yesterday by the owner of sports direct but it is unlikely he will keep all of the 59 stores open. the attrition on the high street is set to continue. a man's appeared in court in calfornia charged with starting a wild—fire that led to more than 20,000 people having to leave their homes. the holy fire, as it has become known, burned nearly 10,000 acres through the mountains of southern california. prosecutors say forrest clark had a grudge against a neighbour. he could face life in prison if convicted. conservative mp jacob rees mogg has claimed an investigation into borisjohnson is a "show trial" to stop him becoming leader. writing in the daily telegraph, the tory backbencher blamed theresa may's "personal rivalry" with mrjohnson for "taking the heat off labour", and said that some senior conservatives are envious of the former foreign secretary's popularity. mrjohnson is under investigation
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for a newspaper article in which he compared muslim women in full face veils to letter boxes and bank robbers. the government's decision to maintain its ban on boxing and martial arts in prisons is a "missed opportunity" according to the uk's leading expert on sport in prisons. in a report commissioned by the ministry ofjustice, professor rosie meek said the sports could help reduce re—offending and improve discipline injails. but ministers have rejected the recommendation, as our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford explains. teenage young offenders held in wetherby, working out their aggression in a rugby league session organised by leeds rhinos. taking exercise while behind bars helps with fitness, mental health and also with fitness, mental health and also with learning lessons for life on the outside. it gives you good
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discipline and that, like, you have got to be told what to do and take it on and stuff like that. it can turn into a real—life situation. today's report into sport in prison found some good examples like here in wetherby but that the provision in england and wales is inconsistent and underdeveloped and it says women's prisons must do more. she went to sleep boxing or martial arts being taught in prisons or young offenders institutions. it is not allowed. today's report suggests that the prison service at least considers changing vat but that recommendation has not been accepted. boxing is taking place in oui’ accepted. boxing is taking place in our prisons anyway, innocently. press that —— professor rosie meek who wrote the report said discipline and teamwork is being taught and she is disappointed. bello if we can develop a well—designed programmes which have meaningful objectives and around reducing reoffending than we really should be doing so. -- if we can develop. they need to improve
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sports provision and education skills that can be taught alongside it, the idea proved too much for them. farmers across the australian region of new south wales are continuing to feel the effects of a drought after one of the driest autumn and winters in living memory. the government has provided 300 million pounds in emergency funding as forecasters predict another three months with little or no rain. we can cross now to the bbc‘s sydney correspondent phil mercer. australia is a country used to pretty harsh conditions but this is ona pretty harsh conditions but this is on a different level, isn't it? this is the worst drought in living memory. we havejust returned is the worst drought in living memory. we have just returned from one of the epicentre is of the drought. the drought zone around the city of tamworth to the north of syd ney city of tamworth to the north of sydney and some of those areas haven't had meaningful rainford the best pa rt haven't had meaningful rainford the best part of two years. the big dry
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as they call it here is affecting eve ryo ne as they call it here is affecting everyone from businesses in the small towns to farmers, their families and even schoolchildren and rachel ferguson is the deputy principal at the manila central school in new south wales and she says the drought could force some of her students from a farming families off the land for good. if you are born on the land, it is a very hard thing to walk away from but i think increasingly, when you look at what out increasingly, when you look at what our fodder costs have been, the costs of carting water, the time and emotional and psychological cost of the rural industry, it is tempting for those students to go away and i can certainly understand why because i think, for most of them, the idea of secure employment, secure financial stability, is obviously very appealing a ghent playing the numbers on the farm. —— against. very appealing a ghent playing the numbers on the farm. -- against. we
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are also hearing that the new south wales state government could call in the military to help transport animalfeed the military to help transport animal feed and water to drought hit farming communities. the federal government is already offering cash assistance to ha rd—pressed government is already offering cash assistance to hard—pressed farming families and the outlook for the next three months isn't good. that dry autumn that you refer to is being followed by a pretty parched and warm winter here in eastern australia. the outlook for spring is not good and the expectation is that the clouds won't come and that dry will intensify its grip here in eastern australia in the months ahead. thanks for that. a rhino calf, one of only 650 in the world, has been playing outside for the first time, just over a week after being born at chester zoo. the baby, which is yet to be named, made was born in front of astonished visitors 11 days ago, despite rhinos usually calving at night. with so few eastern black rhinos left on the planet, he is a very important new addition to the breeding programme working to prevent their extinction.
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a little lie down. a little roll. let's look at the front pages. the guardian leads with comments from the chancellor phillip hammond suggesting a so called "amazon tax" could be applied to online retailers to help the struggling high street. amazon also features on the front of the times, which reports the company is set to be banned from claiming to offer guaranteed next day delivery for its prime customers ahead of a ruling by the advertising watchdog. the daily telegraph features an interview with conservative back—bencherjacob rees—mogg who says borisjohnson is being set up for a "show trial" over his burka comments because of theresa may's "personal rivalry" with the former foreign secretary. and the daily mail carries a photograph ofjeremy corbyn,
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which reportedly shows the labour leader during a wreath—laying ceremony at a cemetery in tunisia. the paper claims mr corbyn is standing near to the graves of members of the palestine liberation 0rganisation including one man who was involved in the 1972 munich 0lympics attack. it was previously reported that mr corbyn had attended such a ceremony in 2014. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: this morning nasa will launch one of the most daring ventures in its history, sending the parker solar probe into the sun's outer atmosphere. marks & spencer is implementing the latest round of its store closure programme this weekend, as it battles to improve its fortunes. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. how is it looking
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today? good morning to you both. we have spent so long this summer talking about how dry the weather has been but what about yesterday? an awful lot of rain across parts of england. it was a very wet day. today, in contrast for many of us, it will be dry and bright with sunshine this morning. however, it will tend to cloud over later in the day for most areas and we will see some more rain in wales and south—west england. the rain clouds are lurking out in the atla ntic rain clouds are lurking out in the atlantic and it will work its way in as we go on through the next few hours. a bright start for many but it will spreading across wales and south—west england before long and we will see outbreaks of rain here is we get through the morning. 0therwise, is we get through the morning. otherwise, a chilly start to the day, temperatures well done into single figures but as the day goes
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by, you can see how the sunny skies get replaced by this area of cloud working in from the south—west and we could see a bit of rain working into northern ireland by the end of the day. temperature wise, ties between 19 and 21 degrees. the deepening and overnight, rain will get more extensive into wales and south—westerly winds picking up in strength. it won't be anywhere near as cold night as last night. looking at overnight lows of around 15 and 17 degrees for most. the rain is tied in with the area of low pressure. it is a weather front that will have pulses of energy running along so there will be some heavy burst of rain, particularly focused across south—west england and central southern england. although it will ease off for a time, further, potential rain coming in of wales and south—west england from heavy showers later in the day. further north, northern ireland and
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scotland, again, a cloudy day with burst around around —— deaths of rain and around. quite chilly with the onshore winds coming in across parts of aberdeenshire. heading into next week, loose the area of low pressure but another one will work its way in off the atlantic. we are going to see at changeable pictured next week. some spells of sunshine but also looking at areas of rain coming in from time to time. temperature is generally high—teens to low 20s. nowhere near as hot as it has been. china is continuing its contentious expansion in the south china sea, despite fervent opposition from its neighbours and their allies. its government has dredged areas of the sea in the spratly island chain to create military bases, to defend what it views as its territory but america says it won't sit back and allow the chinese to dominate the area unchallenged. 0ur correspondent rupert wingfield—hayesjoined a us plane on a reconnaissance flight. this is the chinese navy, likely
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telling the us navy to go away. fire out in the south china sea, we are approaching one of china's huge new ireland faces. it's very clear they do not want us here. for the cruel bought this us navy surveillance plane, this is a daily encounter. it's a routine occurrence ross on these flights. it happens throughout these flights. it happens throughout the flight when they come over and we come back with a standard response and it really has no effect of any operations are what we do. as we close to 12 nautical miles, we can see the huge extent of china's
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development out here. what we are seeing on the screen here is live pictures of mischief reef. the last timei pictures of mischief reef. the last time i was hit 2.5 years ago, it was just a large pile of sand and you can see there has been extensive construction. this is what it looked like then. millions of tons of sand being pumped on to the reef to create land. the first outline of a runway, but no buildings. look at the same place today. a forest of radar domes, aircraft hangars and maybe a building to park missile launchers. using the plain‘s high—powered camera, we watch as a group of vehicles drives down the runway. one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, nine vehicles moving. no aircraft present. these flights aren't just about surveillance. the americans are here to make a point. in the broader sense, yes, it's making sure
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we maintain the rights that we have isa we maintain the rights that we have is a military aircraft to fly in international airspace, is a military aircraft to fly in internationalairspace, maintain is a military aircraft to fly in international airspace, maintain our presence in the area and show that we are not worried about the buildup thatis we are not worried about the buildup that is happening and we are going to continue to stay down here in the south china sea. to understand what is at stake out here, listen to how the chinese navy today talked to an aircraft from a smaller, weaker neighbour, the philippines. with the spaces, china is succeeding in changing the very geography of the south china sea. despite america's assurances, down here the tide of history appears to be flowing towards beijing. rupert wingfield hayes, bbc news, with the us navy in the south china sea. quite extraordinary images. they really are. it's time to take a look at this week's film review. hello and welcome to the film review
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on bbc news, and taking us through this week's releases is jason sullivan. what have you got for us? this week, we go to beirut in 1982. it's mad men in the middle east, wherejohn hamm tries to negotiate the release of a hostage in the negotiator. and there's a big goldfish, an angry one coming up. there it is, jason statham getting his teeth into the meg, and a prehistoric shark is on the loose. can he save us from it? and we take a rare cinematic trip to paraguay for a film called the heiresses. it's about late flowering freedom found amongst older women. so let's start with the negotiator.
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this has been billed as sort of bond or bourne meets mad men, in beirut. that's right, bourne is a particularly good example, because it's written by tony gilroy, the scriptwriter who wrote the first four bourne films and directed one of them himself. so he's very good on the shady operations of the cia and the negotiations that happen, and mad men, because donald draper, one of the great tv characters of our time, was played byjohn hamm, who left the television after that series to go to the movies, and i don't think he's ever quite had a part that matches don draper — there are very few around — until now. he plays mason skiles. it's not as good a name as don draper, i'll give you that. but he is enjoying the high life in 19705 beirut, when a terrorist incident ruins his life and family. ten years later, he's a washed—up alcoholic settling small trade disputes in notown, america and propping up the local bar, which is when he gets a strange tap on the shoulder and the cia, in shady form, try to recruit him again. $6,500 and a first class ticket. i wouldn't go back to beirut
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if it was the last place on earth. flight leaves at 8:45pm tonight. well, it sounds like you've got about six hours to find somebody else. i was told that is not an option. look, i have no idea what's happening here. it would be a lot easier for both of us if i did. but, er... i was told to tell you that... time is extremely tight and the agency would be deeply grateful for your cooperation. it's a serious request, they know that. tell them i don't have a passport. they put one in there with the ticket. so what do you make of it, jason? well, off he goes to beirut and he's given a handler called sandy, a local cia operative,
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played by rosamund pike, with a succession of cold stares, which helps him through the rubble of beirut. this film is really good on the atmosphere of the crumbling town that beirut has become, because it's been seized from all sides, druze militia on one side, muslims, christians, thejewish negotiations with the israelis. we don't know who's got the hostage — is it the plo, is it the various militias? it was an extraordinary time in the middle east. i don't know if you were out there as a news correspondent... i was sent to beirut actually in the ‘80s. john mccarthy had just been kidnapped. it was just a terrifying time. so hostage—taking was all the rage, in a way, terry waite and john mccarthy, and that's the era we are in here, especially with the americans trying to horse trade. they wanted the release of another terrorist. it becomes a moral maze as well as a kind of bond scenario. the tension is great. it's a real game of poker, which is what mason skiles is really good at, and that's whatjohn hamm excels at. he's got this sort of sweaty, intense desperation. one thing that's refreshing about the film is it's a lot
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of adults talking a lot. the action is not as much as it would be in a bourne, although that's there, but a lot of it is about the negotiations and the quick talking and shady characters. you never know who to trust or not. there is always going to be a switcheroo and a double—cross at the end. it's available in cinemas and on download as well today, and it's called beirut in some territories. if you are looking for the negotiator, sometimes it's called beirut. that's a bit confusing! there you go. let's move on to the meg, which is definitely called just the meg, about a prehistoric shark. it sounds like a watery version ofjurassic park. yeah, i thought it might be like a dance inspired by meg ryan in katz‘s deli doing that fake orgasm, but it's not. it's just jason statham taking on a prehistoric shark, which has been awoken from the sea bed by a billionaire sea explorer. jason, who plays a deep sea rescuer, obviously, goes down in his submersible to try and save people stranded at the bottom, but they awake this shark.
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something huge is out there, they say. yes, it is. there's this huge shark, like jaws after a lot of fish food. he's got bigger and bigger. almost too big — you can't really see the monster that well. it's almost not as scary as it should be, but there are moments where it leaves teeth marks on the glass, and that is a scary fish! that doesn't deter statham, who dives in. he was a former diver, actually, in his previous career, before he became an action hero. so the watery stuff he's really good at, diving off boats, taking on the shark with his captain ahab moment. look, it's a silly, popcorn, summer blockbuster movie, and it does deliver on all of those. interestingly, although it's about a prehistoric monster, it's probably the future of blockbusters, with a lot of chinese characters in it, because that's the burgeoning market. and it's set in some chinese resort, a swishy chinese resort where there are a lot of people in the water and they need
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to get out pretty quick before the shark comes. but statham will be there to save them, don't worry, and if you are worried, as seems to be contractually obliged, in alljason statham films, he does get his top off at some point. it's up to you to decide if that's anything to do with it. all right. thank you very much for that. and then we've got the heiresses, which is a spanish drama. even more unusual than that, it's a paraguayan drama. i'm not sure i've ever seen a film from paraguay. we've had a great latin american new wave of films from chile at the moment, argentina and brazil over the last 15 years. this is the first from paraguay and, if this is anything to go by, i hope there's a lot more to come. it's called the heiresses, and it's a really extraordinary story about two women who live in a crumbling mansion in the capital of paraguay. that's a good question — what's the capital of paraguay? er... it's asuncion. of course, i did know that.
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it was on the tip of my tongue. ecuador? no. so in asuncion, and i've never really seen it in the cinema before, but it's obviously a capital that is riven by inequality, so there's the wealthy area, where this is set, and it's about class privilege, but it's also about a female couple who live in a house they've clearly inherited, but they are coming up on hard times. one of them might be sent to prison for tax evasion, so they are selling off the family silver. 0k, it looks pretty atmospheric. it is. the atmosphere is really good, the cinematography, the kind of crumbling nature of this area, but also the faces that we get. one of the women that we see there is chela. when her partner gets sent to jail, that prison is very evocative. it's a chaotic space with poorer people. she ends up sort of ferrying richer women around, because they don't trust local taxi drivers in paraguay. in most of south america, a risk of kidnap is a major thing.
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there's a lot of it about this week in the movies. she becomes a sort of local taxi driverfor the rich, the ladies who lunch in this area of asuncion, and she suddenly discovers a freedom when she gets behind the wheel of a car, a late—flowering romance with another woman called angie, who she finds rather sensual and striking, played by ana ivanova. the woman, chela, won the best actress at the berlin film festival earlier this year for her performance. it's her first screen performance ever. that's how rare cinema is in paraguay. she's been a stage actress all her life and this is her first ever screen appearance. you'd never know. she's brilliant. i hope there is more from paraguay. it's a very tender, atmospheric and suggestible film. it is very slight and you have to read between the lines, a lot of glances and looks, but i thought it was excellent and a really impressive debut. probably the film of the week. jason, best out at the moment? the best film out at the moment, i know there is mamma mia and mission impossible,
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but if you are looking for a sort of small british success, there is a film called apostasy, which is out at the moment. again, a rare glimpse into a society i'd never seen on camera before. it's jehovah's witnesses. the writer and director of this, dan kokotajlo, was a jehovah's witness growing up and he's sort of now showing what it's like in there. if you've ever wondered what it's like — and it's notjust the jehovah's witnesses, it's any religion, any sect where the intensity, children are growing up and splitting from the mother and questioning things... you rarely see a british film that's actually about religion or about faith, and that's what this is. i thought it was brilliant. fantastic performances from molly wright and siobhan finneran, who plays the mother. a brilliant glance into a bit of british society which, you think you've seen it all, you haven't. and a quick look at the best dvd. a big change of pace here! i'm going for peter rabbit, which is out. not anything immediately to do with beatrix potter, which i always found a bit twee, be honest. this is james corden voicing beatrix potter's fluffy—tailed hero,
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and i think he does it rather well. i think it's funny. it got terrible reviews when it came out, including from me, and i've since seen it with my kids and i think it's really funny. they love it, it's got a lot of energy, and it's kind of anarchic and funny, and very well done in many places, with lots of characters for the animals. it's a very funny film, and i'm sorry i gave it a bad review in the first place. i'm retracting that and saying it's good. jason, you've changed your mind. thank very much indeed, jason. that is it for this week. thank you for watching the film review. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. nasa will this morning launch one of its most ambitious space missions — sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. a rocket carrying the parker solar probe will blast off from cape canaveral, in florida, just after 8.30. scientists hope the seven—year mission will gather data to help understand the solar storms which can disrupt satellite communications. an explosion at a military factory
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in wiltshire has killed one person and left another in a critical condition. chemring countermeasures, which is based near salisbury, makes products to protect military ships and aircraft from attack. the police said the incident was under control and there was no risk to the public. marks & spencer will close seven shops today as part of a major restructuring programme. the company plans to shut 100 branches by 2022 as it attempts to improve profitability at a time of unprecedented pressure for the british high street. it comes a day after department store chain house of fraser was bought out of administration. a passenger plane has crashed into the sea after taking off without permission. all flights were grounded at seattle—tacoma international airport in the us when a passenger plane took off without permission. airport authorities confirmed on twitter that an airline employee had made "an unauthorised take—off" without any passengers on board and that it later crashed into the sea. the plane was a horizon air q400,
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according to a statement from horizon's partner airline alaska airlines. a man's appeared in court in calfornia charged with starting a wild—fire that led to more than 20,000 people having to leave their homes. the holy fire, as it has become known, burned nearly 10,000 acres through the mountains of southern california. prosecutors say forrest clark had a grudge against a neighbour. he could face life in prison if convicted. conservative mp jacob rees mogg has claimed an investigation into borisjohnson is a "show trial" to stop him becoming leader. writing in the daily telegraph, the tory backbencher blamed theresa may's "personal rivalry" with mrjohnson for "taking the heat off labour", and said that some senior conservatives are envious of the former foreign secretary's popularity. mrjohnson is under investigation for a newspaper article in which he compared muslim women in full face veils to letter boxes and bank robbers. ministers have rejected a call to lift a ban on boxing
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and martial arts classes in prisons in england and wales. a report commissioned by the government said training sessions would help promote discipline. but the ministry ofjustice said it was concerned the classes would amount to combat training for inmates. the us chemical giant, monsanto, has been ordered to pay nearly 290 million dollars in damages to a man who says its weedkiller made him terminally ill. a jury in california decided that the firm was negligent and malicious for failing to warn users of the risk of the herbicide glyphosate. monsanto says its product is safe and it will appeal the ruling. police in romania have clashed with tens of thousands of protesters demonstrating against government corruption. between 30 and 50 thousand people, including many returning ex—pats, took to the streets. there were reports of bottles and paving slabs being thrown, while police are said to have used tear gas and water cannons to try to control the crowds. emergency services said over 100 people needed medical attention. farmers across the australian
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region of new south wales are continuing to suffer the effects of one of the driest autumn and winters in living memory, as the entire area remains in a state of drought. the conditions have left many landowners forced to cull or sell off their livestock at a reduced price, as forecasters predict another three months with little or no rain. the government has pledged 300 million pounds in emergency support. time to get some sport. i have missed the football but the premier league is back and it was back with a name. paul pogba used a new technique. so the premier league is back and off to a flying start
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after united's 2—1 win over leicester. and this is the kind of confidence that scoring in a world cup final will give you. paul pogba tookjust 3 minutes, and 19 steps to score the first goal in this season's premier league. and there was an unlikely scorer of united's second, luke shaw had never scored in senior football until this... jamie vardy got one back but 2—1 it finished. it was more important to win today than to win against a bayern munich ina than to win against a bayern munich in a friendly. it is important to start well. a couple of weeks ago, we have zero points, now we have three points, the situation is better. despite two lengthy rain delays at lords, england's cricketers are well and truly in control of the second test against india, dominating the two reduced sessions they managed to play yestereday. patrick geary reports. take
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ta ke two. take two. after a full day lost to rain, lords resets. but believe this time, they will get to the crease at least. so this was progress, out of the room and into the path ofjimmy anderson. vj delhi saw his fifth delivery. conditions were changing and they helped him move the ball to ta ke and they helped him move the ball to take and nick, to take a wicket. followed again by drizzle. eventually, they got back out but all of the pauses can make it difficult to know if you are coming or going. run out by the new boy. he left and everyone followed, somewhat faster. they have been asking the rainfor faster. they have been asking the rain for weeks but not right now. initially, they would have needed a
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boat. this is his last test after 49 yea rs. boat. this is his last test after 49 years. somehow he and his team cleared it by five and how grateful england should be. for here and the evening sunshine, the golden wicket. sam curran removed in ash. india we re sam curran removed in ash. india were only happy when it rained. jimmy anderson returned to torment them. a day of water and waiting but most of all, wicket. chris woakes chris woa kes commend chris woakes commend and it was almost seamless, the transition. he has not played in an england shirt for a while due to injury. when he came on, he carried on in west jewett left off. same with sam. it was a great group performance. ——
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where stuart. to the european championships in berlin, and great britain's matt hudson—smith lived up to his billing as the favourite in the men's 400m as he held on to a massive lead coming into the home straight to win great britain's third athletics gold of the championships. he'll go for gold again this evening as part of the 4x400m relay team. a good feeling. i was talking to my agent and my coach. time doesn't matter for the future, is just about winning. that was the whole goal of this year. made it look ugly but it didn't. there was silverfor katerina johnson—thompson in the heptathlon, as she was beaten by the belgian 0lympic champion nafi thiam. johnson—thompson set a new personal best on her way to silver and says the championships are a turning point in her career. this european championships, i was against the very best in the world. silver and bronze medallist from
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last year and one of the all—time greats in my opinion some happy i got to hold my own. there was a surprise medal for meghan beesley in the women's 400m hurdles final. she ran really well from lane one to claim bronze, her best ever individual performance at a senior major championships. jake wightman secured the fourth and final medal of the night for great britain in the men's1500m. he got himself a bronze. fellow brits charlie grice and chris 0'hare finished fifth and ninth respectively. glasgow is the other venue for these european championships and there's been more success in the pool for great britain. jack law and chris mears won silver in the men's synchronised 3—metre springboard final, missing out on gold by less than a point. it's law's third medal of these games after two golds earlier in the week. alistair brownlee missed out on a medal in the triathlon. the double olympic gold medallist finished fourth with france's pierre le corre taking gold. brownlee said he's had a terrible six months as he's struggled with injury but he says
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he's just happy to be racing. in the last golf major of the year — gary woodland set a new lowest 36—hole score at the us pga championship to lead before a thunderstorm postponed friday's play. the american shot a four—under 66 with shots like this with a fairway wood, and at 10 under par he's one shot clear of kevin kisner, who had a six—under 64. wigan warriors beat castleford tigers to close the gap on superleague leaders st helens. an early liam marshall try set wigan on their way to a 20—0 half time lead, but castleford rallied in the second half — scoring four tries of their own including this one from paul mcshane. but it wasn't enough as wigan held on to win 24—22. and how about this for a new way of
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unveiling a player. this spanish top clu b unveiling a player. this spanish top club hired a magician to bring their top player back home. there was a buildup to that. not a bad way to unveil what is essentially a free tra nsfer unveil what is essentially a free transfer who might not play that much. brilliant. when a magician was going to open, there was a plot —— applause. what if they couldn't get him out? —— pause. he would have to stay on the field and everyone would have to play around him. for a lot of kids there's nothing more embarrassing than their dad trying to dance. but dancing is a great way of getting fit, so a group of men in brighton have decided to shrug off the shame, and they've become so confident that they've performed in front of 1500 people.
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mike bushell has been to train with the brilliantly named 0utta puff daddys. they eat to the beat in michael's house and when music be the food of love and all the myths about embarrassing dad ‘s dan single out the window, most of the time. because it's just around the kitchen but michael is moving to the rhythm. hejoined at at —— dancing group forefathers. they turn heads here on the seafront on a hot summer ‘s night and it is time for the 0utta puff daddys to take to the dance floor. come to think of it, i am a daddy. i can't really dams. —— dance. five, six, seven, eight! it
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really changed my life in terms of the fact that it is easy to become very lonely. i'm not part of any sports or activities like that. there is something about the energy of the music and the dancing and people doing the same thing at the same time. you can't help but smile and feel good about yourself. this is only the warmup and already, i'm mentally challenged as well is physically getting a real, real workout. 0f physically getting a real, real workout. of all started seven years ago when a former dancer wanted to encourage more dads who took their children to dad ‘s classes, give it ago children to dad ‘s classes, give it a go themselves. now they perform at the brighton dome and next you, to raise awareness about prostate cancer. we practised in a secret and when it came to the show, we had
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some of the people in the crowd laughing and pointing. " that's my dad!" and then at the end we had a standing ovation. the whole idea is to break the stigma of dads dancing, in further 1500 people, an amazing experience. big chest! i am a taxi driver. it gives me an escape to come down and dance with the lads and have a bit of a laugh. this is it. half an hour later, we are ready to put it into a dance. the great thing about doing this in a group, you can pretty much hide like someone else over there. it means anyone can do it. we know kids don't wa nt to anyone can do it. we know kids don't want to dads with their dads or see their dads dancing but my girls were brilliant, they told me to do it.|j
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was worried i was losing too much weight, it found out i was doing too much dancing, it was probably the reason. that was a 32nd piece of dancing and so many moves to remember. —— 30 second. the moves, he is not bad. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: this morning nasa will launch one of the most daring ventures in its history, sending the parker solar probe into the sun's outer atmosphere. marks & spencer is implementing the latest round of its store closure programme this weekend, as it battles to improve its fortunes. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we had a lot of rain
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yesterday support with start of looking at what happened. we had all this wet weather pushing into england. 49 millimetres. that's the best pa rt england. 49 millimetres. that's the best part of a months of rain. i know we need the rain but too much row liking. as we go through this weekend, a bit more rain to come but today, decent they would most of us having a dry, sunny but chilly start today. it will tend to cloud over as the day goes by. it will cloud over because out in the atlantic, slump of cloud working its way in. the weather system is going to bring us rain over the next 24 hours or so. most of it will come through overnight tonight or tomorrow. that leaves us a decent day of weather. temperatures got down to one degree in northern ireland, pause and fires to scotland, england and wales. most of us having a beautiful morning. it will cloud over. rain moving into
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wales in south—west england. further east, you will notice the crowd spilling across the midlands. into the south—east as well. at your wise, high teens, low 20s. that is true further north. through the night, the rain turns heavy at times as it continues itsjourney northwards and eastwards. 0therwise, a much milder night. the second after the weekend, this area of low pressure takes centre stage. it will be some wet weather and is one of these ones which does not come in a straight line, there will be pulses of heavy rain. some of the heaviest rain will be working into central and southern england. we will likely see some further heavy showers
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working again into south—west in the day. but the onshore wind comments could be quite chilly. 0therwise, looking at high as in the high teens. into next week, quite u nsettled teens. into next week, quite unsettled weather picture, particularly across north—western areas. some fairly breezy conditions. no sign of the heatwave returning to many of us. but that said, it should warm towards south—east england with temperatures pushing into mid— 20s. we can take a look now at this week's click. the sun is shining, the temperature's soaring
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and the robomows are mowing. the science says we are going to have more and more of this weather in the future and fortunately the uk heatwave is less punishing than in much of the rest of the world. so we've done the typically british thing of dressing inappropriately and letting our robots get on with the work. they do know this is astroturf, don't they? and stephen beckett has been cooling off the only way that he knows how. welcome to therme erding. nestled in germany's bavarian countryside, this one of the largest thermal baths in europe, the perfect place to relax, have a drink, maybe even do a little pool yoga. oh, and did i mention, there's also 27 waterslides?! there's a water slide, there's another one, that's a water slide too. yes, this is also europe's
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biggest waterslide park. but with 4,500 people visiting here every day, is 27 slides enough? what if you could change the slides at the flick of a switch? it's time to get my swimming trunks on for some serious journalism. to go on one of the newest rides in the park, i will need more than my togs and a tube, though, i will need one of these. i'm going backwards! it was actually amazing. i was a bit sceptical. i think i need a bit of practice,
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i was going backwards, i was going forward, i didn't feel totally in control. essentially, i went down that slide with my eyes shut. i am no slide connoisseur but that was a pretty good slide. and because it's a vr slide, how about sliding through the snowy mountains, outer space, or this alien planet? that's four virtual slides all packed into the twists and turns of one real slide. sometimes people, especially older ones say, i like it more without glasses, because they are overloaded with the system, but the young people, the kids and the young people and families we have here, about 10—29, they like it and they love it and they say it's the best thing they ever did in their life and so now we get about more than 50,000 visitors used the vr. normal landblubbing vr headsets have already got a bit of a rep for being complicated to use so getting the aquatic version to work well every day was a big challenge. yes, it was very difficult, the first thing we have to convince the owner that we want to do it. and we made the first tries, and then the owner
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of the therme erding tried it and after two tries, he was sick and he said, no, i don't like this, i don't want. because the difficulties, if you go on the slide on the left side, and in virtual reality, you go on the right side, you get this motion sickness. and to see how they solved that problem, first we need to get rid of some of this water. all along this slide are these sensors and that is so the virtual reality headset knows exactly where you are, at exactly the right time, because you want what you're seeing to be the same as what you're feeling. get it wrong and you could end up feeling a little bit sick. stephen greenwood and his team spent months building and, crucially, testing the system. we did hundreds of tests going down the slide, each one of us has ridden the slide hundreds of times, because we had to make sure that we got it right. just off for a dip. stephen's next plan is to take the vr off the slides and into the wild.
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so this is a diving mask version of the same thing i tried earlier. there's a phone in there, so you've got a virtual reality headset. you can also dive. the idea with this is that people who need to practise diving, like equipment repairers or even astronauts, can train in one of these, but i'm just going to go to a shipwreck. when you combine that sensory feeling of being in a different environment, with a completely virtual world over your eyes, it's a powerful combination. i think there is huge potential for military and marine technician training. these prototypes still need some work. for me, the image wasn't perfect and, more importantly, the waterproof phone that is hidden inside only knows where you're looking, not where you're moving. solving that problem is the next big challenge and, in terms of the slide, well, they've got plans for that too. we are considering adding more features, like sound and other sensory elements.
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i think there is a big therapeutic factor. i think that there is a lot that we can do with physical therapy, meditation, rehabilitation, and some of the psychological benefits that you can have from just floating in water and having a relaxing experience in front of your eyes. it sounds like this could just be the start of aquatic vr. until then, though, i think the best i can do is just help out with the testing. wow, steve, that seemed like a really tough assignment. it was hard, i went low, it was difficult, i did it for you guys. well done, yes. so you've done a lot of work with vr over the last two or three years and it seems at the moment we are talking more about vr coming to these theme park areas than to the living room. the thing is, headsets are still quite expensive, they are getting cheaper but they are quite expensive and are still difficult to use so in a themepark environment, it can be controlled and managed and this is the thing, not everyone has a rollercoaster or a waterslide in their home. that's true, yeah.
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it does seem that adds to the experience, doesn't it? it adds to the senses because vr doesn't do that at the moment. the promise of vr that we see in sci—fi films and all that sort of thing is that vr will totally immerse us, it will fool every single sense of our body, but at the moment vr only fools two senses, our eyes and our ears, and it doesn't do that particularly well so maybe this is a way, the first step to fooling our other senses, our sense of motion, and our sense of touch. did you enjoy it, stupid question? i did enjoy it. i had reservations about going down down the slide with my eyes closed but once you get over that, it's fun, it's good. well done, take a long deserved break, it was arduous. it's been hard. we've been in the water — time to go for a bike ride now. gone are the days when you could just slap on a cycling helmet, and pootle around the roads and the cycle paths. these days you have to load up with the latest cycling tech. it's the law, and that's what lara lewington has been doing
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with the help of click‘s own boss, simon. meet simon — a regular cyclist and the editor of click. first off is the coros smart cycle helmet. it connects your mobile phone via bluetooth and, thanks to bone conduction technology, you can hear any sound that you want from your phone — that can be directions or music — without blocking out the sound of the road around you. be safe. thank you. it can be controlled via a remote or its app, which allows you to save routes and share data with friends. it also has a wind—resistant microphone designed for calls, if you consider chatting on the phone while cycling is a good idea, that is. we had a nice chat on the phone there, the sound was amazing. it was so clear. definitely the best thing i've tried on a bike like that, just in terms of the quality of the call. with this, you've got the added dimension of making sure that the bone conduction things are in exactly the right place.
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it's quite a feeling. getting jawbone right is always a difficult one and with this, really after a couple of weeks of trying to perfect it, to get the perfect signal, you kind of have to get it so tight you are almost garrotting yourself. when i'm in the middle of london and there is loads of traffic, it's kind of difficult to hear, i suppose, but i guess some people would say, it's better to hear the traffic than it is the music anyway. this is r—pur, an antipollution mask for cyclists and motorcyclists. the replaceable filters claim to keep pollution, pollen and viruses and bacteria at bay and, based on where you've been cycling, the app will access pollution data and figure out when you need to replace the filter. you looks slightly menacing in that. it's also 30 degrees in london today. it's pretty hot, yeah.
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it's better than some i have tried, i have to say, in that regard. it's a lot more comfortable than some i've tried before. and it's a slightly nicer design, perhaps. that said, it's very expensive compared to other masks. how about the idea that it connects to an app and aims to track the pollution that you're going to be encountering? to me, that sounds like a classic bit of tech overdesign. really, i think you can use commonsense a little bit to know when to change filters. finally, we have blinkers which are claimed to be the next generation of bike lights. they can shine a laser light in the street and they also provide the normalfunctions you'd expect from a light but the question is, are they any better? they are all yours to give a go. so the conclusion? you've got the brake light, which lights up as you slow down, presumably because it's got an accelerometer, which is really impressive and, when you're a cyclist, you do worry that people not noticing when you're coming
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to a halt. left—right indicators — there are so few cyclists who use that as a method of indication. i don't think i've ever seen any, to be honest, and the instructions say, don't rely on this on its own, you've also got to use your arm. i'd worry that i'd have too much stuff to think about, almost. that would concern me. they are very, very bright lights. there is almost an arms race in cycle lights today — they get righter and brighter — and these are very impressive even in daylight. that's it for the short cut of our summer sizzler for this year. i hope you've enjoyed it and don't forget the full—length version is up on iplayer for you to watch right now, if you fancy. we live on facebook and on twitter. after such an intense summer of sport, next week we are going to look back at some of the new tech that's been brought into play in the last few months. and we will leave you with one more
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thing which we hope illustrates the perils of filming someone going down a vr waterslide. enjoy this, our cameraman, nick, certainly did. laughter. good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. 0ur headlines today — a daring new frontier for space exploration. it's lift—off for nasa's mision to the sun. the shutters come down on seven more m&s shops as the retailer battles to improve its fortunes. paul pogba unveils
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a new penalty technique. as manchester united open the new premier league season with a win over leicester. could you give up social media for a month? we'll hear how it could improve your mental health.
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