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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 16, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. our headlines today: the wait is nearly over for hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland, as a—level results are released this morning. italy declares a year—long state of emergency in the genoa region after the motorway bridge collapse. so we just literally — "kids, run, run," because we didn't know what was happening. we left everything in the car, and we just ran for our lives. donald trump withdraws the security clearance of his former cia chief, accusing him of erratic conduct and behaviour. as homebase shuts stores and cuts jobs, and bm.) battles the hot weather, i'm looking at whether we are done with do—it—yourself. in sport: a new season, a new film, but star man kevin de bruyne turns up to last night's premiere on crutches. good morning. we have a band of rain moving across england and wales at the moment. it will clear kent later and then we are all in the day of
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sunshine and showers, some of those will be heavy. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning, welcome to the programme. it thursday 16th august. our top story today: hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland will receive their a—level results this morning — with many also finding out if they have a place at university. it is the second year of major reforms to the qualification. our education correspondent elaine dunkley has been to meet some sixth formers waiting to get their results. soon, the wait will be over. the results of two years of hard work for thousands of a—level students. there have been major changes to a—levels in england, with a move away from coursework, and grades resting on the final exams. away from coursework, and grades resting on the final examslj away from coursework, and grades resting on the final exams. i was prepared for the challenge, but it definitely was a challenge. you can get so stressed out, and in the exam, like, igota get so stressed out, and in the exam, like, i gota lot get so stressed out, and in the exam, like, i got a lot of hot flushes. for the university to encourage me more to still focus on my grades and get these grades, they
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actually offered me £1000. the department for education says that changes will improve standards, but there are concerns that universities guaranteeing a record number of stu d e nts guaranteeing a record number of students a place before they sit their exams could have the opposite effect. in wales, some 18 —year—olds will be more inclined to go to university, as this is the first year those from poorer backgrounds can benefit from generous grants for living cost. in total, almost 68,000 unconditional offers have been made to 18 —year—olds in england, wales and northern ireland this year, compared with 3005 years ago. we really, really work hard with stu d e nts to really, really work hard with students to engage with them, and then halfway through their second year, when they are at their point of struggle, you know, when they are having to stay out late and having to get deadlines in, they get a letter drops from the university and says, you know what? it doesn't matter what you get, you can come to this university. whatever the results may bring for students, what seems clear is there are many more options when it comes to getting a place at university.
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rescuers are continuing to search the rubble of the collapsed motorway bridge in genoa, but now say they don't think they will find any more sui’vivoi’s. italy's deputy prime minister has said those found responsible for tragedy, which has so far claimed 39 lives, must pay the highest penalties possible. dan johnson reports. this long, grey scar of broken concrete, the ribbon of rubble, marks the valley once crossed by a grand, imposing viaduct. but how much more death and destruction is hidden beneath here? could any of the missing still be alive in this tangled mess? we keep on working until every single metre of this rubble will be controlled. how long will that take? actually, it is a very difficult question. it's going to be a long work.
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alongside sad stories of lives lost are near misses and amazing escapes. this british couple stopped their car about 100m short of the section that collapsed. people started shouting. waving their arms to reverse out the windows. and tooting horns, and everything like that. people were running, screaming in italian, "run, out." "everyone out, cars, out, cars!" so we just literally — "kids, run, run," because we didn't know what was happening. we left everything in the car and we just ran for our lives. last night the interior minister, matteo salvini, came here and declared declared that every company taking public money should protect their structures like their own children. he said whoever was responsible would be made to pay. there is real anger here. hows, whys, who's to blame, all need to be addressed. but there are families missing loved ones, still waiting for news.
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their answers must come first. detectives have been granted more time to quiz the suspect in the alleged terror attack in westminster on tuesday. 29—year—old salih khater, a british citizen originally from sudan, was arrested by armed police after crashing his car into a barrier outside the houses of parliament. he is being held on suspicion of terror offences and attempted murder. the rugby player danny cipriani is due to appear before magistrates on jersey this morning after being arrested outside a nightclub in st helier. the gloucester fly—half, who has recently been recalled to the england team, was arrested in the early hours of yesterday morning. he is charged with a number of offences including resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer. a malaysianjudge is due to rule shortly on whether there is sufficient evidence against two women to be tried for murdering a half—brother of the north korean leader, kim jong—un. the prosecution say the women smeared kim jong—nam's face with a toxic nerve agent at kuala lumpur airport last year. our reporterjonathan head is in the malaysian capital.
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tell us a bit about what the latest is, and what are we expecting today? well, thejudge has now ruled that this trial must now proceed, that there is what he claims is sufficient evidence from security camera video that was presented in court showing the two women, one of them appearing to put her hands over them appearing to put her hands over the face of kim jong—nam, that they attempted to kill their victim. they have been charged by the prosecution of being political assassins. this isa of being political assassins. this is a big disappointment to the defence lawyers, who have made the case, although they have not been able to present their own evidence yet, that these are unwitting dukes. both women are from poor backgrounds, both were recruited by men we believe to be north korean agents, and were paid to carry out a
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number of pranks with what were then harmless liquids, and they were then given this lethal agents, vx, and they were hoping that would be enough to see the case dismissed. these women will have many more days of witness hearings, and we may learn a little bit more about this extraordinary case. it is worth remembering it is just these two women who have been charged. there are women who have been charged. there a re lots of women who have been charged. there are lots of north koreans involved in this, including four who were charged two left on the same day, and soa charged two left on the same day, and so a lot of mystery hangs over this case. thank you so much. the former director of the cia, john brennan, has had his security clearance revoked by president trump. the president's press secretary, sarah sanders, said mr brennan had used his access to sensitive information to make unfounded allegations against the administration. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. good afternoon. the announcement
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came out of the blue at a previously unscheduled media briefing at the white house. historically, top officials keep their security credentials once they have left the job, in case they are called upon to advise the current administration. but donald trump says advise the current administration. but donald trump sastohn brennan will no longer have access to classified information. any benefits that senior officials might glean from consultations with mr brennan are now outweighed by the risks posed by his erratic conduct and behaviour. second, that conduct and behaviour. second, that conduct and behaviour has tested and far exceeded the limits of any professional courtesy that may have been due to him. mr brennan has a history that calls into question his objectivity and credibility. john brennan has been a strong critic of donald trump, calling him treasonous after his meeting with russia's president putin. the former cia chief hit back at mr trump in a tweet. he said the move was part of
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a broader effort to suppress freedom of speech and punish critics. he goes on, it should greatly worry all americans, including intelligence professionals, about the cost of speaking out. my principles are worth more than clear answers. i will not relent. the white house says others could face the same treatment. they includejames comey, the former director of the fbi, sacked by trump, who has called the president morally unfit to lead. now we have a whale of a tale. around 100 pilot whales got stuck in a fjord in iceland over the weekend. the whales were guided out by the authorities, but they seemed to lose their way again, and were found back in the same spot in the west of the country a day later. one of the whales got stranded on a bank, so rescue teams herded the pod out of the fjord again, this time further out to sea. and this time, it seemed to work. the whales have not been spotted in the area since.
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a success story. what a moment to ca ptu re a success story. what a moment to capture that, as well? those are the main stories this morning. and it was all looking so rosy for manchester city, they have a new film out, until an injury to star man kevin de bruyne, who arrived, as we will see, to the premiere of that movie on crutches. if you play fa ntasy football, movie on crutches. if you play fantasy football, you might want to make a transfer now. he will not be getting you any points this weekend. manchester city's kevin de bruyne looks set for a lengthy spell on the sidelines after injuring his knee. he arrived on crutches for the premiere of their new documentary all or nothing last night, and will have tests on the injury today. life after cristiano ronaldo not looking so good,
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as real madrid were beaten 11—2 after extra—time by city rivals atletico in the european super cup. that sees the champions league winners play the europa legue champions. 16—year—old maisie summers—newton broke a second world record to win her second european title in dublin, in the 100m breaststoke sb6. she led home a british 1—2, with eleanor simmonds taking the silver. there were also golds for great britain's bethany firth and hannah russell. and the birmingham bears comfortably beat lancashire lightning to keep themselves in contention to reach the latter stages of the t20 blast. they won by seven wickets at edgbaston. a lot of manchester city fans will be seeing how those scans go on kevin de bruyne's knee today. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. i tell you what, i felt very muggy
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recently. does that sound like something i will continue to feel? not so much today, but you certainly will over the next few days. good morning everyone. steph is quite right, it has felt quite humid over the last few days and nights, last night being no exception. today we are looking at mixed fortunes. some will have skies like this weather watcher‘s picture from yesterday, but some of us with sky is like this as well, more cloud around in the north and west of scotland and northern ireland, and those will produce some showers, some of which could be heavy and thundery. you can see what has been happening through the night. a weatherfront see what has been happening through the night. a weather front coming and has produced all this cloud and rain, torrents of rain in the last 24 rain, torrents of rain in the last 2a hours. the rain will continue to sink south, eradicating any early brightness across east anglia and the south—east. behind it, fresher conditions follow. you can see the progress this rain makes, eventually
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getting into kent. behind it is a cold front. we are seeing fresher conditions, a fair bit of sunshine, some scattered showers across wales, the odd sharp one in northern england. we could see some in northern ireland in scotland. in between them that could be some bright and sunny skies, but there could be heavy and thundery haswell. blustery across the far north and this combination will have an impact on the temperatures. kulda in the north, mid to high teens as we come further south. the central and eastern areas in particular we could hit 20 or 21 degrees. you can see that we still at 4pm have that rain in kentand that we still at 4pm have that rain in kent and in essex. as we go through the evening and overnight, eventually that pulls away. we have systems coming in from the west. if you have a look at the isobars, you can see that there is going to be rather windy period we are going into. first thing tomorrow we start off with a lot of dry weather, with some sunshine. as a weather front comes in from the west, and is a warm front this time, we will
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increase the cloud cover. the wind will strengthen and we will bring in some rain as well. we could have near gale force across parts of the northern isles tomorrow. temperature—wise, tempered by the wind and also the rain. we are looking again at around the mid to high teens across the north of the country. as we come further south, in any sunshine, temperatures that bit better, at about 23. if you like it that bit warmer, as well. into the weekend, something more u nsettled the weekend, something more unsettled coming our way from the atlantic. we have an ex— storm coming our way, embedded atlantic. we have an ex— storm coming ourway, embedded in atlantic. we have an ex— storm coming our way, embedded in an area of low pressure. it looks like scotla nd of low pressure. it looks like scotland and northern ireland will feel the brunt of that. you will see the heaviest rain. on saturday we start off with a lot of dry weather. for some of us it will continue this way. it will feel quite humid. steph will be delighted to hear that, and there will be rain coming in from there will be rain coming in from the west. temperature—wise, we are looking at about 11 to about 22 or 23. saturday looks like being the driest day for most. on sunday, the
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driest day for most. on sunday, the driest conditions. thank you very much, we will see you a little bit later. let's take a look at today's front pages. the times leads with the bridge collapse. it also reports that teenagers receiving their a level results today will have thousands more university places to choose from because the number of applicants has fallen to a record low. the sun goes with the story about rugby player danny cipriani being charged with common assault after an alleged incident at a jersey nightclub. it also celebrates the 60th birthday of madonna which is today. hgppy happy birthday madonna, if you are watching. the eu fears confidential meetings are being bugged by the british secret service ahead of crucial brexit negotiations, according to the daily telegraph. the paper says fears have been raised after the british obtained "sensitive documents" shortly after they were discussed at a private meeting. and the daily express leads on an interview with a british family in italy who abandoned their car and ran to escape the genoa bridge collapse.
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the most read article on the bbc news website is about a woman who is one of the youngest recipients of a face transplant and has shared the results of several years of reconstructive surgery. shall we have a look at some of the inside pages? sean and john are with us. inside pages? sean and john are with us. you want to give us a flavour of what it is going to attract what is going on in the business world? we talked about rail prices yesterday, it ended up being 3.2%. that was the retail price index and that figure what used —— was used. blackburn to manchester, currently as season ticket would be £1924, that is £230 more than it was six years ago. people rage when that comes out today about how much tickets will go up today about how much tickets will go up by. every year it fills track
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feels, another 3% year after year and you have your services over recent months, people have had timetables ripped to pieces. and other interesting one in the times today. i made a mess of them. did the butler not i am them for you? half of the airline passengers say drunkenness is a problem. there have been a few stories of issues and airlines have had, over two thirds of britons have seen drunken passengers, according to a study. a real difficult one for the airlines having to handle. how many flights to spain on stag dos and hen do is, it is affecting were people go and whether they bother going at all. stefa nie whether they bother going at all. stefanie asked a reasonable question, whether —— whether madonna
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would be watching us. she moved to portugal so one of her children could play football? yes, she did. i knew there was a football link somewhere. i was thinking more where is he going with this? she moved to, i think it was portugal. anyway, sorry i went off on one there. ba rnsley sorry i went off on one there. barnsley has done this. this is chris ryder, who went on social media who said he suffers from social anxiety. the club, having seen social anxiety. the club, having seen his tweet wrote to him and said you have been a fan of the club for many years and have always supported us, we want you to know if the favour need returning and we need to support you, please do, let us know. clu b support you, please do, let us know. club ‘s chairman saying there are door is always open. how nice is
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that? totally unprompted and they said they have got a really nice fa ncy said they have got a really nice fancy copy machine thanks to the sale of theirformer fancy copy machine thanks to the sale of their former players so pop in and have a chat. clubs get a lot of stick for not giving someone back, what a small gesture. one letter making a big difference. everybody will be writing letters now. the time is 19 minutes past six. returning to events in norther italy now, rescuers have spent a second night searching the rubble of the collapsed motorway bridge in the city of genoa. —— northern. 39 people are now known to have died and hopes of finding more survivors are fading. tim willcox is there for us this morning, that image behind you doesn't get any that image behind you doesn't get a ny less that image behind you doesn't get any less shocking as the days go by. bring us up—to—date on what is going on. you are right. lot of trauma and
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grief here, and anger in genoa about the fact that this bridge, they say hadn't been looked after and many people we were speaking to were saying it was a disaster waiting to happen. as of the last few hours lot of heavy drilling noises coming down the riverbank behind us, trying to ra ke the riverbank behind us, trying to rake up those huge slabs of reinforced concrete. you can see pa rt reinforced concrete. you can see part of the road there, that big chunk of road. they are trying to break up that because they are still not sure how many vehicles are trapped underneath. they think 35 ca rs trapped underneath. they think 35 cars and maybe three lloris kendell and that big section of motorway fell in that storm. but they still haven't confirmed that. they still don't know how many more people may be inside those vehicles. 39 dead, 15 in hospital, 12 of them in a
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critical condition. so it is expected the number of dead will rise. a few more amazing stories of escape from people who have just avoided death at the last minute. if you look at there at that lorry just on the edge, everyone is trying to find a driver of that. but we know, according to italian media, he is called luigi and his friends are quoted in the italian media as saying when he sought the road collapse, he went into reverse, came back, opened the door and ran, leaving the engine running. he is quoted from one of his friends saying as far as i know that engine is still running. the bridge itself is still running. the bridge itself is structurally insecure and nobody has been as far as that lorry yet, either in a vehicle or on foot, as far as we have seen. a big political debate also about what to do with
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this bridge. we have got the populist government cleaning the company behind the motorway, saying that they tell mike there should be resignations, also a fine of 150 million euros, plus criticism of europe for not allowing more money to be spent by the italian government because of austerity measures on the infrastructure. state funerals for the dead are on saturday as well with the president in attendance. it would be a few more days before they get through this rubble, but the generals, the grieving and the anger continues. this rubble, but the generals, the grieving and the anger continueslj grieving and the anger continues.” know you and other correspondence there are happening talking to eyewitnesses, those who are very close as it happened, some extraordinary stories of escapes, people who could have been killed who won't. —— were not. people who could have been killed who won't. -- were not. yeah. the british couple of bbc spoke to yesterday with their two children, who literally were hundreds of
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metres away from the section of road which came down. immediately all of the cars in front of them started slamming on their brakes in this horrendous thunderstorm and then reversing. then, they said people just stop driving, got out of their ca rs just stop driving, got out of their cars and were just running, literally for their lives back towards the tunnel before this bridge section here. they had two children, everyone swept up in this panic, everybody screaming let's get back without really understanding what was going on at the time. another remarkable story, an amateur footballer and a fireman literally driving across in his car, the car plummeted 100 feet, more than 100 feet, where did on top of some other rubble, the car damaged, he then made a phone call to the fire brigade and help me. —— saying come and. . extraordinary stories and of
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course the tragic stories of people, whole families and different nationalities who lost their lives. marcello de angelis from the italian red cross has been involved with the rescue operation. he joins us on the phone from rome. thank you very much for taking the time to speak to us. can you tell us how the rescue operation is going? as you are saying, we are trying to break down this huge slab of concrete that is part of the bridge itself. until we remove this massive object, it is very difficult to go through the rest of the rubble. and until all of the rubble has been removed we will not have a definite account of the victims, obviously and this will take days, probably. are you hopeful that you will still
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be able to find more survivors? as you say, once you get through this slab. miracles do happen. but we are talking miracles, obviously. how long do you think it will take, this operation to try and break down this slab? we are considering a week 's work to remove, as i was saying, all of the rubble. but we are working day and night. we have been working all night breaking down this big chunk and removing the rubble is that we consider —— the rubble. we consider there may still be possibly 15 cars still under the rubble, which obviously means more that is. you have dealt with lots of
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different rescue operations, how does this one compare? —— more victims. this is very similar to the ones we employ with earthquakes, it is more always the same situation that we had last year with the big earthquakes in amatrice. we have the same units, the same teams, search and rescue, some of them with dogs. and we have instruments that detect movement under the rubble. we remove what we can remove and we try to sort of find the space to send the dogsin sort of find the space to send the dogs in and see what they find a. —— what they find. thank you so much for talking to us and good luck with the rest of the operation. the time is 6:27 a.m.. it is an important day for
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youngsters getting their a—levels this morning. students in england, wales and northern ireland receive their a—level results later this morning. our reporter kathryn stanczyszyn is at the headquartersof the university admissions service ucas, where they're gearing up for a busy day. good morning to you. how easy going there? will have a mad one, i imagine. they are, yes. it is within these four walls that crucial decisions will be made about it was futures today. 50 and staff here at the call centre waiting for those anxious enquiries. people can log in from 8am this morning and find out if they have had their first choice of university. if they haven't, clearing opens from 3pm, this big jigsaw to fit everyone in. the phones at pride, the staff are ready and we will be ready to watch it all unfold. but now, i look at news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. new met police figures obtained by bbc london show gang related violence has plummeted since the 2011 riots, despite a recent spike in violent crime. the force has put the drop down to their gang violence matrix. but some criminologists and youth workers have questioned the figures and the levels of gang activity in the capital. daya amole was diagnosed with, neuroblastoma, a rare form of cancer when she was just eleven months old. her parents promised they would do everything they could to save their little girl's life. now they're fundraising to take her to new york, where experts surgeons say they could save her life. she is fighting for a life. she has got a life—threatening condition and i wouldn't call it sick, i call it fight. the chances of survival are
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about 50—50, basically. it is such a rare, horrible, aggressive cancer that we feel as much as possible needs to be done to invest in the research of it. an aspiring actress has found fame, after she swapped north west london for ‘lollywood', the film industry in pakistan. kubra khan left harrow aged nineteen for her big break, and has starred in some of the country's biggest tv dramas. now the actress features in two pakistani films being released next week, but it's not been easy to leave life in the capital behind you know you miss the uk when you start missing the chip. i hated the chip but now i am like i missed the chip. my mum is like, are you normal, i am like, chip. my mum is like, are you normal, iam like, i chip. my mum is like, are you normal, i am like, i don't know. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes this morning we've got minor delays on the overground. on the trains great northern have delays of 30 minutes and some cancellations on services via alexandra palace. south western railway services to/from waterloo are disrupted following signal problems at clapham junction. on the a13 there's westbound traffic
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building from daghenham into barking. lets have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. don't forget to p0p hello, good morning. don't forget to pop your brolly in the back this morning because there is somewhat whether. the rain moving in from the north—west as we had to the late morning into at least the first part of the afternoon. rain on the way but it is a dry, mild, early start. plenty of clout around already. some brea ks to plenty of clout around already. some breaks to the east, some brain is here but it won't last too long. that rain sweeps in from the north—west and it will rain for a good couple of hours or so. some of those outbreaks could be on the heavy side but it will clear south eastwards as we had through the late afternoon and the sun will emerge again. some sunny start as we head towards the end of the day, quite a easy for a time, top temperatures 19 or 20 celsius, feeling quite be cooler than it was yesterday. overnight tonight, again it will be cooler, temperatures dropping into single figures for rural spots, clear skies around and the breeze will ease down too. we start the day
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of tomorrow with lots of sunshine. sunshine should last of the morning, staying dry tomorrow but turning cloudier into the afternoon with highs of 23 or 24 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. it is 6:31am on thursday 16 august. we will have the latest news and sport injust a moment. but coming up later in the programme: if you are one of the thousands of young people getting ready to pick up that all—important envelope this morning, then you probably don't need us to remind you that it is a—level results day. we will be joining students at one college as their academic futures are decided. the podcast you, me and the big c has been called the coolest club you never want to be a part of. graham satchell has been catching up with the hosts of the show that tackles cancer in a whole new way.
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and he is the olympic, commonwealth and now european diving champion. jack laugher will be here with the latest additions to his gold medal collection after 8:30am. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news: hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland will receive their a—level results this morning, with many also finding out if they have a place at university. it is the second year of major reforms to the qualification. our education correspondent elaine dunkley has been to meet some sixth—formers waiting to get their results. soon, the wait will be over — the results of two years of hard work for thousands of a—level students. there have been major changes to a—levels in england, with a move away from coursework, and grades resting on the final exams. i was prepared for the challenge, but it definitely was a challenge. you can get so stressed out, and in the exam, like,
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i get loads of hot flushes, so i'm like, ooh! for the university to encourage me more to still focus on my grades, and get these grades, they actually offered me £1,000. the department for education says that changes will improve standards, but there are concerns that universities guaranteeing a record number of students a place before they sit their exams could have the opposite effect. in wales, some 18—year—olds will be more inclined to go to university, as this is the first year those from poorer backgrounds can benefit from generous grants for living costs. in total, almost 68,000 unconditional offers have been made to 18—year—olds in england, wales and northern ireland this year, compared with 3,000 five years ago. we sort of really, really work hard with the students, to engage with them. and then halfway through their second year, when they're at their point of struggle, you know, when they're having to stay up late and having to get deadlines in, they get a letter drops from the university and says, you know what?
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doesn't matter what you get, you can come to this university. whatever the results may bring for students, what seems clear is there are many more options when it comes to getting a place at university. the itallian red cross have told breakfast that they believe there are still 15 vehicles buried under the rubble of the collapsed motorway bridge in genoa. at least 39 people were killed when the bridge caved in on tuesday morning. the italian prime minister, giuseppe conte, has declared a 12—month state of emergency and warned that those found responsible for the tragedy will be punished. detectives have been granted more time to question the suspect in the alleged terror attack in westminster on tuesday. 29 year—old salih khater, a british citizen originally from sudan, was arrested by armed police after crashing his car into a barrier outside the houses of parliament. he is being held on suspicion of terror offences and attempted murder. a malaysianjudge is due to rule
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shortly on whether there is sufficient evidence against two women to be tried for murdering a half—brother of the north korean leader, kim jong—un. the prosecution says the women smeared kim jong—nam's face with a toxic nerve agent at kuala lumpur airport last year. they claim they thought they were taking part in a prank for a tv show. the rugby player danny cipriani is due to appear before magistrates on jersey this morning after being arrested outside a nightclub in st helier. the gloucester fly—half, who has recently been recalled to the england team, was arrested in the early hours of yesterday morning. he is charged with a number of offences including resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer. the former director of the cia, john brennan, has had his security clearance revoked by president trump. mr brennan has accused the president of trying to suppress freedom of speech, but white house press secretary sarah sanders said the former intelligence chief had used his access to sensitive files to make unfounded allegations. pop icon madonna celebrates her
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60th birthday today. over her 35—year career she has repeatedly reinvented herself and her sound, courting controversy and smashing sales records. she is a mother—of—five, and recently moved to portugal so her youngest son david, who she adopted from malawi, can attend a football academy. we now know, thanks to some eagle eyed viewers, it is benfica.” we now know, thanks to some eagle eyed viewers, it is benfica. i was going to say sporting lisbon. which would have been wrong. just factually wrong —— sporting lisbon. kevin de bruyne, not the start to the season... it has been a great
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start to the season for manchester city. they have this new documentary out which documents their incredible season last year, their record—breaking season. not great for kevin de bruyne. he has injured his knee, so he will be out for quite a considerable amount of time. do we know much about the injury?m is weird, because there were pictures on instagram and social media showing him in the gym, and he was fine, and that afternoon, we think tom in training he injured his knee. how long he will be out, we don't know. it was looking so rosy for manchester city. he turned up to the premiere of that documentary on crutches. this wasn't in the script. the season is just one week old, and manchester city's star man kevin de bruyne could be out for around 2—3 months. here he is arriving at last night's documentary premiere, on crutches. he injured his knee in training yesterday. he will have a scan on his knee this morning. he was integral to man city's record—breaking season, finishing with the most points the most goals scored,
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de bruyne getting 12 of them, as he won the club's player of the year award. life after cristiano ronaldo didn't get off to the best start as real madrid were beaten by city rivals atletico in the uefa super cup, played between the winners of the champions league and europa league. gareth bale played, but it was another former premier league star, diego costa, who equalised to take the game to extra time, before they won it 4—2. you just wonder if it will prompt real to go and sign another galactico to fill the void. to the t20 blast, and there was a comfortable win for the birmingham bears, who beat lancashire lightning by seven wickets, to just about stay in contention for the latter stages of the competition. but they are now reliant on other results to get them into the quarter—finals. oliver hannon—dalby did the damage with the ball, before sam hain hit the winning runs. in the women's super league, loughborough lightning beat western storm to overtake them at the top of the table.
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loughborugh winning by nine wickets, and they'll go straight to the final if they beat the yorkshire diamonds on saturday. there was another gold and another wolrd record for britain's maisie summers—newton at the world para—swimming european championships in dublin. the 16—year old, who will get her gcse results in a week's time, comfortably won the 100m breaststroke sb6. fellow brit eleanor simmonds tooke silver. summers—newton has two races left, and says that competing has been a welcome distraction from her exam results. iam quite i am quite nervous, but, i mean, this week's just made it even better. like, just took my mind off it. i mean, they are a week away tomorrow, so hopefully they'll go well. so i'll just tomorrow, so hopefully they'll go well. so i'lljust see how it goes. ididn't well. so i'lljust see how it goes. i didn't expect to come to this competition and break two world records. i mean, iwanted to competition and break two world records. i mean, i wanted to get close to both of my pbs, and to smash them both is like tom i am so happy with it, yes.
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britain's david smith has claimed his third individual bc1 boccia world title in liverpool. the rio paralympic champion was dominant as he beat china's kai sun 7—2 in the final. smith is britain's most decorated boccia player. great work from him once again. coverage of the championships continues on the bbc sport website today with the team events. and footballers love a new celebration, don't they? remember paul pogba's dab, jesse lingard's fortnight dances at the world cup? well, this is the latest from spurs' dele alli. i was hoping it would be more of a dance. it is sort of a reverse 0k thing. it looks a lot easier than it actually is. i assure you i have not been spending ages in the mirror trying to do it myself. will it
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catch on? i am sure lots of people will try it. he is giving it a go, he is to do it kind of... i don't quite know how he gets his fingers facing the other way. it is up online on the bbc sport website, you can try it out. a rescue ship carrying 141 migrants has arrived in malta after a five—day dispute over whether it should be allowed to dock. it is not the first time the ship has been at the centre of an international dispute. back injune, 630 migrants rescued off the coast of libya were stuck on the same ship for a week, after italy and malta refused to receive them. the aquarius was finally allowed to dock in spain, where it remained for a month, before returning to sea at the beginning of august. ten days later, malta and italy refused entry, which left the ship stranded again. on tuesday eu countries, including spain, france and germany, agreed a deal to take in the migrants. the aquarius finally docked
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in the port of valletta in malta yesterday. aloys vimard from doctors without borders joins us from there. thank you for your time. if you would first bring us up to date in terms of what has happened with those people on board. yes, so we identified that we were allowed to enter the territory yesterday morning. it took us five hours to get to valletta port, the disembarkation went smoothly. it was quite fast, in two hours, all of the people had disembarked and were all sent to a centre where they will be processed. and we are seeing... my apologies, we are just seeing some of the images now that you are
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describing, the moment they left the ship. that must have been a huge relief to everyone. yes, it was a huge relief, we have extraordinary vulnerable people on board, many young boys and girls travelling alone. and unaccompanied, so they will be processed, and to be respected as human beings. it is quite heartbreaking to see all of these young people exhausted, and not being allowed to disembark. this is not the first time, as we mentioned a moment ago, this ship, the aquarius, has been involved in this kind of dispute. do you think anything is changing in the way the authorities are looking at these ships full of people looking for a place to dock? yes, unfortunately we we re place to dock? yes, unfortunately we were prepared for this. we have to be pragmatic, also. but we also have two urge governments to take
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responsibility, and we are welcoming the news that this co—ordinated european response which we think is an appropriate response. obviously there is an unnecessary delay for this disembarkation, but for us it is an appropriate response, and we don't want to blame italy. we don't wa nt to don't want to blame italy. we don't want to blame malta. we really see that it want to blame malta. we really see thatitis want to blame malta. we really see that it is europe as a whole, european governments, who should ta ke european governments, who should take responsibility in this humanitarian crisis. thank you very much. that vote has now moored, and they have disembarked, as you saw, in malta. —— boat. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the headlines: half a million students in northern ireland, england and wales are pressure themselves for their
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a—level results. the italian prominence has declared a 12 month state of emergency in relation to the bridge collapse in genoa. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. that is a beautiful picture. good morning everyone. today we have got rained in the forecast, but we have also got some sunshine later on. for the next few days, that is more or less the forecast. there will be rain at times, it will also be quite windy across the north, the driest conditions even into the weekend will always be in the south and the east. what we have this morning is a weather front which has been steadily pushing southwards over the course of the night. you can cloud associated with it and it has produced a lot of rain across north wales, for example. as the southwards is going to leave fresher conditions behind it with sunshine and showers. look at this progress, still some heavy bursts coming out
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of that rain across parts of south—east england. a bright start to kent and part of essex but this rain is on its way to use later on. behind it the sun comes out, some scattered showers across wales, northern england and more frequent showers across northern ireland and especially scotland, some of them could be heavy and thundery. it will be blustery wherever you are. the wind gust indicating these black circles of. the strongest in the northern half of the country, that will have an impact on the temperatures. at rest we are looking at the mid—to high teens in the northern half, further south we are looking at possibly 20 but fresher thanit looking at possibly 20 but fresher than it was yesterday. tonight our weather front clears kent, you consider next system coming in through the night and to the west, looking at those isobars tells you it will be another windy day, especially in the north. a lot of dry weather to start the day, a fair bit of sunshine, but as a front comes in from the atlantic it will bring in some rain. these are the
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wind gust that you can expect. a windy day, blustery for the south and here we have got the dry conditions and the sunshine, temperatures will recover compare to what we are looking at today. up to 23 but still on the cool side as we push further north. into the weekend, it is complicated because weekend, it is complicated because we have got a subtropical storm embedded in an area of low pressure, all that will do to us is produce a lot of humid conditions, fair bit of moisture, the heaviest rain will be across scotland and northern ireland. ecosystem that rain getting into wales as well. for it arrives on saturday, a lot of dry weather, cloud through the day, he comes the rain from the west, mcleod ahead of it and temperatures ranging from 15— 22 or 23. into sunday, that is then we see more rain coming in from a system across scotland, northern england and we were system showery rain getting in across wales as well. the timing and position of
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this could change, but this is what we think at the moment. i have got to ask you, are you any good at diy? no. rubbish. there is a reason we are asking you. i was expect in her to say she was quite good at it. i have been around to her nice house. she gets people in! results this morning from those companies which supply us with do stuff. is it getting people in and traceable going to other places? i put the toilet system in myself, how about that? we will ask your wife. the question is at the moment, will it continue to get go? that will come down to whether we want to put our feet come down to whether we want to put ourfeet up or
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come down to whether we want to put our feet up or get stuck in. after a tough few years due to the financial crash, the uk do—it—yourself market has grown to now being worth more than £14 billion pounds a year. lots of retailers doing battle for our money, from the traditional diy stores to the likes of wilko and screwfix. but it's homebase that's run into real trouble, closing more than 40 stores and put 1500 jobs at risk. is that a problem with homebase, or are we just not putting up shelves ourselves any more? it depends how big theirjob is. if it looks easy we will have a go and make a mess of it and get my dad in. ido make a mess of it and get my dad in. i do think the younger generation are not quite as handy as my dad ‘s generation. i don't do any diy but my house was built from scratch by my house was built from scratch by my mum and dad to. i don't do my own diy, i have a husband who does it. we do all our painting, decorating.
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we do all our painting, decorating. we used to do everything, not the walls down. these days you get people into do everything. three hours to put our barbecue together, it said 45 minutes on the instructions. that is either because my 14—year—old helped me out that i got it the. no diy. —— got it done the. —— got it done. the big problems for diy retailers? the weather is key. if it isn't nice we don't buy tools. online competition. all retailers having to battle with that. where is the money going? the retailers are falling into two cancer. the big box diy stores have had a tough few years, most of them closing stores since 2012. they are finding it tough. there are retailers in the uk and those dealing with a tradesman, the
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builders, the small builders, kitchen fitters are actually doing very well, tall station, screw fix, those businesses are all growing at the moment and it reflects the fact that we would rather go to tradespeople to do those tasks for us tradespeople to do those tasks for us to. the company that owns b&q also operates a trade brand — screwfix — and that shop is doing well. to put this into perspective, last time kingfisher group reported some results b&q sales were down nearly 9% while screwfix sales were up by the same amount. the kingfisher boss says the fact young people are looking at diy videos on youtube and decoating photos on pinterest says there is a future for them. we have got the tv builder craig phillips in an hour ‘s time. send us
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some of your best and worst achievements around the house. be honest, if you have tried a shelf and it is a bit crooked. perseverance of. it the three weekends to get that toilet.” perseverance of. it the three weekends to get that toilet. i do like online videos for learning how to do stuff. i got an air—conditioning working recently using a guy explain the online video, how to do it. a podcast about living with cancer may seem like a hard sell, but the presenters of radio 5 live's ‘you, me and the big c‘ have won rave reviews for their funny and frank tales ofjuggling their treatment with their everyday lives. as they prepare to record a second series breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to meet rachael, debbie and lauren. hello and welcome to you, me and the
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big c. we all have one thing in common, we all have had have cancer. it is not a clinical cold, we talk about it like its east end is. my way of floating is that you, me, home, now. those two girls are the ones who know exactly who i am feeling, so they have just been amazingly supportive through all of this. i am stressed as a poo! within the space of a minute we are laughing and crying hysterically all at the same time and that is what cancer is like. that is the important thing about bowel cancer awareness month is talking about your poo. i was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 31 and in my head i just always thought that cancer meant that. i might get another jumper on as well. today we are
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having a photo shoot for my fundraising community. everytime i am having a bad day with it ijust try to feel grateful that i am here, iam try to feel grateful that i am here, i am alive and there are worse situations to be in. my a situation is not the best. i am kind of coming to that end of the road point with a treatment, which is not a great place to be. i got my little boy freddie thomas who is three, i want to enjoy those moments where he tells me that he loves me. all the way home which are seen to freddie, lam way home which are seen to freddie, i am sorry, i am so sorry. you are going to make me... it is the first thing that has made me cry in the whole 12 episodes of. it has finally broken me. you have not done anything wrong. you have nothing to apologise for. i feel like he is at that age where he might not even have any memories of me. sol that age where he might not even have any memories of me. so i am basically writing down my whole life
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ina book basically writing down my whole life in a book for him and ijust really hope that through his life he will come back to that book and take comfort from it and feel like he knows the kind of person that his mother was. i was diagnosed with stage for bowel cancer at the age of 35. -- stage for bowel cancer at the age of 35. —— stage for mac. we are a little about life and death years. both of us are living with a shadow of not knowing what the future holds and a very realistic possibility that women —— that we might not be around to see our children grow up. —— four. around to see our children grow up. -- four. come on money, you can go faster than that! seeing you guys be able to get the train to manchester, live your lives, makes me so excited ican get live your lives, makes me so excited i can get my life back on track, sending you love from hospital. roser, selling ub glove from the you, me and the big c studios,
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because this is for us what this point cast is about. i am not going to look at you, craned here is not what we need right now. —— cry in. techies at the listing and we will speak to you next week. by! —— thank you so much. it is very moving, lucky enough to have them on our sofa. the attitude they bring to what they are trying to say is really special. the three of them are cracking girls. you can search for and subscribe to the ‘you, me and the big c‘ podcast through all your normal podcast providers and on the radio 5live website. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. new met police figures obtained by bbc london show gang related violence has plummeted since the 2011 riots, despite a recent spike in violent crime. the force has put the drop down to their gang violence matrix. but some criminologists and youth workers have questioned the figures and the levels of gang
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activity in the capital. one of europe's most wanted man has been arrested in watford. florian jenni has been detained, perspective head of a romanian organised crime network is now facing extradition. daya amole was diagnosed with, neuroblastoma, a rare form of cancer when she was just eleven months old. her parents promised they would do everything they could to save their little girl's life. now they're fundraising to take her to new york, where experts surgeons say they could save her life. the chances of survival are about 50—50, basically. and it is such a rare, horrible, aggressive cancer that we feel as much as possible needs to be done to invest in the research of it. an aspiring actress has found fame, after she swapped north west london for ‘lollywood', the film industry in pakistan. kubra khan left harrow aged nineteen for her big break, and has starred in some of the country's biggest tv dramas. now the actress features in two pakistani films being released next week, but it's not been easy
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to leave life in the capital behind. you know you miss the uk when you start missing the tube. i hated the tube but now i am like "i miss the tube". my mum is like, "are you normal?" i am like, "i don't know." let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes this morning we've got minor delays on the overground. on the trains, great northern have delays of 30 minutes and some cancellations on services via alexandra palace. south western railway services to/from waterloo are disrupted following signal problems at clapham junction. and at clapham junction. on the roads it is slow from blackhall and on the roads it is slow from blackhall weighing in at. hello, good morning. don't forget to pop your brolly in yoru bag this morning because there is some wet weather on the way. the rain moving in from the north—west as we head to the late morning into at least the first part of the afternoon. rain on the way but it is a dry,
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mild, early start. plenty of cloud around already. some breaks towards the east, some brightness here, but it won't last too long. that rain sweeps in from the north—west and it will rain for a good couple of hours or so. some of those outbreaks could be on the heavy side, but it will clear it's way south eastwards as we had through the late afternoon and the sun will emerge again. some sunny spells as we head towards the end of the day, quite breezy for a time, top temperatures 19 or 20 celsius, feeling quite be cooler than it was yesterday. overnight tonight, then again it will be cooler, temperatures dropping into single figures for many of our rural spots, lots of clear skies around and the breeze will ease down too. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. our headlines today: the wait is nearly over for hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland, as a—level results are released this morning. iam here i am here at the headquarters of the national admissions service ucas as they gear up for their busiest day of the year. italy declares a year—long state of emergency in the genoa region after the motorway bridge collapse. so we just literally — "kids, run, run," ‘cause we didn't know what was happening. we left everything in the car, and we just ran for our lives. as homebase shuts stores and cuts jobs, and b80 battles the hot weather, i'm looking at whether we are done with do—it—yourself. in sport: a new season, a new documentary series, but star man kevin de bruyne turns up to last night's
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premiere on crutches. we will tell you the tale of the whales who lost their way in iceland, and how local people helped them to find it again. good morning. we have a band of rain currently pushing south eastwards across england and wales. the high debt, brighter skies, fresher conditions, sunshine and some showers. i will have more than 15 minutes. —— more in 15 minutes. good morning, welcome to the programme. it is thursday 16 august. our top story today: it is results day this morning for hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland, as a—level results are released. it is the second year of major reforms to the qualification in some areas. our education correspondent elaine dunkley has been to meet some sixth—formers waiting to get their results. soon, the wait will be over — the results of two years of hard work for thousands of a—level students.
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there have been major changes to a—levels in england, with a move away from coursework, and grades resting on the final exams. i was prepared for the challenge, but it definitely was a challenge. you can get so stressed out, and in the exam, like, i get loads of hot flushes, so i'm like, ooh! for the university to encourage me more to still focus on my grades, and get these grades, they actually offered me £1,000. the department for education says that changes will improve standards, but there are concerns that universities guaranteeing a record number of students a place before they sit their exams could have the opposite effect. in wales, some 18—year—olds will be more inclined to go to university, as this is the first year those from poorer backgrounds can benefit from generous grants for living costs. in total, almost 68,000 unconditional offers have been made to 18—year—olds in england, wales and northern ireland this year, compared with 3,000 five years ago. we sort of really, really work hard with the students, to engage with them.
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and then halfway through their second year, when they're at their point of struggle, you know, when they're having to stay up late and having to get deadlines in, they get a letter drops from the university and says, you know what? doesn't matter what you get, you can come to this university. whatever the results may bring for students, what seems clear is there are many more options when it comes to getting a place at university. the italian red cross have told breakfast that they believe there are still 15 vehicles buried under the rubble of the collapsed motorway bridge in genoa. italy's deputy prime minister has said those found responsible for the tragedy, which has so far claimed 39 lives, must pay the highest penalties possible. tim willcox is in genoa for us this morning. tim, what's the latest? good morning to you. i mean, it is an incredible rescue operation and one that is very much still
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happening. we were talking to the italian red cross earlier. tell us about what you know in all of this. well, yes. ithink about what you know in all of this. well, yes. i think unfortunately it is now more of a recovery operation. no survivors have been found since the afternoon of the day itself, so quite some time ago, when the bridge collapsed. 39 damp, as you say. they will be state funerals for those families who want a state funeral on saturday, that will be attended by the italian president. the other thing is that there has been drilling all through the night, with heavy hammer drills, trying to break up heavy hammer drills, trying to break up those big slabs of reinforced concrete and those lanes, trying to recover the bodies from the vehicles trapped in need. we don't know quite how many vehicles are still there. 16 people, according to the local prefecture, a re 16 people, according to the local prefecture, are still missing, on top of the 39 confirmed damp. 15 in
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hospital, 12 of them seriously injured. it seems this number of casualties and dead is going to rise. i am speaking to a representative from the search and rescue, and your teams have been there from the moment this happened, really. how many vehicles have you discovered and how many more victims have you found ? discovered and how many more victims have you found? we didn't recover any more victims through the night. we re cove re d any more victims through the night. we recovered a lot of parts of vehicles, it is difficult to compose them and understand how many vehicles are there and how many vehicles are there and how many vehicles are there and how many vehicles are still under the rubble. so in terms of the number of vehicles which have been found so far, do you have a figure on that? you are i think working on the assumption there were 35 cars, three lorries. do you know how many of those vehicles have now been found? well, that number is an estimate of the numberof well, that number is an estimate of the number of vehicles, so we can't
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precisely base our intervention on that. we have to search the rubble before closing the intervention. we cannot close the intervention until we have looked under each stone. and we have looked under each stone. and we have looked under each stone. and we have heard those hammer drills in the last few hours. how long will this process take? we are not sure of how long it will take. we are designing our intervention and updating it depending on the conditions we find. but the procedures in the next hours and days will be more or less that we cut the slabs, we move them, we send in the search dogs, in case any sign is given, we send our firefighters to search. thank you very much indeed. we will keep you posted on this operation, of course, over the next few hours. detectives have been granted more time to question the suspect in the alleged terror attack in westminster on tuesday. 29 year—old salih khater,
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a british citizen originally from sudan, was arrested by armed police after crashing his car into a barrier outside the houses of parliament. he is being held on suspicion of terror offences and attempted murder. a malaysian judge has ruled that two women will be tried for murdering the half—brother of the north korean leader, kim jong—un. the prosecution say the women smeared kim jong—nam's face with a toxic nerve agent at kuala lumpur airport last year. our reporterjonathan head is in the malaysian capital. we know that trial will go ahead. tell us a little more. well, it has been a very long process even to get to this stage, because we have had months of hearings where the prosecution have laid out their case, mostly just based prosecution have laid out their case, mostlyjust based on security camera video which shows apparently these two women, one of them putting their hands over kim jong—nam's
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face, just before he fell ill and died, being exposed to this lethal nerve agent vx. lots of north korean agents have fled the country, some being hold up in the embassy and then allowed to leave. that will add weight to the argument these women we re weight to the argument these women were unwitting dupes. they were picked up working in the sex and entertainment industry in malaysia and vietnam and they argue they had no idea it was a nerve agent. they thought they were carrying out a harmless televised prank. thejudge took a literal reading, saying there was enough evidence from the actions that they were involved in the death, that they had the intention and must carry the liability for the murder charge. it is premeditated murder. they face the death penalty if they are found guilty. we will have many more months of hearings when for the first time the defence will be able to present its case that they are indeed unwitting dupes in this plot, and we hope to possibly learn a lot more about this
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extraordinary assassination. we have heard very little about north korea's role in the trial to date. the rugby player danny cipriani is due to appear before magistrates on jersey this morning, after being arrested outside a nightclub in st helier. the gloucester fly—half, who has recently been recalled to the england team, was arrested in the early hours of yesterday morning. he is charged with a number of offences including resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer. around 100 whales have become repeatedly stuck in a fjord in iceland. police helped them get out of the fjord in the west of the country, but less than 24 hours later they were back again, and needed help to get out once more. lebo diseko has the story. this is a rescue operation in action, the second in as many days for this pod of around 100 whales. they got stuck after swimming into a fjord whose opening is both narrow and shallow, making it hard to get out. police helped guide them into more open waters,
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and it was hoped they'd go back to sea. but, the next day, they were back once again. cue rescue effort number two. translation: 13 of them went all the way to the shore, and we had to deal with them, push them out by hand, and that went very well. one of the whales even got stuck up on the shore and needed a kayaker to help get free. it is not clear why the group keep going back, but locals say they may be using the incoming tide to help them, and they've certainly attracted quite an audience. translation: naturally this is interesting to see, for both foreigners and icelanders, to view and experience this in nature. you can't see this in an aquarium. this is pure nature, which makes it more interesting. the group was eventually guided even further out, in the hope that they'd find their way to the ocean.
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that seems to have done the trick. but, if they do return, rescue teams will be on hand once again to help them find their way. lebo diseko, bbc news. amazing images this morning. amazing images this morningm amazing images this morning. it is incredible to have caught that. back to our top story now. students in england, wales, and northern ireland are finding out the results of their a—level exams this morning. it is sure to be a busy day at the headquarters of the university admissions service, ucas. kathryn stanczyszyn is there for us this morning. but first let's talk to elaine dunkley, who is at a sixth—form college in birkenhead. how is everyone feeling? well, anxious. i mean, it is a big day of hopes and dreams here, across the country, across the uk, thousands of stu d e nts country, across the uk, thousands of students waking up to find out whether they have made the grade to move whether they have made the grade to m ove o nto whether they have made the grade to move onto the next phase of their
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life. there will be hundreds of stu d e nts life. there will be hundreds of students a bit later on collecting their certificates to see how they got on. there is a kick here as well, and the girl out in the background making sausage butties, and major changes to a—levels, less emphasis on coursework and more emphasis on coursework and more emphasis on coursework and more emphasis on the final exam, so for many students there has been years of coursework which will come down to the final exam. i saw you yesterday and you are all quite anxious. i was hoping you would have the smiles today. jordan, how did you get on? i unable to go back to university next year after i have done the foundation here. how are you feeling today? i am feeling absolutely amazing. i am going to salford university to study the course that i really want to do. how stressful has been? it has been so stressful. honestly, waking up this morning it was so stressful, but it
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is all worth it, it is all worth it. finally you can relax. yesterday you saidi finally you can relax. yesterday you said i don't want to think about it. ijust want said i don't want to think about it. i just want to find out my results. you found out at 6am this morning. how did you get on? it is amazing, i got the degrees i wanted, i have an unconditional also, but i got an a—star, two as and the b. i can do because i always wanted to do, which is medicine. and you came as a 12—year—old from syria, so what does this mean for your family?” 12—year—old from syria, so what does this mean for your family? i had to work my way through the system, learn new things, basically, and get used to the society, get used to the college. i mean, the college was really helpful. my parents were really helpful. my parents were really helpful. my parents were really helpful for me and all of my friends. i am really helpful for me and all of my friends. lam really really helpful for me and all of my friends. i am really happy. they must be so proud of you. joining me now, we have the principal. very quickly, how have you guys got on?
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what sorts of results do you have? we have another record—breaking year. one of the best performers in the country last year and we thought there is no way we can improve on that with all the changes. and this bunch of people have done us proud, and we have edged a little bit further up that league table again. but league tables are irrelevant. it is these stories. he will be a doctor and change lives. you have abbey, goodness knows what she will become, but we are going to know about her at some point in the future. she has been a star the whole time she has been here, and that man is going to be an artist to reckon with in the future. fabulous stuff. it has been a great day so farfor stuff. it has been a great day so far for the stuff. it has been a great day so farfor the students stuff. it has been a great day so far for the students here. stuff. it has been a great day so farfor the students here. at lots of stu d e nts farfor the students here. at lots of students have woken up with lots of students have woken up with lots of uncertainty. they haven't made the grade they wanted to, but the university are saying there are still a lot of places, and there are a lot of possibly is. and a proud principal with students who have done brilliantly. congratulations from us. it doesn't always go
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strictly according to plan. and now we can go to kathryn stanczyszyn, who is at the headquarters of the university admissions service, ucas. sorting out who gets to go to which university. exactly. it is within these walls that people will be helping with those key decisions for their future. the busiest day of the year for staff years. —— here. as you say, people can log on from eight o'clock this morning to find out whether or not the results they have got means they have got into their university first choice. ucas says there are about 500,000 applications for higher this year and around three quarters of people get their first choice, but we went to the officialfigure until first choice, but we went to the official figure until 8am this morning. —— will get the official figure. the message is, do not panic if you do get into your first choice. you can give ucas a call or contact them on social media today.
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there are plenty of places, they say it isa there are plenty of places, they say it is a good year to be a team because there are fewer 18—year—old than normal. they will be dealing from everything to the delighted to the distraught to the utterly confused. is a big day for staff. 50 staff in the schools centre, training about how to deal with emotional people. it is also a bit ofa emotional people. it is also a bit of a marathon for them, so they have a little fruit packed on each desk and they have everything in the background at the moment, a little question sheet. some of them will work to 12 hours today dealing with all of these anxious enquiries but one call handler told the divesting you got —— the best thing is when you got —— the best thing is when you get a call and in the background you get a call and in the background you can hear champagne popping. we will follow the college this morning, talk to more people from there. so nice to talk to the head,
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ultimately you can talk about statistics, it is about individuals and they will be ok if they are feeling ok. and they will be ok if they are feeling 0k. teachers who put in a lot of effort to get students to pass their exams. we have someone sticking out tongue out at us. morning carol. ifiam if i am not mistaken, this is one of our regular watchers, sandy's dog. some of us will see some sunshine. the forecast is fairly mixed, we have got rain careering southwards and sunshine and showers behind. for the next few days there will be rain, the driest conditions in the south and east and it will be breezy across the north—west of the country, quite windy. what we have isa country, quite windy. what we have is a weather front slipping southwards. you can see the cloud associated with it has produced a fair bit of rain overnight, especially heavy rain across parts of north wales. through this morning we will continue its journey to the
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south—east with the odd heavy burst. behind fresher conditions. into the afternoon we will still have the strain slow moving towards kent, some sunshine behind it, some well scattered showers. we can see the chart one across northern england, some across northern ireland and scotla nd some across northern ireland and scotland were there will be more frequent, heavy and possibly thundery. the wind arrows as indicated by these black circles show the wind gust, so you can tell that it show the wind gust, so you can tell thatitis show the wind gust, so you can tell that it is going to be pretty blustery wherever you are particularly so across the north—west. these are our temperatures. 15— 18 in the north, up temperatures. 15— 18 in the north, up to 20,21 temperatures. 15— 18 in the north, up to 20, 21 in central and eastern areas. through this evening and overnight, clear skies and a cooler one than the one corner, the system in tomorrow introducing windy conditions and wet conditions as well. we started with a lot of dry weather, sunshine and as the system approaches, the cloud will build and
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you consider rain associated with the. wind arrows, the wind gust on again, the strongest wind in the northern half of the country but blustery wherever you are. any showers will be blustery showers. cabbages in the south—east should stay dry, brightness and sunshine, higher than today but as we move further north we are generally looking at the mid—to high teens. then as we head into the weekend there is a fly in the ointment because we have low pressure coming our way and embedded in that will be an ex— subtropical storm, all that will do is ring in humid air and some heavy rain across parts of scotla nd some heavy rain across parts of scotland and northern ireland. for a time we could see that getting into northern england. this is saturday, a lot of dry weather around, cloud building as the system approaches from the atlantic eventually bringing rain towards the west. it will feel quite timid, quickly show a new sunday. some of that rain will be heavy, dry and bright either side
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of it but the position could still change. quite a mixed picture there. sean will be talking about planes quite a mixed picture there. sean will be talking about planes are. planes, trains, diy, i have got it all. let's kick off with that rail fare price rise figure we previewed yesterday. the retail price index inflation figure came in at 3.2%, which means the cost of regulated fares including season tickets can go up by that amount injanuary. the taxi app uber has lost less money than it did before but remains a long way from making a profit. the company lost more than £700 million injust three months to the end ofjune. clampdown by regulators around the world, like we've seen in london, still continues to hit the business. we've got those diy company
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kingfisher results, it's said sales at b&q were up 3.5% in may, june, july. screwfix up 5.5%. we're chewing over those trends with tv builder craig philips in half an hour. send us pictures of your successes and particularly failures. pop us a tweet or an email. thank you very much, see later on. 7:21am is the time right now. more than a million people in the uk have been diagnosed with eating disorders, but there are fears that men with the conditions could be missing out on vital treatment. male patients, on average, wait nearly three times as long as women for a referral from their gp and now new research has found that some eating disorder inpatient wards have stopped accepting male patients. the research was carried out by dr akira fukutomi and we're also joined by ben robinson who was diagnosed with anorexia in his teens. thank you so much forjoining us.
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tell me first of all, just a bit about this research. well, we just found that a unit were being asked to stop admitting men because the department of health, a few years ago they wanted to separate out the sexes from the wards. this was right across all wards in mental health and in physical health hospitals. what they didn't realise was that eating disorders, because most patients are female, it meant it was difficult to admit men on a mainly female water. and if the ward was in design in the right way they would be fined. —— wasn't. said they had
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to stop admitting men, only a small number. what i worked on was to change the guidelines to make it more straightforward and easy to admitting men there. er struggling with your voice, have a sip of water. ben, welcome to the programme. ina water. ben, welcome to the programme. in a way, this practicality of the problem of mixed wards as to an existing problem of men with some kind of issues getting the treatment they need a. —— adds. possibly because they are less relu cta nt possibly because they are less reluctant to come forward, more relu cta nt reluctant to come forward, more reluctant to come forward, more reluctant to be tell us more about your story. i initially went to the gp about eating disorder problems and it didn't really gets into and i think that wasjust and it didn't really gets into and i think that was just down to a lack of training. drastically went downhill and i got admitted to a hospital on a refitting programme
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due to a low heart rate and problems, and then on i went to an inpatient unit where i was detained under the mental health act. i was in there fora under the mental health act. i was in there for a year and ijust went to quite a bad phase, attempting to ta ke to quite a bad phase, attempting to take my own life, just dealing with loads of different stuff. it was not just, it was added pressures as well, i was the only land in the unit andl well, i was the only land in the unit and i think there was for other girls with eating disorders. —— lad. then there was another 13 adolescents who are dealing with other mental health problems. you tell your story very well and it is brave to come forward in these circumstances, but you think if you had not got the kind of intensive treatment you needed, things could have gone very differently for you ) definitely. i got live that -- i've given the night to live when i got admitted into the general hospital, ifi admitted into the general hospital, if i didn't get admitted i know i wouldn't be where i am now because
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of the drastic actions i took tom if those staff were not there watching me thenl those staff were not there watching me then i wouldn't be there. for all of those people who don't get that help, i was one of the lucky ones, whereas there are thousands of people who are not lucky enough. ben's story really brings it home about how important this treatment is. absolutely. as you know, the nhs is. absolutely. as you know, the nhs is under a lot of richer, but we have the best specialists working in the nhs, most countries around the world look at what we do in this country and learn and take it to their country and in terms of treatment of eating disorders. i think it is important —— so important, there is so many in this country, 1.2 5 billion people is the estimate who need to get the help that they need. they give are
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joining us this morning. power things? all good. very happy. best time of my life. thank you very much for coming on with us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. new met police figures obtained by bbc london show gang related violence has plummeted since the 2011 riots, despite a recent spike in violent crime. the force has put the drop down to their gang violence matrix database. but some criminologists and youth workers have questioned the figures and the levels of gang activity in the capital. one of europe's most wanted men has been arrested in watford. 43 year—old florin ghinea was detained after leaving a gym on tuesday. the suspected head of a romanian organised crime network is now facing extradition. daya amole was diagnosed with, neuroblastoma, a rare form of cancer when she was just eleven months old. her parents promised
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they would do everything they could to save their little girl's life. now they're fundraising to take her to new york, where experts surgeons say they could save her. the chances of survival are about 50—50, basically. and it is such a rare, horrible, aggressive cancer that we feel as much as possible needs to be done to invest in the research of it. an aspiring actress has found fame, after she swapped north west london for ‘lollywood', the film industry in pakistan. kubra khan left harrow aged nineteen for her big break, and has starred in some of the country's biggest tv dramas. now the actress features in two pakistani films being released next week, but it's not been easy to leave life in the capital behind. you know you miss the uk when you start missing the tube. i hated the tube but now i am like "i miss the tube". my mum is like, "are you normal?" i am like, "i don't know." let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes this morning we've got minor delays on the overground. on the trains, great northern have
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delays of 30 minutes and some cancellations on services via alexandra palace. south western railway services to and from waterloo are running a reduced service following a signal problem. on the roads there's northbound traffic is building in palma steeled. slow moving on brownlow road. lets have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. don't forget to pop your brolly in yoru bag this morning because there is some wet weather on the way. the rain moving in from the north—west as we head to the late morning into at least the first part of the afternoon. rain on the way but it is a dry, mild, early start. plenty of cloud around already. some breaks towards the east, some brightness here, but it won't last too long. that rain sweeps in from the north—west and it will rain for a good couple of hours or so. some of those outbreaks could be on the heavy side, but it will clear it's way south eastwards as we had through the late
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afternoon and the sun will emerge again. some sunny spells as we head towards the end of the day, quite breezy for a time, top temperatures 19 or 20 celsius, feeling quite be cooler than it was yesterday. overnight tonight, then again it will be cooler, temperatures dropping into single figures for many of our rural spots, lots of clear skies around and the breeze will ease down too. we start the day of tomorrow with lots of sunshine. the sunshine should last through the morning, staying dry tomorrow but turning cloudier into the afternoon with highs of 23 or 24 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: more than 500,000 students in england, wales, and northern ireland will receive their a—level results this morning. many will also find out
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whether they have got a place at university. it is the second year of major reforms to the qualifications. coursework has been eliminated in most subjects, with grades now resting solely on final exams. last year, 26% of papers received ana ora—stargrade, with results predicted to be broadly similar again this year. the italian red cross have told breakfast that they believe there are still 15 vehicles buried under the rubble of the collapsed motorway bridge in genoa. the italian prime minister has warned that those found responsible for the tragedy will be punished. at least 39 people were killed when the bridge caved in on tuesday morning, and it is feared that number will continue to rise. detectives have been granted more time to question the suspect in the alleged terror attack in westminster on tuesday. 29 year—old salih khater, a british citizen originally from sudan, was arrested by armed police after crashing his car into a barrier outside the houses of parliament. he is being held on suspicion of terror offences and attempted murder. a malaysian judge has ruled that two
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women will be tried for murdering the half—brother of the north korean leader, kim jong—un. the prosecution says the women smeared kim jong—nam's face with a toxic nerve agent at kuala lumpur airport last year. they claim they thought they were taking part in a prank for a tv show. the former director of the cia, john brennan, has had his security clearance revoked by president trump. mr brennan has accused the president of trying to suppress freedom of speech, but white house press secretary sarah sanders said the former intelligence chief had used his access to sensitive files to make unfounded allegations. she has sold more than 300 million records worldwide, and in the uk she has sold more singles than any other performer. the original material girl turns 60 today. the singer has been celebrating the big day with a series of posts on instagram counting down to her birthday, finishing with photos of these outfits inspired by berber culture. over her 35—year career she has repeatedly reinvented herself and her sound, courting controversy
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and smashing sales records. and it was all looking so rosy for manchester city. kevin de bruyne turning up to last night's mea on crutches. —— premiere. this was de bruyne arriving on the blue carpet at last night's premiere in manchester, on crutches. it is thought he could be out for around 2—3 months after injuring his knee in training yesterday. he will have a scan this morning.
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he was integral to city's record—breaking season, as they finished with the most points and the most goals scored, with de bruyne getting 12 of them. but the former premier league defender matt upson says city can cope without him. he has had two seasons at work. you can bring players like this end, who have done a greatjob, he is a young kid and he still sticks out. he knows the system and they have been working on it. and ijust think you are missing for me the best player in the premier league, but they will be ok. can real madrid cope without cristiano ronaldo? on the evidence of last night's super cup defeat to atletico, perhaps not. gareth bale played. but it was another former premier league star, diego costa, who equalised to take the game, played between the champions league winners and the europa league champions, into extra—time. they eventually won 4—2, and you wonder if it will prompt real to go and sign another galactico to fill the void left by ronaldo's move tojuventus. the former england captain michael vaughan says ben stokes
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doesn't deserve a warm welcome if, as expected, he returns for england this weekend. stokes is back in the squad for the third test against india, after being aquitted of affray. and vaughan says that, although stokes deserves his place in the team, it shouldn't come with any fanfare. i can't get my head around why he wouldn't want to go and take some time off. he hasjust gone wouldn't want to go and take some time off. he has just gone through eight days in crown court, i would have thought that his head could be ina have thought that his head could be in a different place for wanting to play international cricket. but he isa play international cricket. but he is a different specimen to most, you know, and he will play saturday. he will be back. the one thing that i don't think he deserves, and i am sure, knowing the england cricket fa ns sure, knowing the england cricket fans as i do, they will give him a reception. i don't think he deserves that. he is certainly not a hero, as some have betrayed him to be. he has brought the game into disrepute. —— portrayed him to be. i do think the
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punishment and the fact that he missed the whole winter in australia is enough, and now he has the not guilty charge, i think he should be able to play cricket. to the t20 blast, and there was a comfortable win for the birmingham bears, who beat lancashire lightning by seven wickets to just about stay in contention for the latter stages of the competition. they are now reliant on other results to get them into the quarter—finals, sam hain hitting the winning runs. in the women's super league, loughborough lightning beat western storm to overtake them at the top of the table. loughborough winning by nine wickets, and they will go straight to the final if they beat the yorkshire diamonds on saturday. there was another gold and another world record for britain's maisie summers—newton at the world para—swimming european championships in dublin. the 16—year old, who will get her gcse results in a week's time, comfortably won the 100m breaststroke sb6. fellow brit eleanor simmonds took silver. britain's david smith claimed his third individual bc one boccia world title in liverpool. the rio paralympic champion was dominant as he beat
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china's kai sun 7—2 in the final. smith is britain's most decorated boccia player. coverage of the championships continues on the bbc sport website today with the team events. and footballers love a new celebration, don't they? we had paul pogba's dab, jesse lingard's fortnight dances at the world cup. well this is the latest from spurs' dele alli. here it is — a sort of reverse ok hand sign. and a few others giving it a go, a pretty good one. i think evenjamie vardy‘s wife has been having a go at it. it is a sensation at the moment, and he makes it look very easy.
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it. it is a sensation at the moment, and he makes it look very easym is like a rubik ‘s cube, trying to work out how... it is hard. can you do it? it is not that one, though, is it? do it? it is not that one, though, isit? let do it? it is not that one, though, is it? let mac itjust requires a bit of flexibility. nearly there. even craig is trying it. we are talking diy at this morning. easy as that. do—it—yourself retailers are in the spotlight today so we've had those latest results in sales at b80 and screwfix both in the last three months with the weather providing a big boost. yet homebase this week has said it's closing stores and cutting jobs. what's going on?
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joining me from our london newsroom is diy retail analyst thomas slide. with me in the studio is tv builder craig phillips. what can we learn from the sales figures from b&q? how good the weather has been for the last few months, and these are first half figures, and it is a tale of two quarters. the first quarter was hit a terrible weather. we had the beast from the east, wash out easter and sales were poor in the first quarter. the second quarter has been totally different, very hot and we have had lots of events to get the factor up. people going out to buy plants, and that has boosted sales in the second quarter. why haven't
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homebase been able to capitalise on that? homebase certainly has its own problems. so the cda says they will close 42 stores and is sort of a long time coming. homebase was a good, profitable business until 2016 when the australian firm wesfarmers bought it and tried to change it into the bunnings. they turned a few stores in the bunnings stores, and it shifted towards hard end diy warehouse stores, left the rest of the same. the customers left and went elsewhere, and now it is left ina sort went elsewhere, and now it is left in a sort of limbo position. the problem with homebase is it has a few stores which just aren't profitable and when you are trying to turn the business around like that, you can't have unprofitable stores holding you back. that is, i think, why the one quarter of good weather we have seen isn't enough to
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change the longer term issues that are facing homebase. also the whole diy industry, really. and that is what is going on with the businesses, the retailers on our streets. what do you see as being the biggest changes among customers of yours? i think customers want to work around the house all the time. tradesmen and diy —ers have not passed the skills on between generations. they are turning to tradesmen to do that work. you must go around some of these stores yourself. do you think there is anything they could be doing better to encourage people to get involved with doing stuff themselves? yes, they have leaflets and books and things like that to try and encourage things, but that is passed the time, really. anyone who needs diy skills, they tend to youtube,
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and they see a step—by—step video. that will encourage them to do it themselves, and give them the spill skills they need. are their skills where you think everybody should be doing that themselves? a simple video, just follow it? yes, but there are plenty out there. i have millions of views on the ones i have done myself, but if you do it step by step, people start off gently doing small items and work up to the bigger items, i genuinely believe as a homeowner it is the biggest investment you can make in your life, it is your responsibility to make it look good and you keep the cost down if you maintain it regularly. are tradespeople still a bit too expensive for a lot of people when they want a smalljob done? yes, and what we find sometimes is to tradesmen get easy doing the biggerjobs and they don't wa nt to doing the biggerjobs and they don't want to do the smalljobs. some customers only one minor maintenance done, and they can't get a tradesmen. with a 60 quid callout or something like that. that's right,
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and they don't want to pay that for and they don't want to pay that for a tiny problem with a single that sort of thing. so what can bridge that gap? people bringing a bit more daring and having a go at their own maintenance and diy. as long as it is safely. people should go on youtube, look at videos and show them how to do it, and once they have done one or two jobs they will build—up their confidence. i find they want to do more and more. and i have a question for you which is nothing to do with diy. one reason we know who you are, big brother, he won the first one. 18 years ago! and what do you make of the latest to her? i have to be honest, i have not watched a single programme that —— latest hoo—ha. it is a little bit like when i was on big brother when it first came out and my sister and family said you couldn't go anywhere without somebody talking about it. it isa without somebody talking about it. it is a little bit like that with
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love island, but i haven't seen any of it. any diy potential for love island? a different genre, but i don't know. he knows a lot about diy, that is the main reason. are you considering applying for love island for the next season? not yet, i don't think they will let me on with my tool belt. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. this morning we have a band of rain careering south—eastward is. still quite heavy and eventually later on today. for the next few days there will be some rain at times. after today's renewal be the driest in the south and east and over the next few days it will be breezy and windy in the far north. there is a cold front thatis the far north. there is a cold front that is coming south. you consider clout associated with it through the night as it moves in from the north—west and is south—eastward is and it has produced heavy rain. especially overnight across parts of north wales. it will continue to
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journey southwards. a cold front behind it, conditions coming our way with right spells, sunshine and showers. it will take its time before it gets into kent, whose across east anglia, behind it brighter skies and sunshine coming through after a cloudy start in wales. one or two showers are you. showers in northern ireland and scotla nd showers in northern ireland and scotland and some of those could be heavy and also country. in between them it will be bright and sunny skies. the black circles you can see indicate the wind gust speed. crustiest will be across the north and that will take the edge of the temperatures along with the clout and the showers, stuck in one, we are looking at temperatures lower across the board than they were yesterday. through the overnight, what of dry weather, clear skies and a cooler night than the one that scorn and tomorrow we will see signs of the next system coming in from the atlantic. tomorrow it will be a fairly blustery day. start off on a dry and bright note that sunshine,
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cloud building ahead of the warm front and that is introducing the rain. once again the wind arrows are on, black circles indicating the wind gust that you can expect. pretty strong across the north. the northern isles getting close to gale force. temperature wise in the north, looking at the mid to high teens. a bit of recovery in the south. to about 23. then we get into the weekend. what is happening at the weekend. what is happening at the weekend. what is happening at the weekend is the have and ex— subtropical storm coming our way in bed in an area of low pressure. what that will bring us is the spell of humid worker and also some heavy rain across parts of northern ireland and scotland in particular. this is saturday's picture. a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine, one or two showers dotted around and incomes that area of low pressure later on bringing rain across northern ireland. riches are about 15/23. this is that we think the
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rain will be on sunday, dry and bright but the timing and positioning of this could still change. —— temperatures about. right now we will talk about a—level results because if you that your a—levels this morning, you will find out how it went. in the next few minutes we'll get a better of the national picture, when we find out how many of them have been accepted by their first choice universities. whether those numbers go up or down, the man who will be held to account is education secretary damian hinds who joins us from ucas headquarters in cheltenham. this is a day i remember very well, very this is a day i remember very well, very nerve this is a day i remember very well, very nerve racking. i am sure you will want to pass on your congratulations to those students who are getting their results today. absolutely. it is a big day for young people. it can be quite a
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nervy day, but it is also a day of recognition of everything that young people have achieved. i congratulate them on that and wish them luck for later on. every year we talk about, the constant chat is, are they easier or harder now? where are we out on that conversation? are they tougher than they ever have been because obviously we have seen reform. we have seen reform and it was necessary to reform a—levels. we involved universities have yearly in that to make sure that what young people were learning and the way they were studying it, having course that last two years with the exams at the end they can bring all that different bits together to make sure that the content and the way it was being learnt was the best preparation for the next step, which is going on to university. it is also the case that individual grades and four passes and fails, the standard to get to a certain grade
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is the same indifferent years. people are not penalise for being the first to be taking the newly reformed exams. i talked to a lot of employers as myjob as a financial journalist and a lot of them are saying to me they feel like education system out is producing exa m education system out is producing exam monsters. not people who can necessarily deal with the real work experience of life. what do you say to that. does it prepare you for the world of work on being good at exams? education is about an awful lot more than just exams. exams are also important because they measure. . . also important because they measure... i think employers actuallyjudged the people on their exa m actuallyjudged the people on their exam results and also what they have donein exam results and also what they have done in life and what their potential is. i would encourage them to carry on doing that. with the reforms we have made to a—levels, for a lot of people actually means if you are exams because they are two—year courses, rather than having
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the a level you would have to do in the a level you would have to do in the first year and then a2. more opportunity to look at the subject asa opportunity to look at the subject as a whole over the course of two yea rs, as a whole over the course of two years, which helps in preparing, if you are going to university, preparing for the first year of undergraduate. it is brilliant for those who are good at exams, but it is fairto those who are good at exams, but it is fair to say that not everyone is good at exams and they the young people who are very bright, butjust don't do very well under exam conditions. what about those people, you are taken away the coursework elements and it is very much just about the exam at the end of. there is still non— exam content in a number of subjects and quite a high proportion is not to exams, but overall, the redesign of a—levels was done in close consultation with universities to make sure it did help prepare young people for going
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on to the next step, which for many of them will be university. not all of them will be university. not all of them, some will go into apprenticeships or other types of qualification training. you talk to universities about it but not businesses? i talk to businesses the whole time. i talked to them about what the school system does, actually not just at a—level, but all the way through and the different types of skills and knowledge that businesses are looking for. we are in the middle at the moment of designing a whole new system of technical vocational qualifications systems called key levels and business is absolutely at the heart of that. businesses are very important for what we do. you mentioned vocational qualifications, yesterday lot of students who are getting their b—tech results, do you think they arejust getting their b—tech results, do you think they are just as good as a—levels? think they are just as good as a-levels? yes, there is a role for the whole range of qualifications
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and different young people are suited to different courses of study and they will have different ambitions and all of those are incredibly important. today, also is a day thinking about options and some young people would have been hoping for a set of particular a—level results and have not quite got there, but my message to them is that panic, you are not alone, there are many others in a position as well. every year tens of thousands of people going into the clearing system, there are a lot of opportunities available and there are other opportunities john university as well, there is the exa m university as well, there is the exam results helpline that people can get in touch with and talk to advisers about that. as well as talking to their teachers who have been through this before. there is a huge increase in the number of people getting unconditional offers for university, corn from nearly 3020 13 to 68,000 this year. head teachers are saying this is undermining the system because stu d e nts
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undermining the system because students are essentially giving up halfway through once they know they have got their university place. what i your thoughts on that? —— 3000 in 2013. i am concerned about that. there is a role for unconditional offers in certain subjects, for arts for example it has been a long time feature of the system. still a relatively small minority of offers overall but it is something that we need to be aware of. the office for students is looking at this actively and will be coming forward with its findings and then determine if there is more that needs to be done. jurien bay your a—level results? —— to europe remember yours —— do you remember yours. it is -- are and it very well, the trepidation of going to school, i remember it yes. i did —— either to a' and a de.
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—— i got two a's and a b. you learn something from other experience. a podcast about living with cancer may seem like a hard sell, but the presenters of radio 5 live's ‘you, me and the big c‘ have won rave reviews for their funny and frank tales ofjuggling their treatment with their everyday lives. as they prepare to record a second series breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to meet rachael, debbie and lauren. hello and welcome to you, me and the big c. we all have one thing in common, we all have or have had cancer. it is not a clinical cold, we talk about it like its eastenders my way of floating is that you, me, home, now. those two girls are the ones who know exactly how i am feeling, so they have just been amazingly supportive
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through all of this. i am stressed as a poo! within the space of a minute we are laughing and crying hysterically all at the same time and that is what cancer is like. that is the important thing about bowel cancer awareness month is talking about your poo. i was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 31 and in my head i just always thought that cancer meant death. i might get another jumper on as well. today we are having a photo shoot for girl versus cancer, my fundraising community. everytime i am having a bad day with it ijust try to feel grateful that i am here, i am alive and there are worse situations to be in. my own situation is not the best. i am kind of coming to that end
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of the road point of my treatment, which is not a great place to be. i got my little boy freddie, who is three, i want to enjoy those moments where he tells me that he loves me. all the way home i was just saying to freddie, "i am sorry, i am so sorry." you are going to make me... it is the first thing that has made me cry in the whole 12 episodes. it has finally broken me. you have not done anything wrong. you have nothing to apologise for. i feel like he is at that age where he might not even have any memories of me. so i am basically writing down my whole life in a book for him and ijust really hope that through his life he will come back to that book and take comfort from it and feel like he knows the kind of person that his mother was. i was diagnosed with stage four bowel cancer at the age of 35. we are talking about
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life and death here. both of us are living with a shadow of not knowing what the future holds and a very realistic possibility that we might not be around to see our children grow up. come on mummy, you can go faster than that! seeing you guys be able to get the train to manchester, live your lives, wear liipstick and socialise and dance makes me so excited i can get my life back on track, sending you big love from hospital. rosa, selling you big love from the you, me and the big c studios, because this is for us what this podcast is about. i am not going to look at you, crying here is not what we need right now. thank you so much for listening and we will speak to you next week. bye! the listener. the. it is that mix of
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funniness and total heartbreak. having known rachel, such a brilliant girl. you can search for and subscribe to the ‘you, me and the big c‘ podcast through all your normal podcast providers and on the radio 5live website. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. new met police figures obtained by bbc london show gang related violence has plummeted since the 2011 riots, despite a recent spike in violent crime. the force has put the drop down to their gang violence matrix database. but some criminologists and youth workers have questioned the figures and the levels of gang activity in the capital. one of europe's most wanted men has been arrested in watford. 43 year—old florin ghinea was detained after leaving a gym on tuesday. the suspected head of a romanian organised crime network is now facing extradition. daya amole was diagnosed with neuroblastoma,
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a rare form of cancer when she was just eleven months old. her parents promised they would do everything they could to save their little girl's life. now they're fundraising to take her to new york, where experts surgeons say they could save her. the chances of survival are about 50—50, basically. and it is such a rare, horrible, aggressive cancer that we feel as much as possible needs to be done to invest in the research of it. an aspiring actress has found fame, after she swapped north west london for ‘lollywood', the film industry in pakistan. kubra khan left harrow aged nineteen for her big break, and after a number of tv roles the actress features in two pakistani films being released next week. but it's not been easy to leave london behind. you know you miss the uk when you start missing the tube. i hated the tube but now i am like "i miss the tube". my mum is like, "are you normal?" i am like, "i don't know." let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes this morning, we've got
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minor delays on the overground. on the trains, great northern have delays of 30 minutes and some cancellations on services via alexandra palace. south western railway services to and from waterloo are running a reduced service following a signal problem. on the roads in palmers green, traffic on the the a406 nth circular is slow westbound into the roadworks at brownlow road. guesswork and temporary lights on trafalgar road is causing westbound laser. lets have a check on the weather now hello, good morning. don't forget to pop your brolly in yoru bag this morning because there is some wet weather on the way. the rain moving in from the north—west as we head to the late morning into at least the first part of the afternoon. rain on the way but it is a dry, mild, early start. plenty of cloud around already. some breaks towards the east, some brightness here, but it won't last too long. that rain sweeps in from the north—west and it will rain for a good couple of hours or so. some of those outbreaks could be on the heavy side, but it will clear it's way south eastwards as we had through the late afternoon and the sun will emerge again.
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some sunny spells as we head towards the end of the day, quite breezy for a time, top temperatures 19 or 20 celsius, feeling quite be cooler than it was yesterday. overnight tonight, then again it will be cooler, temperatures dropping into single figures for many of our rural spots, lots of clear skies around and the breeze will ease down too. we start the day of tomorrow with lots of sunshine. the sunshine should last through the morning, staying dry tomorrow but turning cloudier into the afternoon with highs of 23 or 24 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. our headlines today. the wait is nearly over for hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland, as a—level results are released this morning. italy declares a year
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long state of emergency in the genoa region after the motorway bridge collapse. so we just literally — "kids, run, run," ‘cause we didn't know what was happening. we left everything in the car, and we just ran for our lives. as homebase shuts stores and cutsjobs and b80 is boosted by the hot weather, i'm looking at whether we are done with do—it—yourself. a new season, a new documentary series, but manchester city's star man kevin de bruyne turns up to last night's premiere on crutches... we'll tell you the tale of the whales who lost their way in iceland and how local people helped them to find it again. good morning, cloud today, leaving us with sunshine and showers. more details in 15 minutes. good morning, welcome to the programme,
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it's thursday 16th august. our top story today. it's results day this morning for hundreds of thousands of students in england, wales and northern ireland, as a—level results are released. it's the second year of major reforms to the qualification in some areas. our education correspondent elaine dunkley‘s been to meet some sixth formers waiting to get their results. soon, the wait will be over — the results of two years of hard work for thousands of a—level students. there have been major changes to a—levels in england, with a move away from coursework, and grades resting on the final exams. i was prepared for the challenge, but it definitely was a challenge. you can get so stressed out, and in the exam, like, i get loads of hot flushes, so i'm like, ooh! for the university to encourage me more to still focus on my grades, and get these grades, they actually offered me £1,000. the department for education says that changes will improve standards, but there are concerns that universities guaranteeing a record number of students a place before they sit their exams could have the opposite effect.
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in wales, some 18—year—olds may be more inclined to go to university, as this is the first year those from poorer backgrounds can benefit from generous grants for living costs. in total, almost 68,000 unconditional offers have been made to 18—year—olds in england, wales and northern ireland this year, compared with 3,000 five years ago. we sort of really, really work hard with the students, to engage with them. and then halfway through their second year, when they're at their point of struggle, you know, when they're having to stay up late and having to get deadlines in, they get a letter from the university and says, you know what? doesn't matter what you get, you can come to this university. whatever the results may bring for students, what seems clear is there are many more options when it comes to getting a place at university. elaine dunkley, bbc news. whatever can happen, sometimes
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stu d e nts whatever can happen, sometimes students apply to acas. it's sure to be a frantic day at the university admissions service kathryn stanczyszyn is at their headquarters in cheltenham. stu d e nts students can find out if they have got theirfirst choice, students can find out if they have got their first choice, if they don't, we have this brilliant clearing system that matches people who haven't got their first choice with universities that might still have places. there's a 50— strong tea m have places. there's a 50— strong team to give you advice and it's headed by clare martin and chief executive of ucas. first of all we are talking about the figure just released of the other people going into higher education. we know that at this point in the process was a record number of 18—year—olds accepted into university which is fabulous, even though we've got this
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reduction in the 18—year—old population, so that's wonderful. we know that there's an increasing eu applicants and international applicants and international applicants being accepted so it's a testa m e nt to applicants being accepted so it's a testament to uk higher education being world—class. testament to uk higher education being world-class. what is the record figure. 27.996 of 18-year-old is accepted, that will rise we go through. people will go through clearing and look at their options if they haven't got what they want. why is it such a good year to be 18? there are less of you around! 50,000 courses in clearing but not a massive rise, it is because there area massive rise, it is because there are a few 18—year—olds to be around and choose the causes. what is the advice come you have logged on and phoned up and you are devastated in the way that you only can be when you put so much work into something. what is your advice? don't panic. last year 60,000 people went through clearing successfully and got a
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place and studying now and have made friends. talk to your teachers, advisers, parents and friends, but don't linger too long because those places will go. if you are looking for something specific. it is a big day for you and your staff. a massive day and i am hugely proud, we are an independent charity is of the hundreds of people who work your way arts proud to support you today. the handlers are busy on the phone today, i don't know about you but i remember that feeling, it was terrifying! thank you, we'll be back with you later. time to look at today's of the stories. the italian red cross have told breakfast that they believe there are still 15 vehicles buried under the rubble of the collapsed motorway bridge in genoa. italy's deputy prime minister has said those found responsible for tragedy — which has so far claimed 39 lives — must pay "the highest penalties possible". dan johnson reports. this long, grey scar of broken concrete, the ribbon of rubble, marks the valley once crossed by a grand, imposing viaduct. but how much more death and
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destruction is hidden beneath here? could any of the missing still be alive in this tangled mess? we keep on working until every single metre of this rubble will be controlled. how long will that take? actually, it is a very difficult question. it's going to be a long work. alongside sad stories of lives lost are near misses and amazing escapes. this british couple stopped their car about 100m short of the section that collapsed. people started shouting, waving their arms to reverse out the windows. and tooting horns, and everything like that. people were running, screaming in italian, "run, out." "everyone out, cars, out, cars!" so we just literally — "kids, run, run," because we didn't know what was happening. we left everything in the car
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and we just ran for our lives. last night the interior minister, matteo salvini, came here and declared that every company taking public money should protect their structures like their own children. he said whoever was responsible would be made to pay. there is real anger here. hows, whys, who's to blame, all need to be addressed. but there are families missing loved ones, still waiting for news. their answers must come first. dan johnson, bbc news. detectives have been granted more time to question the suspect in the alleged terror attack in westminster on tuesday. 29—year—old salih khater, a british citizen originally from sudan, was arrested by armed police after crashing his car into a barrier outside the houses of parliament. he's being held on suspicion of terror offences and attempted murder. a malaysianjudge has ruled that two women will be tried for murdering the half—brother of the north korean leader kim jong—un.
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the prosecution say the women smeared kim jong nam's face with a toxic nerve agent, at kuala lumpur airport last year. our reporterjonathan head is in the malaysian capital. jonathan, this is an incredible story, isn't it? we finally at a point now, where we are getting trial. yeah, we have had months and months of pre—trial hearings where the prosecution has laid out its case against these two women. the defence has said, they are innocent pawns. there is evidence that they we re pawns. there is evidence that they were recruited working in entertainment bars to carry out what they thought were pranks, harmless pranks. they did not know that they we re pranks. they did not know that they were dealing with north korea. their background suggests this is true. yet the defence has not yet had its chance to present its case in court and thejudge chance to present its case in court and the judge has sapped away at the case for the prosecution and decide that the trial should go ahead. the defence had hoped that in their
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view, the obvious innocence of this women, even though they smeared the substance on the victim and caused his death, might lead to the acquittal. but did not happen, the judge said they must still be liable for their role in his death, even though, he said, there may be a political conspiracy here. now we'll have the defence case put, they will be able to explain how these women we re be able to explain how these women were recruited, they will also ask for a lot from the malaysia government about the role of north korean people in the embassy and north koreans being allowed to leave the country. there is mystery hanging over this case. things we haven't heard. we hope that in the full trial hearing all of this will come out. jonathan, thank you. the former director of the ciajohn brennan, has had his security clearance revoked by president trump. mr brennan has accused the president of trying to suppress freedom of speech, but white house press secretary sarah sanders said the former intelligence chief had used his access to sensitive files to make unfounded allegations.
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the rugby player danny cipriani is due to appear before magistrates on jersey this morning, after being arrested outside a nightclub in st helier. the gloucester fly—half — who has recently been recalled to the england team — was arrested in the early hours of yesterday morning. he's charged with a number of offences, including resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer. one last story for you. around a hundred whales have become repeatedly stuck in a fjord in iceland. police helped them get out of the fjord, in the west of the country. but less than 24 hours later they were back again, and needed help to get out once more. lebo diseko has the story. this is a rescue operation in action, the second in as many days for this pod of around 100 whales. they got stuck after swimming into a fjord that's opening is both narrow and shallow, making it hard to get out.
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police helped guide them into more open waters, and it was hoped they'd go back to sea. but, the next day, they were back once again. cue rescue effort number two. translation: 13 of them went all the way to the shore, and we had to deal with them, push them out by hand, and that went very well. one of the whales even got stuck up on the shore, and needed a kayaker to help get free. it is not clear why the group keep going back, but locals say they may be using the incoming tide to help them, and they've certainly attracted quite an audience. translation: naturally this is interesting to see, for both foreigners and icelanders, to view and experience this in nature. you can't see this in an aquarium. this is pure nature, which makes it more interesting. the group was eventually guided even further out, in the hope that they'd find their way to the ocean. that seems to have done the trick.
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but, if they do return, rescue teams will be on hand once again to help them find their way. lebo diseko, bbc news. quite a story, brilliant pictures. 39 people are known to have died after the collapse of the bridge in genoa, we can go straight to our correspondent, tim wilcox. however many times you see the image, we can see that lone truck perched on the edge, it is still such shocking image. yes it is, and so such shocking image. yes it is, and so close to that gap with a bridge just collapsed in front of him, we know with the italian media that the driver of the van is named luigi and
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no one has got to him yet. some of his fans have been quoted in the media. apparently what he was driving at speed in a thunderstorm a few days ago suddenly red lights on the cars in front ahead of him, he realised the road was falling awake as the vehicles went down, he slammed on his brakes, the first back, left the engine running, open the door and ran. back, left the engine running, open the doorand ran. his back, left the engine running, open the door and ran. his friends are quoted as saying that luigi believes that the van was running until it ran out of fuel because no one has been as close to that precipice since the tragedy. 39 people dead, we've been here for the last three orfour hours, the we've been here for the last three or four hours, the sound of we've been here for the last three orfour hours, the sound of hammer drills going as search and rescue teams try to destroy all break down those huge slabs of concrete because they still don't know how many cars and trucks underneath and they don't know how many bodies, unfortunately, other as well. 39 dead, according to the local prefecture, 16 people missing, putting people in hospital,
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12 of them critically ill. for the dead recovered so far they will be a state funeral on saturday. nonetheless, like luigi, more incredible stories imagine the people who escaped and managed to flee in time before the road gave way before them, amongst them a british couple, nicola and lisa henton mitchell with their two children. they spoke to the bbc yesterday, it is very dramatic what they went through. people started shouting, waving their arms to reverse out of the windows. tooting horns and everything like that. people were running, screaming in italian, run! so wejust people were running, screaming in italian, run! so we just literally, kids, run, run. because we didn't know what was happening. we left everything in the car and we just run for our lives. nicola and lisa henton mitchell. the italian government is stepping up the pressure on the company running the
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motorway system here. they are demanding resignations forthwith. there are also talking about 150 million euros in a fine and that they want to levy and against the company for not doing the maintenance work. this is the transport minister speaking yesterday. translation: tragic events like this must not be allowed to happen in a civilised, modern country like italy. this is not acceptable. and those responsible must pay until the end. just before igo must pay until the end. just before i go back to you, chelsea, we have a resident of genoa who remembers vividly what happened on the day. —— charlie. what did you see and hear, what do you feel? first, sorry about my english. it's a particular moment for anyone in genoa. what can i say. this tragedy is a thing that has
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happened to everyone in genoa, not only for the people here. because every one of us goes this way every day. you use this page every day? there are lots of worries about the safety of the bridge, people were concerned about that. it is a main artery, isn't it? not only a main road but a symbol of the city, we that personally, i did it every day, going to work and returning from work, every day there's traffic and pass their every afternoon. briefly, what is going to happen now? you have so much traffic coming from the port, traffic coming from france and deeper into italy as well.” port, traffic coming from france and deeper into italy as well. i think the problem is full the entire north of italy in transporting, this is a problem for the city as well,
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because there is no way to take the roads. there is no way to go from east to west, another way. 0k. the condition of the bridge was a thing that no one... alberto, thank you, we are out of time, thank you for speaking to us on breakfast. it will ta ke speaking to us on breakfast. it will take days, weeks to clear the rubble, it will take years to erected in newbridge and work this infrastructure problem is that the area is facing —— to erected a newbridge. 25 million people a year use this bridge, a significant number in terms of transport. thank you. tim, thank you, reporting from genoa this morning. such an incredible story. it's 90 minutes past eight. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. rain pushing southwards, heavy rain,
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when it clears we will have sunshine and showers. the driest conditions in the weekend will be in the 70s but it will be breezy everywhere, the strongest winds in the north and the strongest winds in the north and the west. —— the driest conditions will be in the south east. a cold front has been moving south overnight, continuing its journey across england, now out of wales, heading to the south—east. as it goes things will brighten behind it, a lot of cloud currently but we'll also see showers. even into the afternoon you can see where we've got the rain from the channel islands, behind it, one ortwo showers in wales, the odd sharp one in northern england, for northern ireland and scotland frequent showers, some heavy and thundery, in between, some bright sunny skies. these black circles with the numbers
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indicate the strengths of the winds saw the strongest winds will be in the north. temperature wise today cooler than yesterday, the mid—to high teens, possibly the low 20s in central and eastern england. this evening and overnight clear skies around, still some showers in the north and west, then a new in from the atlantic introducing thicker cloud some showers. a cooler night than last night which bought some people will be a relief, it was quite humid last night in the south—east. tomorrow we'll start off with sunshine, as the weather front comes in from the west not only will it bring in rain to northern ireland and western scotland, it will also bring ina and western scotland, it will also bring in a bit more cloud. another blustery day, particularly in the northern half of the country, in the northern isles. temperatures in that combination, the further north you are, the cooler it will be. in the
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south east, where we see sunshine, we could get up to 23, warmer than we could get up to 23, warmer than we are expecting today. into the weekend we've got an area of low pressure coming in from the atlantic, embedded in this is an ex—sub tropical storm. this will bring wet weather, and humid conditions, the wettest weather is likely to be across scotland and northern ireland, possibly into northern england, before it arrives there will be dry weather and sunshine, just a few showers, here it comes from the west during the day. then on sunday, the timing and positioning of this could change, but this is what we think. the rain moves to northern ireland into southern scotland, some showers across wales, on either side, dryer and brighter but i want to stress that the timing could change so if you are going outdoors on sunday, keepin you are going outdoors on sunday, keep in touch with the forecast. back to you, charlie and steph. the weather is up and down, isn't
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it, one minute cool, one minute humid, iwill it, one minute cool, one minute humid, i will be glad when thank you carol. back to our top story now, students in england, wales, and northern ireland are finding out the results of their a—level exams this morning. a lot of people will know the results already. such a nerve—racking day. let's talk to elaine dunkley who is at a sixth form college in birkenhead. i bet it's quite an atmosphere. yes, a lot ofjoy, some tears as well, a massive day for some students getting their results. many of them have not slept, they were logging on at 6am to get the results. they've come in to get their certificates. dale has put on a fantastic spread to the students, that was enough to bring them in today! let's speak to
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some of the students. it's been two yea rs of ha rd some of the students. it's been two years of hard work, a lot of it came down to finals. emily?” years of hard work, a lot of it came down to finals. emily? i got mine, i got the university i wanted, it was a bit touch and go because i didn't initially get the grades that i wa nted initially get the grades that i wanted but when ucas opened i had a place at the school i wanted. so many hurdles, just waiting to see if you got the place. between 6am and eight in this morning was possibly worse than all of the exams put together! it was, i know what i have got, i don't know if it's good enough. and then when ucas opened, i think they could hear me screaming! you did really well, tell me.” agree with emily, it makes you really nervous. i woke up at six o'clock, just refreshing the page until the results came up. i was really pleased, i got into the cause i've been wanting since a long time
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and the grades i wanted so i'm really happy. your parents are sitting behind you, they are delighted, aren't they. it's been a big journey. i'm very thankful to them, they've done everything they could, i can't thank them enough, and thank the college as well. it's beena and thank the college as well. it's been a great story, basically. you haven't had much sleep, how have you got on? got the grades i wanted, first thing this morning, woke up and saw the results, i can't tell you the shop, it was oxford, when i first got the e—mail for the interview i nearly fell off my chair. and then i got the e—mail about the offer and fell off again, and this morning seeing i've got the three a grades are needed, i am still a bit in shock. i've got a screenshot of the result framed, on my wall! wadham, guys, the relief. —— well done. you are the principal,
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you must be delighted. i'm really delighted, three individual stories, we've got six or 700 stories are young people who have come and worked really hard. you hear people talking about young people and so many negative stories and the three stu d e nts many negative stories and the three students you saw there are so typical of the people at this college, really lovely people, positive. we are so thrilled that we are able to help them on their journey. for some students there has been disappointed but the message is, stay positive get in touch with ucas, speak with your teachers, get some advice, it will all work out. yes, and also a lot of support on the bbc, we have bite size, people who can tell you what they did with the exams, careers advice, if you are thinking about your options. and it is worth reassuring people but often we speak to those who have got just what they wanted, things went
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just what they wanted, things went just as planned. things don't always go according to plan and sometimes thatis go according to plan and sometimes that is not a bad thing. it sounds trite, thing that people say, things might not go right immediately but over time, things have a habit of working out. don't panic is what we are saying. good luck for anyone getting your results today. some of us do very badly in exams! that happens! they are harder, aren't they? people learn in different ways. that is the key to this. but there are lots of options. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning... the podcast ‘you, me and the big c‘ has been called the coolest club you never want to be a part of. graham satchell has been catching up with the hosts of the show that tackles cancer in a whole new way. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. it has been a wet
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start of the day across central parts of england and wales. that rain is moving to the east and something drier and brighter will come in to most parts of the uk into the afternoon. that rain clears to the afternoon. that rain clears to the south—east. one thing most of us will notice today is a bit of a breeze and feeling much cooler. the rain is associated with these weather fronts, the cold fronts. as they move to the air is coming from a north—westerly direction, bringing a north—westerly direction, bringing a drop in temperatures, meaning the rain moves to the south—east of england. behind the rain there will be sunny spells but also showers which will turn heavy and thundery,
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especially across scotland, northern ireland and into north—western parts of england. temperatures will be 16 to 19, and quite a breeze today from the west. that will make it feel a bit more chilly as well. overnight the rain clears away from the south—east and we are left with links the clear skies into friday. a region of high pressure. and then this weather front pushes in on friday and with it comes some rain. this is friday. the cloud increasing and winds increasing on friday again with rain spreading into northern ireland, scotland and western parts of wales and the north west. to the south as the east, it will be largely dry and bright but breezy. these are wind gusts, up to even 35 mph across northern areas. temperatures coming up a bit across the south—east. 23 here but further
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north west temperatures 16 to 18. this weekend we have more low pressure moving in. it will stay fairly unsettled. saturday is likely to be the driest day of the weekend before rain moves in for sunday. that is it from me. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and alice baxter. the world's biggest bricks and mortar retailer, walmart, has been spending big but will it put a dent in the firm's latest profits? live from london, that's our top
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story on thursday 16th august. walmart has invested billions in e—commerce as the retailer takes on internet giants like amazon and google. also in the programme: uber narrows its losses but is still spending millions a day. so can the popular ride—hailing firm break even before going public?

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