Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 11, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

8:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. our headlines today. the countdown to a daring new frontier for space exploration. it's lift—off for nasa's mission to the sun. the shutters come down on seven more m&s shops as the retailer battles to improve its fortunes. do these september issue covers signal fashion‘s new diversity, or are they a one season wonder? paul pogba unveils... ...a new penalty technique. as manchester united open the new premier league season with a win over leicester. music: daddy cool by boney m and we meet the men making dad dancing cool. good morning, a chilly but sunny start, it will cloud over later and we'll see rain in wales and south—west england later. a full forecast in the next 15 minutes. good morning, it's
8:01 am
saturday august 11th. our top story. nasa will today launch one of its most ambitious space missions — sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. a rocket carrying the parker solar probe will blast off from cape canaveral, in florida, at around 9 o'clock. it will travel at speeds of more than 100 miles per second — that's the equivalent of london to sydney in 88 seconds — making it the fastest man—made object in history. will batchelor reports. and liftoff! a dress rehearsal for a journey into the sun. for more than 60 years, nasa has wanted to gather data from inside the sun's atmosphere. this morning's launch of the parker solar probe from cape canaveral in florida will achieve humanity's first closeup look at a star. protected by a heat shield nearly five inches thick, parker will orbit the sun 2a times over the next seven years, travelling at speeds of 430,000 mph, making it
8:02 am
the fastest ever man—made object. at its closest point, parker will be at around 3.8—million miles from the sun, seven times nearer than any previous probe. the prize is to understand the physics that drives the sun's great outbursts, the solar storms which can play havoc with technologies on earth, disrupting communications and satellites. and, nasa says, the chance to explore the last key region of our solar system to be visited by a spacecraft. will batchelor, bbc news. an explosion at a military factory in wiltshire has killed one person and left another in a critical condition. chemring countermeasures — which is based near salisbury — makes products to protect military ships and aircraft from attack. the police said the incident was under control and there was no risk to the public. marks and spencer will close seven shops today as part of a major restructuring programme.
8:03 am
the company plans to shut 100 branches by 2022 as it attempts to improve profitability at a time of unprecedented pressure for the british high street. it comes a day after department store chain house of fraser was bought out of administration. a man's appeared in court in calfornia charged with starting a wildfire that led to more than 20,000 people having to leave their homes. the holy fire — as it has become known— burned nearly 10 thousand acres through the mountains of southern california. prosecutors say forrest clark had a grudge against a neighbour. he could face life in prison if convicted. jacob rees—mogg has criticised the prime ministers comments about boris johnson's remarks over muslim women wearing a full face veil. writing in the daily telegraph, the tory backbencher blamed theresa may's "personal rivalry" with mrjohnson for "taking the heat off labour",
8:04 am
and said that some senior conservatives are "envious" of the former foreign secretary's popularity. a downing street source said it was not about individuals or personalities but about the fact that a complaint had been made. ministers have rejected a call to lift a ban on boxing and martial arts classes in prisons in england and wales. a report commissioned by the government said training sessions would help promote discipline. but the ministry ofjustice said it was concerned the classes would amount to combat training for inmates. a passenger plane has crashed after an employee carried out "an unauthorised take off" from the seattle tacoma international airport. the turbo—prop aircraft was operated by horizon air — a sister company to alaska air. the airline said an employee had taken the plane — no passengers were on board at the time. andy moore reports. the plane crashed into a small island with a population ofjust 20, causing this fire. police confirmed it was not a terrorist incident. they said it involved just one man, a 29—year—old local resident
8:05 am
who wanted to take his own life. alaska airlines said a small commuter plane owned by sister carrier horizon had been stolen from seattle?tacoma international airport. while he was in the air, the pilot was talking to air traffic control and it's been reported that two militaryjets were sent up to intercept him. apparently the plane was taken from seattle?tacoma airport. 0ur information now is that there was only one person on the plane and that was the person flying the plane. i understand they might have been doing some air stunts. i know that some aircraft were scrambled from the air force base. there is no indication that this person who was flying the plane was trying to damage or attack anything. eyewitness voiceover: 0k, but why has it gotjets? this is eyewitness footage of the stolen plane being pursued by a jet. the man at the controls was a ground employee. hejoked with air traffic control that he might be
8:06 am
given a pilot'sjob if he managed to land the plane. andy moore, bbc news. the us chemical giant monsanto has been ordered to pay nearly $290 million in damages to a man who says its weedkiller made him terminally ill. a jury in california decided that the firm was negligent and malicious for failing to warn users of the risk of the herbicide glyphosate. monsanto says its product is safe and it will appeal the ruling. farmers across the australian region of new south wales are continuing to feel the effects of a drought after one of the driest autumn and winters in living memory. the government has provided £300 million in emergency funding as forecasters predict another three months with little or no rain. we can cross now to the bbc‘s sydney correspondent phil mercer: good morning to you phil. australia isa good morning to you phil. australia is a country that is used to is an extreme conditions but this is on a different level, isn't it? yes, we
8:07 am
spent some time in the drought zone near tamworth, north of sydney. and it is amazing how some of australia's prime agricultural land has been laid to waste. the ground there is dry, barron, in some parts and hasn't had a meaningful reins of the best part of two years. it is affecting everyone, businesses, towns, farming families, sculptured and is well being affected. we spoke with rachel ferguson, the deputy principal at the manila central school in new south wales. she says the drought is affecting students who might be. as mike the land. the drought is affecting students who might be. as mike the landm you are born on the land it is a very ha rd you are born on the land it is a very hard thing to walk away from. but i think increasingly when you look at the costs of carting water, the time and psychological cost of the time and psychological cost of the industry, it is tempting for those students to go away and i can understand why because i think for
8:08 am
most of them bad idea of secure employment, secure financial stability, was obviously appealing against playing the numbers on the farm. there is not only that psychological cost but an immense financial cost to farmers as well. the new south wales government has been saying that it could call in the military to help transport animalfeed the military to help transport animal feed and water to drought — hit areas. the federal government in australia is also providing emergency cash assistance to farmers. phil mers are reporting from sydney. a rhino calf — one of only 650 in the world — has been playing outside for the first time, just over a week after being born at chester zoo. the baby, which is yet to be named, was born in front of astonished visitors 11 days ago, despite rhinos usually calving at night. with so few eastern black rhinos left on the planet,
8:09 am
he is a very important new addition to the breeding programme working to prevent their extinction. and very cute as well. i sure experts could confound this but rhino babies look like miniature versions of the adults, although without the horns. do you know what a mean? if you see a puppy it is obviously a puppy but if you saw that in isolation you might not necessarily... i know what i mean! maybe someone will agree with me. it's nine minutes past eight. one of the most ambitious space missions in history is due to blast off in around 45 minutes' time. nasa is sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. the parker solar probe will orbit the star 2a times over the next seven years, getting closer than any spacecraft has gone before, and withstanding temperatures of more than 1300 degrees celsius. tamela maciel (pron: mass—eel) is from the national space centre. good morning. we thought it would be
8:10 am
at 833 but it has been pushed back. this often happens with rocket launchers, they want to make sure everything is perfect. small delays, but they've got a 65 minute window so but they've got a 65 minute window so fingers crossed everything will go well. this has been six decades in the making. are you confident it is going to happen? it's so exciting. the reason it is happening 110w exciting. the reason it is happening now is that the technology has allowed us to do this are the first time. you can imagine going to the sun, extreme speeds, extreme temperature. in 1950 81 this was first proposed we did not have the material to protect instruments that close to the sun. now we do, we have carbon fibre almost. you can protect from temperatures of 1500 celsius
8:11 am
and keep your instruments safe. we are looking at one of the heat shields now. this probe is the size ofa shields now. this probe is the size of a small car. it isn't huge and we have this circular shield, and all the instruments are behind it. hidden behind it. the shield co nsta ntly hidden behind it. the shield constantly faces the sun servers instruments are never looking at the sun itself. there's something in the atmosphere, the plasma, the particles coming off the sun, measuring the magnetic shields, week can't predict big solar flares about being there. these solar flares have the potential to impact satellites and power grids on earth. this will be, the rocket itself, i'm trying to get this right, it will be the fastest man made object ever to have been created, is that right? the
8:12 am
rocket is fairly normal, delta force heavy rocket, one of the heaviest. but in terms of the spacecraft, as $0011 but in terms of the spacecraft, as 50011 as but in terms of the spacecraft, as soon as it has left the rocket, as $0011 soon as it has left the rocket, as soon as it has left the rocket, as soon as it has left the rocket, as soon as it gets going close to the senate will be the fastest man—made object in history, 120 miles a second. the distance between manchester and london in one second. very fast but it will take a while to get there. when will it be the closest it can get to the sun? 2024, i believe. a good few years into the mission but it will first arrive at the sun in november, so in a couple of months it will get closer and closer. it's using the planet venus to manoeuvre itself closer to the sun. really complicated dynamics. we all still have a fascination with space travel. the pictures we saw a moment ago, with your expertise, we
8:13 am
sort of familiar with these images, nasa's and images. what is happening now, do we call it a count down yet? 40 minutes to go. it's in the middle of the night. a night launch in florida. people will be positioning themselves within miles around the launch pad. last minute checks of all the data? making sure that the free will is correct, all the systems you can possibly measure, they are double—checking everything. this is decades in the making. lots of careers of scientists on the line. it's named after eugene parker, who is that? an american scientist, an astronomer, the first person to propose the idea of atmosphere for the sun. and the solar wind. since then there is a lot we don't understand, we don't understand why the atmosphere is
8:14 am
hotter than the surface of the sun. it's completely counterintuitive. that would be like being close to a campfire and that would be like being close to a camp fire and as you move away it gets hotter! it doesn't make sense. this is one reason why we want to send a probe. do they give us a time when the countdown will start, will it be two minutes long? at various stages to it. you've got minutes ahead of time and then seconds, stay with us, whenever it happens, it will be good to have you on hand. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. that time is 840. this morning nasa will launch one of the most daring ventures in its history, sending the parker solar probe into the sun's outer atmosphere. marks & spencer is implementing the latest round of its store closure programmes this weekend, as it battles to improve its fortunes. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. hi tina, hi charlie, i know we will
8:15 am
wa nt hi tina, hi charlie, i know we will want rain because it has been so dry but yesterday was very wet. widespread showers, general rain across england, 49 millimetres of rain in east sussex, that's over three quarters of one month's rain in east sussex, that's over three quarters of one months worth. we have a dry start today but it is chilly. look at these temperatures. 4 degrees in parts of oxygen. 0ne chilly. look at these temperatures. 4 degrees in parts of oxygen. one in northern ireland, in county down. for most of us we have sunshine to come before the weather turns cloudy. it will turn cloudy today because we've got a weather system out to the west and this is pushing a weather front in across south—west england, it will bring cloud and outbreaks of rain, the rain will arrive across western cornwall, the rain will get heavier as the day
8:16 am
goes by, across all of south—west england and wales and will probably start to see that band of rain extending further east. we may well see some rain turning up across central and southern england, maybe across the midlands into the latter pa rt across the midlands into the latter part of the afternoon. nevertheless the heaviest rain might be in the brecon beacons and south—west england. away from that every of cloud will keep sunshine across eastern england, some passing showers for the northern isles, temperature wise, generally high teens to low 20s, 23 in hull, one of the highest two bridges in the country. 0vernight the rain will become more widespread across england and wales, probably some fog patches on the hills. it will stay windy overnight, with all this cloud and rain working in it will be a much milder mud compared with last night with overnight lows between 15 and 17 celsius. into sunday this area of low pressure will continue to throw rain across the country
8:17 am
that it will have pulses of energy working along it, pulses of heavy rain. the heaviest across south west england and wales before weakening across east anglia and the midlands. some wet weather for northern ireland and scotland, with onshore winds in aberdeenshire it could be gloomy, grey and cold, 14 degrees. elsewhere, two bridges generally into the high teens and 20s, probably feeling more humid, more rain in the afternoon across wales and south—west england. into next week it should stay unsettled across the north—west, no return of the heatwave, although temperatures will be lifting in the early part of the week across parts of southern england, back towards the mid—20s although not into the mid—30s that we have endured at some stages this summer. that's the way it looks, back to you, tina and charlie. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers.
8:18 am
the broadcaster and historian tessa dunlop is here to tell us what's caught her eye. hello, i promised i wouldn't talk about boris johnson orjeremy hello, i promised i wouldn't talk about borisjohnson orjeremy corbyn but it is proving almost impossible! cani but it is proving almost impossible! can i ask you to hold that thought. we'll just look at the headlines and then we'll come back to that story. i know he is on the front pages as well. the guardian leads with comments from the chancellor phillip hammond suggesting a so called "amazon tax" could be applied to online retailers to help the struggling high street. amazon also features on the front of the times, which reports the company is set to be banned from claiming to offer guaranteed next day delivery for its "prime" customers, ahead of a ruling by the advertising watchdog. the daily telegraph features an interview with conservative backbencherjacob rees—mogg who says borisjohnson is being set up for a "show trial" over his burqa comments because of theresa may's
8:19 am
"personal rivalry" with the former foreign secretary. and the daily mail carries a photograph ofjeremy corbyn, which reportedly shows the labour leader during a wreath—laying ceremony at a cemetery in tunisia. the paper claims mr corbyn is standing near to the graves of members of the palestine liberation 0rganisation, including one man who was involved in the 1972 munich 0lympics attack. it was previously reported that mr corbyn had attended such a ceremony in 2014. i sort of stopped due in mid—flow there but these are the themes the papers are picking up. even matthew parish in the times says we need the right to ridicule and i am a big fan of matthew parish and i think we should exercise free speech. i think the key difference today with both borisjohnson the key difference today with both boris johnson and jeremy corbyn,
8:20 am
the key difference today with both borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn, and what we can refer to as their failing, in terms of raising the level of the debate, they have brought it down. there are both in positions of power and they are members of our two biggest political parties. so on the one hand we have jeremy corbyn who has 40 isn't able to endorse the official holocaust memorial definition of anti—semitism, and this ties back to his uses with israel and what is seen as his failure to recognise it asa seen as his failure to recognise it as a legitimate state. i don't want to put words into his mouth but there are issues there. and boris johnson in a very different manner referring to women who wear the burger in an unkind and unhelpful fashion. this is not dented boris
8:21 am
johnson's appeal. the party faithful who would like him to be the next prime minister still have him as the frontrunner. and jeremy corbyn‘s position as labour leader is not being questioned. if you look back in history, that dog whistling note courses the debate. 0ften in history, that dog whistling note courses the debate. often it is endorsed by the masses. they have nonetheless lost the job because i think we expect of our leaders a standard, i'm saying that these men up, rumble but when enoch powell made his rivers of blood speech between 60% and 80% of people in opinion polls approved of what he said yet he was sacked as shadow defence secretary. i'm not saying that they should be sacked...” defence secretary. i'm not saying that they should be sacked... i do saying they have public support for what they say? and seeing that boris
8:22 am
johnson, currently in the polls, it does not seem to have dented his popularity within the conservative party. some in politics seem to think it is better to be talked about than not talked about. and if that means that part of the dialogue is controversial, as some people might say, toxic, that is ok because you keeping your name in frame. it sounds cynical but it happens. we're running to the right and to the hard left, where other representative voices of those of us in the centre who do not feel that either leader is speaking for us? and also race relations such a precious files. 0nce relations such a precious files. once you smash them it is hard to put it back together. —— such a precious vase. what is your next story? brits in french flood rescue. california is burning although
8:23 am
a p pa re ntly california is burning although apparently that was started by an arsonist. but right across europe, you are indeed reporting this morning the big drought in australia it seems that we have had armageddon narrative after armageddon narrative. we just need to look at the weather forecast, we don't need a blockbuster scare story from hollywood. not only have we had these unprecedented fires, we are not getting the floods. it is the environmentalists have said figures. and yet there is a feeling, and in papers again, they write about this sense of impotence. what can we do? michael gove says, don't use a plastic straw. will that really make a difference when the permafrost is there just seems to be this disconnect between what is happening and how we can change things. the evidence of course is on an
8:24 am
individual basis people generally try to embrace it and have made changes. people tried to do what they can. this time for one more. this is a discussion in the mail, time for a non—white star to play james bond. a bit patronising, why was this not time before? my only issueis was this not time before? my only issue is that he's got to be beddable. can we ask the women watching... ? beddable. can we ask the women watching...? should there be a different question or should that submita different question or should that submit a question? i think he has to be. james bond is a ladies man. he has to be suave and muscular and convincing. and it is out there certainly is. i am worried that if you put a posh white man in the part, like benedict cumberbatch,
8:25 am
eddie redmayne, none of them are really sex symbols. i used to have an issue with roger moore because he was not sexy enough and he always had hairspray. his thing was being smooth. very smooth. would we have the same conversation if we talked about a female lead? that is the next debate in ten years, it's time for a female james bond. you will be backin for a female james bond. you will be back in an hour, we'll see you then. thank you very much. prisoners need should be given more of a chance to take part in sport, according to a report commissioned by the ministry ofjustice. it says not only should alljails offer some form of physical activity for inmates, but the government should also consider lifting its ban on boxing and martial arts in order to cut reoffending and improve discipline. the report author is professor rosie meek, who joins us now from our southampton studio. thank you forjoining us. . rosie,
8:26 am
what evidence is there that sport changes offenders's lives inside prison? henri there's a lot of evidence. i've been doing research in this field for about ten years. the data that has to this report shows all sorts of different sport —based programmes can be used, not just as a public health is you in promoting health and well—being but ultimately in efforts to reduce reoffending, the evidence is accumulating, really promising there, about how we can use well designed innovative sports —based programmes to encourage people to get involved in education, to go into employment in the sports and fitness sectors. and generally to be able to manage their emotions and violence and develop team skills and other positive attributes coming from sports. so it is about discipline and rehabilitation inside prison. it is interesting that girls
8:27 am
and women, according to your report, not accessing the sports provisions in place, why is that? we know that there's only about 5% of our prison publishing made up of women. but one finding has shown that they are the least active group in prisons. we see big health issues associated with that. i've discovered a range of barriers for why women are not physically active. some of them mirror the barriers we find in community settings, women and girls feeling uncomfortable in a physical education environment, prisons issued pe clothing until recently and they were not gender specific so women were expected to wear boys's shorts is sometimes their underwear could be seen by male staff, or trainers far too big for them. basic issues around closing are important. also the type of sports on offer to women. my recommendation that we have a gendered activity for women
8:28 am
suggests that we should think more creatively about how we are making our women active because the benefits are there notjust in terms of health but in terms of reducing reoffending. rosie, one of your recommendations rejected outright by the government is the idea of allowing and boxing martial arts in prisons. many viewers might not have realised they were banned in the first place. your response to the government rejecting its introduction once more? obviously i'm disappointed. my suggestion was that governors and a very skilled pe staff working in our prisons should be empowered to make decisions, when appropriate, but when carefully delivered professionally designed boxing related programmes can be used in our prisons. there's a lot of evidence from our communities that shows that using boxing related initiatives be incredibly powerful in working with some of our
8:29 am
disaffected people, in particular young people. bruno boxing programmes can actually help reduce levels of violence and some of the schools that, the programmes are what we need in prisons today so i'm disappointed that the government is not willing to at least pilots and initiatives which we will evaluate in terms of how we can use those programmes, and not doing so is missing out on an opportunity. do ta ke missing out on an opportunity. do take on board some of the safety concerns in prisons? we are in a time when prisons are struggling to control offenders, the well—being of staff is an issue and they would say you are encouraging combat training and violence. fighting goes on in prisons, whether or not there's policy around marshall arts. the evidence from community studies shows that when used properly, these
8:30 am
martial arts initiatives will reduce violence. prisons are violent places and the staff need as much they can to reduce violence. my suggestion is that those staff and governors should at least have the choice. i've spoken to staff in england and wales who have so they are frustrated that they can't use a boxing related activity with a particular cohort of offenders when appropriate so i stand by that recommendation. we will leave it there, thank you, rosie. professor rosie meek speaking to us from southampton. it's 8:30am. stay with us. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. here's a summary of this morning's main news. nasa is about to launch one of its most ambitious space missions this morning, sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere.
8:31 am
a rocket carrying the parker solar probe will blast off from cape canaveral, in florida, around 9 o'clock. scientists hope the seven—year mission will gather data to help understand the solar storms which can disrupt satellite communications. we will go to that launch as it happens. an explosion at a military factory in wiltshire has killed one person and left another in a critical condition. chemring countermeasures — which is based near salisbury — makes products to protect military ships and aircraft from attack. the police said the incident was under control and there was no risk to the public. marks and spencer will close seven shops today as part of a major restructuring programme. the company plans to shut 100 branches by 2022 as it attempts to improve profitability at a time of unprecedented pressure for the british high street. it comes a day after department store chain house of fraser was bought out of administration. a passenger plane has crashed after an employee carried out "an unauthorised take off" from the seattle tacoma international airport. the turbo—prop aircraft was operated by horizon air — a sister company to alaska air.
8:32 am
the airline said an employee had taken the plane — no passengers were on board at the time. the local sheriff said two military jets followed the aircraft but weren't involved in the crash. the conservative mp, jacob rees—mogg, has criticised the prime minister's handling of the row over borisjohnson's comments about the full—face veils worn by some muslim women. writing in the daily telegraph, the tory backbencher blamed theresa may's "personal rivalry" with mrjohnson for "taking the heat off labour", and said that some senior conservatives are envious of the former foreign secretary's popularity. a downing street source said the issue was not about individuals or personalities — but about the fact that a complaint had been made. ministers have rejected a call to lift a ban on boxing and martial arts classes in prisons in england and wales. a report commissioned by the government said training sessions would help promote discipline. but the ministry ofjustice said it was concerned the classes would amount to combat training for inmates. the us chemical giant, monsanto, has been ordered to pay nearly
8:33 am
$290 million in damages to a man who says its weedkiller made him terminally ill. a jury in california decided that the firm was negligent and malicious for failing to warn users of the risk of the herbicide glyphosate. monsanto says its product is safe and it will appeal the ruling. police in romania have clashed with tens of thousands of protesters demonstrating against government corruption. between 30,000 and 50,000 people, including many returning expats, took to the streets. there were reports of bottles and paving slabs being thrown, while police are said to have used tear gas and water cannons to try to control the crowds. emergency services said over 100 people needed medical attention. those are the main stories this morning. sport time. everyone is talking about pogba and that penalty. they are. it looks ordinary behind you, when people sit in the top corner,
8:34 am
fresh from the world cup, scoring in the final. but look at the penalty. it isa the final. but look at the penalty. it is a little bit different. he steps up, right—footed overtakes 19 tiny steps before he takes that penalty to put manchester united 1—0 up penalty to put manchester united 1—0 up against leicester. luke shaw made it 2-0. up against leicester. luke shaw made it 2—0. this is his first—ever senior goal, hooking it in with his left foot. jamie vardy got one back for leicester. it was more important to win today than against bayern munich in a friendly. so it was important to start well. a couple of hours ago, we had zero points and now we have three points. the situation is better. so the football season is back, as is football focus and dan walker at midday... morning. nice to be back, isn't it?
8:35 am
i was going to bring in the new premier league football for you, but mike bushell brought it in yesterday. he was one step ahead. stealing your thunder. but we established it was a similar shape and size. if you want any technical stuff, it has only got four panels. so where the panels meet on the ball aware the hotspots are. so if you have fewer panels, there are more sweet spots. so this is what i will be spending money on at christmas for my little boy, because he wants the replica. and that was what pogba scored his penalty with last night. so today we will be looking at that and dissecting it with alex scott and dissecting it with alex scott and modern ups of. we also have jordan pickford will do we will hear from the wolves boss. they are one
8:36 am
of the promoted sides which have spent a lot of time over the summer, as have fulham. and jack wilshere is on the programme. the former england international used to play for arsenal and has now signed for west ham. he told us about what it is like watching the world cup as a fan this summer. i was in the pub for one of the games. it was the columbia game when it went to penalties. and ifinally understood what fans went through. it was awful. even though you have done shoot outs before and you have watched your team ? shoot outs before and you have watched your team? yeah, it was easier to be in it than to watch it on tv. especially when jordan henderson missed. i thought we were going out, and then pickford pulled out of the bag and we went through and it was a good feeling. but it wasn't to watch. kyle walker is on the show as well and we will be
8:37 am
looking at sunderland. two seasons ago, they started the season by taking on manchester city. this year, they are taking on luton, so a big four. so there is loads to come in. where are back in business at midday on bbc one. do you want your ball back? yes, please. let's go to cricket now. despite two lengthy rain delays at lords, england's cricketers are well and truly in control of the second test against india, dominating the two reduced sessions they managed to play yesterday. patrick geary reports... ta ke two. after a full day lost to rain, lords resets. hopefully this time, they'll get to the crease at least. so this was progress, after a long wait out through the long room and into the path ofjimmy anderson. england had chosen to bowl.
8:38 am
here's why. murali vijay barely saw his fifth delivery. conditions were changing and jimmy anderson works magic with clouds. they help him move the ball to take a nick, to take a wicket. exit kl rahul, followed again by drizzle. eventually, they got back out but all the pauses can make it difficult to know if you're coming or going. cheteshwar pujara was definitely going, run out by the new boy 0llie pope. pujara left and everyone followed, somewhat faster. they have been asking for rain for weeks in these parts, just not right now. england will want to get back out there, especially as they're on top. initially, they would have needed a boat. pity poor groundsman mick hunt, this is his last test after 49 years. somehow, he and his team cleared it by five, and how grateful england should be, for here in the evening, sunshine was their golden wicket. virat kohli, india's captain, gone to chris woakes.
8:39 am
sam curran removed dinesh karthik. india were only happy when it rained. jimmy anderson returned to torment them. he finished india off, taking five as they were bowled out for 107 on a day of water and waiting, but most of all, wickets. chris woakes came in and it was almost seamless, the transition. all credit to him, he's not played in an england shirt for a while due to injury. but when he came on, he carried on where stuart left off. same with sam curran. he followed me brilliantly at this end and it was a good group performance. in the last golf major of the year, gary woodland set a new lowest 36—hole score at the us pga championship to lead before a thunderstorm postponed friday's play. the american shot a four—under 66 with shots like this with a fairway wood, and at 10 under par he's one shot clear of kevin kisner, who had a six—under 64. england'sjustin rose is 6 shots off the lead with tiger woods a shot further back.
8:40 am
wigan warriors beat castleford tigers to close the gap on superleague leaders st helens. an early liam marshall try set wigan on their way to a 20—0 half time lead... there looked no way back for castleford, but they rallied in the second half — scoring four tries of their own including this one from paul mcshane. but it wasn't enough as wigan held on to win 24—22. and that is all your sport. we are going to pick up now with one of the success stories from the european championships, which has been great to follow, really exciting. last night there was a brilliant sequence of events. britain's katarina johnson—thompson
8:41 am
came close to a gold in the heptathlon yesterday. she held the lead after five events but lost it to a huge javelin throw by the seemingly unstoppable belgian, nafi thiam. and shejoins us now. congratulations on your silver medal win yesterday. how are you feeling? yeah, iam win yesterday. how are you feeling? yeah, i am super tired. i didn't get much sleep. but i'm glad to be back in the stadium and reflecting on a good performance. you had a pretty tough competitor who you are up against in the form of nafi thiam. how do you go into an event like that knowing that the competition is so strong? yeah, i speak highly of her. she has scored over 7000 points. she is unbeatable at the
8:42 am
minute. but i feel like everybody on the track can be beaten and i feel like i pushed her right to the end. i was happy with my performance and i was happy with my performance and i was happy with my performance and i was happy to show that i can compete against her.|j i was happy to show that i can compete against her. i watched some of the events last month. i was listening to the wise words of the bbc panel who were watching your performance. they were talking about you and the way you looked and felt during the whole two days. they thought they saw in you a change in your demeanour, that you looked happier. is that something you felt in yourself? yeah, i did come into this competition with a different focus. i didn't feel like a had pressure on me. the german was at home. she is the world silver medallist. i felt i home. she is the world silver medallist. ifelt i could just home. she is the world silver medallist. i felt i could just be home. she is the world silver medallist. ifelt i could just be me
8:43 am
and just concentrate on the process and just concentrate on the process and take each event as they come. it definitely worked and i feel like it isa definitely worked and i feel like it is a turning point for me. this competition has given me so much confidence going forward to the next two years. the world and there are next year and then tokyo, the big 0lympic next year and then tokyo, the big olympic games. i was happy to have a big personal best in the championships. it bodes well for the future. it is a great achievement, katarina, but you are living in france these days. how much does it help that you are based there for a lot of your training? it definitely helps, especially with my throws, although i lost it with the javelin. my although i lost it with the javelin. my throws have improved by a couple of metres. so for me, it was all about finding someone who could help improve my throws and my heptathlon asa improve my throws and my heptathlon as a whole. in the past, i have had as a whole. in the past, i have had a good performances individually, but they have never come together in the heptathlon. now i have the
8:44 am
confidence that i can do this and i ama confidence that i can do this and i am a heptathlete and i can do it on the big stage. we are just seeing the big stage. we are just seeing the 800 metres as you are talking, the 800 metres as you are talking, the amazing race last month. you can explain the maths to us. so much of your event is about the maths. at the beginning of the race, you knew that if you were to take the gold, you have to beat rtm by 13 seconds, which would have been extraordinary. but did you start the race by thinking, anything could happen? yeah. i felt like i thinking, anything could happen? yeah. ifelt like i could have done it. obviously, i can't control the performance, but i had to leave it on the check and have no regrets. it is hard to front run and pace at the right moment. for me, my strength is the 801 of her weaknesses is the 200 and 800, so i felt i could have done it. unfortunately, i just and 800, so i felt i could have done it. unfortunately, ijust got the pace wrong and ran out of gas at the
8:45 am
end. but i relish those head—to—head battles in the 800, which is the only time it really gets competitive. i have got 200 points, 13 and a half seconds. i thought, i will go for it. and i am happy that idid will go for it. and i am happy that i did that and could push her to the end. lovely to speak to you. congratulations. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. here is something we are not seeing much of this summer — rain, there was loads of it around yesterday in the form of showers across the whole of the country. this area of rain brought 40 millimetres of rain, over three quarters of the month's worth of rain in herstmonceaux. a chilly
8:46 am
start of the day, but there is plenty of sunshine to come. it will cloud over through the day and a process of having cloudy weather is already taking place across parts of south—west england and wales. that is tied in with the weather front we have to the westeros, a warm front that will spread the cloud in. that cloud has already arrived. it has started to rain across western cornwall. the patchy rain will drift eastwards as we go through the morning. initially patchy rain, but the rain will turn heavier as the day goes by, with strengthening south—westerly winds. they will probably getting across parts of central and southern england and the midlands and not on the door of merseyside and greater manchester in the afternoon. that still leaves a good part of eastern england and scotla nd good part of eastern england and scotland with the best of the day's sunshine. tonight, the rain will become more extensive across england
8:47 am
and wales, pushing northwards across northern ireland and getting into scotland. the far north will miss out on the very. here, it will be a i°y out on the very. here, it will be a joy night. but under this area of cloud and rain, it is a much milder night compared with last night. for sunday's forecast, this area of low pressure will take centrestage, bringing outbreaks of rain across a good part of the uk. the rain is likely to be heaviest across south—west england and wales and perhaps central and southern england. but there is a tendency for it we can across the midlands and probably east anglia for a time. the rain band itself could be very slow to cu re rain band itself could be very slow to cure away from eastern england. to the west, we are likely to see another fund move in to the west, we are likely to see anotherfund move in late in the day. —— another front. anotherfund move in late in the day. —— anotherfront. looking to next week's weather, it will stay
8:48 am
u nsettled next week's weather, it will stay unsettled across the north—west of the uk. but it may warm up for a time across southern england, although we will not see a return of the heatwave and the dry, hot and sunny weather we have seen for much of the summer so far. it looks as though it will be more changeable in nature. we are keeping an eye on that nasa launch which is due in the next 15 minutes. in the meantime... the september edition is the most prestigious magazine cover of the year in the fashion world, and this month elle, vogue, glamour and marie claire are all celebrating a first — they've put black women on the front. the singer rihanna is on the front page of british vogue, and beyonce makes the cover of us vogue. so why now, and why has it taken so long? we can speak to the deputy editor of elle uk magazine kenya hunt who's in south london, and in the studio we're joined by fashion blogger 0nyi moss. kenya, why is this happening now? it
8:49 am
feels like a significant moment in fashion and i know that with the new editor of british vogue, we have seen a change. he is putting more black faces on the cover of magazines. i hope that has started not just a trend, magazines. i hope that has started notjust a trend, but it seems to have resulted in others doing the same. how significant is this?|j same. how significant is this?” think it has been building for quite a while. at l, we had another model honour september, last year and we have been champions of diversity for at least the past three years in terms of really showing a broad representation of women. so that conversation has been building for probably the last eight or ten yea rs. probably the last eight or ten
8:50 am
years. however, 2018 and 2017 have been much better years for women collectively banding together and using one another to pull each other up, whether it's in the area of me too or the gender pay gap or diversity and fashion. so you are seeing a ground swell of activity. it is the zeitgeist. people are conscious of it and then you have the effect of wakanda, a movie filled with black women. there are women owning their stories and showing you a diverse and wide spectrum of womanhood. so it is hard for you to run a magazine and not reflect that because it is just in the air. that is what we do as magazine editors, we reflect what is happening in the world, not to ignore the fact that it is the right thing to do, to reflect your readership in a meaningful way. and for people who don't know, why is the september issue in particular
8:51 am
the september issue in particular the important one? and again going back to edward enninful, when he tweeted the cover with rihanna on the front, he said it has taken 102 yea rs the front, he said it has taken 102 years for there to be a black face on the cover of a september fashion magazine. yes. with american vogue, they just used magazine. yes. with american vogue, theyjust used their first black photographer in their entire history of 126 years. so there are a lot of firsts that are still happening in 2018 at a time when you would not think there would be many firsts any more. it is a fascinating time in terms of why it is happening now. i remember starting out and the industry was very hot modulus, 0rtis deley is, but there has been such little representation behind the scenes that it has taken the industry a long time to get to this point where we are finally seeing women of colour represented on the cove rs. women of colour represented on the covers. the september issue in particular is the biggest issue of the year. it is like your 0scar
8:52 am
movie. there have been documentaries about the importance of the september issue. for us, it is a big moneymaker advertising —wise. and the size is significant. it is the one the readers look forward to most during the editorial calendar. so historically, putting a black woman on the cover has been viewed as a risky move, especially because you really need those magazines to sell. so historically, there has been an old dated view that black women can't sell magazines, when it is not true. last year we had rihanna on the cover. the year before we had beyonce on the cover. both of those we re beyonce on the cover. both of those were top performers. so the numbers don't reflect that at all. so it is really encouraging to see people we thinking about. onyi, we are talking
8:53 am
about quite mainstream magazines in the fashion world. do you think they are way behind the curve with what is happening in everyday life?” think they are way behind, but they are catching up now to what is going on. and it's all thanks to social media. people are now talking about theseissues media. people are now talking about these issues more on social media and the magazines are paying attention and reflecting it, which is brilliant because we might have thought that way in the past, but it is good to see that they are listening to people and taking these things on board. do you worry that there is a risk, bearing in mind the decision making process, that it could be a token thing? so you put a black person on the front page now but in six months' time or two yea rs' but in six months' time or two years' time, you look through the breadth of all coverage and actually, things haven't changed much? i think it's important for us
8:54 am
not to make this a fashion trend in the sense of just not to make this a fashion trend in the sense ofjust having black people on the cover. it is something we have to recognise as an issue and be inclusive going forward. in reality, we have a lot of diverse women in the world, so why not reflect them as they are? you have a big following on social media. it seems like they are having to respond to what is happening in the online space, where people like you are creating your own content, taking your own photographs and in a way, you are in competition with some of these big magazines.” wouldn't necessarily say competition. it is more of a symbiotic relationship where i get inspiration from these magazines, and the magazines also look to celebrities or influencers and see how they represent themselves with the pieces being showcased in magazines. one quick thought from
8:55 am
kenya. there is the concern that this could be a moment in time and lo and behold, nothing really changes. you must be conscious of that. yes. i have been working in this area for the entirety of my career in terms of promoting diversity and that always comes up. however, i love to quote my mentor and harbison. she says activism must remain active. we have to keep this conversation at the forefront of people's brains. the more you talk about it, the more it becomes the norm. it is about changing cultural norms. under our editor in chief henry curtis, we have a socially conscious, woke team. we have the word socially conscious, pregnant, beautiful and bowled on the front of september issue that is a deliberate view of black womanhood and every
8:56 am
cover re p rese nts a view of black womanhood and every cover represents a different strain of womanhood. we want to continue showing that. and in the age of social media, i can't see how we could go backwards. it is a stunning cover. thank you both for your time. one of the most ambitious space missions in history is due to blast off at any moment. nasa is sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. this launch has been six decades in the making. these are nasa's images. there is a wonderful shot as it gets closer in. the official name is the parker solar probe. this is always compelling. however many years we
8:57 am
have been watching the space missions take off, it is always compelling. this mission is unmanned. it is going as close as we can to the sun in order to find out new information. about how the sun affects the atmosphere, affecting technology on earth. the probe is around the size of a small car. it is named after a man called eugene parker, who is an american solar astrophysicist, now aged 91. in the 50s, he was responsible for developing the theory of the supersonic solar wind. tamela maciel is with us from the national space centre. let's stay with those pictures. the take—off seems to have been pushed back. yeah, and this is not uncommon with a rocket launcher. it is always exciting because you approach the
8:58 am
take—off and then they have paused it. they are saying it is an anomaly condition. that could be anything. they are constantly monitoring pressures , they are constantly monitoring pressures, the fuel, the lines, communication. we will see if they delay it to later today or if it is another day. and weather conditions? i would be surprised if it is a weather conditions. so far, they have been saying 95% good in terms of whether in florida. so it is probably something to do with the rocket. it is not unusual. these things happen. but how long is the window now where they cannot? it was supposed to happen half an hour ago. is there a cut—off? supposed to happen half an hour ago. is there a cut-off? the original window was 65 minutes. so we are talking half an hourfrom now, they need to make a call about whether to go for launch or not. if they don't, it will be another day. we will keep an eye on it with you. headlines
8:59 am
coming up in a moment. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. 0ur headlines today. the countdown to a daring new frontier for space exploration. it's close to lift—off for nasa's mission to the sun. the shutters come down on seven more m&s shops as the retailer battles to improve its fortunes. perhaps a new penalty technique as manchester united open the new premier league season with a win over leicester as paul pogba takes 19
9:00 am

46 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on