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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 11, 2018 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. our headlines today. the countdown to a daring new frontier for space exploration. it's close to lift—off for nasa's mission to the sun. the shutters come down on seven more m&s shops as the retailer battles to improve its fortunes. perhaps a new penalty technique as manchester united open the new premier league season with a win over leicester as paul pogba takes 19 steps before putting united ahead. music: daddy cool by boney m and we meet the men making dad dancing cool. a tribe and chilly start, we should see some rain moving in later. i
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have the full forecast coming up in the next 15 minutes —— a dry and chilly start. good morning, it's saturday august 11th. our top story. nasa has just launched one of its most ambitious space missions — sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. a rocket carrying the parker solar probe has just blasted off from cape canaveral, in florida, at around 9 o'clock. it will travel at speeds of more than 100 miles per second — that's the equivalent of london to sydney in 88 seconds — making it the fastest man—made object in history. we are looking at live pictures now. from cape canaveral. you are getting the wide shot but we are closing in from time to time. these pictures
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are always compelling, when you see are always compelling, when you see a spacecraft about to take off. there is the close—up. we heard moments ago from some of the experts that it's not unusual for there to be delays. about half an hour after they first said it would go there are still making last—minute checks. weather conditions are relevant, they've got some time to play with, we are told, so we are just on that count down now, we'll keep an eye on the pictures, we are told they will give some notification and then we'll see the take—off. we are in the window of about an hour, it has to take—off within the next half an hour or to take—off within the next half an hourorso, to take—off within the next half an hour or so, when it happens we will bring you the live pictures. let's go through the rest of the day's news 110w. an explosion at a military factory in wiltshire has killed one person and left another in a critical condition. chemring countermeasures — which is based near salisbury — makes products to protect military ships and aircraft from attack. the police said the incident
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was under control and there was no risk to the public. marks and spencer will close seven shops today as part of a major restructuring programme. the company plans to shut 100 branches by 2022 as it attempts to improve profitability at a time of unprecedented pressure for the british high street. it comes a day after department store chain house of fraser was bought out of administration. a man's appeared in court in calfornia charged with starting a wildfire that led to more than twenty—thousand people having to leave their homes. the holy fire — as it has become known— burned nearly 10,000 acres through the mountains of southern california. prosecutors say forrest clark had a grudge against a neighbour. he could face life in prison if convicted. the conservative mp, jacob rees—mogg, has criticised the prime minister's handling of the row over borisjohnson‘s comments about the full—face veils worn by some muslim women. writing in the daily telegraph, the tory backbencher blamed theresa may's "personal rivalry" with mrjohnson for "taking the heat off labour", and said that some senior conservatives are envious
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of the former foreign secretary's popularity. a downing street source said the issue was not about individuals or personalities — but about the fact that a complaint had been made. the government's decision to maintain its ban on boxing and martial arts in prisons is a "missed opportunity" according to the uk 5 leading expert on sport in prisons. in a report commissioned by the ministry ofjustice, professor rosie meek said the sports could help reduce re—offending and improve discipline injails. but ministers have rejected the recommendation, as our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford explains. teenage young offenders held in wetherby, working out their aggression in a rugby league session organised by leeds rhinos. keep going, guys, well done. taking lots of exercise while behind bars helps with fitness, mental health and also with learning lessons for life on the outside. it gives you good discipline and that, like, you have got to be told what to do and take orders and stuff like that.
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you can turn it into real—life situations. today's report into sport in prison found some good examples like here in wetherby but it says the provision in england and wales is inconsistent and underdeveloped and it says women's prisons must do more. but you won't see boxing or martial arts being taught in prisons or young offenders‘ institutions. it is not allowed. today's report suggests that the prison service at least considers changing that but that recommendation has not been accepted. boxing is taking place in our prisons anyway, innocently. professor rosie meek, who wrote the report, says boxing teaches discipline and teamwork and she is disappointed. if we can develop a well—designed programmes which have meaningful objectives around reducing reoffending, than we really should be doing so. ministers agreed to improve sports provision and the education and life skills that can be taught alongside it, but the idea of inmates learning to fight in prison proved
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too much for them. daniel sandford, bbc news, wetherby. a passenger plane has crashed after an employee carried out an "unauthorised take off" from the seattle tacoma international airport. the turbo—prop aircraft was operated by horizon air — a sister company to alaska air. the airline said an employee had taken the plane — no passengers were on board at the time. andy moore reports. the plane crashed into a small island with a population ofjust 20, causing this fire. police confirmed it was not a terrorist incident. they said it involved just one man, a 29—year—old local resident who wanted to take his own life. alaska airlines said a small commuter plane owned by sister carrier horizon had been stolen from seattle?tacoma international airport. while he was in the air, the pilot was talking to air traffic control. it's been reported that
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two f—15 military jets were sent up to intercept him. apparently the plane was taken from seattle?tacoma airport. 0ur information now is that there was only one person on the plane, and that was the person flying the plane. i understand the person may have been doing some air stunts. i know that some aircraft were scrambled from the air force base. there is no indication that this person who was flying the plane was trying to damage or attack anything. eyewitness voiceover: 0k, but why has it got jets? this is eyewitness footage of the stolen plane being pursued by a jet. the man at the controls was a ground employee. hejoked with air traffic control that he might be given a pilot'sjob if he managed to land the plane. andy moore, bbc news. the us chemical giant monsanto has been ordered to pay nearly $290 million in damages to a man who says its weedkiller made him terminally ill. a jury in california decided that the firm was negligent and malicious for failing to warn users of the risk of the herbicide glyphosate.
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monsanto says its product is safe and it will appeal the ruling. farmers across the south—eastern australian region of new south wales are continuing to suffer the effects of one of the driest summers in living memory as the entire area remains in a state of drought. the conditions have led to the government providing £300 million in emergency funding as forecasters predict another three months with little or no rain. we can cross now to the bbc‘s sydney correspondent phil mercer: phil give us a sense ofjust how bad the conditions are for those people? well, it is the worst drought in living memory, well, it is the worst drought in livin memor we've well, it is the worst drought in living memory, we've spent time in the drought zone in the city of tamworth and flying in and has amazing to see that some of australia's best agricultural land has been laid west. we went to one farm, run by kate james, who rears
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beef cattle. she says the daily grind of surviving on the land is an immense challenge. you wake up and think, 0k, we have to do this all again. there is no room for a break. there is no room to be sick. no room to not feel like doing it today. because the cows need to be fed. it isa because the cows need to be fed. it is a gorgeous day. a sunny winter's day but we are having quite warm daysin day but we are having quite warm days in the middle of winter and this is not normal. this is quite exceptional. famous australian poet wrote about australia's pitiless blue skies. that is the view of many farmers in the drought zone. they are simply praying for rain. although the outlook isn't good, the forecast for new south wales in the next three months is drier than normal conditions. we have a hot summer, normal conditions. we have a hot summer, a very normal conditions. we have a hot summer, a very dry autumn, a dry
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winter and it seems that these dry conditions will persist and the big dry in south—eastern australia will maintain its grip. phil, for the moment, thank you. a rhino calf — one of only 650 in the world — has been playing outside for the first time, just over a week after being born at chester zoo. the baby, which is yet to be named, was born in front of astonished visitors 11 days ago, despite rhinos usually calving at night. there he is. with so few eastern black rhinos left on the planet, he is a very important new addition to the breeding programme working to prevent their extinction. and extremely cute. lying down, having a little roll around, 11 days old, enjoying life. beautiful pictures. it's now ten minutes past nine. just keeping you updated on the images from nasa, the launch is
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being delayed. if you have followed our stories this morning you will be aware that this mission to the sun, aware that this mission to the sun, a new frontierfor space aware that this mission to the sun, a new frontier for space travel, first they said take—off would be 833, it's been put off, we are told that our technical problems, not sure what the details are. nasa have said on twitter that the launch team is in said on twitter that the launch team isina said on twitter that the launch team is ina no said on twitter that the launch team isinano—go said on twitter that the launch team is in a no — go status at the moment, awaiting further details, teams are investigating a condition. not sure what that they have around 20 minutes left if it is to launch within the current window, if it is delayed the launch could take place later today. we will keep you up to date. it's 11 minutes past nine. people with autism can find aspects of their condition hard to manage and issues like late diagnosis and a lack of understanding from the public don't help. but there was some positive news for those with the condition earlier this week.
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nhs england said on thursday that autism is to become a core part of the nhs future strategy, a move that could pave the way for extra money for early diagnosis and support. to tell us more about what this means are sarah lambert from the national autistic society and emily swiatek, who was diagnosed with autism three years ago. welcome. thank you for us. . you must be delighted about this news. we are absolutely delighted. for hundreds of hundreds of thousands of autistic people and their families they can struggle to access diagnosis and once they have a diagnosis, trying to get appropriate help from the doctor who might not understand them well, might not understand them well, might not understand that they need more time to explain what is happening with them. and in terms of wider health inequalities a lot of autistic people have severe mental health problems and getting help that can be very challenging. these problems have been known about for a long time, haven't they. does it feel
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like a significant decision, to kind of make it official that there should be money allocated and possibly a name given to it, some form of campaign? we don't know exactly what this will mean because symptoms of nhs england developing the plan they haven't developed it yet, they have just announced that within their 10—year strategy autism will be a priority. we are pleased it has been recognised but now we have to know what they are putting into the plan is what autistic people and their families are telling us. emily, it took time for you to be diagnosed, what happened? i was diagnosed at 28, i am 31 now, i'd actually worked in autism for ten years and it was only with men and boys and it wasn't until i met another autistic woman that i thought that might autistic myself. in the run—up i had had a lot of
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mental health diagnoses, a lot of misdiagnosed ailments, i had three months of crisis care, underpinning all that was autism. if people had had the imagination there might have seen this, my psychiatrist apologised to me, it must have been so apologised to me, it must have been so frustrating for you, having to go through all those stages before you got to this point. what was it, a lack of understanding? there's the stereotypes, when we think of someone stereotypes, when we think of someone with autism we don't normally think of someone who looks like me, when normally think of young boys or men and there are issues with women and women of colour not being diagnosis because we don't fit that idea. what do you think of what has been announced? i
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think of what has been announced? i think it's integral that autistic people and their families are part of that, but we need more training put in for training up diagnostician is. as long as it is and addiction specialist who is diagnosing your. hearing this story, people who live with the condition will no welagedara problems in getting diagnosed but from the outside, —— they will know well about the problems in being diagnosed. white can people not things more openly and know more? autism isn't a mental health problem, it's a different way of thinking and being. we know that within the core training for
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psychiatrists and psychologists they don't often learn much about autism. so by identifying autism as a priority for the nhs we can look at the training of all those different professionals and make sure that core to their training is autism, and that it is core to the training of other professionals, from nurses, dentists, gps, so they can put the right help in place. we're talking about diagnosis, how did your diagnosis change a life day—to—day? forceps me getting the diagnosis was life changing. i do have a privilege because i work in the area so i could put strategies in place and build understanding. a lot of autistic people get a piece of paper telling them they are autistic and they are left. for me using both strategies to live an easier life was amazing. although i am aware that for many autistic people it's not the case and there's a gap in the support they be getting. looking
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at the official statement from nhs england, they say, as we develop the plan over the coming months, they might have listened to this before. it is positive and we are keen to be engaged with the plan as it develops, it is important that diagnosis is identified and there is support post diagnosis. and there is a real and specialism in some areas, and those with severe mental health problems, though some might have challenging behaviour, there is a lack of specialism in that area. it isa lack of specialism in that area. it is a really important area that the nhs needs to look at. a step in the right direction. we will watch to
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see how it works out. you're watching breakfast. it is 18 minutes past mind. the headlines this morning. this morning nasa will launch one of the most daring ventures in its history, sending the parker solar probe into the sun's outer atmosphere. marks & spencer is implementing the latest round of its store closure programme this weekend, as it battles to improve its fortunes. something tells me chris might be interested in space related things. have you been watching those images? i suppose, a little. with rockets, it's quite incredible to watch, i might tune in later. in the uk we've seen some very wet weather in the last 2a hours, yesterday the wettest weather was in the west of england, we had 49
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millimetres of england in essex, that's over three quarters of a month's worth in just one day. today it isa month's worth in just one day. today it is a cold start with single figure temperatures although soon warming up in the sunshine and they will be plenty to come in the morning. that's not all of us. because down towards wales and south—west england cloud is spreading, a warm front bringing cloudy weather and patchy outbreaks of rain. 0therwise cloudy weather and patchy outbreaks of rain. otherwise a silly start. enjoy the sunshine while it lasts. they will be some showers across the northern isles of scotland, 0rkney and shetland seeing some of them, dry weather for the mainland, and shetland seeing some of them, dry weatherfor the mainland, to and shetland seeing some of them, dry weather for the mainland, to the south and west to the cloud will thicken, rain becoming more widespread towards the middle of the day. the rain turning heavier and steadierfull day. the rain turning heavier and steadier full wales day. the rain turning heavier and steadierfull wales and day. the rain turning heavier and steadier full wales and south—west england. south—westerly winds strengthening as well. avail of cloud of central and southern england, the midlands could see rain
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before the end of the day, late afternoon and early evening time it could hit merseyside and manchester. eastern scotland, highest generally into the low 20s, 23 the top temperature in hell. 0vernight outbreaks of rain become more extensive nationwide, except for more than scotland where it will be a chilly might in the countryside. 0therwise, mild, temperatures between 15 and 17 degrees, tidy and wet. some fog patches developing over the hills. into the weather forecast on sunday. it's the worst of the two days of the weekend weather— wise. this cold front will be one of those that has pulses of energy. the rain will come along and heavy bursts. some of the wettest weather across wales and south—west england. maybe the rain easing of the sometime, but it might be that the sometime, but it might be that the rain is much slower to move east followed by another band of rain
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across wales and south—west england, so across wales and south—west england, so rain at times sums it up and this is true in northern ireland and scotland, eastern scotland staying cool scotland, eastern scotland staying cool. next week, the outlook looks u nsettled cool. next week, the outlook looks unsettled in the north of the uk with other rain and showers, no written of the heatwave here although temperatures will build a little late in the week towards southern counties of england. that's how the weather is looking. back to you too. it isa it is a case of what you wish for! you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. the broadcaster and historian tessa dunlop is here to tell us what's caught her eye. we are on watch for the space launch, let's look at what is in the papers. a lot about shopping, on the high street or otherwise. let's lead with the front page of the times. amazon has been misleading its buyers says the advertising
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standards agency, saying that they cannot claim that their prime service delivers next day because it doesn't always. this is a minor story compared to the bigger story, the chancellor says he wants to tax amazon and apparently this is most effectively done in an international context. what is delightful is that this is page six of the sun, they say it is a global brand so this must be a pan—european decision, we'd better go out and quickly than! it's no joke actually, we'd better go out and quickly than! it's nojoke actually, the we'd better go out and quickly than! it's no joke actually, the other pillar of the story is the demise, and never purchase of house of fraser, by the sports direct tycoon mike ashley. 0ne fraser, by the sports direct tycoon mike ashley. one of many failing high—street stores, and as its closing stores, my local mothercare is closing, there are falling like
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ninepins. if you crunch the statistics, and these on the front page of the guardian, £787 million with a total sales in house of fraser. business tax was £30 million. amazon total sales, mine billion pounds, their types, 33 million, almost the same as house offer fraser. the playing field simply is not level. the chancellor and his henchmen in europe might find a way of taxing amazon, the costs being passed on to the consumer. we have to ask, is a department storejust consumer. we have to ask, is a department store just for christmas because if so it won't survive. if we say look at our rubbish politicians, we need to remember to vote. we could choose not to shop through amazon but we don't. where do you wear your knickers —— where did you buy your knickers, charlie!
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i wanted to referred to a story in the headlines which hasn't made the papers because it broke overnight, massive protests which have turned nasty, and water cannon. massive protests which have turned nasty, and water cannonlj massive protests which have turned nasty, and water cannon. i think 100 people seeking medical attention. what links this protest to britain, in britain at the moment the second largest national minority are not the irish, after the polish people, they are the romanians. they have lost more of that population than any other country in the world except syria between 2010 and 2015. a desperate brain drain. notjust millions, it is educated young workers, this protest is being led by that diaspora, they are going back and telling the government that they are corrupt and have their heads in the sand, sailing, sort
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this out. remainiacs has a history of quite violent protest. the only revolution dash—macro mania has this history. —— romania. a wake—up call toa history. —— romania. a wake—up call to a government that is failing its population. we can see some of those images. you can see the scale of what is going on. it is scary stuff. and i say, go for it but take care. this sort of puppet prime minister and the man who actually leads the party in power is prevented from being prime minister because of an investigation being carried out. the whole thing is a sort of quagmire of lack of honesty and no transparency. never power in the name of the people. never governance for the majority. this self interest that
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romania has never managed to come to terms with. it needs to do that for the sake of its young people as well as its old people. our time is up i think... ijust wanted as its old people. our time is up i think... i just wanted to as its old people. our time is up i think... ijust wanted to say, it used to be the universities that picked their students, now it is the stu d e nts picked their students, now it is the students picking their university and that is because in the year of the millennium we had fewer babies. we have to leave it there, we've got a space launch to follow! is a good reason. now the timing that we were given, it's now 9:26am. we were told the time would be 928, is that correct? we are now told that mine 20 8am will be the time of the launch. —— 28 minutes past nine o'clock. this is probably one of nasa's most ambitious projects, possibly of our lifetimes. these
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moments are compelling, just before the launch. tamela is from the space launch team. is everything good? clea red launch team. is everything good? cleared ago. i think they would issueis cleared ago. i think they would issue is with the data coming in from the rocket. we are just minutes from the rocket. we are just minutes from the rocket. we are just minutes from the launch, it is a mighty launch in florida. 0ne from the launch, it is a mighty launch in florida. one of the most powerful rockets in the world. give us powerful rockets in the world. give us idea of the dimensions? it can be ha rd to us idea of the dimensions? it can be hard to tell from the images. us idea of the dimensions? it can be hard to tell from the imagesm us idea of the dimensions? it can be hard to tell from the images. it is about 72 metres high and has three columns at the bottom, three boosters which will ignite simultaneously. liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. a couple of minutes into the launch of the two side columns will fall away, they will then go into the second stage and will be pushed into orbit around the earth and the third stage will push it into a solar orbit. this will all
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ta ke it into a solar orbit. this will all take several minutes. from our control centre in salford we are relaying information and we've been told it's been pushed back another four minutes! people might be curious. a minute and a half ago they said could be in one—minute's time. i've been to this many times watching rocket launchers. they sometimes push it to the end of the window. 0ur window will close at 935 or $0. window. 0ur window will close at 935 or so. they are cutting it fine. it's already 28 minutes past nine. not long to go. what will be going on right now. nervousness, mission control checking every bit of data, looking at the communications, they just want to make sure everything is correct. or a speedwell to travel out when it takes off? it will
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gradually start off relatively slowly, and then reach higher speeds, enough to enter earth orbit which will be thousands of kilometres per... willjust take a break and go to our headlines, and then we'll come back with the story ina then we'll come back with the story in a moment. stay with us. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. nasa is about to launch one of its most ambitious space missions this morning — sending a probe into the sun's atmosphere. a rocket carrying the parker solar probe will blast off from cape canaveral, in florida, any moment now.
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it will be travelling at the equivalent of london to sydney and 88 seconds, the fastest man—made object in history. we can go to live pictures now of the rocket on standby. this rocket was supposed to lunch at 8.33 this morning. it was push—bike by half an hour. we were then told it would launch at 9.28 and there has been another delay of four minutes, so who knows? were are talking about maybe launching in three minutes' time, but we will keep an eye on it for you. here is the rest of the day's news. an explosion at a military factory in wiltshire has killed one person and left another in a critical condition. chemring countermeasures — which is based near salisbury — makes products to protect military ships and aircraft from attack. the police said the incident was under control and there was no risk to the public. marks and spencer will close seven shops today as part of a major
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restructuring programme. the company plans to shut 100 branches by 2022 as it attempts to improve profitability at a time of unprecedented pressure for the british high street. it comes a day after department store chain house of fraser was bought out of administration. a passenger plane has crashed after an employee carried out "an unauthorised take off" from the seattle tacoma international airport. the turbo—prop aircraft was operated by horizon air — a sister company to alaska air. the airline said an employee had taken the plane — no passengers were on board at the time. the local sheriff said two military jets followed the aircraft but weren't involved in the crash. the conservative mp, jacob rees—mogg, has criticised the prime minister's handling of the row over borisjohnson's comments about the full—face veils worn by some muslim women. writing in the daily telegraph, the tory backbencher blamed theresa may's "personal rivalry" with mrjohnson for "taking the heat off labour", and said that some senior
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conservatives are envious of the former foreign secretary's popularity. a downing street source said the issue was not about individuals or personalities — but about the fact that a complaint had been made. police in romania have clashed with tens of thousands of protesters demonstrating against government corruption. between 30,000 and 50,000 people, including many returning expats, took to the streets. there were reports of bottles and paving slabs being thrown, while police are said to have used tear gas and water cannons to try to control the crowds. emergency services said over 100 people needed medical attention. those are the main stories this morning. football is back. we were just talking about the take—off. have you been watching this? the space mission that was due to take off. we can see the live image. 0ur understanding is that it has been postponed for 2h hours. it has been
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unclear. it was due to take off at 8.33 and then put back. but right now, we are hearing that it has probably been postponed. we will talk more about that in the moment. is that because there is smoke coming out of it? no. i am not big on space! but i can tell you about last night's return of the unique and paul pogba's penalty. he was fresh from the world cup and scoring in the final. and this is the kind of confidence that scoring in a world cup final will give you... paul pogba tookjust three minutes and 19 steps to score the first goal in this season's premier league. and there was an unlikely scorer of united's second. luke shaw had never scored in senior football until this... jamie vardy got one back but 2—1 it finished.
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it was more important to win today than against bayern munich in a friendly. so it was important to start well. a couple of hours ago, we had zero points and now we have three points. the situation is better. despite two lengthy rain delays at lords, england's cricketers are well and truly in control of the second test against india, dominating the two reduced sessions they managed to play yestereday. patrick geary reports. ta ke two. after a full day lost to rain, lords resets. hopefully this time, they'll get to the crease at least. so this was progress, after a long wait out through the long room and into the path ofjimmy anderson. england had chosen to bowl. here's why. murali vijay barely saw his fifth delivery. conditions were changing and jimmy anderson works magic with clouds. they help him move the ball to take a nick, to take a wicket. exit kl rahul, followed again by drizzle. eventually, they got back out
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but all the pauses can make it difficult to know if you're coming or going. cheteshwar pujara was definitely going, run out by the new boy 0llie pope. pujara left and everyone followed, somewhat faster. they have been asking for rain for weeks in these parts, just not right now. england will want to get back out there, especially as they're on top. initially, they would have needed a boat. pity poor groundsman mick hunt, this is his last test after 49 years. somehow, he and his team cleared it by five, and how grateful england should be, for here in the evening, sunshine was their golden wicket. virat kohli, india's captain, gone to chris woakes. sam curran removed dinesh karthik. india were only happy when it rained. jimmy anderson returned to torment them. he finished india off, taking five as they were bowled out for 107 on a day of water and waiting, but most of all, wickets. chris woakes came in and it was almost seamless, the transition.
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all credit to him, he's not played in an england shirt for a while due to injury. but when he came on, he carried on where stuart left off. same with sam curran. he followed me brilliantly at this end and it was a good group performance. to the european championships in berlin, and great britain's matt hudson—smith lived up to his billing as the favourite in the men's a00m as he held on to a massive lead coming into the home straight to win great britain's third athletics gold of the championships. he'll go for gold again this evening as part of the axaoom relay team. it's a good feeling. i was talking to my agent and my coach. winning was the goal of this year. when the
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europeans. i may have done it ugly, but i did it. there was silverfor katerina johnson—thompson in the heptathlon, as she was beaten by the belgian 0lympic champion nafi thiam. johnson—thompson set a new personal best on her way to silver and says the championships are a "turning point" in her career... there was a surprise medal for meghan beesley in the women's a00m hurdles final. she ran really well from lane one to claim bronze, her best ever individual performance at a senior major championships. jake wightman secured the fourth and final medal of the night for great britain in the men's1500m. he got himself a bronze. fellow brits charlie grice and chris 0'hare finished fifth and ninth respectively. glasgow is the other venue for these european championships and there's been more success in the pool for great britain. jack law and chris mears won silver in the men s synchronised 3—metre springboard final, missing out on gold by less than a point. jack laugher and chris mears won silver in the men s
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synchronised 3—metre springboard final, missing out on gold by less than a point. it's laugher‘s third medal of these games after two golds earlier in the week. and how about this for one of the strangest celebrations you'll ever see...if you can even call it a celebration. this is maria lasitskene, she's russian but competing as an authorised neutral athlete who won the high jump. looks like she's had better days. she won? she wins gold in the high jump. she looked blank, so take it back down. everyone has their own way of going about things. anyway, golf. in the last golf major of the year — gary woodland set a new lowest 36—hole score at the us pga championship to lead before a thunderstorm postponed friday's play. the american shot a four—under 66 with shots like this with a fairway wood, and at 10 under par he's one shot clear of kevin kisner, who had a six—under 64. england'sjustin rose is 6 shots off
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the lead with tiger woods a shot further back. wigan warriors beat castleford tigers to close the gap on superleague leaders st helens. an early liam marshall try set wigan on their way to a 20—0 half time lead... there looked no way back for castleford, but they rallied in the second half — scoring four tries of their own including this one from paul mcshane. but it wasn't enough as wigan held on to win 24—22. how long do you think you could without using social media? there's no denying it's become a huge part of our lives, but some people claim it is actually bad for our health. the royal society for public health is calling for people to take part in a digital detox for the whole of september. we'll be talking to them in a moment, as well as one woman who says social media
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is a force for good. first, let's see what some of you had to say. i use social media every day pretty much, really. i use it for personal... keeping up with friends. i use it so much. i probably use it on a daily basis. i use it because it's quite entertaining. i used to use it a lot a few years ago, but now i'm going weeks without even logging on. my favourite apps would be twitter and instagram. i'm mad on twitter. i use facebook. that's the social media i use. i use facebook. i use snapchat the most. a social media detox would make me feel completely cut off. i don't feel like i'd have any contact with my friends. i could definitely go for a week, maybe start with a weekend, but not a month. i've had six months off facebook, so that's no problem. i think so, but not
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everyone's like me. would you go for detox? would you be able to switch off? probably. 0k, well... i don't know. i'm not quite so sure about that, but i would love the idea. could do it. i think it's a good idea. joining us now is ed morrow from the royal society for public health, and bex lewis, a lecturer in digital marketing at manchester metropolitan university. so what are you asking people to do, scroll free for september? we are asking people to give up all their personal social media use. that doesn't include work use or messaging apps. for the month of september. that can be completely cold turkey, or you could choose just not use it in the bedroom because of the impact on sleep, or just not to use it at social events so just not to use it at social events so that you are not impacting those real world interactions. but however you do it, this could be beneficial
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for mental well—being for a lot of people. why? we have been looking at this for a couple of years. talking to young people, we see people who are attached to their social media feeds a lot of the time, consuming a lot of stuff, which is a very curated and idealised vision of reality, perfect bodies, perfect holidays. people feel insecure and their self—esteem is suffering as a result of internalising all of this. so we want people to separate from that, take a break and reflect on what the useful elements of social media are and what other bits which make you feel bad? it is easy to make you feel bad? it is easy to make assumptions about who we are talking about here. one twitter message we got this morning was from cynthia, who said she is 71 years old. she says, i love social media. it is my social life these days. i use it 2a/7, bring it on there are people for whom, if anything, more usage... there may be people who are lonely, i don't want to make
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assumptions about people being lonely if they are elderly, but it can help. my mum loves whatsapp. she calls it what's up. it is another form of communication that may be people who were older didn't have before. i did a lot of training with people who say, i don't do technology. and i say, it's not really about technology, it's about a communications channel and how you use it. if you focus on the social part, it works really well and it is easy. young people know how to do it. i think it is good to reflect on what they are doing. i would experiment a bit more with smaller steps. rather than going for a whole detox. you are a lecturer, right? so you walk into a lecture hall and you lecturer in digital marketing. and you see someone lecturer in digital marketing. and you see someone looking at the phone
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or treating... you see someone looking at the phone or treating. .. do you have a position on it? we have a conversation at the beginning of the year with students about when is a good time to have it on. so we might do some exercises with them when we are encouraging them to look things up are encouraging them to look things up or share something. we have done exercises on twitter where they are talking to someone on the other side of the room and learning how to use it in of the room and learning how to use itina of the room and learning how to use it in a professional way. but obviously, if you're trying to give a lecture, you hope they are paying attention. i do tell them, but they are adults. so they have a certain amount of responsibility, and part of my worry is that we focus on trying to fix the technology problem when actually, a lot of it is a cultural problem, the pressure to respond quickly. the pressure to do well in exams and get good jobs. all of that stuff puts massive pressure on young people. and this allows a
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space to let off steam. but it is the addictive quality. i am on social media, whereas you are not, charlie. there is a way of finding out how long you spend on apps. i have spent five hours on instagram in the last seven days, plus three on twitter and two on whatsapp. that is ten hours. that is scary. within a week, that is not much for a lot of people. when you are going over two hours a day, that is when we think of it as heavy usage. there is evidence that other people who are is heavy social media users have lower mental health and well—being and more emotional issues than people who have moderate usage. is that direct causation or is it a correlation? we are not sure, but there is definitely an exacerbating effect here. it is as much down to the quality of your usage, what you're doing with your time online, as the amount of time. are you using
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it in as the amount of time. are you using itina as the amount of time. are you using it in a way that is connecting you with people you wouldn't otherwise, which is beneficial, or are you just being me to feel insecure by the stuff you are scrolling through? do you think people delude themselves that the stuff they are doing is necessary and important when in reality, if it just necessary and important when in reality, if itjust didn't happen, it would make no difference? reality, if itjust didn't happen, it would make no difference ?m reality, if itjust didn't happen, it would make no difference? it is thinking about that whole idea. does everything we do have to be useful, and does everything we do have to be productive? sometimes, is it ok? i know i am doing something unhealthy when i am sat on the sofa. but i am aware enough now though i have reflected on whether i need to go to bed. so it's thinking about how you use it, and i have found it beneficial. i finished cancer treatment two and a half months ago, and being able to connect with people who have gone through the same treatment, you're like, i have
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this weird symptom, is this normal? and someone goes, don't worry about it. that sounds like a healthy way to use social media, if you pardon the pun. very interesting chat. thank you for sending in your message. diana on twitter says it is good to use social media, but i wish folk would put them bones away when talking to you instead of reading or answering texts. —— i wish people would put their phones away. it is rude. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. first, let's talk about the rain we had yesterday. after a dry summer, we had a real valued. showers were widespread across the country nationwide. we had heavy rain across england. 49 millimetres fell in east sussex, over three quarters of a month's worth of rain. today, it was chilly. it has been cool in the
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countryside first thing this morning. we got plenty of sunshine for most areas, but it will turn cloudier. it has already turned cloudier. it has already turned cloudier across wales and the south—west of england. that is where we have a warm front moving in. the cloud is going to spread northwards and eastwards. we will lose the sunshine across the midlands, central and southern england and northern ireland is that the cloud begins to spread in. there is a bit of rain in central and southern england and the midlands in the afternoon. the best of the sunshine is across afternoon. the best of the sunshine is across eastern afternoon. the best of the sunshine is across eastern scotland and eastern areas of england. tonight,
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that rain gets more extensive, pushing across england and wales before spreading to northern ireland and scotland. the far north stays dry. here, it is going to be a chilly night. 0therwise, dry. here, it is going to be a chilly night. otherwise, a very mild night compared with last night. there will be hillfort patches developing over —— hill fog patches developing over —— hill fog patches developing over —— hill fog patches developing over northern england. this rain front will have pulses of energy running along it. the rain will try to move eastwards, but it might push across eastern england very late in the day, perhaps not clearing until the evening time. it will be followed by another band of rain across wales and south—west england. tomorrow, rain at times sums up the weather. similar weather to come as we get into next week. it
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stays unsettled across the north—west. no return of the heatwave, but it does at least get a bit warmerfor a time heatwave, but it does at least get a bit warmer for a time across southern counties of england. for a lot of kids there's nothing more embarrassing than their dad trying to dance. but dancing is a great way of getting fit, so a group of men in brighton have decided to shrug off the shame, and they've become so confident that they've performed in front of 1,500 people. mike bushell has been to train with the brilliantly named 0utta puff daddys . they eat to the beat in michael's house, where music be the food of love and all the myths about embarrassing dads dancing go out the window, most of the time. because it's notjust around
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the kitchen that michael is moving to the rhythm. after moving to brighton from wales, hejoined a dads' dancing group to give him a social life and to get his fitness back. together, they form quite a force, turning heads here on the seafront on a hot summer's night and once a week, it is time for the 0utta puff daddys to take to the dance floor. come to think of it, i'm a daddy. i can't really dance, so... five, six, seven, eight! it really changed my life in terms of the fact that it is easy to become very lonely. i'm not part of any sports or activities like that. there's something about the energy of the music and the dancing and people doing the same thing at the same time. you can't help but smile and feel good about yourself. this is only the warm—up and already, i'm mentally challenged as well as physically getting a real, real workout.
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it all started seven years ago when a former strictly dance fever contestant wanted to encourage more dads who took their children to dance classes to learn themselves. now they perform every year at the brighton dome and next spring at brighton's football ground to raise awareness about prostate cancer. we practised in secret and when it came to the show, we heard some of the people in the crowd laughing and pointing. "that's my dad!" and then at the end, we had a standing ovation. the whole idea was to break the stigma of dads dancing, to perform on a stage like that in front of 1,500 people, an amazing experience. big chest! i am a london taxi driver. it gives me an escape to come down and dance with the lads and have a bit of a laugh.
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this is it. half an hour later, we're ready to put it into a dance. the great thing about doing this in a group, if you make a mistake, you can pretty much hide like someone else over there. this means anyone can do it. we know kids don't want to dance with their dads or see their dads dancing but my girls were brilliant, they told me to do it. i lost about two or three stone and i went to the doctor's because i was worried i was losing too much weight, they found out i was doing dancing, it was probably the reason. that was just a 30 second piece of dancing and so many moves to remember. mike is not with us this morning but ican mike is not with us this morning but i can confirm, having seen it happen in real times, i can confirm, having seen it happen in realtimes, mike i can confirm, having seen it happen in real times, mike is an enthusiastic dad dancer. he has got
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the moves. let's bring you up—to—date with what has been happening with this space launch this morning. bitter disappointment in cape canaveral because in the last half—hour, nasa failed to launch one of its most ambitious space missions ever. that was to send a probe into the sun's atmosphere. nasa twitter to say the launch was scrapped because of problems, but they will try again tomorrow morning. tamela maciel is from the national space centre. it is disappointing, but not unexpected. it is not a failure. they were try tomorrow or the next day. these things happen. you have to make 100% sure that it is going to make 100% sure that it is going to work, because you have got very expensive spacecraft on top and the careers of thousands of scientists. the terminology in that tweet was
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not terribly scientific, scrubbed. do they say why? i have been looking on twitter and people were saying something about the helium pressure. helium is used to force the fuel through the pipes. and there was some alarm about that. theyjust need to make 100% sure everything is green. this was a shock as the build—up was going on. one thing is the mission itself. there is a lot of pride in it and the world is watching. and there is that element as well that these things need to happen because they are sending a statement out about what we are capable of doing. absolutely. this mission was first proposed in 1958. 60 years on, we finally have the technology to build a heat shield thatis technology to build a heat shield that is capable of shielding
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instruments from the sun and having the ai, the artificial intelligence on board, to keep it operational. europe is particularly watching this because it is about to send a spacecraft also to the sun, called the solar orbiter. that is being built in the uk now. and it will work in tandem with this one. so this one will sample the sun. just explain about the protection that is involved. 0bviously, explain about the protection that is involved. obviously, it is flying close to the sun. how is it protected ? close to the sun. how is it protected? in the images we are seeing, there is a very thick heat shield. it is carbon, similar to the carbon composite you would find in a golf club or a tennis racket. it is carbon foam which you can have at temperatures of 1500 celsius on one side, and 28 degrees on the other side. they literally have a blowtorch here and touch it on the other side and it doesn't transfer any heat. incredibly resilient, lots
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of applications on earth as well. 60 yea rs of applications on earth as well. 60 years in the making, you wouldn't wa nt to years in the making, you wouldn't want to launch for the sake of launching if they are not ready. what will happen between now and the new lunchtime? they will be checking everything. they might be checking the fuel tanks. you have to feel sorry for those at mission control because it is 3am it and they were planning to launch. they will probably have to work for another 3am launch tomorrow. why are they going to the sun? what do we learn? two reasons. there is the very near the scientific reason of the sun being our closest star. we want to know how it works and there are a lot of questions. 0ne know how it works and there are a lot of questions. one of them is about the corona of the sun, which is millions of degrees hotter on the surface and we have no idea why. the other reason is to help us predict solar weather, the flares that could
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come to us and hit the earth, perhaps knockout satellites, power grids, things we are really dependent on. if we can learn how those are created on the sun by sending this probe, we can get some warning. so in summary, it was to be the fastest man—made thing that has ever been made, but today it is going nowhere. but it will launch. thank you for talking the spirit. —— talking us through it. that's it from breakfast for this morning. chris mason and sally nugent will be here from six tomorrow morning. but from us for now, goodbye. this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at ten. security alert at seattle airport after an airline employee steals an empty plane and crashes on a nearby island. mission to the sun on hold —
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nasa is forced to postpone its historic space probe launch until tomorrow. chemical giant monsanto is ordered to pay nearly $300 million in damages to an american man who said its weedkiller made him terminally ill with cancer. and dad to be here to help with this situation after i learned about round—up and glyphosate, i'm glad to be here to help but the causes way bigger than me. ministers reject calls to allow boxing and martial arts lessons in prisons despite recommendations that the move would improve discipline and boost education.
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