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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 11, 2018 7:00am-8:01am BST

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good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. our headlines today — a daring new frontier for space exploration. it's lift—off for nasa's mision to the sun. the shutters come down on seven more m&s shops as the retailer battles to improve its fortunes. paul pogba unveils a new penalty technique. as manchester united open the new premier league season with a win over leicester. could you give up social media for a month? we'll hear how it could improve your mental health. i think it's quite healthy but i just don't think i could do it. chile, cloudy start. —— chilly. full forecasts coming up in the next 15 minutes. good morning, it's saturday august the 11th. our top story —
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nasa will this morning launch one of its most ambitious space missions — sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. a rocket carrying the parker solar probe will blast off from cape canaveral, in florida, at around 9:00. it will travel at speeds of more than 100 miles per second — that's the equivalent of london to sydney in 88 seconds — making it the fastest man—made object in history. will batchelor reports. and liftoff! a dress rehearsal for a journey into the sun. for more than 60 years, nasa has wanted to gather data from inside the sun's atmosphere. this morning's launch of the parker solar probe from cape canaveral in florida will achieve humanity's first closeup look at a star. protected by a shield nearly five inches thick, parker will orbit the sun 2a times over the next seven years, travelling at speeds
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of 430,000 mph, making it the fastest ever man—made object. at its closest point, parker will be at around 3.8—million miles from the sun, seven times at nearer than any previous probe. the prize is to understand the physics that drives the sun's great outbursts, the solar storms which can play havoc with technologies on earth, disrupting communications and satellites. and, nasa says, the chance to explore the last key region of our solar system to be visited by a spacecraft. an explosion at a military factory in wiltshire has killed one person and left another in a critical condition. chemring countermeasures, which is based near salisbury, makes products to protect military ships and aircraft from attack. the police said the incident was under control and there was no risk to the public. seven marks and spencer stores will shut today as part
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of a major restructuring plan. it comes a day after house of fraser was bought out of administration, and as more and more high street stores face pressure from rising costs and online retailers. our business correspondent joe lynam has more. a man's appeared in court in calfornia charged with starting a wild—fire that led to more than 20,000 people having to leave their homes. the holy fire, as it has become known, burned nearly 10,000 acres through the mountains of southern california. prosecutors say forrest clark had a grudge against a neighbour. he could face life in prison if convicted. conservative mp jacob rees mogg has claimed an investigation into borisjohnson is a "show trial" to stop him becoming leader. writing in the daily telegraph, the tory backbencher blamed theresa may's "personal rivalry" with mrjohnson for "taking the heat off labour", and said that some senior conservatives are envious of the former foreign secretary's popularity. mrjohnson is under investigation for a newspaper article
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in which he compared muslim women in full face veils to letter boxes and bank robbers. the government's decision to maintain its ban on boxing and martial arts in prisons is a missed opportunity according to the uk's leading expert on sport in prisons. in a report commissioned by the ministry ofjustice, professor rosie meek said the sports could help reduce re—offending and improve discipline injails. but ministers have rejected the recommendation, as our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford explains. teenage young offenders held in wetherby, working out their aggression in a rugby league session organised by leeds rhinos. keep going, guys, well done. taking exercise while behind bars helps with fitness, mental health and also with learning lessons for life on the outside. it gives you good discipline and that, like, you have got to be told what to do and take it on and stuff like that. you can turn into real—life situations. today's report into sport in prison found some good examples
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like here in wetherby but it says the provision in england and wales is inconsistent and underdeveloped and it says women's prisons must do more. but you won't see boxing or martial arts being taught in prisons or young offenders‘ institutions. it is not allowed. today's report suggests that the prison service at least considers changing that but that recommendation has not been accepted. boxing is taking place in our prisons anyway, innocently. professor rosie meek who wrote the report says boxing teaches discipline and teamwork and she is disappointed. if we can develop a well—designed programmes which have meaningful objectives around reducing reoffending than we really should be doing so. ministers agreed to improve sports provision and the education and life skills that can be taught alongside it, but the idea of inmates learning to fight in prison proved too much for them.
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daniel sandford, bbc news, wetherby. a passenger plane has crashed after an employee carried out an unauthorised take off from the seattle tacoma international airport. the turbo—prop aircraft was operated by horizon air — a sister company to alaska air. the airline said an employee had taken the plane, no passengers were on board at the time. the local sheriff said two military jets followed the aircraft but weren't involved in the crash. the plane crashed into a small island with a population ofjust 20, causing the fire. police confirmed it was not a terrorist incident will stop they said it involved just one man, 25—year—old local resident who wa nted man, 25—year—old local resident who wanted commit suicide. alaska airlines said a small commuter plane owned by sister carrier horizon it had been stolen from seattle—tacoma international airport. while he was india, the pilot was talking to air
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traffic control and it's been reported that two militaryjets were sent up to intercept him. apparently the plane was taken from seattle—tacoma airport. 0ur information now was that there was only one person on the plane and that was that the —— the person on the plane. i understand they might have been doing some air stunts. we noticed aircraft were scrambled from the air force base. there is no indication that this person who was flying the plane was tried to damage oi’ flying the plane was tried to damage or attack anything. 0k, flying the plane was tried to damage or attack anything. ok, but why has it gotjets? or attack anything. ok, but why has it got jets? this is eyewitness footage of the stolen plane being pursued by a jet. the man was at... was an employee. he joked with air traffic control that he might be given a pilots' job if he managed to land the plane. farmers across the australian region of new south wales are continuing to feel the effects of a drought after one of the driest autumn and winters in living memory. the government has provided 300 million pounds in emergency
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funding as forecasters predict another three months with little or no rain. we can cross now to the bbc‘s sydney correspondent phil mercer: and you give us a sense of what it's like they're at the moment and what impact this is likely to have on farmers in the coming months? this is the worst drought in living memory here are many farmers in eastern australia. we have just returned from one of the epicentre is of the drought in new south wales. north of sydney. we met a farmer called kate james and her family. they run beef cattle. they are determined to beat the drought. they are having to transport a feed in every week for their livestock. every month, it costs than £25,000 to keep their animals afloat. kate james says that the daily grind of life on the farm is a challenge. you wa ke life on the farm is a challenge. you wake up and think, 0k, we have got
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to do this all again. there is no i’ooiti to do this all again. there is no room for a break. there is no room to be sick. there is no room to not feel like doing it today. because the cows need to be fed. it's a gorgeous day, a sunny, winters day but we are having quite warm days in the middle of winter and this is not normal. this is quite exceptional. the land and kate james' farm is owned dry and aaron and it is amazing to see how some of australia's most famous agricultural and can be laid to waste. —— baron. that particular farm hasn't seen meaningful rain that two years and many, meaningful rain that two years and any meaningful rain that two years and many, many other farmers meaningful rain that two years and many, many otherfarmers in meaningful rain that two years and many, many other farmers in the meaningful rain that two years and many, many otherfarmers in the rain —— in the area are suffering. it is also towns, businesses, it is school children as well, being affected. the big dry is a big, big concern here. a rhino calf, one of
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only 650 in the world, has been playing outside for the first time, just over a week after being born at chester zoo. the baby, which is yet to be named, was born in front of astonished visitors 11 days ago, despite rhinos usually calving at night. with so few eastern black rhinos left on the planet, he is a very important new addition to the breeding programme working to prevent their extinction. time for a lie down and a little bit ofa time for a lie down and a little bit of a roll in the mud. so cute! the uk high street is continuing to struggle against online retailers and rising costs, with marks and spencer this weekend closing seven of its stores. it comes a day after house of fraser were bought out by sports direct, stopping them going the way of major names
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like toy r us and maplin which collapsed earlier this year. but how do people feel about the potential loss of big—name stores? here's what some of you had to say. disappointed and sad. been brought up disappointed and sad. been brought up with mns. i have a friend in a lot of the customers in the cafe she works in only come to town for marks & spencer for some she could lose herjob. i come back and forward to belfast regularly to visit my daughter and having a big store is really important. they should stay. if they are closing, we are taking the life out of a normal day—to—day life of the people. is house of fraser goes, victoria square suffers. i do believe that. i think it brings a lot of people in. suffers. i do believe that. i think
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it brings a lot of people inm still has a good name. if they can bring it back to the way it used to be. house of fraser in glasgow is a long established and well loved department store. we are now joined bya department store. we are now joined by a retail expert claire bailey. house of fraser yesterday being bought out by sports, direct. we can be optimistic in terms of what happened with the buyout of house of fraser. marks & spencer are restructuring for financial reasons. there was a time in the 90s and early 2000 were some of the large retail chains became over spaced. they took on far too many outlets
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and they now unsustainable because pre— dating online shopping, there was no other way to reach the population. now something of a 10% of all retail sales are through online channels. it still means 82% go through physical retail at the way we shop has changed. —— 18%. high—street, there is a lot of transformation. it is quite painful change that we are seeing new types of businesses pop up. in my local city centre, we have crazy golf and a private cinema opened and it is those social, experience all things that are changing the nature of what we wa nt that are changing the nature of what we want from our high streets. i am optimistic for what the high street has become but it is painfulfor the retail sector because less of what we will be seeing in our high streets will be traditional shops. a lot of people, anecdotally, if you
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asked about the high street, they say it is a shame. they like it when the big stores are there but they are not voting with their wallets, are not voting with their wallets, are they? they like the idea of it but ina are they? they like the idea of it but in a way, they are causing the problem because they are spending the money elsewhere in a different way. it is the increase in the cost base that has taken retailers try to be competitive on price, their costs are going up while the prices are trying to come down. the margin is under some much pressure that they have to reduce their store portfolio. things like business rates, minimum wage, utility cost, currency cost, they have all gone up ata time currency cost, they have all gone up at a time when consumer confidence has come down. it is the perfect storm. those businesses who already perhaps haven't invested in bed stores, they found themselves unable to bring their stores up to standard. vhs is another example. the stores were dated and people
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didn't enjoy visiting them and they took their money elsewhere. house of fraser has a bigger premises. isn't there a feature web people use the store and look around and buy somewhere else cheaper? possibly but there are still only 18% of retail sales going through pure online channels. these places have online channels. these places have online channels. some of the criticism levelled against house of fraser was the fact that they were too slow to respond to the online world. as well is the story to be in, it is being able to adapt their online to match. if you look at debenhams in comparison, they did very well to what we call the omni channel experience where you can browse online, visit the store, to weekend collect and mix up the digital with the physical and that appears to be the physical and that appears to be the preferred way. perhaps people do
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a bit of research and look at what is being said about products by other people and then they might go back to the store to purchase if they had a great experience and a great service proposition or they go somewhere else where they get a good service proposition. are you going shopping today? it i might do. of course, we've had such dry weather so far this summer, it's been a bit of a turnaround in recent days. yesterday we had heavy rain working in across england in particular although showers were widespread. 49 millimetres of rain in east sussex. that is getting on further. 0ver in east sussex. that is getting on further. over three quarters of a pair. looking at the weather picture today, it is a reasonable start to the weekend, sunny but a cold start. what we are going to see through the
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day, a big low pressure system. this will bring us some rain. it is a stunning dasher sunny but cold start to the day. we'll start to see the crowd coming in from the west. 0ver time, that rain will turn quite heavy. avail of cloud across central and southern england. capita wise, nationwide is, lacking hires in the light teens to low 20s. that's the weather picture through today. but we'll see the crowd continue to thicken across north—western areas through the night. it would be anywhere near as cold night as last night with temperatures between 15 and 17. tomorrow, we have our low
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pressure system making inroads. that is going to bring a band of rain with it so some wet weather overnight and it's one of these funds which will have pulses of energy. it might be that the rain eases off for a time. there is likely to be some further downpours. with the onshore winds in aberdeenshire, quite a cool day. 0therwise, 18— aberdeenshire, quite a cool day. otherwise, 18— 21 does it. further weather systems moving in from time to time. across southern parts of the uk, there is a tendency to the weather to be drier. that is the latest weather, back to youtube.
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i was just trying to explain instagram two c. the amount of time people spend on social media, it will be of great interest to people because it is quite startling. when you look at the amount of time people spend on social media. to be discussed. bbc news has been given rare access to a us reconnaissance flight over the south china sea. china is continuing its contentious military expansion in the region, despite fervent opposition from its neighbours and their allies. america says it won't sit back and allow the chinese to dominate the area unchallenged. rupert wingfield—hayes sent this report. this is the chinese navy politely telling the us navy to go away. far out in the south china sea, we're approaching one of china's huge new island bases. it's very clear they do not want us here. for the crew aboard this us
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navy p8 surveillance plane, this is now a daily encounter. it's a routine occurrence for us on these flights. it happens throughout the flight, when they come over and then we just go back with our standard response. it really has no effect on any operations or anything we do. as we close to 12 nautical miles, we can now see the huge extent of china's development out here. so what we're seeing on the screen here is live pictures of a place called mischief reef. and last time i flew over here 2.5 years ago, it was really just a large pile of sand. now you can see there has been extensive construction. this is what it looked like then — millions of tonnes of sand being pumped onto the reef to create new land. the first outline of a runway, but no buildings. look at the same place today — a forest of radar domes, aircraft hangars and maybe a building to park missile launchers. using the plane's high—powered
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camera, we watch as a group of vehicles drives down the runway. one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine... nine vehicles, moving. still looks like nothing on the runway, no aircraft present. these flights aren't just about surveillance. the americans are here to make a point. in the broadest sense, it's making sure that we maintain the rights that we have as a military aircraft, to fly in international airspace, maintain our presence in the area and show that we're not worried about the build—up that's happening and we're going to continue to stay down here in the south china sea. to understand what is at stake out here, listen to how the chinese navy today talked to an aircraft from a smaller, weaker neighbour, the philippines. with the spaces, china is succeeding in changing the very geography
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of the south china sea. despite america's assurances, down here the tide of history appears to be flowing towards beijing. rupert wingfield hayes, bbc news, with the us navy in the south china sea. how long do you think you could without using social media? there's no denying it's become a huge part of our lives, but some people claim it is actually bad for our health. the royal society for public health is calling for people to take part in a digital detox for the whole of september. we'll be talking to them in a moment, as well as one woman who says social media is a force for good. first, let's see what some of you had to say. i use social media every day. i use
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it personally, to keep up with friends, i use it so much and probably on a daily basis. i use it because it's probably on a daily basis. i use it because its quiet and janine fashion detainee. they used to use ita fashion detainee. they used to use it a lot weeks of fascias ago, weeks, even logging on. my favourite apps would be twitter and instagram. twitter. i use facebook, the social media i use facebook. twitter. i use facebook, the social media i use facebooklj twitter. i use facebook, the social media i use facebook. i use snapchat the most. social media detox would make you feel totally cut off. the most. social media detox would make you feel totally cut offlj would have no contact. i could do at a week, maybe start with a weekend but not a month. i could go six months off, no problem. i think so but not everyone is like me. would you go through detox, would you be able to switch off? probably. 0k, well... i don't know. i'm not quite
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sure about that. i would love the idea. i could do it, i think it's a good idea. joining us now is ed morrow from the royal society give us a set give us for public health, and bex lewis, a lecturer in digital marketing at manchester metropolitan university. you're not try to polarise things, saying it's good or bad. would be looking at this issue for a couple of years. there are a huge amount of positives that can come out of social media in terms of the networks you can build, the emotional support you get to be not associated with a lot of exacerbation of existing mental health problems around anxiety. body image issues are a huge thing. what will to do is say, give it up from
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month, he doesn't have to be com pletely month, he doesn't have to be completely cold turkey, you can try giving it up at social events. at the end of the month, reflect back, think, what are the elements i don't miss, and make up those out? how can i keep those and build a healthy relationship on social media. for me, it's the amount of time you spend scrolling, and this is terrifying to me. i was given the stats to how long i have been spending on social media over the past seven days. instagram, five hours, twitter, 3.5, whatsapp two. facebook, seven minutes. it is about ten hours in the last seven days. the kind of frame the amount of time we spend online is problematic but it's more about the quality of what we are doing. i think we agree with that. it's about what you are doing. if yourjob means you need to be
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up—to—date with things, probably look at this content. i grow up in a household without a screen, we won't allow the television. sol household without a screen, we won't allow the television. so i read a lot and i quite often think if you replace i spent six hours on my phone with six hours reading a book, everyone would think that is a good thing that focuses on a screen, it's seen as problematic. but how much time but what we are doing. not necessarily in the 21st century, we re necessarily in the 21st century, were kind of set everything has to be productive, there is nothing wrong withjust sitting be productive, there is nothing wrong with just sitting there and playing a bit of candy crush. the playing a bit of candy crush. the playing of the ten hours, he got a problem. if you take a back a generation. if you grow up in a house without television is, people
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are saying, and must be dreadful, is going to overtake our lives. it falls into place, it takes its place. i would suggest social media isa place. i would suggest social media is a bit ofa place. i would suggest social media is a bit of a different thing. there a lwa ys is a bit of a different thing. there always a way in which it can be getting, but it is about the opportunity cost. it's the kind of lessening the quality of my interactions with people who are with me at the time. on the nature of the campaign, it is realistic that people out to do that, that's fine. whatsapp and instant messaging, people need to be in contact. and your top tips the going cold turkey? i wouldn't, that is the
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wrong question. in i first heard about the campaign, saying that social media is bad, and actually, i think you need to have a habit. we need to think about the positives. i have just finished cancer treatment, going online at three o'clock in the morning when you are high on chemo and steroids and finding all having the same treatment and having that that chat is amazing. i've done a lot of work with churches were people with people are able to engage. the people who most probably need to step away from it. they are the least likely to step away from it. the ones who most need it, they are not going to do that. this is
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only one half of the work we are doing. actually getting them to reshape the way things work. they are reshape the way things work. they a re less reshape the way things work. they are less addictive, less compulsive and we want people ‘s use of social media to be intentional. rather than because you find yourself falling down. people have their thoughts this morning and they can get in touch with us via social media. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. nasa will launch one of its most ambitious space missions this morning— sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. a rocket carrying the parker solar probe will blast off from cape canaveral, in florida, around 9 o'clock. scientists hope the seven—year mission will gather data to help understand the solar storms which can disrupt satellite communications. an explosion at a military factory
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in wiltshire has killed one person and left another in a critical condition. chemring countermeasures, which is based near salisbury, makes products to protect military ships and aircraft from attack. the police said the incident was under control and there was no risk to the public. marks & spencer will close seven shops today as part of a major restructuring programme. the company plans to shut 100 branches by 2022 as it attempts to improve profitability at a time of unprecedented pressure for the british high street. it comes a day after department store chain house of fraser was bought out of administration. a passenger plane has crashed after an employee carried out "an unauthorised take off" from the seattle tacoma international airport. the turbo—prop aircraft was operated by horizon air — a sister company to alaska air. the airline said an employee had taken the plane — no passengers were on board at the time. the local sheriff said two military jets followed the aircraft but weren't involved in the crash.
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a man's appeared in court in calfornia charged with starting a wild—fire that led to more than 20,000 people having to leave their homes. the holy fire, as it has become known, burned nearly 10,000 acres through the mountains of southern california. prosecutors say forrest clark had a grudge against a neighbour. he could face life in prison if convicted. conservative mp jacob rees mogg has claimed an investigation into borisjohnson is a "show trial" to stop him becoming leader. the tory backbencher blamed theresa may's "personal rivalry" with mrjohnson for "taking the heat off labour", and said that some senior conservatives are envious of the former foreign secretary's popularity. mrjohnson has come underfire because of a newspaper article in which he compared muslim women in full face veils to letter boxes and bank robbers. ministers have rejected a call to lift a ban on boxing and martial arts classes in prisons in england and wales. a report commissioned by the government said training sessions would help
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promote discipline. but the ministry ofjustice said it was concerned the classes would amount to combat training for inmates. police in romania have clashed with tens of thousands of protesters demonstrating against government corruption. between 30 and 50 thousand people, including many returning ex—pats, took to the streets. there were reports of bottles and paving slabs being thrown, while police are said to have used tear gas and water cannons to try to control the crowds. emergency services said over 100 people needed medical attention. so the premier league is back and off to a flying start after united's 2—1 win over leicester. a great game and an unusual penalty. they were such a buzz about the world cup. football felt very good at that time so it will be interesting to see whether there will be a pickup on that. it lived
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up will be a pickup on that. it lived up to at month. paul pogba scored in the world cup final and he picks up and scores in the opening game of the premier league season and it lived up to the building last night. it was almost as exciting. and this is the kind of confidence that scoring in a world cup final will give you. paul pogba tookjust 3 minutes, and 19 steps to score the first goal in this season's premier league. and there was an unlikely scorer of united's second, luke shaw had never scored in senior football until this. jamie vardy got one back but 2—1 it finished. it was more important to win today than to win against bayern munich in a friendly. it is important to start well, its three points. a couple of hours ago we had zero points and now we have three points, this situation is better. despite two lengthy rain delays at lords, england's cricketers are well
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and truly in control of the second test against india, dominating the two reduced sessions they managed to play yestereday. patrick geary reports. ta ke two. after a full day lost to rain, lords resets. hopefully this time, they will get to the crease at least. so this was progress, after a long wait out through the long the room and into the path ofjimmy anderson. england had chosen to bowl. here's why. murali vijay barely saw his fifth delivery. conditions were changing and jimmy anderson works magic with clouds. they help him move the ball to take a nick, to take a wicket. exit kl rahul, followed again by drizzle. eventually, they got back out but all the pauses can make it difficult to know if you are coming or going. cheteshwar pujara was definitely going, run out by the new boy 0llie pope. pujara left and everyone followed, somewhat faster.
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they have been asking the rain for weeks in these parts, just not right now. england will want to get back out there, especially as they're on top. initially, they would have needed a boat. pity poor groundsman mick hunt, this is his last test after 49 years. somehow he and his team cleared it by five and how grateful england should be. for here in the evening sunshine was their golden wicket. virat kohli, india's captain, gone to chris woakes. sam curran removed dinesh karthik. india were only happy when it rained. jimmy anderson returned to torment them. he finished india off, taking five as they were bowled out for 107 on a day of water and waiting but most of all, wickets. chris woakes came in and it was almost seamless, the transition. all credit to him, he has not played in an england shirt for a while due to injury. when he came on, he carried on where stuart left off. same with sam curran. he followed me brilliantly at this end and it was a good group performance. to the european
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championships in berlin, and great britain's matt hudson—smith lived up to his billing as the favourite in the men's a00m as he held on to a massive lead coming into the home straight to win great britain's third athletics gold of the championships. he'll go for gold again this evening as part of the axiioom relay team. a good feeling. i was talking to my agent and my coach. time doesn't matter, for the future, is just about winning. that was the whole goal of this year. win europeans, i did it. made it look ugly but it did it. there was silverfor katerina johnson—thompson in the heptathlon, as she was beaten by the belgian 0lympic champion nafi thiam. johnson—thompson set a new personal best on her way to silver and says the championships are a ‘turning point‘ in her career. this european championships, i was against the very best in the world.
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i was against world and olympic champ, silver and bronze medallists from last year and one of the all—time greats in my opinion so i'm grateful i got to hold my own. there was a surprise medal for meghan beesley in the women's a00m hurdles final. she ran really well from lane one to claim bronze, her best ever individual performance at a senior major championships. jake wightman secured the fourth and final medal of the night for great britain in the men's1500m. he got himself a bronze. fellow brits charlie grice and chris 0'hare finished fifth and ninth respectively. glasgow is the other venue for these european championships and there's been more success in the pool for great britain. jack law and chris mears won silver in the men's synchronised 3—metre springboard final, missing out on gold by less than a point. it's law's third medal of these games after two golds earlier in the week. alistair brownlee missed out on a medal in the triathlon. the double olympic gold medallist finished fourth
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with france's pierre le corre taking gold. brownlee said he's had a terrible six months as he's struggled with injury but he says he's just happy to be racing. in the last golf major of the year, gary woodland set a new lowest 36—hole score at the us pga championship to lead before a thunderstorm postponed friday's play. the american shot a four—under 66 with shots like this with a fairway wood, and at 10 under par he's one shot clear of kevin kisner, who had a six—under 64. england'sjustin rose is 6 shots off the lead with tiger woods a shot further back. wigan warriors beat castleford tigers to close the gap on superleague leaders st helens. an early liam marshall try set wigan on their way to a 20—0 half time lead, but castleford rallied in the second half, scoring four tries of their own including this one from paul mcshane.
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but it wasn't enough as wigan held on to win 24—22. and do you want to see andy murray on a roller coaster? of course you do. here he is with fellow tennis pro nick kygrios at an amusement park in america. he apologised for swearing — we've cut that bit out — and said that he felt a bit queazy afterwards. nick kyrgios must be holding the camera. i really like that drop shot. that is a really bad joke and i can't believe i made it on television. the age at which people in england will be screened for bowel cancer is to be lowered by ten years, to 50, bringing the country
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in line with scotland. public health england says it hopes the change could improve survival rates for patients, so who will be affected.. currently there are around 42,000 new cases of bal cancer each year across the uk. of those cases, around 16,000 people die from the disease. if it's caught early around 9 out of 10 patients survive. that figure becomes just 1 in 10 for those diagnosed at a later stage. let's talk about this. do you see this, i mean, this is a ten year difference from the age of 6250. talk us through some of the practicalities. over the next few months for few years, we were changing the screening in england
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from 60 down to 50 so hopefully it will mean better pickup of early cancers, as you have mentioned. seat and 50 in three months time, and they send out a kit to you? —— so, you turn 50. yes, they send out a kit but some people find it difficult to use. you have to get little sticks. they all come in the post, you get little sticks and over a two—week period, you collect two samples from three different bowel movements at different stages. it is not the most convenient of tests at the moment and we are hoping that we will be moving to the scottish system with just one test where you p0p system with just one test where you pop the stick in, send it in the post and wait two weeks the results. you can understand why people might find it difficult but how much of a difference is it that you do don't -- if difference is it that you do don't —— if you can diagnose early on?
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massive. it is it is picked up in stage one, the earliest sign, 95 to 100% survival within five years and so it is fantastic competitor much later stages where it is only one in 100 survival. in terms of these kits, is it something people, when they are reaching their 50s, should be aware of anyway? what are the signs you should be looking out for? any unexplained weight loss, any bleeding from your back passage, any bleeding from your back passage, any bleeding on the stalls, anything where you have noticed change in your bowel habit, becoming increasingly constipated or a lump in yourtummy, get increasingly constipated or a lump in your tummy, get to your gp straightaway. you said people find the notion of doing it themselves
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difficult. people asking for help? yes, and we try to explain to them that otherwise the nhs website has a good information section on how to do the home testing and bowel cancer uk and cancer research uk have excellent services and leaflets online. this brings england in london scotland but what if you are in wales and northern ireland? you have your own programme. screening in those areas are similar to england at the moment. if you have any concerns, go and see your gp that if you have your testing kit at home, i would that if you have your testing kit at home, iwould recommend that if you have your testing kit at home, i would recommend getting it done and getting it sent off. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: this morning nasa will launch one of the most daring ventures in its history, sending the parker solar probe into the sun's outer atmosphere. marks & spencer is
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implementing the latest round of its store closure programme this weekend, as it battles to improve its fortunes. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. everything sort of changing at the moment. it changed as soon as somebody mention the word hosepipe ban. we have lots of heavy rain yesterday. this is how the rain worked its way in, went across england and parts of the south—east. 0ver england and parts of the south—east. over three quarters of a month worth of rain. a dry day. a cold start, temperatures down to one degree. south newington in 0xfordshire, across parts of the south midlands, it is cold. to compensate, affair of
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morning sunshine. turns cloudy. that is going to nudge clad in from the south and west as we go through the day. increasingly though sunny skies. the first signs of arrival of the brain across western cornwall. the rain will turn heavier and steady across south—west england and wales as we go through the afternoon. that is where the wettest weather is going to be. the south—westerly winds will strengthen. that cloud works across the midlands. that really leaves eastern england, eastern areas of scotla nd eastern england, eastern areas of scotland the best of the sunshine through the afternoon. temperatures in the high teens, low 20s. 0vernight tonight, the rain will get more widespread. it will move across northern ireland, quite heavy for a
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time before spreading into scotland as well. the bridges overnight, given all the cloud around, is going to bea given all the cloud around, is going to be a much milder nights. cabbages round 15— 17 for many. for sunday's forecast, the second half of the weekend looks like this. that area of low pressure is moving close to us. it's one of these whether funds that will have pulses of energy running along the front. the rain probably at its heaviest over south—west england. easing off a time across the midlands. the wet weather getting into northern and scotland. it could be cool across aberdeenshire. don't rely too much on the timings of this rain band because it could change a little bit. there will be positive energy working in, heavy showers following. as we look at the weather picture into next week, it stays quite u nsettled. into next week, it stays quite unsettled. there is no return of the heatwave but quite a time across
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parts of southern england. that is how the weather is shaping up. now it's time for the travel show. this week on the show, skyhigh in sarajevo. the capital city of bosnia and herzegovina. it is beautiful, and feels more turkish and more islamic than the rest of the balkans. these shops are filled with jewels and silverware. and with that, comes different architecture and a distinct food culture. the small city centre lies in a valley surrounded by hills, so there are wonderful views almost everywhere. but of course we don't know sarajevo primarily for its beauty. we know it for the terrible siege which ended with more than 10,000 people losing their lives in the 1990s. for three and a half years, bosnian serbs rained rockets down on the city. a quarter of a century later
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the scars are still visible. this used to be a holiday inn and it's where the world's press was stationed during the siege. it became a symbol of the war, and you might remember its distinctive yellow cladding on the outside, which has been kept to this day. the hotel has only just changed hands. it has had extensive renovation work and recently reopened under a different name. you would never know that for years, it was subject to frequent shelling and gunfire. normally, you might pay extra for a beautiful view of these hills, but for that very same reason it was one of the most dangerous spots to be in this hotel. artillery fire was being blasted from the top of those hills and actually lit this building on fire above the fifth floor multiple times. i am given a tour by hajro.
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during the war, he ran catering for the journalists stationed here. these days he is the executive director. can you tell us what role the hotel played during the war? and the hotel went through some recent renovations and the average person walking in would not see anything that reminded them of the war? hajro is very keen to emphasise how the hotel is looking forward to the future these days. but it isn't the only bosnian icon getting a shiny makeover. this long—abandoned cable car network finally reopened just a few months ago. it had been out of use since the war began. this is one of the old cable cars, built for the olympics in 1984. it was left abandoned and fell into ruin during the siege, but they still have
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one here on display. ajla here is deeply in love with sarajevo, and she has agreed to take me up into the hills. so you can see all of sarajevo, every little bit? everything, all of its glory and beauty. the renovation of the cable car seems like a big deal for the city. yes, it is. it is a symbol of the city, lots of people like that from the city centre you could go up the mountain in ten minutes, enjoy the fresh air, beautiful nature, and then, again, you are in the heart of the old town. the hills up here were positions for serbian snipers and for artillery. there is a perfect view of most of sarajevo. only in recent times have the landmines been cleared, but you can still see
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the odd military bunker. once at the top, there is one more repurposed relic. the bobsled track. built for sarajevo's moment in the sun, the winter olympics in 1984. it has been richly decorated, and the colour and nature up here makes a wonderful ride. action! i think i might need more practice at this. we did quite a slow version, i think. you pick up speed really fast. that's the whole point, right? it is supposed to be a bobsled shooting down this. yeah, in the war it was a shelter for the serbian army, that they used to shoot the city and everything. so unfortunately it had that sad purpose. but i think we remade things, to repaint it and everything,
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to make it morejoyful. with interesting activities like this do you think it is a step away from the memories of the war? yes, definitely. i think people are urging to go forward, not to think any more about war, to have a normal life, to have a decent life, next february we have the winter olympic games for young ones. i think also, it is a good way to show that over here we are more than what happened 20 years ago. in the 1920s and 30s, le touquet, on france's north coast was the glitzy destination of choice for wealthy british socialites. the birth of the jet age and longhaul travel means it has been overlooked ever since. but now innovations in flight sharing could put it back on your radar. we sent cat moh to try it out. just outside of london, not far from heathrow, is blackbushe airport. not quite what i was expecting, but i'm told this is the airport. hi, paul. hi, cat, how are you? lovely sunny day. hardly any wind, as you can see the windsock is completely pointing downwards. should be a very smooth flight. i'm sharing a flight with paul. he got his private pilot's license 25 years ago. i don't know how you can fit four people. two in the front, two in the back. it's quite simple. oh my goodness. this is tiny. i found paul through a website,
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wingly, think uber of the skies, sort of. you pick a date, destination, request a seat, and pay. it's one of a number of flight sharing platforms out there flying between general aviation airfields, which are often closer to town so i've chosen a day trip to le touquet in france. we are in the air. like a flying car. my god. what do you love about flying? i love getting out. i love the freedom. paul's dayjob is in it. being able to share flights helps to pay for this rather expensive hobby and keep his flying hours up. the cost is a major thing. so we get to fly at a third or a quarter of the costs we normally do because we split that with our passengers.
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how do you work out how much to charge passengers? there are only certain costs we can include, the hire of the plane, the fuel, landing fees, things like that, not fixed costs, but they get divided by the number of passengers in the plane. because you are not allowed to make any money out of this, are you? no, i'm not a commercial pilot, so i'm not allowed to make any profit. so i pay for this flight the same as you are. my plane seat cost £150, but unlike a commercial flight it's very weather dependent and could have been cancelled at a moment's notice if paulfelt it wasn't safe to fly. flying over the channel now, french radio signals are coming through. welcome to france. yay! my legs definitely feel a bit wobbly. i tell you what, i'm glad i didn't have breakfast this morning. le touquet was once a busy international hub, but now you need a private plane to fly here,
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so flight sharing is a great way to visit without blowing the budget. plus the airport is practically in town, so all you need is a bike, once you clear customs, of course. pilot paul to tour guide paul. ready to go? i think so. i have got to remember which side of the road to be on. yes. the town is now a mix of old british charm and french leisure, with hints of its bygone days. this 116—year—old chocolate shop is an institution here. confession time, i may have gotten carried away in there. but it smelled so good. but all good things come to an end. we have to be back before sunset because the airfield in britain has no runway lights to land.
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it looks like we made itjust in time. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. 0ur headlines today. the countdown to a daring new frontier for space exploration. it's lift—off for nasa's mission to the sun. the shutters come down on seven more m&s shops as the retailer battles to improve its fortunes. do these september issue covers signal fashion's new diversity, or are they a one season wonder? paul pogba unveils... ...a new penalty technique. as manchester united open the new premier league season with a win over leicester. music: daddy cool by boney m and we meet the men making dad dancing cool. good morning, a chilly but sunny
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start, it will cloud over later
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